High Museum Of Art To Reunite Romare Bearden’s “Profile” Series For 2019-20 Touring Exhibition

More Than 30 Of Bearden’s Iconic Autobiographical Works Will Be Shown Together For The First Time In Nearly 40 Years

n fall 2019, the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, will premiere “Something Over Something Else: Romare Bearden’s Profile Series,” the first exhibition to bring dozens of works from the eminent series together since its debut nearly 40 years ago. Having opened on Sept. 14, 2019 and then scheduled to run through Feb. 2, 2020, the exhibition will then travel to the Cincinnati Art Museum (Feb. 28–May 24, 2020). “Something Over Something Else: Romare Bearden’s Profile Series” will be presented in the special exhibition gallery on the second level of the High’s Stent Family Wing.

Profile/Part 1, The Twenties: Mecklenberg County, Miss Bertha & Mr. Seth They rented a house from my grandfather. Collages & Montages Romare Bearden, American, 1911–1988 1978 American Collage on board Profile, Part 1: The Twenties Series Support/Overall: 25 1/2 x 18 1/2 inches Collection of Susan Merker

In November 1977, The New Yorker magazine published a feature-length biography of Bearden (American, 1911–1988) by Calvin Tomkins as part of its “Profiles” series. The article brought national focus to the artist, whose rise had been virtually meteoric since the late 1960s. The experience of the interview prompted Bearden to launch an autobiographical collection he called “Profile.” He sequenced the project in two parts: “Part I, The Twenties,” featuring memories from his youth in Charlotte, N.C., and in Pittsburgh, and “Part II, The Thirties,” about his early adult life in New York. For the series’ exhibitions in New York in 1978 and 1981, Bearden collaborated with friend and writer Albert Murray on short statements for the pieces, which were scripted onto the walls to lead visitors on a visual and poetic journey through the works.

Romare Bearden (American, 1911–1988), Profile/Part II, The Thirties: Artist with Painting & Model, 1981, collage on fiberboard. High Museum of Art, Atlanta, purchase with funds from Alfred Austell Thornton in memory of Leila Austell Thornton and Albert Edward Thornton, Sr., and Sarah Miller Venable and William Hoyt Venable, Margaret and Terry Stent Endowment for the Acquisition of American Art, David C. Driskell African American Art Acquisition Fund, Anonymous Donors, Sarah and Jim Kennedy, The Spray Foundation, Dr. Henrie M. Treadwell, Charlotte Garson, The Morgens West Foundation, Lauren Amos, Margaret and Scotty Greene, Harriet and Edus Warren, The European Fine Art Foundation, Billye and Hank Aaron, Veronica and Franklin Biggins, Helen and Howard Elkins, Drs. Sivan and Jeff Hines, Brenda and Larry Thompson, and a gift to honor Howard Elkins from the Docents of the High Museum of Art, 2014.66. © 2019 Romare Bearden Foundation/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Inspired by the High’s recent acquisition of a key work from the series, “Something Over Something Else” will be the first exhibition to reassemble more than 30 collages from the series. The exhibition design will reference the experience of the series’ original gallery presentations by incorporating their handwritten captions into the accompanying wall texts. The project is co-curated by Stephanie Heydt, the High’s Margaret and Terry Stent Curator of American Art, and Bearden scholar Robert G. O’Meally, Zora Neale Hurston professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia University.

We are privileged to organize ‘Something Over Something Else,’ which honors Bearden’s legacy as one of the 20th century’s most influential artists and brings important recognition to this beautiful and powerful series,” said Rand Suffolk, Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr., director of the High.

We are very excited to reassemble Bearden’s original ‘Profile’ project—and to experience these works along with their captions, presented in the original sequence,” said Heydt. “Bearden was a wonderful storyteller, and ‘Profile’ shows Bearden at his best, using words and images to evoke deeply personal memories. But Bearden also invites us all to find something to relate to along the way. There is a poetry in the arrangement of the exhibition that feels unique for Bearden’s work and this show, which assembles nearly two-thirds of the original group and may be the only opportunity to see those works together again.

Bearden presented the “Profile” series as a shared history—his reflection on a life path that follows the journey of migration and transition in black communities across the mid-20th century. The series is an origin story that tracks Bearden’s transition from rural South to urban North, weaving his personal history into a communal one. Beyond providing the opportunity to explore an understudied body of work, the exhibition will investigate the roles of narrative and self-presentation for an artist who made a career of creating works based on memory and experience. It will also reveal some of Bearden’s broader inspirations, which lend insight into American life in the first decades of the 20th century.

Heydt was inspired to develop the exhibition in 2014 when the High acquired “Profile/Part II, The Thirties: Artist with Painting & Model” (1981), the culminating work in the series and one of Bearden’s only known self-portraits. The collage, which will feature prominently in the exhibition, is a retrospective work in which Bearden brings together important memories and spiritual influences from his youth in the South with broader art-historical themes that guided his career for more than four decades.

The exhibition will be arranged roughly chronologically according to the original presentations, moving from collages featuring Bearden’s early memories to works exploring his development as an artist in New York. Thematically, the subjects range from neighbors, friends, music and church to work, play, love and loss. The works also vary greatly in size. Though some are large, many are diminutive, a deliberate choice by Bearden to convey his experience of revisiting childhood memories. In addition to the wall texts by Bearden and Murray, the galleries will feature an original copy of The New Yorker article and the catalogues from the 1978 and 1981 gallery exhibitions. The High will also show clips from the 1980 documentary “Bearden Plays Bearden,” directed by Nelson E. Breen.

Featured works will include:

Part I, The Twenties:

  • School Bell Time” (1978): this collage is the first work in the exhibition and recalls one of Bearden’s earliest memories.
  • Pittsburgh Memories, Mill Hand’s Lunch Bucket” (1978): Based on Bearden’s memories of the interior of his grandmother’s boardinghouse in Pittsburgh, this work inspired playwright August Wilson to write the play “Joe Turner’s Come and Gone.” Wilson’s stage set description reflects the composition of the collage, and the two main characters in the play were inspired by another painting in the series, “Mecklenberg County, Miss Bertha & Mr. Seth” (1978).
  • Pittsburgh Memories, Farewell Eugene” (1978): this work features a scene from the funeral of childhood friend who had introduced Bearden to drawing.
Romare Bearden (American, 1911–1988), Profile/Part I, The Twenties, Mecklenberg County, School Bell Time, 1978, collage on board. Kingsborough Community College, The City University of New York. © Romare Bearden Foundation/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo by Paul Takeuchi.

Part II, The Thirties:

  • Pepper Jelly Lady” (1981): in this work, Bearden returns to his memories of the South and Mecklenburg County.
  • Artist with Painting & Model” (1981): from the High’s collection, this collage is one of Bearden’s only known self-portraits and a reminiscence on his studio above the Apollo Theater in Harlem in the 1940s.
  • Johnny Hudgins Comes On” (1981): This work features the famous vaudeville performer. According to Bearden, Hudgins’ act inspired Bearden’s own approach to “making worlds” with his art.
Romare Bearden (American, 1911–1988), Profile/Part I, The Twenties, Mecklenberg County, Daybreak Express, 1978, collage on board. Courtesy of the McConnell Family Trust. © Romare Bearden Foundation/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Exhibition Catalogue
The High, in collaboration with University of Washington Press, will publish a full-color, illustrated catalogue to accompany the exhibition. Texts will include an introduction by former National Gallery of Art curator Ruth Fine and essays by Heydt, O’Meally, Rachael DeLue (Christopher Binyon Sarofim ’86 professor in American art at Princeton University) and Paul Devlin (assistant professor of English at the United States Merchant Marine Academy).


Something Over Something Else: Romare Bearden’s Profile Series” is organized and supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support is provided by the Andrew Wyeth Foundation for American Art. This exhibition is made possible by Exhibition Series Sponsors Delta Air Lines, Inc., and Turner; Premier Exhibition Series Supporters the Antinori Foundation, Sarah and Jim Kennedy, Louise Sams and Jerome Grilhot, and wish foundation; Benefactor Exhibition Series Supporter Anne Cox Chambers Foundation; Ambassador Exhibition Series Supporters Tom and Susan Wardell, and Rod Westmoreland; and Contributing Exhibition Series Supporters the Ron and Lisa Brill Family Charitable Trust, Lucinda W. Bunnen, Corporate Environments, Marcia and John Donnell, W. Daniel Ebersole and Sarah Eby-Ebersole, Peggy Foreman, Robin and Hilton Howell, Mr. and Mrs. Baxter Jones, and Margot and Danny McCaul. Generous support is also provided by the Alfred and Adele Davis Exhibition Endowment Fund, Anne Cox Chambers Exhibition Fund, Barbara Stewart Exhibition Fund, Marjorie and Carter Crittenden, Dorothy Smith Hopkins Exhibition Endowment Fund, Eleanor McDonald Storza Exhibition Endowment Fund, The Fay and Barrett Howell Exhibition Fund, Forward Arts Foundation Exhibition Endowment Fund, Helen S. Lanier Endowment Fund, Isobel Anne Fraser–Nancy Fraser Parker Exhibition Endowment Fund, John H. and Wilhelmina D. Harland Exhibition Endowment Fund, Katherine Murphy Riley Special Exhibition Endowment Fund, Margaretta Taylor Exhibition Fund, RJR Nabisco Exhibition Endowment Fund, and Dr. Diane L. Wisebram.


Located in the heart of Atlanta, Georgia, the High Museum of Art connects with audiences from across the Southeast and around the world through its distinguished collection, dynamic schedule of special exhibitions and engaging community-focused programs. Housed within facilities designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architects Richard Meier and Renzo Piano, the High features a collection of more than 17,000 works of art, including an extensive anthology of 19th- and 20th-century American fine and decorative arts; major holdings of photography and folk and self-taught work, especially that of artists from the American South; burgeoning collections of modern and contemporary art, including paintings, sculpture, new media and design; a growing collection of African art, with work dating from pre-history through the present; and significant holdings of European paintings and works on paper. The High is dedicated to reflecting the diversity of its communities and offering a variety of exhibitions and educational programs that engage visitors with the world of art, the lives of artists and the creative process. For more information about the High, visit www.high.org.

Pottery Barn Introduces Mix-And-Match Textiles Collection With Fashion Designers Emily Current And Meritt Elliott

Pottery Barn has launched a new collection of textiles and bedding essentials with revered stylists and fashion designers, Emily Current and Meritt Elliott of Current/Elliott. Inspired by their ready-to-wear collection, THE GREAT, the new Emily & Meritt for Pottery Barn assortment celebrates personal style and embodies the spirit of creative fearlessness that is synonymous with the LA-based designers.

Emily Current and Meritt Elliott, a creative team since 1999, are the celebrated Los Angeles-based duo known for their whimsical and timeless sensibility that recalls classic Americana. Drawn to one another’s innate sense of style, Emily and Meritt first met in college and quickly realized the fresh and fearless aesthetic they share – an affinity for individuality, dressing without rules and mixing high and low with confidence and flair.

In Spring 2012, the twosome joined an elite rank of designers when they became members of the prestigious Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA). In a visual ode to their varied career, encapsulating their love affair with denim and imaginative worldview, Emily and Meritt penned A Denim Story: Inspirations from Bell-bottoms to Boyfriends, a coffee table book published by Rizzoli in Spring 2014. In Spring 2015, Emily and Meritt launched their much anticipated, multi-category women’s collection, aptly named THE GREAT. Whether they’re designing a collection, creating memorable outfits for clients, styling unforgettable editorial spreads and advertising campaigns, appearing as fashion experts, or consulting for companies inspired by their distinct world-view, Emily and Meritt always bring a playful, intelligent spirit to whatever they touch

Emily and Meritt exclusively for Pottery Barn (Photo: Business Wire)

True to Emily and Meritt’s casual and nostalgic Americana aesthetic, the latest chapter in their Pottery Barn partnership features washed garment-dyed fabrics in fall color palettes and chic prints that inspire endless combinations and create an effortless, lived-in collection for both bath and bedroom. From the warm solids in hues of army green, spice and indigo, the pops of bright marigold and soft vintage blush to the playful yet subtle star, stripe and dot patterns, the new Fall collection gives Pottery Barn customers yet another way to embrace and express their unique style within the home.

We’re thrilled to introduce the newest collection in our partnership with Pottery Barn — a range of sheets, duvets, quilts and towels in washed garment-dyed colors and special prints made for layering, mixing, and matching,” said Emily Current and Meritt Elliot. “We wanted to capture the look and feel of a well-loved fabric and designed this collection for the person who treasures effortless personal style.”

Emily and Meritt have a playful yet chic aesthetic that translates beautifully into approachable designs for the home,” said Monica Bhargava, Executive Vice President of Product Development and Design, Pottery Barn. “This collection of garment-dyed textiles evokes a sense of comfort and self-expression and allows the Pottery Barn customer to add cozy layers to their space just in time for fall.

The new Emily & Meritt for Pottery Barn collection is now available online at PotteryBarn.com and in select Pottery Barn stores. To learn more about the line, visit www.potterybarn.com/emilyandmeritt and join the conversation on social media with @potterybarn #EandMxPB.

The Museum Of Modern Art Announces The First Major Dorothea Lange Solo Exhibition At Moma In 50 Years

The Museum of Modern Art announces Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures, the first major solo exhibition at the Museum of the photographer’s incisive work in over 50 years. On view from February 9 through May 2, 2020, in The Paul J. Sachs Galleries in The David and Peggy Rockefeller Building,

Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures includes approximately 100 photographs drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection. The exhibition also uses archival materials such as correspondence, historical publications, and oral histories, as well as contemporary voices, to examine the ways in which words inflect our understanding of Lange’s pictures. These new perspectives and responses from artists, scholars, critics, and writers, including Julie Ault, Wendy Red Star, and Rebecca Solnit, provide fresh insight into Lange’s practice. Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures is organized by Sarah Meister, Curator, with River Bullock, Beaumont & Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, assisted by Madeline Weisburg, Modern Women’s Fund Twelve-Month Intern, Department of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art.

Dorothea Lange. Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California. 1936. Gelatin silver print, 11 1/8 x 8 9/16″ (28.3 x 21.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase

Toward the end of her life, Dorothea Lange (1895–1965) remarked, “All photographs—not only those that are so-called ‘documentary,’ and every photograph really is documentary and belongs in some place, has a place in history—can be fortified by words.”

Dorothea Lange. Tractored Out, Childress County, Texas. 1938. Gelatin silver print. 9 5/16 x 12 13/16″ (23.6 x 32.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase

Organized loosely chronologically and spanning her career, the exhibition groups iconic works together with lesser known photographs and traces their varied relationships to words: from early criticism on Lange’s photographs to her photo-essays published in LIFE magazine, and from the landmark photobook An American Exodus to her examination of the US criminal justice system. The exhibition also includes groundbreaking photographs of the 1930s—including Migrant Mother (1936)—that inspired pivotal public awareness of the lives of sharecroppers, displaced families, and migrant workers during the Great Depression. Through her photography and her words, Lange urged photographers to reconnect with the world—a call reflective of her own ethos and working method, which coupled an attention to aesthetics with a central concern for humanity.

Dorothea Lange. The Defendant, Alameda County Courthouse, California. 1957. Gelatin silver print. 12 3/8 x 10 1/8″ (31.4 x 25.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase

It seems both timely and urgent that we renew our attention to Lange’s extraordinary achievements,” said Meister. “Her concern for less fortunate and often overlooked individuals, and her success in using photography (and words) to address these inequities, encourages each of us to reflect on our own civic responsibilities. It reminds me of the unique role that art—and in particular photography—can play in imagining a more just society.

The exhibition begins in 1933, when Lange, then a portrait photographer, first brought her camera outside into the streets of San Francisco. Lange’s increasing interest in the everyday experience of people she encountered eventually led her to work for government agencies, 2 supporting their objective to raise public awareness and to provide aid to struggling farmers and those devastated by the Great Depression. During this time, Lange photographed her subjects and kept notes that formed the backbone of government reports; these and other archival materials will be represented alongside corresponding photographs throughout the exhibition. Lange’s commitment to social justice and her faith in the power of photography remained constant throughout her life, even when her politics did not align with those who were paying for her work.

A central focus of the exhibition is An American Exodus, a 1939 collaboration between Lange and Paul Schuster Taylor, her husband and an agricultural economist. As an object and as an idea, An American Exodus highlights the voices of her subjects by pairing first-person quotations alongside their pictures. Later, Lange’s photographs continued to be useful in addressing marginalized histories and ongoing social concerns. Throughout her career as a photographer for the US Government and various popular magazines, Lange’s pictures were frequently syndicated and circulated outside of their original context. Lange’s photographs of the 1930s helped illustrate Richard Wright’s 12 Million Black Voices (1941), and her 1950s photographs of a public defender were used to illustrate Minimizing Racism in Jury Trials (1969), a law handbook published after Black Panther Huey P. Newton’s first trial during a time of great racial strife.

This collection-based exhibition would not be possible had it not been for Lange’s deep creative ties to the Museum during her lifetime. MoMA’s collection of Lange photographs was built over many decades and remains one of the definitive collections of her work. Her relationship to MoMA’s Department of Photography dates to her inclusion in its inaugural exhibition, in 1940 which was curated by the department’s director, Edward Steichen. Lange is a rare artist in that both Steichen and his successor, John Szarkowski, held her in equally high esteem. More than a generation after her first retrospective, organized by Szarkowski at MoMA in 1966, Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures uses both historical and contemporary words to encourage a more nuanced understanding of words and pictures in circulation.

The exhibition is accompanied by the catalogue Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures, capturing this renewed consideration of Lange’s work through the particular lens of its relationship to words. Contributors to the exhibition and the catalogue include artists and curators Julie Ault, Sam Contis (in collaboration with Tess Taylor), Sandy Phillips, Wendy Red Star, and Sally Mann; scholars and writers Kimberly Juanita Brown, Jennifer Greenhill, Christina Sharpe, Robert Slifkin, and Rebecca Solnit.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

The Museum Of Modern Art Announces Sur Moderno: Journeys Of Abstraction—The Patricia Phelps De Cisneros Gift

Major Exhibition at the Opening of New MoMA Will Display Over 100 Important Works by Latin American Artists

The Museum of Modern Art announces Sur moderno: Journeys of Abstraction―The Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Gift, a major exhibition drawn primarily from the paintings, sculptures, and works on paper donated to the Museum by the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros between 1997 and 2016.

Since its founding in 1929, The Museum of Modern Art has collected, exhibited, and studied the art of Latin America. Today, MoMA’s collection includes more than 5,000 works of modern and contemporary art by artists from Latin America distributed across its six curatorial departments, representing important figures in early modernism, Expressionism, Surrealism, abstraction, architecture, and Conceptual and contemporary art.

Alfredo Hlito (Argentine, 1923–1993). Ritmos cromáticos III (Chromatic Rhythms III), 1949. Oil on canvas, 39 3/8 × 39 3/8″ (100 × 100 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund

On view from October 21, 2019, through March 14, 2020, Sur moderno celebrates the arrival of the most important collection of abstract and concrete art from Latin America by dedicating an entire suite of galleries on the Museum’s third floor to the display of artists from Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina, and Uruguay.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988). Contra relevo no. 1 (Counter Relief no. 1). 1958. Synthetic polymer paint on wood, 55 1/2 × 55 1/2 × 1 5/16″ (141 × 141 × 3.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Promised gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund. Courtesy of “The World of Lygia Clark” Cultural Association

The exhibition highlights the work of Lygia Clark, Gego, Raúl Lozza, Hélio Oiticica, Jesús Rafael Soto, and Rhod Rothfuss, among others, focusing on the concept of transformation: a radical reinvention of the art object and a renewal of the social environment through art and design. The exhibition is also anchored by a selection of archival materials that situate the works within their local contexts. Sur moderno is organized by Inés Katzenstein, Curator of Latin American Art and Director of the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America, The Museum of Modern Art, and consulting curator María Amalia García, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET)–Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Argentina, with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

María Freire (Uruguayan, 1917–2015). Untitled. 1954. Oil on canvas, 36 1/4 × 48 1/16″ (92 × 122 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund in honor of Gabriel Pérez‑Barreiro

The exhibition is divided into two main sections based on the concept of transformation. The first section, “Artworks as Artifacts, Artworks as Manifestos,” presents a group of works that subverted the conventional formats of painting and sculpture. Cuts, folds, articulated objects, cut-out frames, and experiments that question the autonomy of the art object are some examples of these artists’ material explorations. One of the first works visitors encounter in the exhibition, Willys de Castro’s Active Object (1961), fuses the materiality of painting with the principles of free-standing sculpture, inviting the viewer to circle around a painted canvas. Another work in this section, Gyula Kosice’s Articulated Mobile Sculpture (1948), questions the grounds of traditional sculpture by combining strips of brass to create a movable structure that defies classification.

Hélio Oiticica (Brazilian, 1937–1980). Relevo neoconcreto (Neoconcrete Relief) 1960. Oil on wood, 37 7/8 × 51 1/4″ (96 × 130 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Gary Garrels. © Projeto Hélio Oiticica

The exhibition’s inclusion of Spatial Construction no. 12 (c. 1920) by Aleksandr Rodchenko highlights the influence of Russian Constructivism on South American art. Similarly, images of Piet Mondrian’s works were widely circulated and had a great impact on the development of abstraction in the region. His Broadway Boogie Woogie (1942–43), on view in the exhibition, inspired investigations of kineticism among artists such as Jesús Rafael Soto, whose Double Transparency (1956) is an attempt to transform the two-dimensionality of Mondrian’s painting into a three-dimensional experience.

Lygia Pape (Brazilian, 1927–2004). Untitled. 1956. Acrylic on wood, 13 3/4 × 13 3/4 × 3 1/8″ (35 × 35 × 8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund in honor of Sharon Rockefeller. Courtesy of Projeto Lygia Pape

In the second section, “Modern as Abstract,” the language of abstraction is displayed as both a product of and a catalyst for the transformation of the artists’ surroundings. The geometrical principles of abstract painting carried over into the everyday, where artists and architects recognized one another as allies, leading to a shared operation and set of ideals. Here, María Freire’s Untitled (1954), for example, is displayed alongside archival materials and works from MoMA’s Architecture and Design collection, in an exploration of public sculptural projects and furniture design.

The final part of the exhibition is dedicated to the grid, one of modern art’s central motifs of experimentation. Gego’s Square Reticularea 71/6 (1971) and Hélio Oiticica’s Painting 9 (1959) are two examples of works in the exhibition that approached the transformation and expansion of the rational grid in different ways. Oiticica disrupted the strict geometric system with his rhythmically arranged rectangles, while Gego warps and deconstructs the reticular structure.

Over the last 25 years, the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros has donated more than 200 works by Latin American artists to The Museum of Modern Art. In addition to those generous donations, in 2016 the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros established the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America at MoMA. The Institute’s programming includes fellowships for scholars, curators and artists, and an extended research initiative that contributes to a series of public programs hosted by the Museum, as well as symposia in Latin America, and publications in digital and printed format.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, with contributions from such prominent scholars in the field as María Amalia García, Irene V. Small, and Mónica Amor. The volume also includes a conversation between Patricia Phelps de Cisneros and MoMA director Glenn D. Lowry, and a dialogue between Inés Katzenstein, the Museum’s current curator of Latin American art, and Luis Pérez-Oramas, who, in addition to serving as MoMA’s Latin American art curator between 2003 and 2017, was one of the principal curators involved in the development of the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.

SPONSORSHIP:

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by Agnes Gund.

Additional support is provided by Adriana Cisneros de Griffin and Nicholas Griffin.

Leadership contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund, in support of the Museum’s collection and collection exhibitions, are generously provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley, 3 Eva and Glenn Dubin, The Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund, Alice and Tom Tisch, The David Rockefeller Council, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Anne Dias, Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., Kenneth C. Griffin, The Keith Haring Foundation, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, and Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro.

Major contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund are provided by the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, Clarissa Alcock and Edgar Bronfman, Jr., Agnes Gund, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

Sterling Vineyards Celebrates The 71st Emmy Awards As The Official Wine Of The 2019 Emmy Awards Season

For the fourth consecutive year, iconic Napa Valley winery Sterling Vineyards, known for its ‘Always Polished, Never Dull‘ lifestyle, returns to television’s most anticipated night as the Official Wine of the 71st Emmy® Awards Season.

Following the live telecast of the 71st Emmy Awards on Sunday evening, September 22, 2019, Sterling Vineyards will invite Emmy nominees, presenters and members of the Television Academy to toast with their award-winning wines at the Television Academy’s official after-party, the Governors Ball. The evening will feature a taste of the 2015 Sterling Vineyards Platinum Cabernet Sauvignon, launched to retailers across the country last November. The Cabernet, among the finest from Napa Valley, is the winery’s newest expression of the depth, precision and intensity that is unique to the region, a testament to the craftsmanship of winemaker Harry Hansen and the winery’s tradition of producing outstanding, varietally focused wines. Chosen by the Television Academy Governors Ball Committee to showcase with the night’s menu from acclaimed Chef Joachim Splichal and Patina Catering, Sterling Vineyards Platinum Cabernet Sauvignon will be served alongside the 2017 Sterling Vineyards Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay and 2016 Sterling Vineyards Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, paired with dishes including Paella Valenciana, Yellowfin Sashimi, Candy Striped Beet Poke, and Hand-Carved Grass-fed Tenderloin of Beef.

(PRNewsfoto/Sterling Vineyards)

Sterling Vineyards will also gift a special limited-edition, personalized bottle of the 2015 Sterling Vineyards Iridium Cabernet Sauvignon to each Emmy Award winner as they await their Emmy statuette in the Governors Ball Winner’s Circle. 2015 is just the second vintage of the winery’s premier luxury Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, named appropriately for one of the rarest elements on earth. Made in only the very best vintages with the finest and most intense expression of Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, Iridium is the pinnacle of winemaking perfection. Emmy winners who enter the Winner’s Circle will have the exclusive chance to enjoy a glass of this special wine, as they are invited to raise a glass while their Emmy statuettes are personalized.

Sterling Vineyards is honored to share in the recognition of television excellence and outstanding creative talent, and we look forward to toasting this year’s Emmys winners with these exceptional wines,” shares Senior Vice President of Marketing at Treasury Wine Estates, Brett Scallan. “This year in particular, marks the end of some of television’s most esteemed series such as Game of Thrones, Empire, Veep, and The Big Bang Theory, making the evening even more special and giving us all the more reason to raise a glass in their honor.”

The 71st Emmy Awards will telecast live on FOX from the Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday, September 22, 8:00 PM ET/5:00 PM PT. The Governors Ball will take place at the adjacent L.A. LIVE Event Deck immediately following the telecast.

Florida Has A New Orange: Tanqueray Announces The U.S. Release Of New Flavor Tanqueray Sevilla Orange

Inspired By The Warmth Of Seville Orange Groves, Tanqueray Sevilla Orange Offers Delicious, Bittersweet Flavor to The Signature TANQUERAY Four-times London Dry Gin

Tanqueray, widely-known as the world’s most celebrated gin, has released Tanqueray Sevilla Orange. Launched in select Florida markets this summer, the new flavor epitomizes sunshine in a glass with its bittersweet orange taste and warm hints of spice. Known for its iconic green bottle and red emblem, TANQUERAY London Dry Gin is one of the world’s most award-winning gins, with a portfolio that includes TANQUERAY London Dry Gin, TANQUERAY No. TEN Gin, TANQUERAY Rangpur Gin and TANQUERAY Sterling Vodka.

Tanqueray Sevilla Orange launches in Miami and Orlando.

Tanqueray Sevilla Orange is created by infusing the brand’s four-times distilled classic London Dry gin with the essence of orange. Tanqueray has been making world-class gin for over 185 years. Founder Charles Tanqueray had a pioneering spirit and an obsession with creating the world’s finest gin. In this pursuit, he sourced botanicals from all around the world and created over 300 recipes. Charles Tanqueray once captured the sun-soaked taste of Seville orange groves in a recipe during the nineteenth century. His archival recipe inspired the creation of this new liquid. Tanqueray Sevilla Orange is an ideal complement for bright, fresh cocktails like Negronis, Sevilla Orange Spritz, Sevilla Orange & Tonic and more.

Tanqueray Sevilla Orange unveils a Wynwood mural in celebration of launching in Miami and Orlando.

We are thrilled to introduce Tanqueray Sevilla Orange into the U.S. market just in time for summer. This vibrant flavor innovation is perfectly crafted for bartenders and consumers to enjoy at sundown and anytime in between,” said Christina Choi, Senior Vice President of Gin at DIAGEO North America. “We encourage them to enjoy and serve Sevilla Orange responsibly as we remind spirits drinkers that gin is officially in.”

To celebrate the launch and bring Tanqueray Sevilla Orange to life, the brand has unveiled a mural in Miami’s Wynwood Art District located at the corner of NW 5th Ave + NW 27th (2701 NW 5th Ave), encouraging consumers to take snapshots of the artwork and try Florida’s new orange. If you’re planning to check out Wynwood’s latest exhibit, Tanqueray invites you to stop by the local restaurants currently serving Tanqueray Sevilla Orange in the Wynwood neighbourhood: Beaker & Gray and Three. Tanqueray Sevilla Orange can also be enjoyed in Orlando at local bars Celine and Mathers.

Mural artist and Miami local Nicole Salgar said, “Working with Tanqueray Sevilla Orange was an exciting experience. Their team did a great job of capturing the Miami feel with this mural, and it was a very fun challenge for me to execute. The Wynwood Arts District is a perfect setting for this mural, as it is a Miami landmark of public art and culture!

First introduced in Europe in September 2018, Tanqueray Sevilla Orange is now available in one Liter bottles at select accounts in Orlando and Miami. 750ml bottles will also be available this October 2019.

The Glenlivet Continues to Set New Standards with the Release of a Dynamic New Expression: The Glenlivet 14 Year Old

The Glenlivet is breaking convention and encouraging consumers to rethink traditions within the single malt category with the release of a dynamic new expression: The Glenlivet 14 Year Old. Featuring sweet and fruity aromas, the newest liquid is the first in The Glenlivet portfolio to introduce single malt whisky selectively finished in high-quality ex-Cognac casks to the U.S. market.

The Glenlivet’s newest expression featuring the brand’s signature citrus notes and creamy smoothness, with a raisin-rich finish from select ex-Cognac casks, is now available exclusively in the U.S.

The Glenlivet 14 Year Old sees The Glenlivet’s iconic style of citrus and floral notes and creamy smoothness complemented by the sumptuous influence of select ex-Cognac casks, which include moist raisins, chocolate and licorice, to deliver a deep and intense experience. The new liquid is the latest step in the distillery’s quest to inspire and open up to a new generation of whisky drinkers through bold and unconventional flavor combinations and finishing techniques.

The Glenlivet 14 Year Old Bottle (PRNewsfoto/The Glenlivet)

With The Glenlivet 14 Year Old we’ve created something truly iconic that embodies our incredible legacy while putting a modern spin on single malt whisky that’s been selectively finished in former Cognac casks,” said Sona Bajaria, Vice President of Marketing, The Glenlivet, Pernod Ricard USA. “The Glenlivet brand is built on a passion for extraordinary products and 14 Year Old was created with that in mind. We are confident consumers will love this new liquid as much as we do.

The Glenlivet 14 Year Old will be exclusively available in the U.S. beginning in July 2019, where it will be a welcome addition to the thriving single malt Scotch whisky category and expand consumer choice as demand for new flavor profiles continues to grow.

We crafted The Glenlivet 14 Year Old with the curious single malt community in mind,” said Alan Winchester, The Glenlivet Master Distiller. “The beauty of the whisky lover is that their palate is always evolving, searching for the next flavor experience, and we’re proud to add this delicious aged single malt, with portions selectively finished in ex-cognac casks, to our portfolio. The blend of rich Cognac-cask flavor influences and our signature fruity, smooth style are guaranteed to captivate single malt drinkers looking to explore.

“Having spent time with whisky drinkers in the U.S., you can see the passion for original single malt innovation growing, and we’re confident The Glenlivet 14 Year Old will be a success with those looking to explore new flavor frontiers,” continued Winchester.

To sync with the bold, new color of The Glenlivet 14 Year Old’s packaging, The Glenlivet has teamed up with the Purple Heart Foundation to give back to those who serve by encouraging consumers to join them in raising a glass to service members.

For every bottle of The Glenlivet 14-Year-Old sold to participating retailers from now through December 31, 2019, The Glenlivet will donate $1 to The Purple Heart Foundation, with a minimum guaranteed donation of $50,000, up to $100,000.

The Glenlivet 14 Year Old will be available for an MSRP of $55 for 750ml and is the first The Glenlivet expression to launch since the brand unveiled a fresh new look and campaign earlier this year.

For more information on The Glenlivet 14 Year Old, www.theglenlivet.com/en-us/the-collection/14-year-old.