The Los Angeles LGBT Center Receives $10,000 Grant From The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation in Partnership with Macy’s

The Los Angeles LGBT Center has been awarded a grant for $10,000 from The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) in partnership with Macy’s to fund an HIV prevention program tailored for LGBT youth. The grant will be used by the Center’s Sexual Health and Education Program, which provides cutting-edge HIV prevention care that includes rapid HIV antibody testing, ultra-sensitive PCR/DNA HIV testing, comprehensive Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) testing and STI treatment, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and more.

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The Los Angeles LGBT Center

The Center is honored to be recognized by ETAF for its unique work in the community. Since 1969 the Los Angeles LGBT Center has cared for, championed and celebrated LGBT individuals and families in Los Angeles and beyond. Today the Center’s nearly 600 employees provide services for more LGBT people than any other organization in the world, offering programs, services, and global advocacy that span four broad categories: Health, Social Services and Housing, Culture and Education, Leadership and Advocacy. The organization is an unstoppable force in the fight against bigotry and the struggle to build a better world; a world in which LGBT people can be healthy, equal and complete members of society.

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The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) logo

The late Dame Elizabeth Taylor established The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation (ETAF) in 1991 to support organizations delivering direct care and services to people living with HIV and AIDS, especially the most marginalized communities. Today, ETAF also provides grants for innovative HIV prevention education and advocacy programs to existing organizations around the world. With aagrd8rrkey domestic advocacy funding focuses on comprehensive sexual health education and HIV criminalization reform, ETAF continues to bring the marginalized to the center of attention and advocate for their rights. The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation has granted to more than 675 organizations in 44 countries and nearly all 50 states in the U.S.

The work that the Los Angeles LGBT Center does to help people affected by HIV/AIDS is impressive and very much aligned with Elizabeth Taylor’s passionate commitment to the cause,” said Joel Goldman, Managing Director of The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation. “ETAF and our partners at Macy’s are thrilled to present the Los Angeles LGBT Center with these funds to help further our shared mission.”macys-logo

Through their Cause Marketing Program, Macy’s recognizes their responsibility to the community and their concern for the needs of their neighbors. They are proud to partner with ETAF and have contributed to this grant.

Immigrant Contributions To American Society Recognized With 2017 Vilcek Prizes

Visual Artist Nari Ward And Biophysicists Lily And Yuh-Nung Jan Receive $100,000 Vilcek Prizes

Winners Of Vilcek Prizes For Creative Promise Each Receive $50,000 Awards

The Vilcek Foundation is pleased to announce the winners of the annual Vilcek Prizes, recognizing outstanding immigrant contributions to the American arts and sciences. The Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science will be awarded jointly to Chinese-born Lily and Yuh-Nung Jan, a collaborative research duo and professors of molecular physiology at the University of California, San Francisco. The Vilcek Prize in the Arts recognizes Jamaican-born Nari Ward, a New York-based visual artist known for found-object assemblage art. Each prize includes a $100,000 cash award. The prizewinners were selected by panels of experts in each field; they will be honored at an awards gala in New York City in April 2017.1083773.jpg

Like all great artists and scientists, these immigrant prizewinners challenge our very perceptions of the world,” said Rick Kinsel, president of the Vilcek Foundation. “Their works are attempts to understand fundamental questions and concepts in American society, from the neurological underpinnings of the self to the institution of democracy.”vilcek_logo_black_xsmall

The Vilcek Foundation was established in 2000 by Jan and Marica Vilcek, immigrants from the former Czechoslovakia. The mission of the foundation, to honor the contributions of immigrants to the United States and to foster an appreciation of the arts and sciences, was inspired by the couple’s respective careers in biomedical science and art history, as well as their personal experiences and appreciation for the opportunities they received as newcomers to this country. The foundation awards annual prizes to prominent immigrant biomedical scientists and artists and manages the Vilcek Foundation Art Collections, a promised gift from its founders.

This year, the Vilcek Prize in the Arts is awarded in the fine arts, marking the completion of an 11-year cycle through various disciplines in the arts and humanities. The recipient, Nari Ward, was born in Jamaica and immigrated to the U.S. at the age of 12. He is known for found-object assemblage artworks that invite both a public conversation and an intimate dialogue with the viewer around topics of race, immigration, and the Caribbean diaspora identity. His usage of found objects aims to highlight the history of a place and the urgency of the moment; his installation Naturalization Drawing Table features a large desk—built out of Plexiglas bodega barriers—covered with dense linear drawings made over copies of Immigration and Naturalization Service applications. On select days during the exhibition, viewers are invited to “apply” for naturalization by lining up and filling out an application, giving them a taste of the bureaucratic process of applying for citizenship. Ward has won several prestigious art prizes, including the Joyce Award, the Rome Prize, a Bessie Award, and several other awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation.

Lily and Yuh-Nung Jan were both born in China and raised in Taiwan. They came to the U.S. as graduate students of physics at the California Institute of Technology but switched their focus to biology, in part inspired by their mentor, the renowned biophysicist Max Delbrück. Over the course of a collaborative career spanning over four decades, the husband-and-wife team has made many significant discoveries in the field of neuroscience, with far-reaching clinical implications. They isolated the gene encoding a protein that shuttles potassium ions across cell membranes, enabling the characterization of a molecular player important to functions as vital as maintaining heart rate and controlling muscle movement. Today, this type of ion channel is implicated in diseases such as epilepsy, ataxia, and hypertension. Simultaneously, the Jans identified genes and principles underlying the processes by which neurons acquire distinct identities, burgeon into thickets, and establish precise circuits; their work in this area may help unravel human diseases such as autism and schizophrenia. Currently, professors of molecular physiology at the University of California, San Francisco, the Jans have been honored with membership in the United States National Academy of Sciences, as well as with Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator awards.

The Vilcek Foundation also awards the Vilcek Prizes for Creative Promise, given to younger immigrants who have shown substantial talent and ability early in their careers. Each prize includes a $50,000 cash award. The winners in the fine arts are the following:

Iman Issa, born in Egypt, a conceptual artist, creates objects and installations in an attempt to address complex philosophical questions. Her original area of study was phenomenology, a branch of philosophy that examines the structures of consciousness that organize subjective experience—or, put another way, how we take meaning from things we individually experience. Later, Issa realized that art allowed for nuanced exploration of those topics, and continued her philosophical questioning through art. She is particularly interested in monuments and memorials—aesthetic forms tasked with a function that holds a shifting relevance based on their location in time and relationship to history. Her work has been shown at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the 8th Berlin Biennial, and the New Museum, and she has received the DAAD 2017 Artist in Residence Award, the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award, and the HNF-MACBA Award.

Meleko Mokgosi, born in Botswana, is a slow, considered painter; behind every painting he produces are hours of research, reading, and conversations with people. Mokgosi is interested in depictions of Africa and its people; he believes that the widespread misrepresentation of Africa and Africans has done a violence to the people of the continent, and through his art he attempts a representation that is fair and just. He is deeply concerned with politics and seeks to understand and illuminate the relations of power that shape people, families, villages, regions, and nations. Mokgosi has been named the recipient of the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters Grant and the Jarl and Pamela Mohn Award, and he has shown his work at Art Basel, the Armory, the Hammer Museum, and the Whitney Museum. Continue reading

For The Cure: Carson Kressley, Victor Cruz, Bill Nye And More Participate In First Ever Blue Jacket Fashion Show To Benefit The Prostate Cancer Foundation

Mario Cantone, Don Lemon, Ian Mellencamp, Thom Browne, Joseph Abboud, John Varvatos And Others Participate In National Awareness Campaign

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Celebrities, media, and influencers gather at Pier 59 Studios as the inaugural Blue Jacket Fashion Show is set to begin

Yesterday, the inaugural Blue Jacket Fashion Show took place at Pier 59 Studios as part of New York Men’s Fashion Week. In partnership with Johnson & Johnson, the Blue Jacket Fashion Show benefited the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF), founded by philanthropist and financier Michael Milken.bluejacket_745x510-jpg-676x373

The Blue Jacket Fashion Show is the kick-off event for The Blue Jacket Initiative founded by Frederick Anderson and Laura Miller (Anderson/Miller) and is a national awareness campaign designed to demystify and create a platform to openly discuss men’s cancer issues. Anderson/ Miller is a marketing and promotion agency based in New York City.

The Show brought together the fashion, entertainment, sports, healthcare, and media worlds around a national platform to openly discuss men’s cancer issues, with an emphasis on prostate cancer. Coinciding with February’s Cancer Prevention Month and New York Men’s Fashion Week, the Show included participation from designers such as John Varvatos, Nick Graham, Joseph Abboud, Nicole Miller, Proper Cloth, Stephen F, Maggie Norris, Theory, Gustavo Moscoso, Craft Atlantic, Rag and Bone, Thom Browne and Haspel who used their creative talents to “reinvent” the traditional blue blazer.

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Backstage at Pier59 Studios before the inaugural Blue Jacket Fashion Show, held in partnership with Johnson & Johnson to benefit the Prostate Cancer Foundation

Those walking the runway wearing one-of-a-kind blue jackets included models, actors, athletes, members of the media and business titans. Among those who walked are: actor Mario Cantone, musician and model Ian Mellencamp, New York Giants Wide Receiver Victor Cruz, TV personality Carson Kressley, science educator and host of the forthcoming Netflix series Bill Nye Saves the World Bill Nye, New York Yankees Pitcher CC Sabathia, New York Post’s Richard Johnson, model Alex Lundqvist, and CNN Anchor Don Lemon. Following the show, all of the specially designed jackets modeled were included in a live auction, with proceeds going to the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

According to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, statistics show that prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in America. It affects everyone out of eight men at some point in their lifetimes. Every 3.3 minutes a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, and millions of men and their families are fighting this disease on any given day across the globe.

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Joaquin Duato, Worldwide Chairman, Pharmaceuticals, Johnson & Johnson and Carson Kressley at the Blue Jacket Fashion Show benefiting the Prostate Cancer Foundation

Continue reading

The Go Red For Women™ Red Dress Collection Fashion Show Returns to New York Fashion Week

The American Heart Association Go Red For Women™ Red Dress Collection 2017 Fashion Show Presented By Macy’s Merges Entertainment, Media And Fashion As Celebrities Raise Awareness Of Heart Disease And Stroke In Women

Celebrities on the runway include: Adrienne Bailon, Jessie James Decker, Diane Guerrero, Jazz Jennings, Juliette Lewis, Rachel Platten, and Laurie Hernandez

The American Heart Association announced that the Go Red For Women™ Red Dress Collection (Fashion Show) 2017 presented by Macy’s will return to New York Fashion Week at the Hammerstein Ballroom on Thursday, February 9, 2017. The fashion show is slated to feature 19 celebrities in gowns by top fashion designers. Founded by NHLBI’s The Heart Truth®, the event reminds women of the need to protect their heart health. The show begins at 8 p.m. ET, along with a Facebook Live on Go Red For Women‘s Facebook page.gored_logo

Cardiovascular diseases cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. However, 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. The most important action: know your numbers. Knowing the most critical numbers for your heart health including Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Blood Sugar, and Body Mass Index (BMI) could save your life. Go Red For Women and Macy’s are encouraging all women to learn their personal health numbers. Your heart might depend on it.macys-logo

Macy’s, the founding national sponsor of Go Red For Women, is the presenting sponsor of the annual Go Red For Women Red Dress Collection. To date, Macy’s has raised more than $60 million through the generosity and commitment of Macy’s associates and customers, which has helped to directly fund women’s heart health research and education.

Walking in this year’s Go Red For Women’s Red Dress Collection presented by Macy’s are: Adrienne Bailon (co-host, The Real); Bonnie Somerville (Code Black); CCH Pounder (NCIS: New Orleans, Sons of Anarchy); Diane Guerrero (Orange is the New Black, Jane the Virgin); Jazz Jennings (activist/I am Jazz); Jeannie Mai (co-host, The Real); Jessie James Decker (singer/designer/reality star); Juliette Lewis (Secrets and Lies); Lauren Holly (Motive); Laurie Hernandez (Olympic Gymnast); Lea Thompson (Switched at Birth, Back to the Future); Lorraine Toussaint (Orange is the New Black); Lucy Lawless (Zena: Warrior Princess, Parks & Recreation); Lynn Whitfield (Greenleaf); Maureen McCormick (Dancing with the Stars); Peyton List (Jessie); Rachel Platten (singer); Stephanie March (Law & Order SVU); and Veronica Webb (model).

The Go Red For Women Red Dress Collection 2017 presented by Macy’s will feature three looks from designers in the not-for-profit, independently-run Fashion Incubator Programs housed at Macy’s: Masha Titievsky from the Chicago Fashion Incubator, Bethany Meuleners from Fashion Incubator San Francisco, and Amanda Casarez from the D.C. Fashion Incubator. Wearing these designs will be Lorraine Toussaint in VARYFORM by Masha Titievsky, CCH Pounder in Bethany Meuleners, and Veronica Webb in Amanda Casarez.

This year, for the first time ever, heart disease survivors will be walking alongside the celebrities. Last year, Macy’s took its commitment to women’s health to the next level by holding a nationwide employee associate casting call to identify five associates from Macy’s stores who’ve been personally impacted by heart disease. Odilia Cristabel Flores from New York City, a Senior Manager in Macy’s Social Compliance Department, and AHA Real Woman Nicole Hardy from Scarborough, Maine will be hitting the runway to raise awareness for a cause they know all too well.

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During the month of February, Macy’s offers customers additional ways to support this worthy cause through merchandise that gives back, including this limited-edition red dress by Calvin Klein (above, $134.00).

We are grateful to all of the celebrities and survivors walking in this year’s Go Red For Women Red Dress Collection for inspiring women world-wide to prioritize their heart health and make ‘Know Your Numbers’ actionable,” said Nancy Brown, Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association. “The American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement is honored to be a part of New York Fashion Week with Macy’s, to shine a bright light on women’s heart disease, both on and off the runway.” Continue reading

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention Announces National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day 2017, February 7

African Americans are the racial/ethnic group most affected by HIV in the United States. Gay and bisexual men account for more than half of estimated new HIV diagnoses among African Americans. The number of HIV diagnoses among African American women has declined, though it is still high compared to women of other races/ethnicities.nbhaad-social-images-instagram

February 7 is National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NBHAAD). The theme for NBHAAD, I Am My Brother’s and Sister’s Keeper: Fight HIV/AIDS, emphasizes the role that everyone can play in HIV prevention.

Coordinated by the Strategic Leadership Council, National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is observed each year on February 7 to increase HIV education, testing, community involvement, and treatment among black communities.nhbaad-get-educated-640x640

Compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the United States, blacks/African Americans* have a disproportionate burden of HIV and AIDS. While blacks represent approximately 12% of the US population, they account for more new HIV diagnoses (44%) and people living with HIV (41%) than any other racial/ethnic group. Among all blacks, black gay and bisexual men account for the majority of new infections. Young black gay and bisexual men are especially affected.nhbaad-get-involved-640x640

HIV and AIDS Diagnoses b

  • In 2014, 44% (19,540) of estimated new HIV diagnoses in the United States were among African Americans, who comprise 12% of the US population.
  • Among all African Americans diagnosed with HIV in 2014, an estimated 73% (14,305) were men and 26% (5,128) were women.
  • Among all African Americans diagnosed with HIV in 2014, an estimated 57% (11,201) were gay or bisexual men.c Of those gay and bisexual men, 39% (4,321) were young men aged 13 to 24.
  • From 2005 to 2014, the number of new HIV diagnoses among African American women fell 42%, though it is still high compared to women of other races/ethnicities. In 2014, an estimated 1,350 Hispanic/Latino women and 1,483 white women were diagnosed with HIV, compared to 5,128 African American women.nhbaad-get-tested-640x640
  • From 2005 to 2014, the number of new HIV diagnoses among African American gay and bisexual men increased 22%. But that number stabilized in recent years, increasing less than 1% since 2010.
  • From 2005 to 2014, the number of new HIV diagnoses among young African American gay and bisexual men (aged 13 to 24) increased 87%. But that trend has leveled off recently, with the number declining 2% since 2010.
  • In 2014, an estimated 48% (10,045) of those diagnosed with AIDS in the United States were African Americans. By the end of 2014, 42% (504,354) of those ever diagnosed with AIDS were African Americans.nhbaad-get-treated-640x640

Living With HIV and Deaths Continue reading

Macy’s Goes Red for Heart Health This February in Support of the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women™

Macy’s will go red for women’s heart health again this February in honor of American Heart Month. As the founding national sponsor of the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement, Macy’s will offer limited-edition merchandise and promotions to benefit Go Red For Women. Since 2004, Macy’s customers and associates have raised $60 million to support the fight against heart disease in women, and over that time, 293 more lives have been saved every day from heart disease and stroke, according to the American Heart Association.

Go Red For Women is the American Heart Association‘s national movement to end heart disease and stroke in women. Cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. kill approximately one woman every 80 seconds. The good news is that 80 percent of cardiac events may be prevented with education and lifestyle changes. Go Red For Women advocates for more research and swifter action for women’s heart health. The American Heart Association‘s Go Red For Women movement is nationally sponsored by Macy’s, with additional support from additional cause supporters.GRFW_CMYK_2CS

GO RED WITH MACY’S: Cardiovascular diseases kill nearly one in three women each year, but 80 percent of cardiac and stroke events may be prevented with education and action. That is why Macy’s encourages customers and associates to band together to prevent and fight cardiovascular diseases by participating in Go Red with Macy’s from Wednesday, Feb. 1 to Monday, Feb. 6. Customers can wear red or purchase the Official Red Dress Pin for $3 to receive 25 percent off on a great selection of items storewide, plus 15 percent off select home, fine and fashion jewelry, and sale and clearance watches. (Exclusions and restrictions apply.) One hundred percent of the pin sales will benefit Go Red For Women. Macy’s associates will also be wearing red in-store to create further awareness for the pin sale and celebrate National Wear Red Day on Feb. 3.

MERCHANDISE THAT GIVES BACK: During the month of February, Macy’s offers customers additional ways to support this worthy cause through merchandise that gives back, including three limited-edition red dresses by Kensie ($99.00), Thalia ($89.50) and Calvin Klein ($134.00). For all three styles, 10 percent of the purchase price from Feb. 1 through Feb. 28 will be donated to Go Red For Women. To go red and get fit in style, Macy’s also offers exclusive Ideology active wear, which includes four graphic t-shirts where 10 percent of the purchase price will be donated to Go Red For Women. The dresses and active wear will be available in most stores and online at www.macys.com/GoRed.

GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEONS: Go Red For Women Luncheons will take place in 186 cities across the country, raising much-needed funds for the cause. Luncheon guests will receive a $10 Macy’s gift card, and guests of select luncheons will be eligible to win a $250 Macy’s gift card. At select luncheons, Estée Lauder will also have an activation for guests featuring a free lipstick when guests return to any Macy’s store.

THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION’S® GO RED FOR WOMEN® RED DRESS COLLECTION™, PRESENTED BY MACY’S: Macy’s is, once again, the presenting sponsor of the American Heart Association’s® Go Red For Women® Red Dress Collection™, which has kicked off New York Fashion Week since 2003, in support of women’s heart health. The Red Dress Collection will be unveiled on Thursday, Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. at The Hammerstein Ballroom in New York City. This year’s runway show will feature inspiring and powerful female celebrities who will walk the runway to showcase emerging and established designers. Three of the red dresses featured on the runway will be created by designers in Fashion Incubator Programs, which are housed at Macy’s locations and develop the next generation of fashion trendsetters. The designers-in-residence featured are Amanda Casarez from DC Fashion Incubator, Bethany Meuleners from Fashion Incubator San Francisco and Masha Titievsky from Chicago Fashion Incubator. Continue reading

HIV & AIDS in the United States Update: World AIDS Day Letter

The following letter was released by Dr. Jonathan H. Mermin and Dr. Eugene McCray of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention in celebration of World AIDS Day 2016.cdc-logo

December 1 is World AIDS Day, a day to unite in the fight against HIV, support people living with HIV, and honor those who have lost their life. This year’s theme, Leadership. Commitment. Impact., asks each of us to strengthen our commitment to stop HIV using the most up-to-date, evidence-based HIV interventions, prevention tools, and testing options available. In 2015, 39,513 people received a diagnosis of HIV, and over 1.2 million people are living with HIV in the United States.

Recent trends in HIV diagnoses show some promising signs of progress. From 2010 to 2014, the annual number of HIV diagnoses in the United States declined by 9%, driven doingit-vertical-adam-shankmanby declines among heterosexuals and people who inject drugs (PWID). Diagnoses stabilized among gay and bisexual men overall, though trends varied by age, race and ethnicity. African Americans and Latinos continue to be disproportionally affected by HIV, compared with other races and ethnicities.

Despite gains in HIV prevention among PWID, the prescription opioid epidemic and increases in heroin use may threaten this success. PWID are at high risk for HIV and viral hepatitis if they share injection equipment. Today, we have options to help ensure that all PWID have access to prevention services. According to a new edition of CDC’s Vital Signs, released this week,

  • PWID account for 9% of HIV diagnoses in the United States, though they make up only 0.3% of the population.
  • Last year, only 1 in 4 PWID (in 22 US cities) got all their syringes from sterile sources such as syringe services programs (SSPs) and pharmacies.
  • SSPs that are comprehensive not only provide PWID with better access to sterile injection equipment, but also medication-assisted treatment for substance use disorder, HIV and hepatitis testing, and other HIV prevention options like condoms, behavioral interventions, and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP, a daily pill that can prevent HIV).

States and local communities now have the opportunity to use federal funds under some circumstances to support SSPs. CDC guidance is available for partners interested in implementing SSPs, where permitted by local law.

On World AIDS Day and every day, [the] CDC is dedicated to reducing new HIV infections among all populations and improving health outcomes for those who are living with HIV. Current activities include

  • Awards of at least $330 million each year since 2012 ($343.7 million in 2015) to health departments to direct resources to the populations and geographic areas of greatest need and prioritize the HIV prevention strategies that will have the greatest impact.
  • The Capacity Building Assistance for High-Impact HIV Prevention national program that provides training and technical assistance for health departments, community-based organizations, and health care organizations to help them better address gaps in the HIV continuum of care and provide high-impact prevention to HIV-negative persons.

  • The Act Against AIDS initiative that raises awareness about HIV testing and prevention through campaigns and partnerships. For example,

    • Let’s Stop HIV Together is a campaign that raises awareness and fights stigma among all Americans and provides stories about people living with HIV.

    • Doing It is a national testing and prevention campaign that encourages all adults to know their HIV status and make HIV testing a part of their regular health routine.

    • Partnering and Communicating Together (PACT) to Act Against AIDS is a partnership with organizations such as AIDS United and I Choose Life to raise HIV awareness among populations disproportionately affected by HIV.

Thank you for your hard work and commitment to prevent HIV. Through our commitment, collaboration, and coordination, we can continue to reduce HIV incidence for all Americans and help all people with HIV live long, healthy lives.

Sincerely,

Jonathan H. Mermin, MD, MPH

RADM and Assistant Surgeon General, USPHS/Director, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/nchhstp

Eugene McCray, MD

Director, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/hiv