MACY’S FLOWER SHOW PRESENTS ART IN BLOOM

Macy’s Downtown Flagships Showcase an Art History Inspired Floral Spectacular In New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, Minneapolis and San Francisco
SUNDAY, MARCH 22 – SATURDAY, APRIL 4, 2015

Art is presently sprouts from fabulous flora as the annual Macy’s Flower Show, returns to celebrate the renewal of spring. Blooming in dramatic fashion, the multicolored splendor takes root at five Macy’s flagship locations nationwide including Herald Square in New York City, Center City in Philadelphia, State Street in Chicago, Downtown Minneapolis and Union Square in San Francisco. From now through Saturday, April 4, 2015, Art in2015FlowerShowLogo_ALL Bloom, the theme of this year’s spectacle, will take spectators into a multi-dimensional floral wonderland featuring incredibly landscaped gardens that celebrate the deep connection between art and nature.

For more than 65 years, Macy’s Flower Show has delighted generations of floral aficionados with over-the-top presentations of lavish gardens that showcase millions of live flowers, plants and trees from around the globe. Native to many different climates, the show features a host of flora blooming in unison, in a presentation that crosses ecological boundaries. Taking root in unexpected settings including store countertops, specially designed architecture and even full-scale auditorium presentations, Macy’s Flower Show is staged in unique fashion at each of the five locations nationwide. Free to the public, Macy’s Flower Show will be open during regular store hours.

“Lush foliage and beautifully designed gardens celebrating artistic styles and eras bring Art in Bloom to life for this year’s Macy’s Flower Show. Enveloped by rich color and dramatic landscaping, spectators will be in for a breathtaking trip through art history as they step into our imaginative gardens,” said Mike Gansmoe, executive producer of Macy’s Flower Show.
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This year, the showcase begins as spectators are welcomed by a stunning re-interpretation of the famed David sculpture in a garden inspired by the Pop Art movement. Serving as the centerpiece of this avant garde floral exhibition, the Renaissance era sculpture will incorporate pixel mapping projection technology to bring David to the new millennium. From impressionism and cubism to abstract displays, various art styles will guide the landscaping of Macy’s Flower Show creating a one-of-a kind, striking floral tour de force.

In addition to serving as Macy’s official celebration for the start of the spring season, Macy’s Flower Show is also the prime setting for some of the nation’s most renowned floral and entertaining designers. These décor masters each bring to life a fan favorite – a rotating wonder called the “Bouquet of the Day.” These singular floral creations to be showcased in the New York, Chicago and San Francisco shows are out-of-this-world centerpieces that interpret the theme of the show through the lens of each designer’s unique aesthetic. The Macy’s Flower Show is also the perfect backdrop for two weeks of in-store special events including fashion shows, cooking demonstrations and special appearances.

New this year, the Macy’s Flower Show allows spectators to become floral artistes when they download the specially created Artista Impresso by JixiPix app. Available for iOS and Android devices, the Artista Impresso photo app transforms Flower Show snapshots into stroke filled impressionist masterpieces. Designed with the user in mind, Artista Impresso allows visitors to customize their image from a host of impressionist styles. The app will be available to purchase for 99 cents, for a limited time only during the Flower Show’s run. Artistes in training can find the link to download on macys.com/flowershow.

Macy’s glorious spring tradition is made possible nationally thanks to partners JixiPix and Royal Caribbean International, the cruise line voted “Best in the Caribbean” and “Best Overall,” 12-years running by Travel Weekly. Anthem of the Seas, Royal Caribbean’s newest ship will set sail from the New York area this November to the Caribbean where visitors can experience some of the flowers featured in Macy’s Flower Show in their natural habitats.  Macy’s Flower Show in Minneapolis is produced in partnership with Bachman’s. For additional information about these events contact the hotline at (212) 494-4495, or visitwww.macys.com/flowershow.

Bellagio Las Vegas Celebrates Japanese Culture with Vibrant Spring Conservatory Display and Art Installation by Renowned Sculptor Masatoshi Izumi

A burly turtle made of thousands of fresh-cut flowers rests next to an 18-foot-tall cherry blossom tree, gracefully adorned with 300 acrylic blossoms and leaves.

A burly turtle made of thousands of fresh-cut flowers rests next to an 18-foot-tall cherry blossom tree, gracefully adorned with 300 acrylic blossoms and leaves.

The Bellagio’s Conservatory & Botanical Gardens invites guests  and other visitors to Las Vegas to take a peaceful journey through the Japan’’s rich culture with its first Japanese-inspired display (a collaboration between Bellagio’s expert horticulture team and MGM Resorts International Event Productions with consultation from Master Gardener Kanji Nomura from Nagoya). Pairing the soothing aesthetics of Japan’s traditional gardens with Bellagio’s striking grandeur; the new display boasts a vibrant collection of more than 82,000 flowers and larger-than-life floral creations. Among the thousands of flowers, including fresh tulips, daffodils and snapdragons, guests will discover traditional bonsai trees nestled among recreations of some of Japan’s most iconic landmarks. Adding to the charming atmosphere, live musicians perform Japanese melodies on a floating platform. On view through May 11, the Japanese Garden will culminate with Golden Week, a national celebration in Japan recognizing several significant holidays including Constitution Day, Children’s Day and Greenery Day. Bellagio’s Conservatory & Botanical Gardens is complimentary to the public and open daily, 24 hours a day.

The West Garden is a sacred scene featuring a 26-foot-tall Japanese temple inspired by Kyoto’s famous Golden Temple. Resting on the shore of peaceful waters, the regal temple is elaborately arrayed in gold veneer featuring wood frames with traditional rice paper Shoji screens.

A 26-foot-tall Japanese temple inspired by Kyoto’s famous Golden Temple is elaborately arrayed in gold veneer featuring wood frames with traditional rice paper Shoji screens.

A 26-foot-tall Japanese temple inspired by Kyoto’s famous Golden Temple is elaborately arrayed in gold veneer featuring wood frames with traditional rice paper Shoji screens.

Nestled among raked, golden sand, a traditional Japanese-inspired tea house celebrates Japan’s ancient tradition of drinking tea.

Nestled among raked, golden sand, a traditional Japanese-inspired tea house celebrates Japan’s ancient tradition of drinking tea.

The Japanese-inspired garden boasts a vibrant collection of more than 82,000 flowers, including 12 types of tulips.

The Japanese-inspired garden boasts a vibrant collection of more than 82,000 flowers, including 12 types of tulips.

In the East Garden, guests are greeted by a towering, 18-foot-tall cherry blossom tree, gracefully adorned with 300 acrylic blossoms and leaves. At the foot of the tree, 75 live Koi fish enjoy the refreshing waters of a tranquil pond, while a cascading tsukubai waterfall flows from16 feet above. Two ornate floral topiaries showcase a combined 15,000 fresh-cut flowers: one, a majestic crane standing six feet tall and the other, a burly turtle stretching seven feet in length. These botanical animals enjoy shade offered by a colorful parade of 35 hand-painted parasols, each exquisitely decorated and suspended in midair.

Nestled among raked, golden sand in the South Garden, a traditional Japanese-inspired tea house invites guests to take in the splendor of the exhibit. Custom built using bamboo pieces, natural logs and mineral copper accents, the 12-foot-tall structure celebrates Japan’s ancient tradition of drinking tea.

In the North Bed, just steps from the tea house, is a hanging garden of Wisteria and Bougainvillea vines. Abstract stone art rests below, each representing different Japanese cultural icons such as Mount Fuji, the crane and turtle. Stone lanterns are placed within this serene setting, illuminating the garden and contributing to its reflective ambiance.

Springtime in Japan is truly breathtaking and we are excited to share this extraordinary cultural experience with our guests from around the world,” said Randy Morton, President and Chief Operating Officer of Bellagio. “After traveling more than 5,000 miles to study gardens in Tokyo and Kyoto, our horticulture and design teams created a dynamic interpretation of Japan’s enchanting spring season, featuring many of the culture’s most recognizable elements.

Renowned Japanese stone sculptor Masatoshi Izumi stands with his A Gift From the Earth installation now featured at Bellagio.

Renowned Japanese stone sculptor Masatoshi Izumi stands with his A Gift From the Earth installation now featured at Bellagio.

Masatoshi Izumi’s A Gift From the Earth is comprised of four distinct stone sculptures – Wind, Fire, Water and Land – each representing one of Earth’s four elements.

Masatoshi Izumi’s A Gift From the Earth is comprised of four distinct stone sculptures – Wind, Fire, Water and Land – each representing one of Earth’s four elements.

Continuing the celebration of Japanese culture, the Bellagio has also unveils a striking new art installation handcrafted by renowned Japanese sculptor Masatoshi Izumi just outside of the hotel’s main entrance. The installation, A Gift From the Earth, is comprised of four distinct stone sculptures, Wind, Fire, Water and Land, each representing one of Earth’s four elements. Meticulously hand carved from basalt over the course of 18 months, each sculpture weighs between 17,000 and 27,000 pounds. Basalt, a form of lava that has cooled on the volcano’s surface, is frequently found in Japanese art as it represents the origins of the island nation.

Izumi was born into a family of stone carvers in Japan and began working on his own craft in 1953. His work celebrates harmony with nature by taking existing forms and altering them slightly to reveal an even more beautiful state. Izumi’s work has been showcased around the world in Japan, Taiwan, San Francisco and Chicago, in addition to Mandarin Oriental Las Vegas where “CACTUS Life – living with Earth” has been part of the iconic CityCenter Fine Art Collection since the hotel’s opening in 2009.

Art and culture are integral to the Bellagio experience, with original works throughout the resort, in addition to rotating exhibits at the Bellagio Gallery of Fine Art,” said Tarissa Tiberti, executive director of MGM Resorts Fine Art Collection. “The Izumi installation is a tremendous addition to this experience and is a beautiful representation of the authentic art forms within the Japanese culture.”

Celebrate the new season with PANDORA Jewelry and the Spring 2015 Collection featuring pieces inspired by nature. The affordable luxury brand blooms with elegant pieces paying tribute to the symbol of transformation: the butterfly.

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The collection consists of statement pieces that capture the ethereal movements of a butterfly in flight. The asymmetric, abstract butterfly statement ring and pendant necklace feature glittering micro-set cubic zirconia set in sterling silver, accentuating the beauty and sophistication of the butterfly. The necklace can be styled in three different lengths to accessorize any look.

Tiny, delicate butterfly studs with dazzling stones in sterling silver or 14K gold add a touch of simple elegance to any spring occasion. Complete the look with the Fluttering Butterflies charm added to a bangle bracelet; it is available in light-pink enamel or shimmering pave and features delicate cutout detail.

Spring calls for subtle sophistication when accessorizing an outfit. You can style your spring outfit with a bracelet or a necklace chain with the Sparkling Butterfly dangle charm in sterling silver or PANDORA Rose(TM), featuring 92 clear stones set in a whimsical rose-pink hue, perfectly capturing the spirit of spring. The Spring Collection is now available in stores. To locate an authorized retailer or view the entire collection, visit www.pandora.net.

2015 JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION AWARDS NOMINEES ANNOUNCED

The James Beard Foundation is proud to announce the final nominees for the 2015 James Beard Foundation Awards presented by Lexus. The nominees were announced today during a breakfast at the James Beard House in New York City, hosted by Susan Ungaro, James Beard Foundation president; executive vice-president, Mitchell Davis; Emily Luchetti, chair of the Foundation’s board of trustees; and John Washko, trustee and chair of the Awards committee. The 2015 James Beard Foundation Book Awards For books published in English in 2014. Winners will be announced on April 24, 2015. The winner of the Cookbook of the Year Award and the Cookbook Hall of Fame inductee will be announced on April 24, 2015.

Nominees in 59 categories were announced in the Foundation’s various awards programs, including Restaurant and Chef, Restaurant Design, and Book, Broadcast and Journalism. In addition, previously announced special achievement award honorees were highlighted, including Lifetime Achievement, Humanitarian of the Year, Who’s Who, and the America’s Classics.

 

Multiple James Beard Award–winning TV host, author, and chef Alton Brown will host the 2015 James Beard Foundation Awards presented by Lexus. The highly anticipated James Beard Awards ceremony and gala reception will take place on Monday, May 4, 2015, at Lyric Opera of Chicago. On Friday, April 24, 2015, Carla Hall, co-host of ABC’s The Chew, will host the annual James Beard Foundation Book, Broadcast & Journalism Awards Dinner, an exclusive event honoring the nation’s top cookbook authors, culinary broadcast producers and hosts, and food journalists, at Pier Sixty at Chelsea Piers in New York City.

The James Beard Foundation Awards Ceremony and Gala Reception will be open to the public, and hand out awards for the Restaurant and Chef including America’s Classics and Restaurant Design categories will be handed out, along with special achievement awards including Humanitarian of the Year, Lifetime Achievement and Who’s Who of Food and Beverage in America. A gala reception will immediately follow, featuring top chefs and beverage professionals from across the country.

A native of Nashville, Hall’s food journey began at L’Academie de Cuisine in Maryland, after returning from a trip throughout Europe that awakened her passion for food. Upon completing her culinary training, she went on to work as a sous Chef at the Henley Park Hotel in Washington D.C. and later served as Executive Chef at both The State Plaza Hotel and The Washington Club. Hall’s approach to cooking blends her classic French training and southern upbringing, both of which she has carried through to her artisan cookie company, Carla Hall Petite Cookies, as well as her restaurant, Carla Hall’s Southern Kitchen, slated to open in New York City later this year.

The 2015 James Beard Foundation Awards Nominees are:

2015 James Beard Foundation Restaurant and Chef Awards

Winners will be announced on May 4, 2015

Outstanding Chef Presented by All-Clad Metalcrafters Presented to a working chef in America whose career has set national industry standards and who has served as an inspiration to other food professionals. Candidates must have been working as chefs for at least the past 5 years.

Michael Anthony, Gramercy Tavern, NYC

Sean Brock, Husk, Charleston, SC

Suzanne Goin, Lucques, Los Angeles

Donald Link, Herbsaint, New Orleans

Marc Vetri, Vetri, Philadelphia

Rising Star Chef of the Year Presented by S.Pellegrino® Sparkling Natural Mineral Water A chef age 30 or younger who displays an impressive talent and who is likely to have a significant impact on the industry in years to come.

Tanya Baker, Boarding House, Chicago

Alex Bois, High Street on Market, Philadelphia

Erik Bruner-Yang, Toki Underground, Washington, D.C.

Jessica Largey, Manresa, Los Gatos, CA

Cara Stadler, Tao Yuan, Brunswick, ME

Ari Taymor, Alma, Los Angeles

Best Chef: Great Lakes (IL, IN, MI, OH)

Curtis Duffy, Grace, Chicago

Jonathon Sawyer, Greenhouse Tavern, Cleveland

Paul Virant, Vie, Western Springs, IL

Erling Wu-Bower,

Nico Osteria, Chicago

Andrew Zimmerman, Sepia, Chicago

Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic (D.C., DE, MD, NJ, PA, VA)

Joe Cicala, Le Virtù, Philadelphia

Spike Gjerde, Woodberry Kitchen, Baltimore

Rich Landau, Vedge, Philadelphia

Greg Vernick, Vernick Food & Drink, Philadelphia

Cindy Wolf, Charleston, Baltimore

 

Best Chef: Midwest (IA, KS, MN, MO, NE, ND, SD, WI)

Paul Berglund, The Bachelor Farmer, Minneapolis

Justin Carlisle, Ardent, Milwaukee

Gerard Craft, Niche, Clayton, MO

Michelle Gayer, Salty Tart, Minneapolis

Lenny Russo, Heartland Restaurant & Farm Direct Market, St. Paul, MN

Best Chef: Northeast (CT, MA, ME, NH, NY STATE, RI, VT)

Karen Akunowicz, Myers + Chang, Boston

Barry Maiden, Hungry Mother, Cambridge, MA

Masa Miyake, Miyake, Portland, ME

Cassie Piuma, Sarma, Somerville, MA

Andrew Taylor and Mike Wiley, Eventide Oyster Co., Portland, ME

Best Chef: Northwest (AK, ID, MT, OR, WA, WY)

Greg Denton and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton, Ox, Portland, OR

Renee Erickson, The Whale Wins, Seattle

Blaine Wetzel, The Willows Inn on Lummi Island, Lummi Island, WA

Justin Woodward, Castagna, Portland, OR

Rachel Yang and Seif Chirchi, Joule, Seattle

Best Chef: New York City (Five Boroughs)

Marco Canora, Hearth

Mario Carbone and Rich Torrisi, Carbone

Mark Ladner, Del Posto

Anita Lo, Annisa

Ignacio Mattos, Estela

Jonathan Waxman, Barbuto

Best Chef: South (AL, AR, FL, LA, MS, PR)

Vishwesh Bhatt, Snackbar, Oxford, MS

Justin Devillier, La Petite Grocery, New Orleans

Jose Enrique, Jose Enrique, San Juan, PR

Slade Rushing, Brennan’s, New Orleans

Alon Shaya, Domenica, New Orleans

Best Chef: Southeast (GA, KY, NC, SC, TN, WV)

John Fleer, Rhubarb, Asheville, NC

Edward Lee, 610 Magnolia, Louisville, KY

Steven Satterfield, Miller Union, Atlanta

Jason Stanhope, FIG, Charleston, SC

Andrew Ticer and Michael Hudman, Andrew Michael Italian Kitchen, Memphis

Tandy Wilson, City House, Nashville

Best Chef: Southwest (AZ, CO, NM, OK, TX, UT)

Kevin Binkley, Binkley’s, Cave Creek, AZ

Aaron Franklin, Franklin Barbecue, Austin

Bryce Gilmore, Barley Swine, Austin

Hugo Ortega, Hugo’s, Houston

Martín Rios, Restaurant Martín, Santa Fe, NM

Justin Yu, Oxheart, Houston

Best Chef: West (CA, HI, NV)

Matthew Accarrino, SPQR, San Francisco

Stuart Brioza and Nicole Krasinski, State Bird Provisions, San Francisco

Michael Cimarusti, Providence, Los Angeles

Corey Lee, Benu, San Francisco

Jon Shook and Vinny Dotolo, Animal, Los Angeles

Outstanding Pastry Chef

A chef or baker who prepares desserts, pastries, or breads and who serves as a standard-bearer for excellence. Candidates must have been pastry chefs or bakers for at least the past 5 years.

Dana Cree, Blackbird, Chicago

Maura Kilpatrick, Oleana, Cambridge, MA

Dahlia Narvaez, Osteria Mozza, Los Angeles

Ghaya Oliveira, Daniel, NYC

Christina Tosi, Momofuku, NYC

Outstanding Restaurant Presented by Acqua Panna® Natural Spring Water Presented to a restaurant in the United States that serves as a national standard-bearer for consistent quality and excellence in food, atmosphere, and service. Candidates must have been in operation for at least 10 or more consecutive years.

Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Pocantico Hills, NY

Highlands Bar and Grill, Birmingham, AL

Momofuku Noodle Bar, NYC

Per Se, NYC

The Spotted Pig, NYC

Outstanding Restaurateur

Presented to a working restaurateur who sets high national standards in restaurant operations and entrepreneurship. Candidates must have been in the restaurant business for at least 10 years. Candidates must not have been nominated for a James Beard Foundation chef award in the past 10 years.

JoAnn Clevenger, Upperline, New Orleans

Donnie Madia, One Off Hospitality Group, Chicago (Blackbird, Avec, The Publican, and others)

Michael Mina, Mina Group, San Francisco (Michael Mina, RN74, Bourbon Steak, and others)

Cindy Pawlcyn, Napa, CA (Mustards Grill, Cindy’s Back Street Kitchen, and Cindy’s Waterfront at the Monterey Bay Aquarium)

Stephen Starr, Starr Restaurants, Philadelphia (The Dandelion, Talula’s Garden, Serpico, and others)

Best New Restaurant Presented by True Refrigeration® – Presented to a restaurant opened in 2014 that already displays excellence in food, beverage, and service and is likely to have a significant impact on the industry in years to come.

Bâtard, NYC

Central Provisions, Portland, ME

Cosme, NYC

Parachute, Chicago

Petit Trois, Los Angeles

The Progress, San Francisco

Spoon and Stable, Minneapolis

Outstanding Baker

Joanne Chang, Flour Bakery + Cafe, Boston

Mark Furstenberg, Bread Furst, Washington, D.C.

Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery, NYC

Belinda Leong and Michel Suas, B. Patisserie, San Francisco

William Werner, Craftsman and Wolves, San Francisco Continue reading

NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO PRESENT NEW EXHIBITION EXPLORING THE RELATIONSHIP OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN AND HIS JEWISH CONTEMPORARIES

Samuel Alschuler, a Jewish photographer lent Lincoln his own velvet-trimmed coat for this photo taken in Urbana, Illinois, on April 25, 1858, just as Lincoln would begin his Senate campaign against Stephen Douglas. Lincoln would again sit for Alschuler two years later, after he was elected president.

Samuel Alschuler, a Jewish photographer lent Lincoln his own velvet-trimmed coat for this photo taken in Urbana, Illinois, on April 25, 1858, just as Lincoln would begin his Senate campaign against Stephen Douglas. Lincoln would again sit for Alschuler two years later, after he was elected president.

Marking the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln’s assassination, the New-York Historical Society will present the exhibition Lincoln and the Jews, on view March 20 through June 7, 2015. Through several never-before-exhibited original writings by Lincoln and his Jewish contemporaries, the exhibition will bring to light Lincoln’s little-known relationship with the Jewish community and its lasting implications for Lincoln, for America, and for Jews. The exhibition is inspired by the publication of Lincoln and the Jews: A History (Thomas Dunne Books, March 2015), by Jonathan D. Sarna, Joseph H. & Belle R. Braun Professor of American Jewish History at Brandeis University, and Benjamin Shapell, founder of The Shapell Manuscript Foundation.

Lincoln’s close friend, Abraham Jonas, was a Jewish lawyer in Quincy, Illinois whom Lincoln first met in 1843. Jonas was a staunch supporter of Lincoln throughout their more than two decades of friendship. The correspondence between the two men demonstrates their personal, professional, and political closeness, and in 1860 Lincoln said of Jonas that he was “one of my most valued friends.”

Lincoln’s close friend, Abraham Jonas, was a Jewish lawyer in Quincy, Illinois whom Lincoln first met in 1843. Jonas was a staunch supporter of Lincoln throughout their more than two decades of friendship. The correspondence between the two men demonstrates their personal, professional, and political closeness, and in 1860 Lincoln said of Jonas that he was “one of my most valued friends.”

Abraham Jonas, a close friend of Lincoln's (a Jewish lawyer from Illinois), warns Lincoln of a plot to assassinate him before Inauguration Day. Jonas had sons living in the South, and he received word from them of the rumors to kill Lincoln. The warnings did not go unheeded: Lincoln was smuggled into Washington, arriving in the dead of night ten days before the Inauguration.

Abraham Jonas, a close friend of Lincoln’s (a Jewish lawyer from Illinois), warns Lincoln of a plot to assassinate him before Inauguration Day. Jonas had sons living in the South, and he received word from them of the rumors to kill Lincoln. The warnings did not go unheeded: Lincoln was smuggled into Washington, arriving in the dead of night ten days before the Inauguration.

Presented in collaboration with the Shapell Manuscript Foundation, the exhibition will premiere at the New-York Historical Society before traveling to the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum in Springfield, Illinois. The exhibition is guest curated by Dr. Ann Meyerson, independent museum curator, under the leadership of Benjamin Shapell. Harold Holzer, the Roger Hertog Fellow at the New-York Historical Society and chairman of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Foundation, serves as Chief Historical Advisor.

Lincoln and the Jews will illustrate how America changed as its Jewish population surged from 3,000 to 150,000, and how Abraham Lincoln, more than any of his predecessors, changed America in order to accelerate acceptance of Jews as part of the mosaic of American life. Showcasing more than 80 artifacts documenting the connection between Lincoln and Jews – including letters, official appointments, pardons, and personal notes, as well as Bibles, paintings and Judaica – Lincoln and the Jews will trace the events in Lincoln’s life through the lens of his Jewish friends, such as his fellow lawyer and politician Abraham Jonas and his enigmatic chiropodist (podiatrist) and confidant Issachar Zacharie, as well as Lincoln’s profound interest in and connection to the Old Testament. The exhibition will paint a portrait of a politician and president who worked for the inclusion of Jews as equals in America – a leader truly committed to “malice toward none.”

Painting titled: The Last Hours of Abraham Lincoln, by Alonzo Chappel, 1868. Oil on canvas. This painting depicts President Lincoln on his deathbed surrounded by a large group of people including Robert Todd Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, Clara Harris, Henry Rathbone, Edwin Stanton, and Andrew Johnson. Artist and engraver John B. Bachelder of Washington, D.C., arranged for everyone who visited the dying president to have their photographs taken at Mathew Brady’s studio. From those images, Bachelder created a design for a monumental painting and hired Alonzo Chappel to complete the canvas: A Jewish doctor at Lincoln’s deathbed: Alonzo Chappel’s famous 1867 painting depicts the ten-by-fifteen-foot room in which Lincoln lay dying as large enough to be filled with almost as many doctors who later claimed to be there. Of the nine actually in attendance, Dr. Charles Liebermann, a Russian-born Jewish ophthalmologist and a leading Washington physician, is prominently featured here, gazing intently at the president. Lierbermann had attended at Lincoln’s deathbed throughout the nine-hour coma.

Painting titled: The Last Hours of Abraham Lincoln, by Alonzo Chappel, 1868. Oil on canvas. This painting depicts President Lincoln on his deathbed surrounded by a large group of people including Robert Todd Lincoln, Mary Todd Lincoln, Clara Harris, Henry Rathbone, Edwin Stanton, and Andrew Johnson. Artist and engraver John B. Bachelder of Washington, D.C., arranged for everyone who visited the dying president to have their photographs taken at Mathew Brady’s studio. From those images, Bachelder created a design for a monumental painting and hired Alonzo Chappel to complete the canvas: A Jewish doctor at Lincoln’s deathbed: Alonzo Chappel’s famous 1867 painting depicts the ten-by-fifteen-foot room in which Lincoln lay dying as large enough to be filled with almost as many doctors who later claimed to be there. Of the nine actually in attendance, Dr. Charles Liebermann, a Russian-born Jewish ophthalmologist and a leading Washington physician, is prominently featured here, gazing intently at the president. Lierbermann had attended at Lincoln’s deathbed throughout the nine-hour coma.

The exhibition is designed to move visitors chronologically through Lincoln’s life, beginning with items and documents from before his presidential inauguration and ending with his untimely death in 1865. Lincoln’s relationship with Abraham Jonas, a Jewish member of the Illinois State Legislature whom Lincoln called “one of my most valued friends,” will be explored in the show, with an 1860 letter on view from Jonas that warns of an assassination plot before Lincoln’s first inauguration, rumors of which Jonas learned from his extended family in the South. Also on display is the illustration of a Hebrew flag that Abraham Kohn, a leader of the Jewish community in Chicago, bestowed upon then-president-elect Lincoln shortly before his departure from Springfield for his inauguration in Washington. Quoting the Book of Joshua, it urged Lincoln to “Be strong and of a good courage… Be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed; for the Lord thy God is with thee whithersoever thou goest.

Lincoln often took unpopular stands in defense of Jews and Judaism, and the exhibition explores Lincoln’s two most important wartime interactions with the Jewish community. One was his role in amending the chaplaincy law so that Jews and other non-Christians might serve as chaplains; he also appointed the first-ever Jewish military chaplains in the United States. The other was his countermanding of General Ulysses S. Grant’s notorious General Orders No. 11 that expelled “Jews as a class” from the territory then under his command. Lincoln had the order revoked as soon as he learned of it, explaining that he did “not like to hear a class or nationality condemned on account of a few sinners.” Lincoln also supported the promotion and decoration of Jewish Civil War soldiers. On view in the exhibition will be dueling pistols presented to the Civil War hero Edward S. Salomon by the Citizens of Cook County, Illinois in 1867. Salomon led the so-called “Jewish Company” from Illinois and was commended for his battlefield bravery, exhibited at the Battle of Gettysburg and beyond.

Carte-de-visite of Issachar Zacharie. The Shapell Manuscript Collection

Carte-de-visite of Issachar Zacharie. The Shapell Manuscript Collection

Issachar Zacharie came highly recommended to treat Lincoln’s feet after shrewdly amassing a host of testimonials, mostly from leading politicians and generals. Yet Zacharie was not shy about requesting and accumulating more, even from the president, who, in the historic week that followed Antietam, the single bloodiest day in American history, and the week in which Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation to his cabinet, wrote no less than three testimonials for the Jewish chiropodist. Lincoln attested to Zacharie’s skill in treating his feet, and in one, refers to “what plain people called backache,” alluding to his own humble origins and years of hard labor. Within months, Zacharie would become emissary to the Jewish community in Union-occupied New Orleans.

Issachar Zacharie came highly recommended to treat Lincoln’s feet after shrewdly amassing a host of testimonials, mostly from leading politicians and generals. Yet Zacharie was not shy about requesting and accumulating more, even from the president, who, in the historic week that followed Antietam, the single bloodiest day in American history, and the week in which Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation to his cabinet, wrote no less than three testimonials for the Jewish chiropodist. Lincoln attested to Zacharie’s skill in treating his feet, and in one, refers to “what plain people called backache,” alluding to his own humble origins and years of hard labor. Within months, Zacharie would become emissary to the Jewish community in Union-occupied New Orleans.

In 1862, just as he was preparing to deliver the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation to his cabinet, Lincoln was treated by podiatrist Issachar Zacharie, who soon became a close confidant. Lincoln entrusted Zacharie with several secret missions, even sending him to New Orleans to promote pro-Union sentiments among his Jewish “countrymen.” Zacharie also worked to win Jewish voters to Lincoln’s side in the 1864 election. In return, when Savannah was restored to the Union, he sought Lincoln’s permission to visit his family there. In a remarkable 1865 letter bluntly titled “About Jews,” which is on view in the exhibition, Lincoln instructed Secretary of War Edwin Stanton to grant passage for Zacharie. He also ordered a hearing for a dismissed Jewish provost marshall (head of the military police) whom, he wrote, “has suffered for us & served us well.” In an era when anti-Semitism was commonplace, Lincoln openly sided with these Jews, against the advice of his Secretary of War. Continue reading

NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY CELEBRATES LEGENDARY PORTRAITIST IN THE HIRSCHFELD CENTURY: THE ART OF AL HIRSCHFELD

Laurel and Hardy Ink, watercolor, collage wallpaper sample, and photograph, 1928 Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Laurel and Hardy
Ink, watercolor, collage wallpaper sample, and photograph, 1928
Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation. © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Acclaimed portraitist Al Hirschfeld (1903–2003) immortalized celebrities and Broadway productions with his iconic linear calligraphic drawings for nine decades, establishing himself as one of the most important contemporary portrait artists. This spring, the New-York Historical Society will present The Hirschfeld Century: The Art of Al Hirschfeld, on view from May 22 through October 12, 2015, honoring the renowned portraitist whose work documented the performing arts in the 20th century. Organized by Louise Kerz Hirschfeld and guest curated by David Leopold of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation, the exhibition will feature more than 100 original drawings, from the artist’s early work for Hollywood studios to his last drawings for The New York Times.

2000 Academy Award Nominees for Best Actor and Best Actress [Laura Linney in You Can Count on Me, Tom Hanks in Cast Away, Russell Crowe in Gladiator, Allen Burstyn in Requiem for a Dream, Ed Harris in Pollock, Geoffrey Rush in Quills, Julia Roberts in Erin Brockovich, Joan Allen in The Contender, Javier Bardem in Before Night Falls, Juliette Binoche in Chocolat], 2001 Ink on board Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

2000 Academy Award Nominees for Best Actor and Best Actress [Laura Linney in You Can Count on Me, Tom Hanks in Cast Away, Russell Crowe in Gladiator, Allen Burstyn in Requiem for a Dream, Ed Harris in Pollock, Geoffrey Rush in Quills, Julia Roberts in Erin Brockovich, Joan Allen in The Contender, Javier Bardem in Before Night Falls, Juliette Binoche in Chocolat], 2001
Ink on board. Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation
© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Self portrait, 1985 Ink on board Collection of Harvard University © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Self portrait, 1985, Ink on board
Collection of Harvard University. © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Ella Fitzgerald, 1993 Ink on board Collection of Harvard University © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Ella Fitzgerald, 1993, Ink on board
Collection of Harvard University. © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Known by many as “the Line King,” Al Hirschfeld was widely considered one of the most important figures in contemporary drawing and caricature. Celebrities considered it an honor to be “Hirschfelded” and his drawings brought the energy and exuberance of Broadway to the page. The exhibition will feature classic portraits of Charlie Chaplin, Carol Channing, Ella Fitzgerald, Jane Fonda and Ringo Starr, as well as cast drawings from such landmark productions as Fiddler on the Roof, West Side Story, and The Glass Menagerie. Also on view will be selections from the artist’s sketchbooks, ephemera, and related videos.

Richard Kiley in Man of La Mancha, 1977 Ink on board Collection of Harvard University © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Richard Kiley in Man of La Mancha, 1977, Ink on board
Collection of Harvard University. © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Visitors to The Hirschfeld Century will explore the artist’s career chronologically, beginning with his pre-caricature days at Selznick Pictures in the early 1920s to his last works in theater, film, television, music and dance in 2002. A video showing Hirschfeld’s working process, from inception to completion, will also be on view.

Among the highlights is a 1928 drawing for MGM depicting the fledgling comedy team Laurel and Hardy in a bed with a brightly colored blanket, ingeniously made from a collage of wallpaper samples. An image of actress Ruby Keeler from No, No Nanette (1971) captures the wild energy of the 60-year old actress in her comeback role, enthusiastically tap dancing with arms and legs a-blur. Portraits of more recent stage legends like Jerry Orbach (in 42nd Street, 1980) and Sandra Bernhard (in I’m Still Here… Damn It!, 1998) evoke their big personalities with sparing lines.

Jerry Orbach in 42nd Street, 1980 Ink on board Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Jerry Orbach in 42nd Street, 1980, Ink on board, Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation
© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Sandra Bernhard in I’m Still Here...Damn It!, 1998 Ink on board Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Sandra Bernhard in I’m Still Here…Damn It!, 1998, Ink on board. Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation
© The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Ruby Keeler in No, No Nanette, 1971 Ink on board Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Ruby Keeler in No, No Nanette, 1971, Ink on board
Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation, © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Nina’s Revenge, 1966 Ink on board Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

Nina’s Revenge, 1966, Ink on board
Collection of the Al Hirschfeld Foundation, © The Al Hirschfeld Foundation. www.AlHirschfeldFoundation.org

When his daughter Nina was born in late 1945, Hirschfeld began to hide her name in the designs of his drawings, creating a hide-and-seek game for his viewers that Hirschfeld called “a national insanity.” Visitors to the exhibition can continue the search, but might initially be stumped by Nina’s Revenge (1966)–until they realize that her curly hair and folds of her clothes contain her proud parents’ names (“Al” and “Dolly”). Continue reading

The Manhattan Cocktail Classic Celebrates Its 6th Anniversary with Spectacular Venues in Downtown Manhattan

Opening Night Gala at Cipriani Wall Street and Industry Invitational at the Newly Opened Pier A Harbor House, May 16-19, 2015

New Team Takes the Reins of the Four-Day Festival to Amplify Its Offerings and Engage the Wider Hospitality Sector and Beyond

The Manhattan Cocktail Classic (MCC), New York’s legendary multi-day celebration of cocktails and culture, today announces its move downtown with new festival venues as it prepares to celebrate its sixth anniversary. The much-anticipated Opening Night Gala (usually held at the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue) will be held at the iconic Cipriani Wall Street on Saturday, May 16, 2015 and the trade-oriented, Industry Invitational will take place Monday, May 18 in the newly opened Pier A Harbor House overlooking New York Harbor in Battery Park. (Tickets will go on sale soon at www.manhattancocktailclassic.com.)

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Part festival, part fete, part conference, part cocktail party, The Manhattan Cocktail Classic (MCC) is an annual celebration of the myriad points of intersection between cocktails and culture. With a wide range of events– parties, pairings, dinners, dances, workshops, lectures, tiki-tours and bar crawls–spread across four days and multiple boroughs, the MCC offers a vast array of unique experiences to enthusiasts and professionals alike, expanding the very definition of what constitutes a “cocktail event” and is produced by Cocktail Classic Productions LLC. Most of these events and activities are conceptualized and organized independently by brands, both large and small, as well as craft bartenders and cocktail luminaries. Ticket prices vary by event, but typically range from $25 to $295.

The Manhattan Cocktail Classic opening night Gala at The New York Public Library on Friday, May 17, 2013. Photography Credit: Gabi Porter

The Manhattan Cocktail Classic opening night Gala at The New York Public Library on Friday, May 17, 2013. Photography Credit: Gabi Porter

Michael Arenella and his Dreamland Orchestra entertain guests in the Bartos Forum. Photography Credit: Filip Wolak

Michael Arenella and his Dreamland Orchestra entertain guests in the Bartos Forum. Photography Credit: Filip Wolak

Located at 55 Wall St., The stunning Greek Revival masterpiece with its facade embellished by 12 towering ionic granite pillars will be transformed into New York’s most glamorous and exciting cocktail party for thousands of revelers. Built between 1836 and 1842, it originally housed the Merchants Exchange, the U.S. Customs House and National City Bank. Its Grand Ballroom is opulently designed and crowned by a vast dome. The building’s terraces overlooking Wall Street, its bi-level restaurant and library will also be devoted to the Gala. And for the first time ever, the Cipriani Club, a secret subterranean level complete with a barber shop, billiards room and screening room, will be open to gala attendees as part of the festive evening.

Leo Robitschek pours a classic Negroni at the 2013 Manhattan Cocktail Classic Opening Night Gala Photography Credit: Virginia Rollison

Leo Robitschek pours a classic Negroni at the 2013 Manhattan Cocktail Classic Opening Night Gala Photography Credit: Virginia Rollison

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