Canada’s New Museum of Modern Art, Remai Modern, Announces Full Artist Lineup

Inaugural program features world’s largest collection of Picasso linocuts, artist-led projects, immersive installations, and modern and contemporary art from Canada and the world

Canada’s museum of modern art, Remai Modern, has announced the full list of artists participating in its inaugural exhibition, Field Guide, which debuts during October 21, 2017, the opening of the direction-setting museum in Saskatoon.

Remai Modern Logo

Remai Modern Logo

Curated by Executive Director & CEO, Gregory Burke, and Director of Programs & Chief Curator, Sandra Guimarães, Field Guide will feature contemporary projects, commissions and immersive installations by nearly 80 renowned Canadian and international artists — many of whom are showing in Canada for the first time. The building-wide exhibition will create a dialogue between these works and a selection from Remai Modern’s permanent collection.

Remai Modern

Canada’s newest home for modern and contemporary art, Remai Modern opens October 21st, which was recently completed by renowned Canadian architect Bruce Kuwabara of KPMB Architects. Photo Credi: Adrien Williams

The breadth of artists we’ve brought together for our inaugural exhibition, Field Guide, is quite expansive and diverse,” said Burke. “With works from leading American artists like John Baldessari, Christopher Williams, Lawrence Weiner and Pae White, prominent international artists including Walid Raad, Rosemarie Trockel, Haegue Yang and Philippe Parreno, as well as renowned Canadian artists such as Stan Douglas and Ian Wallace and locals like Bob Boyer, Eli Bornstein and Kara Uzelman, we’ve produced a program that introduces Remai Modern’s philosophy and direction. On one hand, Field Guide points to a field of relations impacting on the development of art and its current agency. On the other, the exhibition articulates a spirit of active engagement, curiosity, and disruption that begins to enact Remai Modern‘s vision and its responsibilities going forward.

Field Guide rethinks the idea of “modern” from multiple cultural, geographic, historic and contemporary perspectives. Legacies are an important component, and the history of the Mendel Art Gallery, from which Remai Modern inherited a collection of nearly 8,000 works, acts as a formative nucleus. Civic engagement, progressive politics, and the unique history of abstraction—fostered by Saskatchewan’s Emma Lake Artists’ Workshops—are explored through their enduring influence. Field Guide also signals a new chapter, debuting many key acquisitions reflecting the aspirations and future growth of the collection.

Several previously announced commissioned projects anchor the exhibition,” said Guimarães. These include a new “Presence and Production” work by Thomas Hirschhorn titled, What I can learn from you. What you can learn from me. (Critical Workshop); a collaborative installation and discursive event by Tanya Lukin Linklater and Duane Linklater, Determined by the river; and Faces of Picasso: The collection selected by Ryan Gander, the first showing of Remai Modern‘s collection of Picasso linocut prints, the most comprehensive in the world. Continue reading

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The Whitney to Present First U.S. Retrospective of Jimmie Durham

The Whitney Museum of American Art will host the first North American retrospective of artist, performer, poet, essayist, and activist Jimmie Durham (b. 1940), one of the most compelling and multifaceted figures working internationally today. On view from November 3, 2017, to January 28, 2018, Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World features approximately 120 works from 1970 to the present, including sculpture, drawing, collage, printmaking, photography, and video.

Jimmie Durham

Jimmie Durham, Self-Portrait Pretending to Be a Stone Statue of Myself, 2006. Color photograph. Edition of 1 + 1 AP. 31 ¾ × 24 in. (80.7 × 60.9 cm). Collection of fluid archives, Karlsruhe. Courtesy of ZKM Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe.

Durham has, over the past nearly five decades, produced wryly political art, often raising questions about authenticity and making visible the ongoing repercussions of colonialism, both within the U.S. and globally. Frequently working with a combination of natural and found materials, he approaches his subjects with a poetic wit and a potent blend of irony and insight.

The Whitney is delighted to present the work of Jimmie Durham, who has made a singular contribution to contemporary art since the 1970s,” said Adam D. Weinberg, the Whitney’s Alice Pratt Brown Director. “This retrospective provides an opportunity for audiences to gain a deeper understanding of Durham’s expansive practice, or perhaps to discover him for the first time. We are grateful to the Hammer Museum, in particular to director Ann Philbin and curator Anne Ellegood, for organizing this long-overdue retrospective.”

Jimmie Durham was born in 1940 in Houston, Texas, and raised in southwestern Arkansas. In the late 1960s, he enrolled at the École des Beaux-Arts in Geneva, where he worked primarily in performance and sculpture. At this time, he formed an organization called Incomindios, with Indigenous friends from South America, which attempted to coordinate and encourage support for the struggle of Indigenous people throughout the Americas. A lifelong activist, he returned to the U.S. at the end of 1973 during the occupation at Wounded Knee, in South Dakota, and became a full-time organizer for the American Indian Movement (AIM); he would become a member of their Central Council in 1974. That same year AIM established the International Indian Treaty Council (IITC) and appointed Durham the executive director. Durham relocated to New York City to run the IITC and become the representative of American Indians to the United Nations.

Durham resigned from AIM in 1979 and returned to a focus on art making. He was the director of the Foundation for the Community of Artists in New York from 1981 to 1983 and edited their monthly Art and Artists Newspaper (formerly Artworkers News) from 1982 to 1985. In 1987, Durham moved to Cuernavaca, Mexico, and then in 1994 to Europe, where he has lived in Dublin, Brussels, Marseille, Rome, Berlin, and Naples. Since leaving the U.S., Durham has immersed himself in the culture and history of each adopted home, drawing on the local language, materials, and architecture to reframe his larger political, historical, and philosophical questions. Throughout his travels, he has dryly declared wherever he happens to be—from Mexico City to Berlin to Naples—the “center of the world.

Whitney curator Elisabeth Sussman, who is installing the exhibition at the Whitney together with assistant curator Laura Phipps, noted, “Although Jimmie Durham has lived as an expatriate for decades, his work has remained connected to crucial developments in American art, such as found-object assemblage, appropriation of text and image, institutional critique, performance art, and the politics of representation. This is Durham’s first substantial solo show in the United States in twenty-two years and it’s a rare chance to celebrate his extraordinary accomplishments as an artist and to revel in his wit, his fascination with language, and his remarkable use of materials.

This exhibition, as it has traveled from its previous venues at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, has revived debates, dating back to the early 1990s, over the artist’s claims of Cherokee ancestry. Durham is not recognized as a citizen by any of the Cherokee tribes, which as sovereign nations determine their own membership. Recent discussions of this point have prompted a wider audience to confront important questions regarding tribal sovereignty, and what it means—or does not mean—for an artist to self-identify as being Native American. This exhibition does not attempt to resolve these questions. Rather it contends that Durham’s work—with its singular and vital critique of Western systems of knowledge and power—offers a crucial perspective on the history of American art and life.

Jimmie Durham: At the Center of the World was organized by the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, and curated by Anne Ellegood, senior curator, with MacKenzie Stevens, curatorial assistant. It traveled to the Walker Art Center prior to coming to the Whitney, where its installation is being overseen by Elisabeth Sussman, curator and Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography, and assistant curator Laura Phipps. Following the Whitney, the exhibition will travel to the Remai Modern in Saskatoon.

Durham’s exhibition history spans several decades and continents. Recent solo exhibitions include God’s Children, God’s Poems (Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich, 2017); Here at the Center (Neue Berliner Kunstverein, Berlin, 2015); Venice: Objects, Work and Tourism (Fondazione Querini Stampalia, Venice, 2015); and Various Items and Complaints (Serpentine Gallery, London, 2015). Group shows include Take It or Leave It: Institution, Image, Ideology (Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, 2014) and Documenta (2012), among many others. A retrospective of his work—A Matter of Life and Death and Singing—was organized by the Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst, Antwerp (2012), and a survey of his work from 1994 forward, Pierres rejetées, took place at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (2009).

Durham’s works are included in major public collections around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York; the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Tate Modern, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; the Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst, Antwerp; the Stedelijk Museum voor Actuele Kunst, Ghent; the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; and the Museo Jumex, Mexico City.

Durham’s work is also part of The Whitney’s permanent collection. Self Portrait was included in the Museum’s inaugural show in its downtown home in 2015, America is Hard to See, and in the 1998 exhibition Art at the End of the Century: Selections from the Whitney Museum of American Art, as well as in the exhibition The American Century: Art and Culture 1900-2000 (Part II). His work also appeared at the Whitney in the 1993 Biennial, the 2006 Biennial, and the 2014 Biennial. Durham has also co-curated a number of exhibitions, including Ni’ Go Tlunh A Doh Ka (We Are Always Turning Around On Purpose) at the Amelie A. Wallace Gallery, State University of New York Old Westbury, Long Island, New York, in 1986 (co-curated with Jean Fisher); We The People at Artists Space, New York, in 1987 (co-curated with Jean Fisher; special advisors Edgar Heap of Birds and G. Peter Jemison); and The American West, at Compton Verney in Warwickshire, England, in 2005 (co-curated with Richard W. Hill).

An avid essayist and poet, Durham has published many texts in journals such as Artforum, Art Journal, and Third Text. His book of poems, Columbus Day, was published in 1983 by West End Press, Minneapolis. A book of his collected essays, A Certain Lack of Coherence, was published in 1993 by Kala Press. In 2013, Jimmie Durham: Waiting to Be Interrupted, Selected Writings 1993-2012 was published by Mousse Publishing and Museum van Hedendaagse Kunst, Antwerp, and his book of poetry Poems That Do Not Go Together was published by Edition Hansjörg Maye. Continue reading

Christie’s Education Launches Courses New Learning Online Platform in October

Available in English, Arabic, and Mandarin

Immerse yourself in the art world, wherever you are.

This October Christie’s Education will launch new Online Courses, that will make the study of art history and the art market more accessible to students around the world. The digital platform will become Christie’s Education’s third pillar of learning, joining the Continuing Education programs and Master’s degrees as routes to gain a deeper understanding of the art world, whether to further careers, enhance knowledge, or explore passions. Online learning programs will be available from within a dedicated web-based platform, providing weekly lectures enhanced with immersive video content with behind-the-scenes insight into the world’s leading auction house, and online classroom interaction with tutors.

Christie’s Education, a wholly owned subsidiary of the world’s leading art business, imagesChristie’s, is an international postgraduate institution devoted to preparing graduates for entry into the art world through the advanced study of the art business, art world practice and the acquisition of connoisseurship skills. By offering Master’s degrees in London and New York, students are immersed in all areas of the art world, focusing on business analysis, object-based study, history of art, art market studies, supported by rigorous professional development courses. All Master’s degrees have an integrated work placement at Christie’s auction house as an accredited part of these programs.

Christie’s Education online courses provide a fully immersive experience of the art world. Christie’s Education also offers also offer a vast range of continuing education opportunities in London, New York, and Hong Kong, designed to introduce enthusiasts to the fundamentals of art and the art market.

We are pleased to launch our new online course to a global audience,” said Guillaume Cerutti, Chief Executive Officer, Christie’s. “As the appreciation and appetite for art have grown around the world, there has been increasing interest and demand for understanding the industry and cultural context for collecting. As a wholly-owned subsidiary, Christie’s Education is an important part of our operations and this new, digital course will complement our existing, international programs. It is significant we are launching this during our events in Shanghai and recognizes that education is a vibrant part of our programs in the region. Continue reading

Art News: The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994

STEPHEN BARKER, “The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994”

Exhibition dates: September 14 – October 28, 2017

Daniel Cooney Fine Art (508-526 West 26th Street, Suite 9C, New York, NY 10001, 212 255 8158. dan@danielcooneyfineart.com. Hours: Wednesday – Saturday 11 – 6) is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of photographs, “The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994“, by renowned photographer Stephen Barker. The exhibit will showcase approximately 15 never before seen black and white photographic portraits of AIDS activists – in the studio and at home – taken by Barker during his time working within the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) 1991-1994, and Barker’s unique artist’s book Funeral March, which chronicles the carrying of Mark Fisher’s body in an open coffin from Judson Church, up Sixth Avenue, to the steps of the Republican National Committee on the eve of the presidential election in 1992.

Rod Sorge (1969-1999) ACT UP Needle Exchange, 1991

Rod Sorge (1969-1999) ACT UP Needle Exchange, 1991

Barker became involved with ACT UP in the late 80s working primarily with the needle exchange program. The photographs were never intended as an encyclopedic project, but rather the portraits evolved organically out of Barker’s working relationships, friendships, and intimacies. The exhibition is especially timely during this 30th anniversary year of ACT UP when once again all underserved communities, including those living with HIV/AIDS, are threatened by our own government. It is a call to arms for activism and a reminder of the distance we have traveled and battles we have won.

Stephen Barker, 'Gay Wachman, ACT UP Needle Exchange,' 1992, Gelatin Silver Print

Stephen Barker, ‘Gay Wachman, ACT UP Needle Exchange,’ 1992, Gelatin Silver Print

Continue reading

New-York Historical Society To Present Unprecedented Exhibition On The History Of The Vietnam War

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975, On View October 4, 2017 – April 22, 2018

One of the major turning points of the 20th century, the Vietnam War will be the subject of an unprecedented exhibition presented by the New-York Historical Society from October 4, 2017April 22, 2018. Bringing the hotly contested history of this struggle into the realm of public display as never before, the exhibition will offer a chronological and thematic narrative of the conflict from 1945 through 1975 as told through more than 300 artifacts, photographs, artworks, documents, and interactive digital media.

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American infantrymen crowd into a mud-filled bomb crater and look up at tall jungle trees seeking out Viet Cong snipers firing at them during a battle in Phuoc Vinh, north-northeast of Saigon in Vietnam’s War Zone D, June 15, 1967. Henri Huet / Associated Press

Objects on display will range from a Jeep used at Tan Son Nhut Air Base to a copy of the Pentagon Papers; from posters and bumper stickers both opposing and supporting the U.S. war effort to personal items left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC; from indelible news photographs (such as Eddie Adams’ Execution) to specially commissioned murals by contemporary artist Matt Huynh. While no gallery exhibition can provide a comprehensive, global perspective on this vast subject, the materials brought together in The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 will comprise a sweeping and immersive narrative, exploring, from a primarily American viewpoint, how this pivotal struggle was experienced both on the war front and on the home front. The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 was curated by Marci Reaven, New-York Historical Society vice president for history exhibitions.

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Interior of the USNS General Nelson M. Walker. Courtesy of Art and Lee Beltrone, Vietnam Graffiti Project, Keswick, VA. American servicemen initially traveled to Vietnam aboard WWII-era troop ships like the General Nelson M. Walker. Nearly 5,000 Marines and G.I.s crowded the Walker on each three-week voyage from Oakland, California to Danang or Qui Nhon, South Vietnam.

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 signals a new ambition for the New-York Historical Society, which is to include in our exhibition program histories that are not only difficult but also as yet unresolved,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president, and CEO of New-York Historical. “This monumental exhibit challenges received wisdom about the origins and consequences of the War, relying on sources only recently made available to scholars as well as first person accounts of those who fought. As the exhibition shows, the War continues to provoke debate and discussion today and to dominate much of our thinking about military conduct and policy. The Vietnam War was the longest armed conflict of the 20th century, and today—more than 40 years after it ended―it continues to influence both public policy and personal convictions. We are grateful for the opportunity to offer the public a chance to better understand events and protagonists of the 20th century that reverberate well into the 21st.

Exhibition Overview

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 sets the scene for the coming conflict through a display in an introductory gallery, where texts and materials about the onset of the Cold War document how the U.S. and its allies began to maneuver against the Communist bloc in regional confrontations after World War II while avoiding head-on engagement between the nuclear powers. Objects on view include a series of oil paintings by Chesley Bonestell imagining the destruction of New York City by Soviet atomic bombs and a newsreel from 1950 making the case for U.S. military action in Korea.

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Men of the 173rd Airborne Brigade on a search and destroy patrol after receiving supplies, 1966. National Archives at College Park, MD. The primary mission of U.S. forces was to destroy the enemy and their logistical network. American ground troops operated throughout South Vietnam, supported by naval and air campaigns. They defended the DMZ, pursued units in the hills along the Central Coast, combed through Viet Cong base areas in the Iron Triangle, and ranged across the upper Mekong Delta as part of an Army-Navy mobile riverine force.

The exhibition then takes up the story of Vietnam by recalling the successful struggle of the Communist-nationalist coalition Viet Minh to force France to abandon its claim to Vietnam, then part of the French colony known as Indochina. Archival footage from a CBS News broadcast illustrates the “domino theory” put forward by the Eisenhower administration in support of its desire to halt the spread of Communism in Asia, a mindset which contributed to the partitioning of Vietnam into North and South. Among the objects representing the experiences of the North Vietnamese and southern insurgents are a 1962 painting by the Hanoi-based artist Tran Huu Chat and a bicycle of the sort used by North Vietnamese forces for transport of arms along the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Also on view is a scale model of the USS Maddox, one of the destroyers involved in the Gulf of Tonkin encounter with North Vietnamese forces in August 1964, which gave the Johnson Administration grounds for seeking Congressional authorization to increase U.S. military operations without a declaration of war.

On July 28, 1965, President Johnson spoke to the nation on TV to explain that it was up to America to protect South Vietnam and fight communism in Asia and that to be driven from the field would imperil U.S. power, security, and credibility. He also announced a dramatic escalation in the military draft.

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Draft card. Courtesy of Joseph Corrigan, C Troop, 2nd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, Dak To, Vietnam 1967–68. President Johnson’s order to send more troops to Vietnam affected all men between the ages of 18 and 26. Registration for military service was compulsory. The Selective Service called up only the men needed while excusing the rest through deferments. Twenty-seven million American men were of draft age during the war. Forty percent served in the military, and about 2.5 million went to Vietnam.

Objects on view, like an original draft card, and displays will address various responses to the draft, which affected all men between the ages of 18 and 26. Archival footage of Johnson’s address announcing the doubling of the draft will be shown. Artifacts, such as graffiti created by soldiers on their canvas berths, from the troopship General Walker, which ferried draftees during the three-week voyage to Vietnam, will demonstrate the personal side of soldiers as they headed toward war.

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Detail. Tran Huu Chat, Spring in Tay Nguyen, 1962 and 2016. Lacquer engraving. New-York Historical Society. Hanoi art student Tran Huu Chat received high marks in 1962 for his lacquer engraving that depicted Ho Chi Minh and the Viet Minh organizing among the people to depose the French colonialists. Fellow Vietnamese would have understood that the artist was using the heroism of the Viet Minh to symbolically refer to the National Liberation Front, organized in 1960 to oppose the Diem regime and its U.S. backers. The original artwork hangs in Hanoi’s Vietnam National Museum of Fine Arts. The 84-year-old Tran Huu Chat made an exact reproduction for this exhibition.

With this escalation of U.S. military involvement, the exhibition moves into a section that examines the conduct of the war and its repercussions both in the field and among American civilians. Two large, illustrated murals by noted artist and illustrator Matt Huynh, titled War Front and Home Front, depict key aspects of the years 1966 and 1967. War Front depicts the four combat zones in South Vietnam to show differing types of combat and highlight significant moments and battlegrounds. Home Front illustrates activity in the United States, including the Spring Mobilization, the largest antiwar demonstration to that date in American history, in which hundreds of thousands marched through midtown Manhattan on April 15, 1967.

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71st Evacuation Hospital patch belonging to Barbara Chiminello (left) and 57th Medical Detachment patch belonging to Thomas Chiminello (right). Courtesy of Barbara, Philip, and Eugene Chiminello. Siblings Thomas and Barbara Chiminello served alongside one another in Vietnam—Tommy as a Medevac helicopter pilot and Barbara as a nurse. These are their unit patches. In October 1967, Barbara received devastating news. Tommy and his crew had all been killed while responding to an urgent evacuation request.

The mural also shows a pro-war demonstration from May 1967 and other scenes of the war’s impact on national life. Interactive kiosks placed next to both murals bring them to life, allowing visitors to explore the events depicted through videos and photographs. Notable objects displayed in this section include a poster of a woman fighter in support of the southern insurgents, recreated by Tran Thi Van; helmets worn by U.S. and South Vietnamese government soldiers, dog tags, military patches, and field implements; letters from soldiers to their loved ones back home; a condolence letter on the death of a son; period magazines; posters and buttons both demanding an end to the war and urging support for the military effort; and a recording of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s April 1967 speech against the war. Continue reading

Gaetano Pesce Art Exhibition at The Peninsula Chicago

Aligning With Expo Chicago, The Peninsula Chicago Announces An Exhibition Celebrating Artist, Architect And Designer Gaetano Pesce Curated by Salon 94 Design

The Peninsula Chicago presents an exclusive art exhibition with works created by impresario artist, architect, and designer Gaetano Pesce. Curated by Salon 94 Design, the exhibition entitled, What it is to be Human,” aligns with the sixth annual EXPO CHICAGO, the International Exposition of Contemporary & Modern Art, taking place at Navy Pier, September 13 to 17, 2017, and the Chicago Architecture Biennial September 16 to January 7, 2018. The collection is open to the public and displayed in the hotel, September 11 to October 9, 2017.

Palladio Cabinet

Gaetano Pesce, Palladio Cabinet, 2007. Photo by Jeff Elstone

With this exhibition, The Peninsula Hotels is continuing its support of innovative public art around the world, by partnering with museums, galleries, and private collectors so guests may enjoy pioneering works by established masters and emerging artists. Each hotel has committed to supporting the arts and art-related Peninsula Academy programs.The Peninsula Chicago Logo

The exhibit title explains how Gaetano’s art connects with humanity, showcasing joy in each piece: featuring 20 objects including: Ritratto dell’ Uomo Centento Cabinet, 2016; Palladio Cabinet, 2007; two versions of Rug Wall Lamp, 2017; Friend Lamp, 2014; What it is to be human chandelier, 2012; Lake Table, 2012; Ricordo della Gamba Sinistra (Skin), 2015; Ritratto di quello che non guarda…o almeno così sembra (Skin), 2015; a selection of Tree Vases, 2015-2017; and ‘Donna’ chair 1969, on loan from Luminaire—an armchair and pouf—a metaphor of the female figure and whimsically comes with a ball and chain. All objects are available for purchase.

Gaetano Pesce's Rug Wall Lamps, 2017

Gaetano Pesce, Rug Wall Lamps, 2017

Maria Razumich-Zec, Regional Vice President and General Manager of The Peninsula Chicago says, “Known for celebrating thoughtful art within the hotel, it is our honor to display Mr. Pesce’s works that provoke thought, emotion and dialogue.”

We are extremely grateful for our partnership with The Peninsula Chicago as both our Official Hotel Sponsor and their ongoing commitment to presenting international artworks to the Chicago community,” said EXPO CHICAGO President | Director Tony Karman. “Gaetano Pesce is an internationally respected artist and this is a not-to-be-missed exhibition.”

Expo Chicago 2017 logo

Expo Chicago 2017 logo

“The work of iconic designer Gaetano Pesce, at The Peninsula Chicago, highlights Salon 94 Design’s focus on radical design. Gaetano’s 50-year career is centered around experimenting with materials and technologies. Featured are his papier-mâche and resin tree vases, recalling the Tuscan landscape of his youth, alongside his explosive sculptural sconces,” said Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, owner of Salon 94 Design. Continue reading

The Whitney To Present Myth Astray: A Project By Arto Lindsay

Contributors include Júlio Bressane, Barbara Browning, Gustavo di Dalva, Christopher Dunn, and Pedro Meira Monteiro

Brazilian-American artist and experimental composer Arto Lindsay will present MYTH ASTRAY, a series of talks, screenings, and musical performances at the Whitney Museum of Modern Art from September 7 to 10.

On the occasion of the current Whitney exhibitions Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium and Calder: Hypermobility, MYTH ASTRAY brings together a multidisciplinary group of artists and scholars to explore the themes of Oiticica’s work and life. Lindsay kicks off the project with the debut of a site-specific installation and a ticketed solo performance on Thursday evening, September 7, in the Museum’s Susan and John Hess Theater. He returns on Saturday, September 9, to perform with the noisemakers and instrument-like objects made by Alexander Calder that were inspired by his travels to Brazil in the late 1940s.

Miguel Rio Branco, Babylonests, 1971. Digital projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy of César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Miguel Rio Branco, Babylonests, 1971. Digital projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy of César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Three seminal films by Júlio Bressane, an influential member of Brazil’s Cinema Marginal movement of the late 1960s/early 1970s, screen throughout the weekend. Matou a Família e Foi ao Cinema (1969), O Anjo Nasceu (1969), and Cuidado Madame (1970) are among the films to be shown.

Speakers include award-winning novelist, dancer, and cultural critic Barbara Browning and scholars of Brazilian studies Christopher Dunn and Pedro Meira Monteiro. Brazilian percussionist Gustavo di Dalva—who has performed and recorded with some of Brazil’s preeminent musicians, including Gilberto Gil, Milton Nascimento, and Caetano Veloso—performs throughout the weekend.

The program will explore Tropicália, Samba, and the Brazilian avant-garde, focusing on the aesthetic and political movements of Brazil that were central to Oiticica’s practice and the period he spent in New York in the 1970s, where he was stimulated by the art, music, poetry, and theater scenes.

A complete schedule of events is noted below. Programs and screenings on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday are free with Museum admission. For more information, visit whitney.org.

SCHEDULE

All events will take place in the Museum’s Susan and John Hess Family Theater, Floor 3.

Thursday, September 7

8 pm: Arto Lindsay in Concert

Tickets are required ($25 adults; $18 members, students and seniors). Capacity is limited, and all tickets are standing room only. Visitors are encouraged to purchase tickets in advance.

Friday, September 8

  • 3 pm: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 4 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s O Anjo Nasceu, 1969 (90 min)
  • 6 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 7:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 8:30 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning

Saturday, September 9

  • 12 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning
  • 2 pm: Performance of Alexander Calder’s noisemakers
  • 3 pm: Performance of Alexander Calder’s noisemakers
  • 4:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 5 pm: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 6 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 6:30 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 8:30 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s Film Cuidado Madame, 1970 (70 min)

Sunday, September 10

  • 11 am: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 12 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning
  • 1 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 1:30 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 2:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 4 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s Film Matou a Família e Foi ao Cinema, 1969 (90 min)

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium is organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; and the Art Institute of Chicago. Support for the national tour of this exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. In New York, major support is provided by The Whitney’s National Committee. Continue reading