Acclaimed Cultural Festival ‘Taste of Iceland’ Returns to Boston March 8-11

Bostonians Can Immerse Themselves In Icelandic Culture During This Four-Day Festival Of Icelandic Food, Cocktails, Music, Film And Art.

Acclaimed Cultural Festival 'Taste of Iceland' Returns to Boston March 8-11

Acclaimed Cultural Festival ‘Taste of Iceland’ Returns to Boston March 8-11

Taste of Iceland, an annual festival that celebrates Iceland’s vibrant culture, returns to Boston with a series of events March 8-11, 2018. Over the past nine years, Taste of Iceland in Boston has featured some of the best names in Icelandic food, music, art and more. The four-day festival, presented by Iceland Naturally, gives Bostonians the chance to experience the country’s pure culture through a variety of (mostly free!) events.

Schedule of Events

March 8 -11: Icelandic Menu at Townsman

March 8 – 11: Icelandic Cocktail Menu at Beat Brasserie

March 9: Reykjavik Calling Concert at Paradise Rock Club (FREE)

March 10: Discussion of Iceland’s Thriving Design and Architectural Scene at BSA Space (FREE)

March 11: Icelandic Short Film Festival at The Brattle Theatre (FREE)

Event Details

Icelandic Menu at Townsman
March 8-11 | 5:30PM – Close | Townsman | 120 Kingston St., Boston, MA 02111
Icelanders are among the world’s healthiest, happiest and longest-living people – and many believe their pure, natural diet is the reason for this. From March 8-11, experience delicious Icelandic cuisine for yourself with a special Icelandic menu at Townsman. Icelandic chef
Georg Arnar Halldórsson will fly to Boston to collaborate with American chef Matt Jennings to create a prix fixe Icelandic dinner menu. Pair your meal with delicious Reyka Vodka and Brennivin cocktails crafted by Icelandic mixologist Teitur Ridderman Schiöth and Townsman’s Jon Ross. Reserve your seat for this unique dining experience on OpenTable. Click here to view the Facebook event.

Iceland Naturally Logo

Iceland Naturally Logo

Chef Halldórsson has won multiple culinary awards, including two silver medals and a bronze medal at the 2016 Culinary Olympics. Chef Jennings was named one of the 40 Under 40 Big Thinkers in the food industry by Food & Wine and was a finalist for James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef Northeast award numerous times.

Icelandic Cocktails at Beat Brasserie
March 8-11 | 4PM – 1AM | Beat Brasserie | 13 Brattle St., Cambridge, MA 02138
Experience traditional Icelandic cocktails with the Taste of Iceland cocktail menu at Beat Brasserie! Created and mixed by Brennivin cocktail champion Teitur Ridderman Schiöth and Beat Brasserie’s Doug Capozzoli, the unique cocktails feature famed Icelandic spirits Reyka Vodka and Brennivin. One of Iceland’s premier bartenders, Schiöth currently manages Pablo Discobar, a lively gathering place in Reykjavik. Capozzoli established himself as one of Boston’s best up and coming young bartenders while working in 5-star hotels before making the move to Beat Brasserie in 2015. Stop by Beat Brasserie March 8-11 to try these mouthwatering handcrafted cocktails! RSVP on Facebook.

Reykjavik Calling Concert at Paradise Rock Club
March 9 | Doors at 7PM, Show at 8PM | Paradise Rock Club | 967 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215
The free annual Reykjavik Calling concert, sponsored by
WERS, returns to Boston on Friday, March 9 – this time at Paradise Rock Club! One of Boston’s most anticipated international concerts of the year, 2018’s lineup features Icelandic artists JFDR, whose first, full-length album was co-produced by Laurie Anderson, Yoko Ono, and Tom Waits; and Sturla Atlas, one of Iceland’s most exciting new acts who will be playing his first U.S. show at Taste of Iceland in Boston. The Icelandic bands will be joined by Air Traffic Controller, a Boston-based indie pop band with an eclectic song catalog and category-defying organic/electronic sound. Admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis. Must be 18+. RSVP on Facebook.

Iceland Design Center Presents: ‘Iceland’s Thriving Design and Architectural Scene’ at BSA Space
March 10 | BSA Spaces Pearl Street Room | 12-2PM | 290 Congress St., Suite 200, Boston, MA 02210
Discuss the current state of design in Iceland and learn more about the country’s premier design event,
DesignMarch, at this luncheon. Participants will hear from Halla Helgadóttir, award-winning designer and Managing Director of the Iceland Design Centre, and enjoy food, drinks, and networking. This free event will look at how the designer-driven community in Iceland has enabled Icelandic design and architecture to emerge on the international stage and solidify its place in the world. Design and art lovers alike should RSVP on Facebook for this event; admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first served basis!

Shortfish: Iceland’s Premier Short Film Festival at the Brattle Theatre
March 11 | 1PM | The Brattle Theatre | 40 Brattle St., Cambridge, MA 02138
Enjoy an afternoon of Icelandic short films at The Brattle Theatre in Harvard Square. The screening will feature six short films from the 2017 Shortfish competition (the short film division of Iceland’s premier film festival, Stockfish). The program will run approximately 90 minutes. There are no age restrictions on these films, however, they are not recommended for children. Doors open at 12:30 p.m.; program starts at 1:00 p.m. Admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis. RSVP on Facebook.

Taste of Iceland in Boston is presented by Iceland Naturally in cooperation with, Blue Lagoon, Brennivin, Iceland Airwaves, IcelandairIcelandic GlacialIcelandic Provisions Promote Iceland, Ölgerðin Egill Skallagrímsson, Reyka Vodka, Visit Reykjavik, Beat Brasserie, The Brattle Theatre, BSA Space, Paradise Rock Club, Stockfish Film Festival, Townsman, WBUR, and WERS.

If all this talk about Iceland has you wanting to make your own trip to the land of fire and ice, Icelandair offers more nonstop flights from North America than ever before, including daily flights out of Boston-Logan. The airline’s updated fleet features more legroom, in-flight entertainment, and gate-to-gate Wi-Fi. Visit Icelandair.com to book your flight today.

Iceland Naturally is a cooperative marketing organization that promotes the services, products, and culture of Iceland. Through events, promotions and online marketing initiatives, Iceland Naturally introduces Iceland’s creativity and natural wonders to North Americans. The group is comprised of Iceland’s top companies and organizations: Blue Lagoon, City of ReykjavikGovernment of Iceland, Icelandair, Icelandic Glacial Water, Icelandic Group, Icelandic Provisions, Keflavik International Airport, LandsvirkjunÖlgerðin Egill Skallagrímsson, Promote Iceland and Reyka Vodka.

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Danielle Herrington “Owns It” as the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Cover Model

2018 Issue Celebrates 36 Strong + Sexy Women, Including Aly Raisman, Ashley Graham, Kate Upton, Paulina Porizkova, Hailey Clauson, Sloane Stephens, Genie Bouchard, Brenna Huckaby, Sailor Brinkley Cook, Alexis Ren, Olivia Culpo, Plus New Powerful Section “In Her Own Words”

Three New Original SI Swimsuit Television Specials Air Exclusively on Sports Illustrated TV (SI TV) – “Making of SI Swimsuit,” “#SISwimSearch – The journey to find the next SI Swimsuit star,” and “In Her Own Words,” Which Was Shot by Model Robyn Lawley

Special AR and VR Features Makes This the Most Immersive Issue of SI Swimsuit Ever

Watch Former SI Swimsuit Cover Model Tyra Banks Reveal the Cover to Herrington on www.SI.com/Swimsuit

Newcomer Danielle Herrington claims the coveted cover of the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue. The cover was revealed first on SI.com and the brand’s social platforms via a video featuring former SI Swimsuit cover model Tyra Banks sharing the news with a surprised and emotional Herrington. Herrington, a Rookie in 2017’s SI Swimsuit issue, shot her 2018 photos in the Bahamas with photographer Ben Watts. SI Swimsuit Editor MJ Day, who marks her sixth year as editor and 21st year working at the brand, considers all photos from all the models for the cover. SI Swimsuit 2018 hits newsstands on Wednesday, February 14.

SI Swimsuit 2018 cover featuring Danielle Herrington. CREDIT Ben Watts-SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

Danielle Herrington “Owns It” as the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Cover Model. SI Swimsuit 2018 cover featuring Danielle Herrington. The issue is on newsstand now. CREDIT: Ben Watts/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

The annual SPORTS ILLUSTRATED Swimsuit Issue (www.si.com/swimsuit) reaches more than 70 million US adults annually and more men ages 18 to 34 than the Super Bowl. The iconic brand spans 16 product extensions, along with a vibrant experiential marketing business. Since debuting in 1964, Swimsuit has become a pop culture phenomenon and a revered launching pad for successful careers in TV, fashion, business, and film. The fashion industry describes SI Swimsuit as the “Oscars of Swimwear,” as an appearance in the issue is a crowning achievement for swimsuit and accessory manufacturers.

The 55th installment of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue features a diverse cast of 36 models including 4 returning cover models, 5 world-famous athletes, 5 mothers, 4 published authors, 12 rookies, 6 model search contestants and 10 women who are featured in the new section, “In Her Own Words.” The full list of SI Swimsuit 2018 models is below.

Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2018 features a diverse array of 36 models, including Compton, CA native and cover model Danielle Herrington and 2018 Rookie of the Year Alexis Ren. The full SI Swimsuit 2018 cast is: Alexis Ren, Allie Ayers, Aly Raisman, Anne de Paula, Ashley Graham, Barbara Palvin, Bianca Balti, Brenna Huckaby, Camille Kostek, Chase Carter, Danielle Herrington, Ebonee Davis, Genie Bouchard, Georgia Gibbs, Hailey Clauson, Haley Kalil, Hunter McGrady, Iyonna Fairbanks, Jasmyn Wilkins, Kate Bock, Kate Upton, Kate Wasley, Lais Ribeiro, Myla Dalbesio, Olivia Culpo, Olivia Jordan, Paige Spiranac, Paulina Porizkova, Raven Lyn, Robin Holzken, Robyn Lawley, Sailor Brinkley Cook, Samantha Hoopes, Sloane Stephens, Tabria Majors and Vita Sidorkina.

Every on-location shoot of the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue took place in the Caribbean, the brand’s most frequent destination and the backdrop for more than 40 photo shoots and 20 cover images, including the 2018 cover. The Caribbean locations shot in 2018 were the Bahamas, Aruba, Belize, and Nevis. In honor of that history, SI Swimsuit will continue to support hurricane relief efforts in the region and has already committed to visiting Puerto Rico for the 2019 issue.

SI Swimsuit 2018 spotlights beauty in its many different forms while providing a platform for the voices and messages of the bold, diverse, inspiring and stunning women featured throughout the issue. This comes to life in different ways and across mediums, from first-person essays written by a collection of models, to emotional short-form videos, to full-length documentary-style features.

SW2018_LOGO_FINAL_highres

Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2018 logo

MJ Day, the editor of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit, said, “As a 20 year veteran of this iconic brand – the past six as editor – I am constantly inspired by the incredible women I get to work with annually. Their brilliance, their drive, their successes, their strength are something to celebrate and emulate. We feature models who are scientists, CEOs, Olympians, activists, moms, influencers, show hosts and more—and not one of them failed to achieve her goals because she chose to look sexy and wear a bikini. It is time to move past the incorrect assumption that ‘sexy and empowered’ do not go together.

Day continued, “This year we are so proud to elevate Danielle Herrington’s profile. She is a fresh face, beautiful inside and out, and a hard-working, grounded woman who will be a beacon to many younger girls who can see themselves in her.”

Two of my role models are Tyra Banks and Beyoncé, so the fact that I get to join this incredible group of women as I become the third black model on the cover of SI Swimsuit is a dream come true,” said Danielle Herrington, 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit cover model. “I am so excited to be part of this iconic brand that has long given identity and voice to women of all shapes, colors, and beliefs. I hope that young girls who look at this cover are inspired to dream as big as I did and work hard to attain all their goals.”

This year’s issue marks several “firsts” for SI Swimsuit:

  • In Her Own Words” – The “In Her Own Words” project, which debuts in 2018, was conceived to deliver a message of empowerment, beauty, confidence, and self-acceptance. Featuring models painted in words they chose, this platform allowed the voice, the strength and the passion of these women to be expressed in the rawest form: on the naked body. With a stripped-down studio and an all-female crew, SI gave full creative control to the women as they became their own canvas. Models and activists such as Aly Raisman and Paulina Porizkova participated in the project. Sailor Brinkley Cook, a photography student at Parsons School of Design, and Robyn Lawley, an aspiring videographer, joined the crew, taking behind-the-scenes photos and capturing video of the intimate shoot.

Continue reading

Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture Exhibits Emancipation Proclamation and 13th Amendment

Original copies of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment are on display in the “Slavery and Freedom” exhibition on Concourse One of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. The documents share exhibition space with a restored slave cabin used in the early 1800s to house enslaved families on a plantation on Edisto Island, S.C. The Emancipation Proclamation and 13th Amendment are on a long-term loan to the museum by philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, Smithsonian Regent and co-founder and co-executive chairman of The Carlyle Group.

National Museum of African American History and Culture logo

National Museum of African American History and Culture logo

These two original documents show a nation in transition: they mark a powerful shift in America’s relation to the millions of enslaved blacks who had been bought and sold and considered property,” said Lonnie G. Bunch III, founding director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. “Showcasing the documents in the museum helps to illuminate an often overlooked story of how the enslaved, through self-emancipation and other resistance methods, forced the federal government to create policies that led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment.

The Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment to the Constitution are among the most important documents in the history of the United States. With the Emancipation Proclamation, issued by President Abraham Lincoln to take effect Jan. 1, 1863, the aim of the Civil War evolved to include the liberation of enslaved African Americans in 10 rebellious states. The 13th Amendment, which passed Dec. 6, 1865, made slavery illegal in the United States.

On Sept. 22, 1862, Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. Under his wartime authority as Commander-in-Chief, he ordered that, as of Jan. 1, 1863, all enslaved individuals in all areas still in rebellion against the United States “henceforward shall be free.” African Americans could also enlist in the armed forces. The proclamation was limited in scope but revolutionary in impact. The war to preserve the Union also became a war to end slavery.

Lincoln considered the Emancipation Proclamation to be the crowning achievement of his time in office. “I never, in my life, felt more certain that I was doing right, than I do in signing this paper,” he declared. “If my name ever goes into history it will be for this act, and my whole soul is in it.”

The 13th Amendment completed what free and enslaved African Americans, abolitionists and the Emancipation Proclamation set in motion. On Dec. 6, 1865, the U.S. government abolished slavery by amending the Constitution to state: “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

Slavery in America often destroyed enslaved families and communities, and yet African Americans survived it with their humanity intact,” Bunch added. “Their stories have shaped the American story and remind us of the enduring power of the human spirit. We are grateful to David Rubenstein—his generosity and his vision—for making these documents available to the museum and to the millions of visitors who will see them. The nation is honored by what he has done.”

 

The Whitney To Host A Variety Of Performances And Programs With Artists And Critics In February

mecca vazie andrews and the MOVEMENT: [title]
Saturday, February 3, 2018. 4 pm

An immersive performance in dialogue with the work of Laura Owens, mecca vazie andrews and the MOVEMENT’s [title] combines movement, sound, and projection. The running time is approximately fifty minutes. This program is organized in conjunction with Laura Owens in collaboration with 356 S. Mission Rd.

Tickets are required for the performance ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors, plus Museum admission; free for members).

What Art Speaks to These Times
Wednesday, February 7, 6:30 pm

What does it mean to be an artist in this political moment? An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017 examines how artists have confronted the political and social issues of their day. This panel brings together four artists in the exhibition to speak about their individual aesthetic approaches to the political urgencies of our present moment. Speakers include artists Ja’Tovia Gary, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Julie Mehretu, and Dread Scott. Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator, moderates the discussion.

Tickets are required ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors). This event will also be livestreamed on Facebook.

Toyin Ojih Odutola in conversation Yaa Gyasi with Texas Isaiah
Friday, February 9, 6:30 pm

In her exhibition To Wander Determined, Toyin Ojih Odutola presents an interconnected series of fictional portraits, chronicling the lives of two aristocratic Nigerian families. For this program, Ojih Odutola invites novelist Yaa Gyasi, whose debut novel Homegoing received the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard Award for Best First Book, and visual narrator Texas Isaiah, whose work documents gender, race, and sexuality, to discuss their respective practices as artists and their overlapping and intersecting interests, from narrative and portraiture to migration and dislocation. The conversation is moderated by Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator.The Whitney logo

This event has reached ticketing capacity but will be live-streamed on Facebook. A limited number of standby tickets may be available at the admissions desk on a first-come, first-served basis. The standby line will open one hour prior to the program’s start time.

Where He Was: Auden in America
Sunday, February 25, 3 pm

Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960, takes as its starting point a poem by W.H. Auden, September 1, 1939, which considers the ‘euphoric dream’ of American life on the cusp of world war, through the eyes of a foreigner, an Englishman. But why was Auden’s understanding of his adopted homeland so enduringly clear-eyed? Join two other U.S.-based émigré writers, poet Paul Muldoon and professor Michael Wood, for a conversation about Auden in America. A collaboration with the London Review of Books, their discussion will draw on Wood’s writing about Auden for the LRB, and Muldoon’s pastiche of his work in the poem 7, Middagh Street, to reflect on the USA’s significance for Auden, and vice versa, and why outsider perspectives can be the best mirror for a nation seeking to understand itself.

Tickets are required ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors).

For a complete listing of upcoming programs, please visit whitney.org.

An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017 is organized by David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection; Jennie Goldstein, assistant curator; and Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator; with David Kiehl, curator emeritus; and Margaret Kross, curatorial assistant.

Laura Owens is organized by Scott Rothkopf, Deputy Director for Programs and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, with Jessica Man, curatorial assistant.

Toyin Ojih Odutola: To Wander Determined is organized by Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator and Melinda Lang, curatorial assistant.

Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960 is organized by David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, with Jennie Goldstein, assistant curator, and Margaret Kross, curatorial assistant.

Major support for An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017 is provided by The American Contemporary Art Foundation, Inc., Leonard A. Lauder, President.

Significant support is provided by the Ford Foundation. Major support for Laura Owens is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Whitney’s National Committee.

Significant support is provided by Nancy and Steve Crown; Candy and Michael Barasch; The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston; Mariel and Jack Cayre; Marcia Dunn and Jonathan Sobel; and anonymous donors.

Generous support is provided by Fotene Demoulas and Tom Coté, Charlotte Feng Ford, Allison and Warren Kanders, and Ashley Leeds and Christopher Harland.

Additional support is provided by Rebecca and Martin Eisenberg, Susan and Leonard Feinstein, and the Nina and Frank Moore Family Foundation.

Generous endowment support is provided by Lise and Michael Evans, Sueyun and Gene Locks, and Donna Perret Rosen and Benjamin M. Rosen.

Curatorial research and travel for this exhibition were funded by an endowment established by Rosina Lee Yue and Bert A. Lies, Jr., MD.

Toyin Ojih Odutola: To Wander Determined is sponsored by Audi of America. Major support is provided by the John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation. Generous support is provided by Jackson Tang. Additional support is provided by Bernard I. Lumpkin and Carmine D. Boccuzzi. Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960 is sponsored by Delta.

American Gothic, Wood’s Best Known Painting, To Travel To The Whitney Museum of American Art

The Whitney To Present Grant Wood: American Gothic And Other Fables

The upcoming Grant Wood retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art will reassess the career of an artist whose most famous work, American Gothic—one of the most indelible emblems of Americana and perhaps the best-known work of twentieth-century American art—will be making a rare voyage from the Art Institute of Chicago for the occasion. Organized by Whitney curator Barbara Haskell, with senior curatorial assistant Sarah Humphreville, this exhibition is Wood’s first museum retrospective in New York since 1983 and only the third survey of his work outside the Midwest since 1935. It will be on view in the Whitney’s fifth-floor Neil Bluhm Family Galleries from March 2 through June 10, 2018.

Grant Wood (1891–1942), American Gothic, 1930.

Grant Wood (1891–1942), American Gothic, 1930. Oil on composition board, 30 3⁄4 x 25 3⁄4 in. (78 x 65.3 cm). Art Institute of Chicago; Friends of American Art Collection 1930.934. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph courtesy Art Institute of Chicago/Art Resource, NY

Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables brings together the full range of Wood’s art, from his early Arts and Crafts decorative objects and Impressionist oils through his mature paintings, murals, works on paper, and book illustrations. The exhibition reveals a complex, sophisticated artist whose image as a farmer-painter was as mythical as the fables he depicted in his art.

Grant Wood (1891–1942) achieved instant celebrity following the debut of American Gothic at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1930. Until then, he had been a relatively unknown painter of French-inspired Impressionist landscapes in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. His relatively short mature career, from 1930 to 1942, spanned a tormented period for the country, as the United States grappled with the aftermath of an economic meltdown and engaged in bitter debates over its core national identity. What emerged as a powerful strain in popular culture during the period was a pronounced reverence for the values of community, hard work, and self-reliance that were seen as fundamental to the national character, embodied most fully in America’s small towns and on its farms. Wood’s romanticized depictions of a seemingly more innocent and uncomplicated time elevated him into a popular, almost mythic figure, celebrated for his art and promotion of Regionalism, the representational style associated with the Midwest that dominated American art during the Depression.

As Barbara Haskell has noted, “The enduring power of Wood’s art owes as much to its mesmerizing psychological ambiguity as to its archetypal Midwestern imagery. An eerie silence and disquiet runs throughout his work, complicating its seemingly bucolic, elegiac exterior. Notwithstanding Wood’s desire to recapture the imagined world of his childhood, the estrangement and isolation that came of trying to resolve his loyalty to that world with his instincts as a shy, sexually closeted Midwesterner seeped into his art, endowing it with an unsettling sadness and alienation. By subconsciously expressing his conflicted relationship to the homeland he professed to adore, Wood created hypnotic works of apprehension and solitude that may be a truer expression of the unresolved tensions of the American experience than he might ever have imagined, even some seventy-five years after his death.”

This exhibition is an interrogation—not a reification—of stereotypes, values, and reputations,” writes Adam D. Weinberg, the Whitney’s Alice Pratt Brown Director, in his foreword to the exhibition catalog. Rather than celebrating a nostalgic American past that never was, the exhibition is “a quest to understand how a remarkable artist created mythic images, images that are not as unequivocal or as unambiguous as some might think or, yet, as some might wish…What one discovers, looking deeply into Wood’s paintings, is that, for all their apparent clarity and precision of style, in the best of them what is depicted is not at all straightforward. The images put forth are often conflicting and ambiguous. They reveal a collision of amplified meanings, sublimated feelings, and layered evidence.

Wood began his career as an Arts and Crafts decorative artist. Even after he shifted to fine arts, he retained the movement’s ideology and pictorial vocabulary. To it, he owed his later use of flat, decorative patterns and sinuous, intertwined organic forms as well as his belief that art was a democratic enterprise that must be accessible to the average person, not just the elite. Wood’s training in the decorative arts began early. He studied at the Handicraft Guild in Minneapolis for two summers after graduating from high school before moving to Chicago to join the Kalo Arts and Crafts Community house. In 1914, he opened the Volund Crafts Shop with a fellow craftsman and began to exhibit his jewelry and metalwork in the Art Institute of Chicago’s prestigious decorative arts exhibitions. Despite this recognition, commercial success eluded him and he closed the shop and returned to Cedar Rapids in 1916 to begin his painting career. The decision did not mean the end of his work in decorative arts, however, as is evident from the 1925 Corn Cob Chandelier included in the exhibition and the 1928 stained-glass window he designed for Cedar Rapids’ Veterans Memorial Building, replicated at half-scale in the exhibition. Even after the success of American Gothic, he continued designing objects for popular use. His Spring Plowing fabric design, armchair and ottoman, Steuben glass vase, eight book covers and illustrations for two books—all made after 1930—are also included in the exhibition. Continue reading

Explore The Style And Substance Of Antique Shoes At The New-York Historical Society

Walk This Way: Footwear from the Stuart Weitzman Collection of Historic Shoes On view April 20 – October 8, 2018

This spring, a new exhibition at the New-York Historical Society explores how shoes have transcended their utilitarian purpose to become representations of culture—coveted as objects of desire, designed with artistic consideration, and expressing complicated meanings of femininity, power, and aspiration for women and men alike. On view April 20 through October 8, 2018, in the Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery at the Center for Women’s History, Walk This Way: Footwear from the Stuart Weitzman Collection of Historic Shoes highlights 100 pairs of shoes from the iconic designer’s extensive private collection, assembled over three decades with his wife Jane Gershon Weitzman.

1 boudoir shoes - 1867 - no 101

Boudoir shoes, 1867. Paris, France Silk, embroidery, metallic thread. Stuart Weitzman Collection, no. 101. Photo credit: Glenn Castellano, New-York Historical Society. These shoes were created especially for the Paris Universal Exposition of 1867. The soles are stamped with the exhibition seal. During the age of European imperial expansion, Western consumers clamored for “exotic” textiles, such as the Turkish gilt-thread embroidery seen on these shoes.

Walk This Way will surprise and delight visitors with its unexpected lens on women’s history through Stuart Weitzman’s unparalleled historic footwear collection,” says Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “Shoes on view range from designs to be worn in the privacy of a woman’s home, shoes that American suffragists wore as they marched through city streets, ‘sexy’ heels that reflected changing norms of female aesthetics, and professional shoes suitable for the increasing numbers of women in the workforce. We are thrilled to be able to offer the public this unique opportunity to explore the private collection of a collector extraordinaire who is also America’s top shoe designer.

2 buttoned boots - 1870s - no 179

Buttoned boots, 1870s, Leather, Stuart Weitzman Collection, no. 179, Photo credit: Glenn Castellano, New-York Historical Society. One of the first American industries to embrace large-scale mechanization, the footwear industry soon grew into one of America’s largest: by 1850, shoemaking was America’s second-largest industry, following only agriculture.

3 lace-up boots - 1900 - no 59

Lace-up boots, ca. 1900, Silk and silk brocade, Stuart Weitzman Collection, no. 59 Photo credit: Glenn Castellano, New-York Historical Society. The late 1800s saw the introduction of machines capable of mimicking even the most intricate hand shoe-making processes, and producing high-quality shoes. By 1900, nearly every American shoe was made in a mechanized factory. One-third of the workers in these factories were women, at a time when women made up less than 20% of the total industrial workforce.

The exhibition considers the story of the shoe from the perspectives of collection, consumption, presentation, and production. It explores larger trends in American economic history, from industrialization to the rise of consumer culture, with a focus on women’s contributions as producers, consumers, designers, and entrepreneurs. Continue reading

Pottery Barn Kids Unveils Bright Bohemian Collection With Designer And Artist Justina Blakeney

Exclusive Collection of Home Decor for Nursery and Kids Debuts 

Pottery Barn Kids, a member of the Williams-Sonoma, Inc. portfolio of brands, has launched a vibrant new collection with Justina Blakeney, artist, designer, author and founder of Jungalow®.POTTERY_BARN_KIDS_Logo-_JPEG

A mother herself, this will be Blakeney’s first collection created specifically for kids and baby. Bursting with bold hues, the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids collection features the designer’s signature hand-drawn patterns and bohemian aesthetic with more than 90 pieces, including bedding, rugs, lighting, giftables, decorative accessories, and storage. Inspired by Justina’s passion for travel and nature, the collection includes imaginative themes, from wild jungle scenes to whimsical worlds of magic and outer space.

Astronomad room in the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids collection..jpg

Astronomad room in the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids collection.

 

Designer, artist, New York Times best-selling author, and founder of Jungalow®, Justina Blakeney is known for her colorful, patternful and plant-iful aesthetic. With an online audience of over 2,000,000, Justina has created a design movement which encourages people to experiment, let loose and decorate wild! Justina grew up in Berkeley, California where her colorful, soulful, multi-cultural upbringing had her obsessed with international travel, flea markets, plants, and textiles from an early age. She then moved to Los Angeles to study World Arts and Cultures at UCLA and upon graduation, she set off to travel the globe. She made it across the Atlantic but then somehow found herself living, studying design and then working in Italy for the better half of her twenties. Now, back in Los Angeles, Justina runs her award-winning lifestyle blog Jungalow.com and designs surface patterns and products for her homewares brand, Justina Blakeney Home.

Jungalino Nursery in the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids Collection.

Jungalino Nursery in the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids Collection.

The best part of being a child is letting your imagination run wild, and with this collaboration, I wanted to capture that spirit of adventure,” said Blakeney. “Inspired by my daughter and my love of nature, I wanted to bring fun, color and a sense of wonder into the nursery and kid space. Together with Pottery Barn Kids, I used my hand-painted patterns and boho sensibility to create pieces inspired by imaginary worlds my daughter and I share, and collections that celebrate the curiosity and playfulness of children everywhere.”

Magic Disco Caravan room in the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids Collection.

Magic Disco Caravan room in the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids Collection.

The Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids collection showcases Justina’s uninhibited creativity and ability to bring cheerful and eclectic style into any space. The Jungalino room and nursery, which includes decor for both kids and baby, was made to mix and match, featuring palm fronds prints, jungle animals, and natural textures. Adding an eye-catching twist to classic bedding, the hand-stitched Embroidered Palm Quilt pairs seamlessly with the “Hey Boo Boo” Sentiment Pillow, while the Dipped Fringe Light and Sun Shelf create a playful vibe.

Jungalino Room in the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids collection.

Jungalino Room in the Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids collection.

Designed with mystical accents, the Magic Disco Caravan bedroom combines mosaic-inspired global patterns with shimmering metallic detailing. Highlights include the Ceramic Turtle Night Light, Disco Caravan Rug and Vida Luna Doll, the designer’s personal favorite, which all bring a touch of enchantment to the space. Taking the collection to the next level with out-of-this-world style, the Astronomad bedroom incorporates a deep blue hue and groovy galactic print and pattern.

The Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids collection brings to life Justina’s free-spirited outlook, mixing bohemian style and modern charm,” said Jennifer Kellor, President, Pottery Barn Kids. “The collection is designed with pieces that inspire imagination and encourage children to explore their own colorful creativity, and we are thrilled to share this collaboration with our customers.

The Justina Blakeney for Pottery Barn Kids collection is available for purchase now on www.potterybarnkids.com/justina-blakeney and in select Pottery Barn Kids stores.

For more information, please visit potterybarnkids.com/justina-blakeney and join the conversation on social media @potterybarnkids @justinablakeney and #lovemypbk.