Carnegie Hall Unveils Full Schedule of 70+ Events for its Beethoven Celebration in Honor of the 250th Anniversary of the Composer's Birth, January – June 2020

Carnegie Hall’s Largest-Ever Celebration of One Composer Features More Than 35 Events at the Hall with Internationally Renowned Artists Exploring the Revolutionary Composer’s Works and His Transformative Impact on Music

Plus, 35+ Events Citywide at Prestigious Partner Organizations Including Music, Dance, Exhibitions, Talks, and Poetry

As the 250th anniversary year of Beethoven’s birth approaches, Carnegie Hall announces a wider schedule of partner events by leading cultural institutions, complementing the Hall’s programming as part of its Beethoven Celebration which includes an unprecedented range of performances by renowned artists exploring the composer’s works and his transformative impact on music. The Beethoven Celebration presents one of the largest explorations of the great master’s music in our time and marks the largest-ever exploration of one composer by Carnegie Hall, with 86 works of music performed by more than 58 artists and ensembles in New York City and beyond from January through June 2020. Ticketing Information.

Beyond Carnegie Hall, public programming, performances, exhibitions, and events at partner organizations—leading cultural and academic institutions in New York City and beyond—highlight the many dimensions of the great music master. The more than 35 partner events range from music and dance to poetry, exhibitions, and talks, many of which have a contemporary slant. Together, the Beethoven Celebration features more than 70 programs, creating an extraordinary view of this revolutionary composer.

This rich series of events across New York City celebrates Beethoven’s unique place in the pantheon of the greatest artists in history as a composer whose music, perhaps more than any other, changed the course of Western classical music,” said Clive Gillinson, Executive and Artistic Director of Carnegie Hall. “Beethoven was audacious and absolutely fearless, a true revolutionary who never stopped challenging himself and who redefined every area of music that he touched. His music is timeless, and he continues to connect people worldwide with sounds that remain idealistic, compelling, fearsome, and personal. It’s no surprise that people around the globe continue to turn to his music to celebrate some of the most important turning points in history. We hope this opportunity to immerse ourselves in his music during this anniversary year will highlight the transformational impact he has had on culture, inspiring fresh perspectives on his life and work.”

HIGHLIGHTS OF BEETHOVEN CELEBRATION EVENTS AT CARNEGIE HALL

Anne-Sophie Mutter. Credit: Bastian Achard
Mitsuko Uchida. Credit: Justin Pumfrey / Decca

At Carnegie Hall, the Beethoven Celebration features more than 35 events including two complete symphony cycles, the complete piano sonatas and complete string quartets, chamber music, choral works, plus additional concerts and lectures as well as an ambitious global project that explores the themes found in Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy,” led by Marin Alsop.

A highlight of the Beethoven Celebration—never before presented by Carnegie Hall in one season—are two complete symphony cycles, one in February 2020 by Sir John Eliot Gardiner and his Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique (ORR), performed on period instruments, and another in March and April 2020 by Yannick Nézet-Séguin and The Philadelphia Orchestra, contrasting their two different interpretive perspectives on these pillars of the orchestral repertoire.

Emanuel Ax, Leonidas Kavakos, Yo-Yo Ma – Credit: Shane McCauley
Joyce DiDonato – Credit: © Simon Pauly

A key figure both in the early music revival and as a pioneer of historically informed performances, Sir John Eliot Gardiner leads his internationally acclaimed early music ensemble ORR in Beethoven’s Symphony No. 1, along with the rarely-heard score for the ballet, The Creatures of Prometheus (February 19 at 8:00 p.m.). The six-day symphony cycle in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage continues with the Symphony Nos. 2 and No. 3, “Eroica” (February 20 at 8:00 p.m.); Symphony Nos. 4, and 5—with its famous opening motif—(February 21 at 8:00 p.m.); Symphony No. 6, “Pastoral” and No. 7 (February 23 at 2:00 p.m.); and Symphony Nos. 8 and 9 (February 24 at 8:00 p.m.). The soloists for the Ninth Symphony include soprano Lucy Crowe, contralt Jess Dandy, tenor Ed Lyon, and bass Tareq Nazmi alongside The Monteverdi Choir. As a prelude to the cycle, Maestro Gardiner will be joined by distinguished Beethoven scholar William Kinderman for a discussion in Weill Recital Hall that illuminates Gardiner’s approach to these symphonic masterworks (February 18 at 7:00 p.m.). These Beethoven Celebration events comprise Sir John Eliot Gardiner’s Perspectives series, which the celebrated conductor has curated for the 2019-20 season.

Sir John Eliot Gardiner. Credit: © Sim Canetty-Clarke


One of the most remarkable talents of his generation, Yannick Nézet-Séguin leads The Philadelphia Orchestra in the second complete cycle of Beethoven symphonies this season in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, beginning with Symphony Nos. 5 and 6, “Pastoral” (March 13 at 8:00 p.m.). The four-concert cycle continues with Symphony Nos. 2 and 3, “Eroica” (March 20 at 8:00 p.m.); Symphony Nos. 4, 7, and 8 (March 26 at 8:00 p.m.); and Symphony Nos. 1 and 9 (April 3 at 8:00 p.m.). The soloists for the Ninth Symphony include soprano Angel Blue, mezzo-soprano Mihoko Fujimura, tenor Rolando Villazón, and baritone Quinn Kelsey alongside the Westminster Symphonic Choir. Maestro Nézet-Séguin also leads The MET Orchestra in a program that features virtuoso superstar Anne-Sophie Mutter in Beethoven’s groundbreaking Violin Concerto and Romance for Violin and Orchestra in F Major (June 12 at 8:00 p.m.). These five Beethoven Celebration performances are part of conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin’s nine-concert Perspectives series this season.

Joerg Widmann. Photo Credit: Marco Borggreve
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Tituss Takes Carnegie Hall

Award-Winning Guest Stars Loretta Devine, Jane Krakowski, and Lillias White Join Tituss Burgess in Carnegie Hall Tribute to Stephen Sondheim on February 1 at 8:00 PM

On Saturday, February 1 at 8:00 p.m. Emmy-nominated Broadway star Tituss Burgess makes his Carnegie Hall debut in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage with a tribute concert to the music of Stephen Sondheim. Titled Take Me to the World, guest artists include Emmy Award winner Loretta Devine and Tony Award winnersn Jane Krakowski and Lillias White. Directed by Gabriel Vega Weissman with music direction by Charlie Rosen, the program focuses on the music of Sondheim – on the occasion of his upcoming 90th birthday – and its singular impact on Burgess’s life and artistic trajectory.

On curating the program, Tituss offered, “Sondheim is a religion. I don’t claim to have some profound knowledge on interpreting his catalog, but I do have an expert awareness on how deeply I’ve been affected by his vast array of compositions. I simply want to thank him for what he’s given me and so many other people.”

Tituss Burgess by Jeff Mills

Emmy and Screen Actors Guild nominated actor, musician, and writer Tituss Burgess is quickly emerging as one of the entertainment industry’s most versatile and dynamic performers, with his work in television and theater generating both critical and commercial acclaim.

Most notably, Burgess stars as Titus Andromedon in the Emmy-nominated comedy series Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, opposite Ellie Kemper, Jane Krakowski, and Carol Kane. The show follows a young woman named Kimmy Schmidt as she adjusts to life in New York City after living in a doomsday cult for 15 years. Burgess’s character becomes a friend, roommate, and mentor to Kimmy while he pursues his dreams of Broadway superstardom and becomes a viral sensation on YouTube. Tina Fey created Burgess’s outrageous character specifically for him. For the actor’s extraordinary performance on the series, Burgess has been nominated for two Emmy Awards for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series, a SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series and two Critics’ Choice TV Awards for Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series. He was also awarded Best Actor at the 2015 Webby Awards and Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy at the 2015 Gold Derby TV Awards.

The actor was first introduced to television audiences in Tina Fey’s Emmy-winning NBC series 30 Rock, where he played the scene-stealing ‘D’Fwan,’ a vivacious hairdresser and the sidekick of Angie Jordan (Sherri Shepherd). Burgess quickly became a breakout star in the series’ fifth and sixth seasons. His other television credits include A Gifted Man, Blue Bloods, and Royal Pains. On the big screen, Burgess recently lent his voice to two major studio films: The Angry Birds Movie and Smurfs: The Lost Village – and appeared in this year’s Dolemite is My Name alongside Eddie Murphy.

A veteran of the stage, Burgess made his Broadway debut in 2005 as Eddie in Good Vibrations. Since, he has held many memorable roles on the Broadway stage including Hal Miller in Jersey Boys, Sebastian the Crab in The Little Mermaid, and Nicely-Nicely Johnson in the 2009 revival of Guys and Dolls. Burgess has also performed in regional theater productions such as The Wiz and Jesus Christ Superstar.

With a celebrated high tenor voice, Burgess is an acclaimed singer and songwriter, headlining major symphonies and top cabaret venues throughout the world. In 2008, he performed at the Broadway for Obama benefit concert in Easton, PA and the Broadway After Dark benefit concert in New York City. In 2013, he performed a gender-swapped version of the classic Dreamgirls song “And I Am Telling You…” at the Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS fundraising concert for Broadway Backwards— a performance that quickly became one of the highlights of the show.

In addition, Burgess has built a rich solo music career. His most recent album Saint Tituss was released in July 2019 and follows his previous two albums, Here’s To You and Comfortable.

Program Information

February 1, 2020 at 8:00 p.m., Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage

  • TITUSS BURGESS, Vocals
  • Gabriel Vega Weissman, Director
  • Charlie Rosen, Music Director

with Special Guests

  • Loretta Devine
  • Jane Krakowski
  • Lillias White

Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.

In honor of the centenary of his birth, Carnegie Hall’s 2019–2020 season is dedicated to the memory of Isaac Stern in recognition of his extraordinary contributions to Carnegie Hall, arts advocacy, and the field of music.

Tickets, priced at $34–$80, are available at the Carnegie Hall Box Office, 154 West 57th Street, by calling CarnegieCharge at 212-247-7800, or by visiting the Carnegie Hall website, carnegiehall.org. In addition, a limited number of seats, priced at $10, will be available day-of-concert beginning at 11:00 a.m. Monday through Saturday and 12:00 noon on Sunday until one hour before the performance or until supply lasts. The exceptions are Carnegie Hall Family Concerts and gala events. These $10 tickets are available to the general public on a first-come, first-served basis at the Carnegie Hall Box Office only. There is a two-ticket limit per customer.

For all Carnegie Hall presentations in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage, a limited number of partial view (seats with obstructed or limited sight lines or restricted leg room) will be sold for 50% of the full price. For more information on this and other discount ticket programs, including those for students, Notables members, and Bank of America customers, visit carnegiehall.org/discounts. Artists, programs, and prices are subject to change.

All-Star Jazz Ensemble Artemis Make Carnegie Hall Debut in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage on Saturday, December 7 at 8:00 PM

Jazz Septet To Release Upcoming Album With Legendary Blue Note Records

OnSaturday, December 7, 2019 at 8:00 p.m., jazz supergroup Artemis make their Carnegie Hall debut in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage. Each renowned for their outstanding solo work, these powerhouse musicians including Cécile McLorin Salvant (Vocals), Renee Rosnes (Music Director and Piano), Anat Cohen (Clarinet and Bass Clarinet), Melissa Aldana (Tenor Saxophone), Ingrid Jensen (Trumpet), Noriko Ueda (Bass), and Allison Miller (Drums) captivate audiences with bold new arrangements of classics by The Beatles to Thelonious Monk, as well as strikingly original compositions by the group’s members.

Hailing from America, Canada, France, Israel, Chile and Japan, the musicians first assembled as a band for a European tour in summer 2017, and with each member being a bandleader in her own right, were able to align schedules and perform at the Newport Jazz Festival, Miami’s Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, and the Ferring Jazz Bistro in St. Louis. Eventually naming themselves Artemis after the Olympian goddess of the hunt and the wild, the group has just been signed to the world-famous Blue Note record label, releasing their debut album in the new year along with upcoming appearances at San Francisco’s SFJAZZ, Chicago’s Symphony Center, and Washington D.C.’s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

About the Artists

Renee Rosnes is one of the premier jazz pianists and composers of her generation. Upon moving to New York City from Vancouver, Canada, she quickly established a reputation of high regard, touring and recording with such masters as Joe Henderson, Wayne Shorter, J.J. Johnson, James Moody and Bobby Hutcherson. She was a charter member of the all-star ensemble, the SFJAZZ Collective, with whom she toured for six years.

Rosnes has released 17 recordings, including 10 for Blue Note Records, and has appeared on many others as a sideman. In 2016, Written in the Rocks (Smoke Sessions) was named one of the Best Albums by The Nation, and earned Rosnes her 5th Canadian Juno Award. Her most recent session, Beloved of the Sky, draws inspiration from Canadian painter Emily Carr, and features Chris Potter, Steve Nelson, Peter Washington and Lenny White.

Over her 30-year career, Rosnes has collaborated with a diverse range of artists, such as Jack DeJohnette, Zakir Hussain, Christian McBride, Chris Potter, Renée Fleming and Nicholas Payton. Her works have been performed and recorded by J.J. Johnson, Phil Woods, Michael Dease, and the Danish Radio Big Band, among others.

Rosnes is a member of bassist Ron Carter’s Foursight Quartet and often performs with her husband, acclaimed pianist Bill Charlap. The couple released Double Portrait (Blue Note) and performed their New York City concert debut in Zankel Hall in spring 2011 as part of The Shape of Jazz series. The piano duo was also featured on the 2016 Grammy Award winning album, Tony Bennett & Bill Charlap – The Silver Lining: The Songs of Jerome Kern (Columbia).

From 2008-2010, Rosnes was the host of The Jazz Profiles, an interview series produced by CBC Radio and has contributed two cover story interviews for JazzTimes with Wayne Shorter and with Geri Allen.

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Carnegie Hall Celebrates the Holidays with Festive Musical Offerings

Carnegie Hall celebrates the holiday season with a variety of festive concerts this December. On Friday, December 20 at 8:00 p.m. andSaturday, December 21 at 8:00 p.m., jazz star Tony DeSare and Broadway star Capathia Jenkins join The New York Pops’ annual holiday celebration, ringing in the most wonderful time of the year. Hear such favorites as “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” Jenkins reprising Ella Fitzgerald’s classic take on “Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town,” DeSare revisiting Frank Sinatra’s beloved arrangement of “O Come, All Ye Faithful,” a rock shuffle duet of “Let it Snow,” “Jingle Bell Rock,” “Winter Wonderland,” the New York City premiere of “Eight Days of Life” in celebration of Hanukkah, and more.

The New York String Orchestra, an ensemble of remarkable young players from around the world who come together each December for a seminar of rehearsals and performance preparation, is conducted by Jaime Laredo in their annual pair of year-end concerts. On Tuesday, December 24 at 7:00 p.m., the orchestra plays an all-Mozart program including the overture toThe Marriage of Figaro, Symphony No. 41, “Jupiter,” and Violin Concerto No. 5, “Turkish” with soloist Nancy Zhou. On Saturday, December 28 at 8:00 p.m., the orchestra returns with Mr. Laredo conducting Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto with soloist Shannon Lee, alongside Mendelssohn’s Sinfonia No. 10 in B Minor and Brahms’s Symphony No. 1. The program no longer features pianist Peter Serkin, who has withdrawn due to health reasons.

Carnegie Hall Exterior at Night

Program Information

A FRANK AND ELLA CHRISTMAS

  • Friday, December 20 at 8:00 p.m.
  • Saturday, December 21 at 8:00 p.m.
  • Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
  • The New York Pops
  • Steven Reineke, Music Director and Conductor
  • Tony DeSare, Guest Artist
  • Capathia Jenkins, Guest Artist
  • Essential Voices USA
  • Judith Clurman, Music Director and Conductor
  • Tickets: $44–$145

December 20 concert is sponsored by KPMG LLP. December 21 concert is sponsored by Mastercard, the Official Card of Carnegie Hall

Tuesday, December 24 at 7:00 p.m.

ALL-MOZART PROGRAM

  • Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
  • New York String Orchestra
  • Jaime Laredo, Conductor
  • Nancy Zhou, Violin
  • Overture to The Marriage of Figaro
  • Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major, K. 219, “Turkish”
  • Symphony No. 41 in C Major, K. 551, “Jupiter”
  • Tickets: $25–$60

This concert is made possible, in part, by an endowment fund for young artists established by Stella and Robert Jones.

Saturday, December 28 at 8:00 p.m.

  • Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
  • New York String Orchestra
  • Jaime Laredo, Conductor
  • Shannon Lee, Violin
  • FELIX MENDELSSOHN Sinfonia No. 10 in B Minor
  • PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY Violin Concerto in D. Major, Op. 35
  • JOHANNES BRAHMS Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 68
  • Tickets: $25–$60

This concert is made possible, in part, by an endowment fund for young artists established by Stella and Robert Jones.

Tony DeSare (Image: The New York Pops!)

Tony DeSare performs with infectious joy, wry playfulness, and robust musicality. Named a Rising Star Male Vocalist in Downbeat magazine, DeSare has lived up to this distinction by winning critical and popular acclaim for his concert performances throughout North America and abroad. From jazz clubs to Carnegie Hall to Las Vegas, headlining with Don Rickles and major symphony orchestras, DeSare has brought his fresh take on old school class around the globe. DeSare has three top ten Billboard jazz albums under his belt and has been featured on CBS’ The Early Show, NPR, A Prairie Home Companion, and The Today Show, and his music has been posted by social media celebrity juggernaut George Takei. DeSare has also collaborated with YouTube icons Postmodern Jukebox. Notwithstanding his critically acclaimed turns as a singer/pianist, DeSare is also an accomplished award-winning composer. He not only won first place in the USA Songwriting Contest, but has also written the theme song for the motion picture My Date With Drew and several broadcast commercials, and has composed the full soundtracks for the Hallmark Channel’s Love Always, Santa and Lifetime’s Nanny Nightmare. His sound is romantic, swinging and sensual, but what sets DeSare apart is his ability to write original material that sounds fresh and contemporary, yet pays homage to the Great American Songbook. His compositions include a wide-range of romantic, funny, and soulful sounds that can be found on his top-selling recordings. DeSare’s forthcoming appearances include the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra, The New York Pops, Seattle Symphony, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra, Kansas City Symphony, Omaha Symphony and the Gold Coast Jazz Society. DeSare releases new recordings, videos of standards, and new originals every few weeks on his YouTube channel, iTunes and Spotify. Follow Tony on Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe on YouTube to stay connected. Tony DeSare is a Yamaha Artist.

Capaathia Jenkins (Image: The New York Pops!)

The Brooklyn-born and raised singer/actor Capathia Jenkins most recently released the critically acclaimed CD Phenomenal Woman: The Maya Angelou Songs with her collaborator Louis Rosen and they sold out the world-famous Birdland Theatre in NYC for 3 nights. She starred as Medda in the hit Disney production of Newsies on Broadway. She made her Broadway debut in The Civil War, where she created the role of Harriet Jackson. She then starred in the 2000 off-Broadway revival of Godspell, where she wowed audiences with her stirring rendition of “Turn Back, O Man”, which can still be heard on the cast recording. She returned to Broadway in The Look of Love and was critically acclaimed for her performances of the hits of Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Ms. Jenkins then created the roles of The Washing Machine in Caroline, Or Change and Frieda May in Martin Short: Fame Becomes Me where she sang “Stop the Show” and brought the house down every night. In 2007 she went back to Off-Broadway and starred in (mis)Understanding Mammy: The Hattie McDaniel Story, for which she was nominated for a Drama Desk Award. She was also seen in Nora Ephron’s Love, Loss, and What I Wore. An active concert artist, Ms. Jenkins has appeared with numerous orchestras around the world including the Cleveland Orchestra, Houston Symphony, Pittsburgh Symphony (with Marvin Hamlisch), National Symphony, Cincinnati Pops (with John Morris Russell), Philly Pops, Atlanta Symphony, Seattle Symphony, Utah Symphony, Minnesota Orchestra, Toronto Symphony, San Diego Symphony, the Hong Kong Philharmonic and many others. She was a soloist with the Festival Český Krumlov in the Czech Republic multiple times. Capathia had the great honor of performing in the “Broadway Ambassadors to Cuba” concert as part of the Festival De Teatro De La Habana. She has appeared several times at Carnegie Hall with The New York Pops and also sang in a Tribute to Marvin Hamlisch at the Library of Congress. Her upcoming 2019-2020 engagements include a return to the Cleveland Orchestra, Houston Symphony, Seattle Symphony, National Symphony at The Kennedy Center, and The New York Pops at Carnegie Hall with Steven Reineke. Her television credits include 30 Rock, The Practice, Law & Order, Law & Order: SVU, and The Sopranos. She can be seen in the film Musical Chairs directed by Susan Seidelman. Ms. Jenkins was also seen in The Wiz in a live performance on NBC. She can be heard on the film soundtracks for Nine, Chicago, and Legally Blonde 2.

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Mezzo-Soprano Joyce DiDonato Curates Carnegie Hall 2019-2020 Perspectives Series

Series Includes Six Upcoming Concerts and Three Annual Master Classes Throughout the 2019-2020 Season

Upcoming Concerts Include November Appearances with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra & Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal, and a December Recital with Fellow Carnegie Hall Perspectives Artist Yannick Nézet-Séguin

Mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato returns to Carnegie Hall for a series of Perspectives concerts throughout the 2019-2020 season, highlighting her full range of vocal artistry as well as her work as an educator. (Ticketing Information)

Ms. DiDonato is one of a handful of artists who have been invited to curate a second Perspectives series at Carnegie Hall. Her first Perspectives was presented throughout the Hall’s 2014–2015 season. Now in its 21st season, Carnegie Hall’s Perspectives series is an artistic initiative in which select musicians are invited to explore their own musical individuality and create their own personal concert series through collaborations with other musicians and ensembles. In the 2019–2020 season, Perspectives series will be curated by four acclaimed artists: conductors Sir John Eliot Gardiner and Yannick Nézet-Séguin, mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato, and singer-songwriter Angélique Kidjo.

Joyce DiDonato by Simon Pauly

Previous Perspectives artists have included Senegalese vocalist Youssou NDOUR; Brazilian singer-songwriter Caetano Veloso; Indian classical tabla player Zakir Hussain; experimental rocker David Byrne; singer-songwriters Rosanne Cash and James Taylor; as well as conductor and pianist Daniel Barenboim; conductors Pierre Boulez, James Levine, Sir Simon Rattle, David Robertson, and Michael Tilson Thomas; violinists Janine Jansen, Gidon Kremer, Anne-Sophie Mutter, and Christian Tetzlaff; cellist Yo-Yo Ma; pianists Pierre-Laurent Aimard, Leif Ove Andsnes, Martha Argerich, Emanuel Ax, Evgeny Kissin, Maurizio Pollini, Sir András Schiff, Peter Serkin, Daniil Trifonov, Mitsuko Uchida, and Yuja Wang; sopranos Renée Fleming and Dawn Upshaw; mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato; bass-baritone Thomas Quasthoff; the Emerson String Quartet; the Kronos Quartet; and early music ensemble L’Arpeggiata.

Ms. DiDonato’s 2019-2020 Perspectives kicked off during the summer of 2019 when she joined Carnegie Hall’s National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America (NYO-USA) on tour across Europe with her longtime collaborator conductor Sir Antonio Pappano in performances of Berlioz’s Les nuits d’été.

Yannick Nézet-Séguin by Jan Regan, Joyce DiDonato by Chris Singer

On Friday, November 15 at 8:00 p.m., she continues her series with one of her specialties: singing Berlioz’s La mort de Cléopâtre, with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra conducted by Riccardo Muti. The program, featuring music inspired by Rome, also includes Bizet’s rarely performed Roma and Respighi’s Pines of Rome. The concert is part of the Carnegie Hall Live broadcast and digital series with a live radio broadcast on WQXR 105.9 FM in New York and online at wqxr.org and carnegiehall.org/wqxr. Produced by WQXR and Carnegie Hall and co-hosted by WQXR’s Jeff Spurgeon and Clemency Burton-Hill, Carnegie Hall Live broadcasts include behind-the-scenes access to the artists and broadcast team, connecting national and international fans to the music and to each other.

The following week, on Friday, November 22 at 8:00 p.m., she joins fellow Perspectives artist Yannick Nézet-Séguin with the Orchestre Métropolitain de Montréal singing arias from Mozart’s La clemenza di Tito on a program that also includes Bruckner’s Symphony No. 4, “Romantic” in the orchestra’s Carnegie Hall debut. She collaborates again with Mr. Nézet-Séguin on piano on Sunday, December 15 at 2:00 p.m., singing Schubert’s powerful song cycle Winterreise. The December 15 concert will be webcast live, free of charge, to a worldwide audience on medici.tv and carnegiehall.org/medici. The collaboration between Carnegie Hall and medici.tv—making live webcasts of select Carnegie Hall concerts available to music lovers everywhere—began in fall 2014 and has since showcased performances by some of the world’s most celebrated artists. These webcasts have been enthusiastically received, reaching over 8 million views over the past five seasons with audience members originating from more than 180 countries and territories around the world.

Ms. DiDonato joins New Yorkers of all ages onstage in Zankel Hall on Sunday, April 5 at 7:00 p.m. for All Together: Songs for Joy. This special concert features music written as part of Carnegie Hall’s worldwide exploration of the “Ode to Joy” in Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 and its season-long celebration honoring the 250th anniversary of the composer’s birth. The young musicians will share their own perspectives on joy, a universal emotion that binds communities together.

Also that week, April 6–8 at 4:00 p.m., Ms. DiDonato returns to lead her annual series of public master classes for young opera singers, webcast via medici.tv, presented by Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute (WMI) in the Weill Music Room.

The following week, Ms. DiDonato returns to Zankel Hall joined by some of her dearest musical friends: flutist Tara Helen O’Connor, clarinetist Anthony McGill, harpist Emmanuel Ceysson, pianist Bryan Wagorn, and the Brentano String Quartet for A French Soirée, presenting works by Ravel, Debussy, and the premiere of a new arrangement of Debussy’s Chansons de Bilitis by Jake Heggie commissioned by Carnegie Hall on Monday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m.

Her Perspectives culminates on Tuesday, May 26, at 8:00 p.m. with a recital in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage titled Joyce DiDonato: My Favorite Thingswith conductor Maxim Emelyanychev leading Il Pomo d’Oro, the dynamic Italian ensemble that specializes in Baroque performance practice, in selections by Monteverdi, Gluck, Handel, and Purcell.

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Riccardo Muti and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Return to Carnegie Hall, November 15-16

November 15 Concert Featuring Music Inspired by Rome Includes Carnegie Hall Perspectives Artist Mezzo-Soprano Joyce DiDonato as Soloist

November 16 Features an All-Prokofiev Program

This November, Music Director Riccardo Muti and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra return to Carnegie Hall for two concerts in Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage. The first evening, on Friday, November 15 at 8:00 p.m., features music inspired by Rome, including Berlioz’s La mort de Cléopâtre, written in 1829 as a bid for a Prix de Rome, with Perspectives artist mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato; Bizet’s rarely performed symphonic poem Roma; and Respighi’s Pines of Rome, one of three symphonic poems written by the Italian composer about different aspects of the Eternal City. Maestro Muti and the Orchestra return on the following night, Saturday, November 16 at 8:00 p.m., with an all-Prokofiev program featuring selections from Romeo and Juliet and Symphony No. 3.

The concert on November 15 is part of the Carnegie Hall Live broadcast and digital series with a live radio broadcast on WQXR 105.9 FM in New York and online at wqxr.org and carnegiehall.org/wqxr. Produced by WQXR and Carnegie Hall and co-hosted by WQXR’s Jeff Spurgeon and Clemency Burton-Hill, Carnegie Hall Live broadcasts include behind-the-scenes access to the artists and broadcast team, connecting national and international fans to the music and to each other. Riccardo Muti and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra last performed at Carnegie Hall in February 2018. Bank of America is the Proud Season Sponsor of Carnegie Hall.

This performance is also part of Joyce DiDonato’s Perspectives series at Carnegie Hall with concerts and events throughout the 2019–2020 season that highlight her full range of vocal artistry, as well as her work as an educator. (For more information on upcoming Perspectives performances, please visit: www.carnegiehall.org/didonato.

Program Information

Friday, November 15, 2019 at 8:00 p.m.

  • Chicago Symphony Orchestra
  • Riccardo Muti, Music Director and Conductor
  • Joyce DiDonato, Mezzo-Soprano
  • Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
  • Georges Bizet Roma
  • Hector Berlioz La Mort De Cléopâtre
  • Ottorino Respighi Pines Of Rome
  • Public support for Carnegie Hall Live on WQXR is provided by the National Endowment for the Arts.
  • Perspectives: Joyce DiDonato

Saturday, November 16, 2019 at 8:00 p.m.

  • Chicago Symphony Orchestra
  • Riccardo Muti, Music Director and Conductor
  • Stern Auditorium / Perelman Stage
  • Sergei Prokofiev Selections From Romeo And Juliet
  • Sergei Prokofiev Symphony No. 3 In C Minor, Op. 44

Born in Naples, Italy, Riccardo Muti is one of the preeminent conductors of our day. In 2010, when he became the tenth music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO), he had more than forty years of experience at the helm of Maggio Musicale Fiorentino (1968–80), the Philharmonia Orchestra (1973–82), The Philadelphia Orchestra (1980–92), and Teatro alla Scala (1986–2005).

Photo of Riccardo Muti by Todd Rosenberg Photography

Mr. Muti studied piano under Vincenzo Vitale at the Conservatory of San Pietro a Majella in his hometown of Naples, graduating with distinction. After he won the Guido Cantelli Conducting Competition—by unanimous vote of the jury—in Milan in 1967, his career developed quickly. In 1968, he became principal conductor of Florence’s Maggio Musicale, a position that he held until 1980.

Herbert von Karajan invited him to conduct at the Salzburg Festival in Austria in 1971, and Mr. Muti has maintained a close relationship with the summer festival and with its great orchestra, the Vienna Philharmonic, for more than 45 years. When he conducted the orchestra’s 150th anniversary concert in 1992, he was presented with the Golden Ring, a special sign of esteem and affection, and in 2001, his outstanding artistic contributions to the orchestra were further recognized with the Otto Nicolai Gold Medal. He is also a recipient of a silver medal from the Salzburg Mozarteum for his contribution to the music of Mozart and the Golden Johann Strauss Award by the Johann Strauss Society of Vienna. He is an honorary member of Vienna’s Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde (Society of the Friends of Music), the Vienna Hofmusikkapelle, the Vienna Philharmonic, and the Vienna State Opera.

Mr. Muti succeeded Otto Klemperer as chief conductor and music director of London’s Philharmonia Orchestra in 1973, holding that position until 1982. From 1980 to 1992, he was music director of The Philadelphia Orchestra, and, in 1986, he became music director of Milan’s Teatro alla Scala. During his 19-year tenure, Muti conducted operatic and symphonic repertoire ranging from the baroque to the contemporary, also leading hundreds of concerts with the Filarmonica della Scala and touring the world with both the opera company and the orchestra. His tenure as music director, the longest of any in La Scala’s history, culminated in the triumphant reopening of the restored opera house with Antonio Salieri’s Europa riconosciuta, originally commissioned for La Scala’s inaugural performance in 1778.

Riccardo Muti’s vast catalog of recordings, numbering in the hundreds, ranges from the traditional symphonic and operatic repertoires to contemporary works. He also has written three books, Verdi, l’italiano and Riccardo Muti: An Autobiography: First the Music, Then the Words, both of which have been published in several languages, as well as Infinity Between the Notes: My Journey Into Music, published May 2019 and available in Italian.

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During his time with the CSO, Mr. Muti has won over audiences in greater Chicago and across the globe through his music making as well as his demonstrated commitment to sharing classical music. His first annual free concert as CSO music director attracted more than 25,000 people to Chicago’s Millennium Park. He regularly invites subscribers, students, seniors, and people of low incomes to attend, at no charge, his CSO rehearsals. Mr. Muti’s commitment to artistic excellence and to creating a strong bond between an orchestra and its communities continues to bring the Chicago Symphony Orchestra to ever higher levels of achievement and renown.

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Munich Philharmonic and Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra Both Return to Carnegie Hall with Two Concerts Each in Fall 2019

Music Director Valery Gergiev Leads Munich Philharmonic October 25–26 with Pianist Behzod Abduraimov and Violinist Leonidas Kavakos

Chief Conductor Mariss Jansons Leads the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra November 8–9 with Soprano Diana Damrau and Pianist Rudolf Buchbinder

Concerts on October 26 and November 8 to Be Heard Nationwide on Carnegie Hall Live on WQXR 105.9 FM and WQXR.org

Carnegie Hall welcomes back two orchestras from the culturally rich city of Munich, Germany: Munich Philharmonic and Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra (BRSO) this fall. On Friday, October 25 at 8:00 p.m., Music Director Valery Gergiev leads the Munich Philharmonic in Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No 1. with Behzod Abduraimov and Bruckner’s Symphony No. 7. The following evening,Saturday, October 26 at 8:00 p.m. they return with Leonidas Kavakos playing Brahms’s Violin Concerto. Also on the program is Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5 and Jörg Widmann’s Con brio.

Just two weeks later, onFriday, November 8 at 8:00 p.m., Chief Conductor Mariss Jansons leads the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra on a program that includes R. Strauss’s Four Symphonic Interludes from Intermezzo, Four Last Songs with soprano Diana Damrau, and Brahms’s Symphony No. 4. They return the following evening onSaturday, November 9 at 8:00 p.m. with pianist Rudolf Buchbinder playing Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 23 in A Major, K. 488; Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 10, and Weber’s Overture to Euryanthe.

Both the Munich Philharmonic concert October 26 and the BRSO concert on November 8 are part of the Carnegie Hall Live broadcast and digital series with a live radio broadcast on WQXR 105.9 FM in New York and online at wqxr.org and carnegiehall.org/wqxr. Produced by WQXR and Carnegie Hall and co-hosted by WQXR’s Jeff Spurgeon and Clemency Burton-Hill, Carnegie Hall Live broadcasts include behind-the-scenes access to the artists and broadcast team, connecting national and international fans to the music and to each other.

Behzod Abduraimov’s performances combine an immense depth of musicality with phenomenal technique and breath-taking delicacy. He works with leading orchestras worldwide including the Los Angeles Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, NHK Symphony Orchestra and Münchner Philharmoniker, and prestigious conductors including Valery Gergiev, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Manfred Honeck, Lorenzo Viotti, Vasily Petrenko, James Gaffigan, Jakub Hruša and Vladimir Jurowski.

Born in Tashkent, Uzbekistan, in 1990, Behzod began to play the piano at the age of five as a pupil of Tamara Popovich at Uspensky State Central Lyceum in Tashkent. He is an alumnus of Park University’s International Center for Music where he studied with Stanislav Ioudenitch, and now serves as the ICM’s artist-in-residence.

Photo of Valery Gergiev by Alexandra Shapunov; Behzod Abduraimov by Nissor Abdourazakov; Leonidas Kavakos by Marco Borggreve; Mariss Jansons by Peter Meisel; Diana Damrau by Jiyang Chen; and Rudolf Buchbinder by Marco Borggreve.

Leonidas Kavakos is recognized as a violinist and artist of rare quality, known for the integrity of his playing and for his virtuosity and superb musicianship. By age 21, Mr. Kavakos had won three major competitions: the International Jean Sibelius Violin Competition (1985), the Paganini Competition (1988), and the Naumburg International Piano Competition (1988). This success led to his recording the original Sibelius Violin Concerto (1903–1904), the first recording of the work in history, which won the Gramophone Concerto of the Year Award in 1991. Mr. Kavakos was awarded the Gramophone Artist of the Year Award in 2014, and he was the winner of Denmark’s Léonie Sonning Music Prize in 2017.

Mr. Kavakos recently signed an exclusive contract with Sony Classical, for whom he has previously recorded Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto and Mozart’s violin concertos, play-conducting with Camerata Salzburg. In the 2019–2020 season, in addition to concerts with major orchestras in Europe and the United States, Leonidas Kavakos will once again join Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax for three programs in Carnegie Hall comprising Beethoven trios and sonatas. He will undertake two Asian tours, first as soloist with the Singapore Symphony and Seoul Philharmonic and in recital in the NCPA Beijing, and then in the spring he performs with the Hong Kong Philharmonic and Taiwan National Symphony Orchestra, prior to playing Beethoven Sonata Cycles in Shanghai and Guangzhou with Enrico Pace. Mr. Kavakos plays the “Willemotte” Stradivarius violin of 1734.

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