Philadelphia Museum of Art to Renovate and Update Chinese Galleries

Six Galleries to Close on April 11, 2018, Reopening in Early 2019

The Philadelphia Museum of Art will soon begin the first comprehensive renovation and reinstallation of its galleries of Chinese art in many decades. This initiative will enable its staff to reimagine the presentation of this important part of the Museum’s collection and interpret it in new ways for the benefit of visitors. This represents the next step in an ongoing series of reinstallations of the Museum’s collection that began with the Rodin Museum in 2012 and continued with the renovation of its galleries of South Asian art in 2016. Beginning April 11, 2018, six galleries in the wing of the Museum devoted to Asian art will close for approximately ten months and then re-open to the public in early 2019.

Philadelphia Museum of Art logo

Philadelphia Museum of Art logo

The Philadelphia Museum of Art houses one of the country’s earliest Chinese art collections, initially established through purchases made at the Centennial International Exhibition held in Philadelphia in 1876. Today it includes more than 7000 works in a wide range of media spanning more than 4000 years. Strengths include Tang dynasty (618–907) tomb figures, Song dynasty (960–1127) ceramics as well as Ming (1368–1644) and Qing dynasty (1644–1911) imperial art and Buddhist sculpture. The collection includes more than 500 paintings, dating from the 12th to the 20th centuries, as well as costumes and textiles, furniture, jades, lacquer wares, and cloisonné. It also features three remarkable architectural interiors: an early 15th-century coffered ceiling from an imperial Buddhist temple, a 17th century painted wood reception hall, and an 18th-century scholar’s study that provides context for the collection and an exceptional immersive experience.

Timothy Rub, The George D. Widener Director, and Chief Executive Officer, said: “This once-in-a-generation project follows the success of our new galleries of South Asian art, and is proceeding in tandem with the implementation of the next phase of our Facilities Master Plan. It will transform the experience of one of the most important, but still underappreciated parts of our collection. In addition to renovating these galleries, a step that is long overdue, this project will enable us to re-present and reinterpret our extensive holdings of Chinese art for the benefit of our visitors and will also serve as the basis for a new, purpose-built curriculum taught by our educators. These efforts will create relevance, deepen understanding, and renew our visitors’ appreciation for different cultures and artistic traditions around the world.”

A $2 million initiative, this project on the second floor of the main building will promote improved visitor engagement with Chinese art through the implementation of significant physical improvements, including new gallery furniture and the creation of better sight lines. Select windows will be enclosed, improving conditions for the display of light-sensitive textiles and paintings not previously exhibitable in these galleries, while new lighting will enhance the viewing experience. The Museum’s exhibition team is designing purpose-built casework, some equipped with internal lighting that will dramatically improve viewing clarity. These changes will allow for greater flexibility in the rotations of works of art, giving curators the opportunity to regularly refresh the installations and offering returning visitors new works to experience. The project will also benefit from a multi-year study of interpretation strategies, including the development of new learning resources and training, for teacher workshops and new school visits.


The reinstallation is led by project director Dr. Hiromi Kinoshita, The Hannah L. and J. Welles Henderson Associate Curator of Chinese Art, supported by staff specialized in Exhibition Design, Education, and Publishing. Dr. Kinoshita’s interpretive plan is arranged around key themes through which four thousand years of art can be understood. It will present a new comprehensive display of Chinese art in all media, including paintings, sculpture, porcelains, ceramics, carvings, metalwork, costume and textiles, furniture, and contemporary works. Continue reading


Cocktail Artist® Launches Seven New Mixologist-Crafted Cocktail Mixes and Bar Ingredients

After a year of driving growth in the cocktail mix category, Cocktail Artist expands its footprint to fifteen premium mixes and ingredients that inspire home bartenders everywhere to make the glass their canvas

Cocktail Artist®, an innovative brand of premium cocktail mixes and bar ingredients, celebrates its one-year anniversary this month with the release of seven new products, crafted by award-winning mixologists from across America and the Bahamas. Starting in March 2018, all fifteen Cocktail Artist mixes and bar ingredients, including seven new ones, will be available nationwide in Walmart stores, and shortly thereafter, in supermarket chains across the country.Cocktail_Artist_Logo

Cocktail Artist® is shaking up the cocktail mix category with fifteen essential mixes and bar ingredients that are designed in collaboration with award-winning mixologists, whose premium products help demystify the art of mixology, so anyone can mix perfectly balanced craft cocktails at home. After a year of driving growth in the cocktail mix category at one of the nation’s largest retailers, the Cocktail Artist family now touts 15 products, including category mainstays Margarita Mix and Bloody Mary Mix, available nationwide.

Cocktail Artist has invigorated the cocktail mix category with its high-quality standards: eliminating high fructose corn syrup and unnecessary artificial ingredients; using natural cane sugar and fruit juices; and developing perfectly balanced flavor profiles in collaboration with renowned mixologists and cocktail tastemakers. The mixes and ingredients are packaged in artfully designed bottles that elevate the aesthetic of any home bar, and are available at an accessible price point.


Cocktail Artist® Launches Seven New Mixologist-Crafted Cocktail Mixes and Bar Ingredients

The seven new Cocktail Artists and their curated mixes and bar ingredients include:

  • Skyy John (Los Angeles, CA; Host and Creator of Tipsy Bartender, top cocktail social media influencer with 27 million followers): Margarita Mix

I want to help people make delicious cocktails easily—and have fun with it,” said Skyy John. “My Cocktail Artist Margarita Mix is made with the very best ingredients, meaning there’s no high fructose corn syrup, just pure cane sugar and natural fruit juices. It’s so smooth that you can enjoy it on its own or with spirits, from tequila to rum or vodka. It is so versatile and perfectly balanced, you can’t beat it!

  • Carla Rivera (Miami, FL; Secretary of Miami’s Chapter of the United States Bartenders’ Guild; Top 15 Finalist at the Diageo World Class Cocktail Competition, 2014): Piña Colada Mix

Piña Colada was invented in Puerto Rico, and I like to tell people that while my ethnicity is Puerto Rican, my blood type is Piña Colada,” explained mixologist Carla Rivera. “My Cocktail Artist Piña Colada Mix is a great substitute for the classic recipe used at the Caribe Hilton Hotel in San Juan.” Continue reading

The 2018 James Beard Foundation Award Finalists is Announced

The James Beard Foundation has announced the finalists for its annual chef, restaurant, and media awards. Here is the full list. Winners will be announced at the annual gala on May 7 in Chicago.

Best New Restaurant
The Charter Oak, St. Helena, CA
Empellón Midtown, NYC
Felix Trattoria, Venice, CA
JuneBaby, Seattle
Kismet, Los Angeles

Outstanding Baker
Dianna Daoheung, Black Seed Bagels, NYC
Zachary Golper, Bien Cuit, Brooklyn, NY
Maura Kilpatrick, Sofra Bakery and Café, Cambridge, MA
Belinda Leong and Michel Suas, B. Patisserie, San Francisco
Alison Pray, Standard Baking Co., Portland, ME
Greg Wade, Publican Quality Bread, Chicago

Outstanding Bar Program
Anvil Bar & Refuge, Houston
Bar Agricole, San Francisco
Clyde Common, Portland, OR
Cure, New Orleans
Kimball House, Decatur, GA
Trick Dog, San Francisco

Outstanding Chef
Ashley Christensen, Poole’s Diner, Raleigh, NC
Gabrielle Hamilton, Prune, NYC
David Kinch, Manresa, Los Gatos, CA
Christopher Kostow, The Restaurant at Meadowood, St. Helena, CA
Donald Link, Herbsaint, New OrleansJBF_LOGO_PMS_SILVER

Outstanding Pastry Chef
Kelly Fields, Willa Jean, New Orleans
Meg Galus, Boka, Chicago
Margarita Manzke, République, Los Angeles
Dolester Miles, Highlands Bar & Grill, Birmingham, AL
Diane Yang, Spoon and Stable, Minneapolis

Outstanding Restaurant
Balthazar, NYC
Canlis, Seattle
Frasca Food and Wine, Boulder, CO
Highlands Bar & Grill, Birmingham, AL
Quince, San Francisco

Outstanding Restaurateur
Kevin Boehm and Rob Katz, Boka Restaurant Group, Chicago (BokaGT Fish & OysterGirl & the Goat, and others)
JoAnn Clevenger, Upperline, New Orleans
Continue reading

Acclaimed Cultural Festival ‘Taste of Iceland’ Returns to Boston March 8-11

Bostonians Can Immerse Themselves In Icelandic Culture During This Four-Day Festival Of Icelandic Food, Cocktails, Music, Film And Art.

Acclaimed Cultural Festival 'Taste of Iceland' Returns to Boston March 8-11

Acclaimed Cultural Festival ‘Taste of Iceland’ Returns to Boston March 8-11

Taste of Iceland, an annual festival that celebrates Iceland’s vibrant culture, returns to Boston with a series of events March 8-11, 2018. Over the past nine years, Taste of Iceland in Boston has featured some of the best names in Icelandic food, music, art and more. The four-day festival, presented by Iceland Naturally, gives Bostonians the chance to experience the country’s pure culture through a variety of (mostly free!) events.

Schedule of Events

March 8 -11: Icelandic Menu at Townsman

March 8 – 11: Icelandic Cocktail Menu at Beat Brasserie

March 9: Reykjavik Calling Concert at Paradise Rock Club (FREE)

March 10: Discussion of Iceland’s Thriving Design and Architectural Scene at BSA Space (FREE)

March 11: Icelandic Short Film Festival at The Brattle Theatre (FREE)

Event Details

Icelandic Menu at Townsman
March 8-11 | 5:30PM – Close | Townsman | 120 Kingston St., Boston, MA 02111
Icelanders are among the world’s healthiest, happiest and longest-living people – and many believe their pure, natural diet is the reason for this. From March 8-11, experience delicious Icelandic cuisine for yourself with a special Icelandic menu at Townsman. Icelandic chef
Georg Arnar Halldórsson will fly to Boston to collaborate with American chef Matt Jennings to create a prix fixe Icelandic dinner menu. Pair your meal with delicious Reyka Vodka and Brennivin cocktails crafted by Icelandic mixologist Teitur Ridderman Schiöth and Townsman’s Jon Ross. Reserve your seat for this unique dining experience on OpenTable. Click here to view the Facebook event.

Iceland Naturally Logo

Iceland Naturally Logo

Chef Halldórsson has won multiple culinary awards, including two silver medals and a bronze medal at the 2016 Culinary Olympics. Chef Jennings was named one of the 40 Under 40 Big Thinkers in the food industry by Food & Wine and was a finalist for James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef Northeast award numerous times.

Icelandic Cocktails at Beat Brasserie
March 8-11 | 4PM – 1AM | Beat Brasserie | 13 Brattle St., Cambridge, MA 02138
Experience traditional Icelandic cocktails with the Taste of Iceland cocktail menu at Beat Brasserie! Created and mixed by Brennivin cocktail champion Teitur Ridderman Schiöth and Beat Brasserie’s Doug Capozzoli, the unique cocktails feature famed Icelandic spirits Reyka Vodka and Brennivin. One of Iceland’s premier bartenders, Schiöth currently manages Pablo Discobar, a lively gathering place in Reykjavik. Capozzoli established himself as one of Boston’s best up and coming young bartenders while working in 5-star hotels before making the move to Beat Brasserie in 2015. Stop by Beat Brasserie March 8-11 to try these mouthwatering handcrafted cocktails! RSVP on Facebook.

Reykjavik Calling Concert at Paradise Rock Club
March 9 | Doors at 7PM, Show at 8PM | Paradise Rock Club | 967 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215
The free annual Reykjavik Calling concert, sponsored by
WERS, returns to Boston on Friday, March 9 – this time at Paradise Rock Club! One of Boston’s most anticipated international concerts of the year, 2018’s lineup features Icelandic artists JFDR, whose first, full-length album was co-produced by Laurie Anderson, Yoko Ono, and Tom Waits; and Sturla Atlas, one of Iceland’s most exciting new acts who will be playing his first U.S. show at Taste of Iceland in Boston. The Icelandic bands will be joined by Air Traffic Controller, a Boston-based indie pop band with an eclectic song catalog and category-defying organic/electronic sound. Admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis. Must be 18+. RSVP on Facebook.

Iceland Design Center Presents: ‘Iceland’s Thriving Design and Architectural Scene’ at BSA Space
March 10 | BSA Spaces Pearl Street Room | 12-2PM | 290 Congress St., Suite 200, Boston, MA 02210
Discuss the current state of design in Iceland and learn more about the country’s premier design event,
DesignMarch, at this luncheon. Participants will hear from Halla Helgadóttir, award-winning designer and Managing Director of the Iceland Design Centre, and enjoy food, drinks, and networking. This free event will look at how the designer-driven community in Iceland has enabled Icelandic design and architecture to emerge on the international stage and solidify its place in the world. Design and art lovers alike should RSVP on Facebook for this event; admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first served basis!

Shortfish: Iceland’s Premier Short Film Festival at the Brattle Theatre
March 11 | 1PM | The Brattle Theatre | 40 Brattle St., Cambridge, MA 02138
Enjoy an afternoon of Icelandic short films at The Brattle Theatre in Harvard Square. The screening will feature six short films from the 2017 Shortfish competition (the short film division of Iceland’s premier film festival, Stockfish). The program will run approximately 90 minutes. There are no age restrictions on these films, however, they are not recommended for children. Doors open at 12:30 p.m.; program starts at 1:00 p.m. Admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis. RSVP on Facebook.

Taste of Iceland in Boston is presented by Iceland Naturally in cooperation with, Blue Lagoon, Brennivin, Iceland Airwaves, IcelandairIcelandic GlacialIcelandic Provisions Promote Iceland, Ölgerðin Egill Skallagrímsson, Reyka Vodka, Visit Reykjavik, Beat Brasserie, The Brattle Theatre, BSA Space, Paradise Rock Club, Stockfish Film Festival, Townsman, WBUR, and WERS.

If all this talk about Iceland has you wanting to make your own trip to the land of fire and ice, Icelandair offers more nonstop flights from North America than ever before, including daily flights out of Boston-Logan. The airline’s updated fleet features more legroom, in-flight entertainment, and gate-to-gate Wi-Fi. Visit to book your flight today.

Iceland Naturally is a cooperative marketing organization that promotes the services, products, and culture of Iceland. Through events, promotions and online marketing initiatives, Iceland Naturally introduces Iceland’s creativity and natural wonders to North Americans. The group is comprised of Iceland’s top companies and organizations: Blue Lagoon, City of ReykjavikGovernment of Iceland, Icelandair, Icelandic Glacial Water, Icelandic Group, Icelandic Provisions, Keflavik International Airport, LandsvirkjunÖlgerðin Egill Skallagrímsson, Promote Iceland and Reyka Vodka.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Announces Schedule of Spring and Summer 2018 Exhibitions

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced the schedule of its upcoming spring and summer seasons. Highlights of the upcoming 2018 exhibition season are:

Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism

Exhibition Dates: January 17–July 15, 2018

Exhibition Location: Gallery 851

William Wegman, Before-After

William Wegman, Before/On/After (detail), 1972. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Vital Projects Fund Inc. Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, 2016. © William Wegman, Courtesy the artist

Opening at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on January 17, the exhibition Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism will survey Conceptual Art as it developed in Southern California in the 1970s. The show is occasioned by the artist William Wegman’s extraordinary recent gift to the Museum of 174 short videos that he made between 1970 and 1999—his entire career in the medium. A 90-minute selection of videos from this gift will be shown along with photographs and drawings by Wegman as well as drawings, prints, and photographs by his contemporaries in Southern California—John Baldessari, Vija Celmins, Douglas Huebler, Ed Ruscha, and others.

Wegman took up video while teaching painting at the University of Illinois in the mid-1960s. Like many artists using the then-new medium, Wegman appreciated video—like photography—for its lo-fi reproducibility and anti-artistic qualities. Also, unlike film, where the negative must be developed and processed before viewing, video was like a sketchbook that allowed revision in real time.

It wasn’t until Wegman moved to Southern California in 1970 that his video production took off. Although he lived in Los Angeles for only three years, the artist found his method: short, staged vignettes using everyday items in which expectations are reversed and puns and homonyms pursued to absurd conclusions.

The artist’s key early collaborator for most of these short videos was his dog, a Weimaraner called Man Ray, who enthusiastically participates in the goings-on. In contrast to other early adopters of video, Wegman eschewed an aesthetic of boredom to focus on humorous, improvised scenarios in which he deflated the pretensions of painting and sculpture while also lampooning the pieties and self-seriousness of Conceptual Art—at a time when it was being codified and institutionalized. Beneath the slacker humor, however, are poignant points about failure and the reversal of expectations that resonate with work by other West Coast Conceptualists—the friends and fellow travelers also featured in the exhibition.

Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism is organized by Doug Eklund, Curator in the Department of Photographs at The Met.

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris

Exhibition Dates: January 23–April 15, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue, Gallery 918, Lila Acheson Wallace Wing

Joseph Cornell (American, 1903–1972). Homage to Juan Gris, 1953–54.

Joseph Cornell (American, 1903-1972). Homage to Juan Gris, 1953-54. Box construction. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Purchased: John D. McIlhenny Fund. Art © The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

On October 22, 1953, Joseph Cornell wrote in his diary: “Juan Gris/Janis Yesterday.” He was referring to the previous day’s outing, when, on one of his frequent trips to the gallery district in midtown Manhattan, Cornell visited the Sidney Janis Gallery on East 57th Street. Among a presentation of approximately 30 works by modern artists, one alone captivated Cornell—Juan Gris’s celebrated collage The Man at the Café (1914), which is now a promised gift to the Museum as part of the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection.

This shadowy profile of a fedora-topped man immediately inspired Cornell to begin a new series: some 18 boxes, two collages and one sandtray created in homage to Juan Gris, whom he called a “warm fraternal spirit.”

When he began the Gris series in 1953, Cornell was an established artist, two decades into his career. His shadow box assemblages —a genre he is credited with pioneering—were exhibited regularly in major galleries and museums, and acquired by collectors and museums for their permanent collections. Cornell gathered his banal yet evocative materials during his forays in New York City or Long Island. His sources were many and varied; he made his assemblages from old journals and French history textbooks, postage stamps, fishing tackle, cordial glasses, clay pipes, and “flotsam and jetsam” to use his words. From these disparate fragments, Cornell wove together concepts, subjects, and lives that fascinated him. The complex network of references contained in each box often obscures, if not conceals, the artist’s intended theme or subject. For instance, in his Gris series, Cornell incorporated reproductions of Gris’s works into only one box, as well as in two collages and the one sandtray. Without these reproductions and the inscriptions Cornell made on some of the constructions, most of the works in his Gris series would be indistinguishable from those in his Aviary and Hotel series from around the same time – although for his homages to Gris he used the great white-crested cockatoo exclusively. Few viewers would have known about Cornell’s extensive notes found in his diaries and his Gris dossier, a working source file in which he stored materials for inspiration or later use. Cornell’s research on Gris included the acquisition of biographical publications and reviews on the Spanish-born artist, and he bolstered his knowledge of Gris and his art through conversations with artist friends such as Marcel Duchamp and Robert Motherwell.

In The Man at the Café, Gris worked in oil paint and pasted newsprint to present a mysterious male figure reading a newspaper, which obscures his face. The shapes of the man’s stylized fedora and its prominent black shadow cast against the café wall held a particular fascination for Cornell. For the central figure of his Gris series, Cornell selected a white cockatoo to contrast with the dramatic blacks, but he also embedded a reference to Gris’s shadow play and the fedora’s silhouette. Indeed, the bird, or its distinctive silhouette, appears in all but two of the boxes, with Cornell mimicking the relationship between positive and negative space by pasting the bird print to a wood cutout, outlining it, or echoing its contours with black paper.

Although Gris remained the initial catalyst for the series, Cornell also incorporated allusions to his own passions and pastimes as revealed in the foreign language texts, hotel advertisements, and maps. An aficionado of ballet and opera, Cornell attended performances in New York City and contributed illustrations to the Dance Index, a periodical edited by New York City Ballet co-founder Lincoln Kirstein in the 1940s. The white, feathered and tulle costumes of the principals dancing Swan Lake and La Sylphide reminded him of birds. Cornell was also enamored with the nineteenth century, the era of the romantic ballet and bel canto singing, and wove these birds of song and stage into the Gris series as well.

Completed over a period of 13 years, Cornell’s series of Gris shadow boxes is more extensive in number than any other that the artist openly dedicated to one of his admired luminaries of stage, screen, literature, or the visual arts. The main protagonist of Cornell’s Juan Gris series is a bird—the great white-crested cockatoo—specifically, an image taken from a 19th-century print of the species that Cornell repeatedly used along with Photostats or silhouettes of the bird’s form to explore the fascinating shadows that Gris produced in his own practice. At The Met, the exhibition Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris will reunite for the first time nearly a dozen boxes from Cornell’s Gris series together with the Cubist masterpiece, The Man at the Café.

The exhibition is made possible by the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust.

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris inaugurates a series of dossier exhibitions under the auspices of the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

As part of its mission to ensure the ongoing study of modern art with a particular focus on Cubism, the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center offers fellowships, lectures, and other programs to support new scholarship on the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection and other 20th-century art. Each dossier exhibition will be related to a work or group of works from the Collection. Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris and future projects in the series are intended to provide a deeper context for understanding Cubism, its protagonists, and greater influences, to contribute exceptional scholarship, and to offer a fresh approach to the subject of looking and thinking about modern art.

The exhibition is curated by Mary Clare McKinley, an independent art historian based in London and former Assistant Curator in the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A catalog, made possible by the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, accompanies the exhibition and contains a major essay, written by McKinley, and the first-ever documentary catalog of Cornell’s Gris series.

Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings

Exhibition Dates: January 30–May 13, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue, Floor 1, Gallery 746, The Erving and Joyce Wolf Gallery

Thomas Cole (American, 1801–1848). View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts,

Thomas Cole (American, 1801-1848). View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm-The Oxbow (detail), 1836. Oil on canvas, 51 1/2 x 76 in. (130.8 x 193 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1908

Met Museum to Explore Transatlantic Career of Renowned Painter Thomas Cole

Exhibition Marks 200th Anniversary of the Artist’s Arrival in America

Celebrated as one of America’s preeminent landscape painters, Thomas Cole (1801–1848) was born in northern England at the start of the Industrial Revolution, emigrated to the United States in his youth, and traveled extensively throughout England and Italy as a young artist. He returned to America to create some of his most ambitious works and inspire a new generation of American artists, launching a national school of landscape art. Opening January 30, the exhibition Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings will examine, for the first time, the artist’s transatlantic career and engagement with European art. With Cole’s masterwork The Oxbow (1836) as its centerpiece, the exhibition will feature more than three dozen examples of his large-scale landscape paintings, oil studies, and works on paper. Consummate paintings by Cole will be juxtaposed with works by European masters including J. M. W. Turner and John Constable, among others, highlighting the dialogue between American and European artists and establishing Cole as a major figure in 19th-century landscape art within a global context. The exhibition marks the 200th anniversary of Cole’s arrival in America.

The exhibition was organized by Elizabeth Kornhauser, the Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Painting and Sculpture at The Met, and Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University, with Chris Riopelle, Curator of Post-1800 Paintings at the National Gallery, London.

The exhibition follows the chronology of Cole’s life, beginning with his origins in recently industrialized northern England, his arrival in the United States in 1818, and his embrace of the American wilderness as a novel subject for landscape art of the New World. Early works by Cole will reveal his prodigious talent. After establishing himself as the premier landscape painter of the young United States, he traveled back to Europe.

The next section will explore in depth Cole’s return to England in 1829–31 and his travels in Italy in 1831–32, revealing the development of his artistic processes. He embraced the on-site landscape oil study and adopted elements of the European landscape tradition reaching back to Claude Lorrain. He learned from contemporary painters in England, including Turner, Constable, and John Martin, and furthered his studies in landscape and figure painting in Italy. By exploring this formative period in Cole’s life, the exhibition will offer a significant revision of existing accounts of his work, which have, until now, emphasized the American aspects of his formation and identity. The exhibition will also provide new interpretations of Cole’s work within the expanded contexts of the history of the British Empire, the rise of the United States, the Industrial Revolution, and the American wilderness, and Romantic theories of history.

Upon his return to America, Cole applied the lessons he had learned abroad to create the five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36). These works reveal a definition of the new American Sublime that comes to its fullest expression in The Oxbow (1836). Finally, the exhibition concludes with an examination of Cole’s legacy in the works of the next generation of American landscape painters whom Cole personally mentored, notably Asher B. Durand and Frederic E. Church.

Exhibition design is by Brian Butterfield, Senior Exhibition Designer; graphics are by Ria Roberts, Graphic Designer; and lighting is by Clint Ross Coller and Richard Lichte, Lighting Design Managers, all of The Met Design Department. After the presentation at The Met, the exhibition will be shown at The National Gallery, London (June 11–October 7, 2018).

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalog suitable for both scholars and the general public. With new information on Cole’s life and revisionist interpretations of his major work, the publication will also feature research by The Met’s conservation team into Cole’s methods as a painter, illuminating this previously neglected area. The catalog will be available for purchase in The Met Store (hardcover, $65). The catalog is made possible by the William Cullen Bryant Fellows of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A series of Education programs will complement the exhibition. MetLiveArts will feature a 40-minute acoustic performance by Sting in the Museum’s Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium on April 24, 25, and 26 (7:30 p.m.). Prior to each concert, ticket holders will enjoy a special viewing of the exhibition with curators Elizabeth Kornhauser and Tim Barringer. The April 24 performance of “Sting: Atlantic Crossings” is for Members only. Tickets will be available for purchase in early 2018.

On April 8 (2 p.m.), as part of MetSpeaks, American artist Ed Ruscha will discuss his seminal five-part Course of Empire series (1992 and 2003–5) with his friend, the author, and artist Tom McCarthy, who resides in London. Tickets for this event will be available for purchase.

Met curator Elizabeth Kornhauser and paintings conservator Dorothy Mahon will explore Cole’s work methods and techniques with artist Stephen Hannock on February 7 (6:00 p.m.), revealing the layers of meaning in Cole’s iconic painting, The Oxbow. This program is part of the Conversations With… series.

Elizabeth Kornhauser will moderate a Sunday at The Met discussion on April 15 (2 p.m.) on Cole’s role as a proto-environmental artist with scholars Alan Braddock and Rebecca Bedell and artist Michel Auder. (Auder’s 2017 work The Course of Empire was shown at the Documenta exhibition in Kassel, Germany.) These programs are free with Museum admission.

In a Gallery Performance on April 27 (6:00 p.m.), exhibition co-curator Tim Barringer will explore the musical and literary references that inspired Cole. This program is free with Museum admission, advance registration is required.

Education programs are made possible in part by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund and The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts.

The exhibition, organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The National Gallery, London, is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation, White & Case LLP, the Enterprise Holdings Endowment, and the Terra Foundation for American Art. It is also supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve

Exhibition Dates: February 6–May 27, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Breuer, Floor 2

Leon Golub (American, 1922–2004). Gigantomachy II (detail), 1966

Leon Golub (American, 1922-2004). Gigantomachy II (detail), 1966. Acrylic on linen, 9 ft. 11 1/2 in. x 24 ft. 10 1/2 in. (303.5 x 758.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts and Stephen, Philip, and Paul Golub, 2016 (2016.696). © The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Opening February 6, 2018 at The Met Breuer, Leon Golub: Raw Nerve will present a selective survey of this groundbreaking artist’s work. Timed to celebrate the 2016 gift to The Met of the monumental painting Gigantomachy II (1966) from The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts and Stephen, Philip, and Paul Golub, the exhibition will present highlights from Golub’s long, eminent career, drawn from distinguished private collections as well as the artist’s estate. Golub’s unflinching portrayals of power and brutality have profound relevance today, as does his belief in the ethical responsibility of the artist.

Born in Chicago, Golub (1922-2004) occupies a singular position in the history of mid to late 20th-century art. His devotion to the figure, his embrace of expressionism, his amalgamation of modern and classical sources, and his commitment to social justice distinguish his practice as an artist. The centerpiece of Leon Golub: Raw Nerve is Gigantomachy II, a commanding, epic work measuring nearly 10 by 25 feet. Created in 1966, two years after Golub joined the Artists and Writers Protest Group and began to lobby actively against the Vietnam War, this political allegory recounts the story of a mythic battle between the Olympian gods and a race of giants. In Golub’s contemporary retelling, there are no heroes, only anonymous men in various states of distress, their bodies riven by scars and wounds. Alongside this powerful and terrifying work, Leon Golub: Raw Nerve will feature paintings from all of the artist’s most important series, including Pylon, White Squad, Riot, and Horsing Around. These will be accompanied by a 1970 painting of a victim of the Vietnam War, as well as a suite of early paintings that reflect Golub’s study of antiquity, and a group of unsettling portraits of the Brazilian dictator Ernesto Geisel. Also on view will be works on paper that represent subjects of longstanding interest to the artist, from mercenaries, interrogators, and the victims of violence to political figures, nudes, and animals, all of them rendered in the raw, visceral style for which he is justly celebrated. Taken together, the works in Leon Golub: Raw Nerve, which spans the entire arc of Golub’s career, attest to his incisive perspective on the catastrophes that afflict human civilization as well as his critique of violence and belligerent masculinity.

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve is organized by Kelly Baum, Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Curator of Contemporary Art in The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. Continue reading

The Peninsula Hong Kong Celebrates The Holiday Spirit Of Giving With The Trees Of Hope Campaign And Special Events To Bring Seasonal Cheer For All Families

Timeless traditions, festive dining, and a special charitable initiative create unforgettable memories for guests at The Peninsula Hong Kong

The Peninsula Hong Kong will shares the festive spirit with guests and local residents during the holiday season with memorable Yuletide events that celebrate the joy of giving and raise funds for Make-A-Wish® Hong Kong. The Peninsula Hotels’ annual Trees of Hope fundraising campaign is now in its 14th year across all hotels and has raised more than US$ 1.5 million since its launch in Hong Kong in 2003.


The Peninsula Hong Kong logo

Trees Of Hope

For the 14th consecutive year, The Peninsula Hong Kong will participate in The Peninsula Hotels’ worldwide charity program, Trees of Hope. Guests who stay in or visit the hotel will have the chance to purchase a SnowPage custom-crafted glass tree ornament, priced at HK$ 150 each, and a SnowPage plush toy, priced at HK$ 200, with the proceeds going directly to Make-A-Wish® Hong Kong’s program, which makes dreams come true for children with life-threatening medical conditions.

Timeless traditions, festive dining and a special charitable initiative create unforgettable memories for guests at The Peninsula Hong Kong

Timeless traditions, festive dining and a special charitable initiative create unforgettable memories for guests at The Peninsula Hong Kong

Guests will also receive a SnowPage gingerbread cookie with every ornament purchased and will have the option of hanging the ornament on the hotel’s Christmas trees as a symbol of hope or taking it home as a souvenir. For every classic SnowPage plush toy and ornament sold, HK$ 100 will be donated to Make-A-Wish® Hong Kong.

The festive season is a time for good cheer and generosity, and both are in abundant supply this year at The Peninsula Hong Kong. To celebrate the spirit of giving this Christmas, the city’s timeless Grande Dame presents a series of programs and special offers throughout the hotel that are sure to put guests in the holiday mood while helping create a brighter future for those who are less fortunate.

The Trees of Hope fundraising campaign will also extend to The Peninsula’s restaurants, which will offer special promotions that include donations to the charitable enterprise.

In the hotel’s legendary Lobby, the much-loved tradition of Afternoon Tea will be given a festive makeover as the “Teas of Hope” Classic Afternoon Tea. Available from 1 to 21 December and 27 to 30 December 2017, the set is priced at HK$ 368* per person and HK$ 658 for two and includes an ornament. For each tea set sold, 20% will be donated to Make-A-Wish®.

*subject to 10% service charge

Six special cocktails created for the festive season will be available throughout December in the hotel’s various restaurants and bars. These “Cocktails of Hope” are the ideal pick-me-up for winter evenings, and include:

  • Warming Glühwein (HK$ 150*), red wine, port, bay leaf, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, orange, and lemon
  • Iced Glühwein (HK$ 120*), grape juice, cranberry juice, bay leaf, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, ginger, orange, and lemon
  • Egg Nog (HK$ 150*), brandy, dark rum, milk, coffee cream, egg, and nutmeg
  • Winter’s Ginger (HK$ 150*), Hedonist liqueur, gin, peach puree, white peach syrup and ginger
  • Tropic Cider (HK$ 150*), aged rum, pineapple juice, cherry blossom syrup, fresh lime juice and orange
  • Lemongrass Elixir (HK$ 120*), lemongrass, agave nectar, grapefruit juice and butter

Available in all The Peninsula’s outlets (except the American Bar at Felix), 100% of each cocktail sold will be donated to Make-A-Wish®. Continue reading

Toast To 2018 At The Peninsula New York’s Rooftop New Year’s Eve Gala At Salon De Ning

Grab a glass of champagne and toast to 2018 high above the city lights of Fifth Avenue at The Peninsula New York’s first Rooftop New Year’s Eve Gala, taking place at Salon de Ning rooftop bar and terrace. This glamorous event will see the property’s Salon de Ning transformed into a chic sky-lit penthouse complete with live music, delicious eats, entertainment and dancing, as both the East and West Terraces are enclosed and heated under translucent marquees.1510073027-925c0c2051589fd218c3816db3509a6f

A Manhattan favorite, Salon de Ning is inspired by the fictitious tale of Madame Ning, a celebrated Shanghai socialite, avid world traveler and international hostess who presided over “salons” in her stylish and eclectic residences around the world, making her friends and guests feel at home in a warm and welcoming environment. Boasting the most spectacular views of the glittering New York skyline and its streets below, Salon de Ning makes for the ideal rooftop venue to ring in 2018 beneath the city lights.

Following a red-carpet arrival through a private entrance leading directly to Salon de Ning, guests will be greeted with Champagne and be given an exclusive key with a hashtag for entry, as they then pass through an iridescent photo tunnel which will send a text directly to a guest’s phone with the image. From there, guests will enter an express elevator up to Salon de Ning.

Upon entry and resembling a luxe speakeasy, the West Terrace will welcome guests with crisp couches, vast velvet curtains, dancing and live music from the imaginative French duo Jul & Co, performing their signature mix of multi-instrumental DJ skills to set a unique and eclectic vibe. An exclusive VIP section for 20 people is available for purchase for $20,000, which includes five bottles of Cristal champagne, a lavish caviar setup, a rare bottle of the Balvenie 30-Year-Old Vintage Single Malt Scotch Whisky and all-night bottle service to ring in not just New Year’s Eve, but mark the start of the hotel’s 30th Anniversary year, taking place in 2018.

On the East Terrace, two full-service bars and a range of dining stations and passed plates will excite guests, along with a performance by The Chip Shop Boys, regarded as the UK’s best rock and pop cover band to dance the night away. Behind them, a video wall with a live feed of New York City’s iconic Times Square ball drop will be broadcast at the stroke of midnight, kicking off 2018 along with a confetti drop, more dancing, drinks and posh late-night bites.

The two atmospheres will meet in Salon de Ning’s interior bar, which will host a decadent tequila-pairing bar complemented with a live sushi station and raw bar for guests to enjoy, as a range of curious performers dazzles through the space. Additional eats include an Asian street food station, taco bar, and post-midnight dessert graffiti station.

The Salon de Ning Rooftop New Year’s Eve Gala will take place from 9:00pm to 2:00am and is priced at $725, not including tax and gratuity. Attire is black tie optional. For reservations, please call 212-903-3051 or email