The 2018 James Beard Foundation Award Finalists is Announced

The James Beard Foundation has announced the finalists for its annual chef, restaurant, and media awards. Here is the full list. Winners will be announced at the annual gala on May 7 in Chicago.

Best New Restaurant
The Charter Oak, St. Helena, CA
Empellón Midtown, NYC
Felix Trattoria, Venice, CA
JuneBaby, Seattle
Kismet, Los Angeles

Outstanding Baker
Dianna Daoheung, Black Seed Bagels, NYC
Zachary Golper, Bien Cuit, Brooklyn, NY
Maura Kilpatrick, Sofra Bakery and Café, Cambridge, MA
Belinda Leong and Michel Suas, B. Patisserie, San Francisco
Alison Pray, Standard Baking Co., Portland, ME
Greg Wade, Publican Quality Bread, Chicago

Outstanding Bar Program
Anvil Bar & Refuge, Houston
Bar Agricole, San Francisco
Clyde Common, Portland, OR
Cure, New Orleans
Kimball House, Decatur, GA
Trick Dog, San Francisco

Outstanding Chef
Ashley Christensen, Poole’s Diner, Raleigh, NC
Gabrielle Hamilton, Prune, NYC
David Kinch, Manresa, Los Gatos, CA
Christopher Kostow, The Restaurant at Meadowood, St. Helena, CA
Donald Link, Herbsaint, New OrleansJBF_LOGO_PMS_SILVER

Outstanding Pastry Chef
Kelly Fields, Willa Jean, New Orleans
Meg Galus, Boka, Chicago
Margarita Manzke, République, Los Angeles
Dolester Miles, Highlands Bar & Grill, Birmingham, AL
Diane Yang, Spoon and Stable, Minneapolis

Outstanding Restaurant
Balthazar, NYC
Canlis, Seattle
Frasca Food and Wine, Boulder, CO
Highlands Bar & Grill, Birmingham, AL
Quince, San Francisco

Outstanding Restaurateur
Kevin Boehm and Rob Katz, Boka Restaurant Group, Chicago (BokaGT Fish & OysterGirl & the Goat, and others)
JoAnn Clevenger, Upperline, New Orleans
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Acclaimed Cultural Festival ‘Taste of Iceland’ Returns to Boston March 8-11

Bostonians Can Immerse Themselves In Icelandic Culture During This Four-Day Festival Of Icelandic Food, Cocktails, Music, Film And Art.

Acclaimed Cultural Festival 'Taste of Iceland' Returns to Boston March 8-11

Acclaimed Cultural Festival ‘Taste of Iceland’ Returns to Boston March 8-11

Taste of Iceland, an annual festival that celebrates Iceland’s vibrant culture, returns to Boston with a series of events March 8-11, 2018. Over the past nine years, Taste of Iceland in Boston has featured some of the best names in Icelandic food, music, art and more. The four-day festival, presented by Iceland Naturally, gives Bostonians the chance to experience the country’s pure culture through a variety of (mostly free!) events.

Schedule of Events

March 8 -11: Icelandic Menu at Townsman

March 8 – 11: Icelandic Cocktail Menu at Beat Brasserie

March 9: Reykjavik Calling Concert at Paradise Rock Club (FREE)

March 10: Discussion of Iceland’s Thriving Design and Architectural Scene at BSA Space (FREE)

March 11: Icelandic Short Film Festival at The Brattle Theatre (FREE)

Event Details

Icelandic Menu at Townsman
March 8-11 | 5:30PM – Close | Townsman | 120 Kingston St., Boston, MA 02111
Icelanders are among the world’s healthiest, happiest and longest-living people – and many believe their pure, natural diet is the reason for this. From March 8-11, experience delicious Icelandic cuisine for yourself with a special Icelandic menu at Townsman. Icelandic chef
Georg Arnar Halldórsson will fly to Boston to collaborate with American chef Matt Jennings to create a prix fixe Icelandic dinner menu. Pair your meal with delicious Reyka Vodka and Brennivin cocktails crafted by Icelandic mixologist Teitur Ridderman Schiöth and Townsman’s Jon Ross. Reserve your seat for this unique dining experience on OpenTable. Click here to view the Facebook event.

Iceland Naturally Logo

Iceland Naturally Logo

Chef Halldórsson has won multiple culinary awards, including two silver medals and a bronze medal at the 2016 Culinary Olympics. Chef Jennings was named one of the 40 Under 40 Big Thinkers in the food industry by Food & Wine and was a finalist for James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef Northeast award numerous times.

Icelandic Cocktails at Beat Brasserie
March 8-11 | 4PM – 1AM | Beat Brasserie | 13 Brattle St., Cambridge, MA 02138
Experience traditional Icelandic cocktails with the Taste of Iceland cocktail menu at Beat Brasserie! Created and mixed by Brennivin cocktail champion Teitur Ridderman Schiöth and Beat Brasserie’s Doug Capozzoli, the unique cocktails feature famed Icelandic spirits Reyka Vodka and Brennivin. One of Iceland’s premier bartenders, Schiöth currently manages Pablo Discobar, a lively gathering place in Reykjavik. Capozzoli established himself as one of Boston’s best up and coming young bartenders while working in 5-star hotels before making the move to Beat Brasserie in 2015. Stop by Beat Brasserie March 8-11 to try these mouthwatering handcrafted cocktails! RSVP on Facebook.

Reykjavik Calling Concert at Paradise Rock Club
March 9 | Doors at 7PM, Show at 8PM | Paradise Rock Club | 967 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215
The free annual Reykjavik Calling concert, sponsored by
WERS, returns to Boston on Friday, March 9 – this time at Paradise Rock Club! One of Boston’s most anticipated international concerts of the year, 2018’s lineup features Icelandic artists JFDR, whose first, full-length album was co-produced by Laurie Anderson, Yoko Ono, and Tom Waits; and Sturla Atlas, one of Iceland’s most exciting new acts who will be playing his first U.S. show at Taste of Iceland in Boston. The Icelandic bands will be joined by Air Traffic Controller, a Boston-based indie pop band with an eclectic song catalog and category-defying organic/electronic sound. Admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis. Must be 18+. RSVP on Facebook.

Iceland Design Center Presents: ‘Iceland’s Thriving Design and Architectural Scene’ at BSA Space
March 10 | BSA Spaces Pearl Street Room | 12-2PM | 290 Congress St., Suite 200, Boston, MA 02210
Discuss the current state of design in Iceland and learn more about the country’s premier design event,
DesignMarch, at this luncheon. Participants will hear from Halla Helgadóttir, award-winning designer and Managing Director of the Iceland Design Centre, and enjoy food, drinks, and networking. This free event will look at how the designer-driven community in Iceland has enabled Icelandic design and architecture to emerge on the international stage and solidify its place in the world. Design and art lovers alike should RSVP on Facebook for this event; admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first served basis!

Shortfish: Iceland’s Premier Short Film Festival at the Brattle Theatre
March 11 | 1PM | The Brattle Theatre | 40 Brattle St., Cambridge, MA 02138
Enjoy an afternoon of Icelandic short films at The Brattle Theatre in Harvard Square. The screening will feature six short films from the 2017 Shortfish competition (the short film division of Iceland’s premier film festival, Stockfish). The program will run approximately 90 minutes. There are no age restrictions on these films, however, they are not recommended for children. Doors open at 12:30 p.m.; program starts at 1:00 p.m. Admission is free and will be granted on a first-come, first-served basis. RSVP on Facebook.

Taste of Iceland in Boston is presented by Iceland Naturally in cooperation with, Blue Lagoon, Brennivin, Iceland Airwaves, IcelandairIcelandic GlacialIcelandic Provisions Promote Iceland, Ölgerðin Egill Skallagrímsson, Reyka Vodka, Visit Reykjavik, Beat Brasserie, The Brattle Theatre, BSA Space, Paradise Rock Club, Stockfish Film Festival, Townsman, WBUR, and WERS.

If all this talk about Iceland has you wanting to make your own trip to the land of fire and ice, Icelandair offers more nonstop flights from North America than ever before, including daily flights out of Boston-Logan. The airline’s updated fleet features more legroom, in-flight entertainment, and gate-to-gate Wi-Fi. Visit to book your flight today.

Iceland Naturally is a cooperative marketing organization that promotes the services, products, and culture of Iceland. Through events, promotions and online marketing initiatives, Iceland Naturally introduces Iceland’s creativity and natural wonders to North Americans. The group is comprised of Iceland’s top companies and organizations: Blue Lagoon, City of ReykjavikGovernment of Iceland, Icelandair, Icelandic Glacial Water, Icelandic Group, Icelandic Provisions, Keflavik International Airport, LandsvirkjunÖlgerðin Egill Skallagrímsson, Promote Iceland and Reyka Vodka.

Danielle Herrington “Owns It” as the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Cover Model

2018 Issue Celebrates 36 Strong + Sexy Women, Including Aly Raisman, Ashley Graham, Kate Upton, Paulina Porizkova, Hailey Clauson, Sloane Stephens, Genie Bouchard, Brenna Huckaby, Sailor Brinkley Cook, Alexis Ren, Olivia Culpo, Plus New Powerful Section “In Her Own Words”

Three New Original SI Swimsuit Television Specials Air Exclusively on Sports Illustrated TV (SI TV) – “Making of SI Swimsuit,” “#SISwimSearch – The journey to find the next SI Swimsuit star,” and “In Her Own Words,” Which Was Shot by Model Robyn Lawley

Special AR and VR Features Makes This the Most Immersive Issue of SI Swimsuit Ever

Watch Former SI Swimsuit Cover Model Tyra Banks Reveal the Cover to Herrington on

Newcomer Danielle Herrington claims the coveted cover of the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue. The cover was revealed first on and the brand’s social platforms via a video featuring former SI Swimsuit cover model Tyra Banks sharing the news with a surprised and emotional Herrington. Herrington, a Rookie in 2017’s SI Swimsuit issue, shot her 2018 photos in the Bahamas with photographer Ben Watts. SI Swimsuit Editor MJ Day, who marks her sixth year as editor and 21st year working at the brand, considers all photos from all the models for the cover. SI Swimsuit 2018 hits newsstands on Wednesday, February 14.

SI Swimsuit 2018 cover featuring Danielle Herrington. CREDIT Ben Watts-SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

Danielle Herrington “Owns It” as the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Cover Model. SI Swimsuit 2018 cover featuring Danielle Herrington. The issue is on newsstand now. CREDIT: Ben Watts/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

The annual SPORTS ILLUSTRATED Swimsuit Issue ( reaches more than 70 million US adults annually and more men ages 18 to 34 than the Super Bowl. The iconic brand spans 16 product extensions, along with a vibrant experiential marketing business. Since debuting in 1964, Swimsuit has become a pop culture phenomenon and a revered launching pad for successful careers in TV, fashion, business, and film. The fashion industry describes SI Swimsuit as the “Oscars of Swimwear,” as an appearance in the issue is a crowning achievement for swimsuit and accessory manufacturers.

The 55th installment of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue features a diverse cast of 36 models including 4 returning cover models, 5 world-famous athletes, 5 mothers, 4 published authors, 12 rookies, 6 model search contestants and 10 women who are featured in the new section, “In Her Own Words.” The full list of SI Swimsuit 2018 models is below.

Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2018 features a diverse array of 36 models, including Compton, CA native and cover model Danielle Herrington and 2018 Rookie of the Year Alexis Ren. The full SI Swimsuit 2018 cast is: Alexis Ren, Allie Ayers, Aly Raisman, Anne de Paula, Ashley Graham, Barbara Palvin, Bianca Balti, Brenna Huckaby, Camille Kostek, Chase Carter, Danielle Herrington, Ebonee Davis, Genie Bouchard, Georgia Gibbs, Hailey Clauson, Haley Kalil, Hunter McGrady, Iyonna Fairbanks, Jasmyn Wilkins, Kate Bock, Kate Upton, Kate Wasley, Lais Ribeiro, Myla Dalbesio, Olivia Culpo, Olivia Jordan, Paige Spiranac, Paulina Porizkova, Raven Lyn, Robin Holzken, Robyn Lawley, Sailor Brinkley Cook, Samantha Hoopes, Sloane Stephens, Tabria Majors and Vita Sidorkina.

Every on-location shoot of the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue took place in the Caribbean, the brand’s most frequent destination and the backdrop for more than 40 photo shoots and 20 cover images, including the 2018 cover. The Caribbean locations shot in 2018 were the Bahamas, Aruba, Belize, and Nevis. In honor of that history, SI Swimsuit will continue to support hurricane relief efforts in the region and has already committed to visiting Puerto Rico for the 2019 issue.

SI Swimsuit 2018 spotlights beauty in its many different forms while providing a platform for the voices and messages of the bold, diverse, inspiring and stunning women featured throughout the issue. This comes to life in different ways and across mediums, from first-person essays written by a collection of models, to emotional short-form videos, to full-length documentary-style features.


Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2018 logo

MJ Day, the editor of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit, said, “As a 20 year veteran of this iconic brand – the past six as editor – I am constantly inspired by the incredible women I get to work with annually. Their brilliance, their drive, their successes, their strength are something to celebrate and emulate. We feature models who are scientists, CEOs, Olympians, activists, moms, influencers, show hosts and more—and not one of them failed to achieve her goals because she chose to look sexy and wear a bikini. It is time to move past the incorrect assumption that ‘sexy and empowered’ do not go together.

Day continued, “This year we are so proud to elevate Danielle Herrington’s profile. She is a fresh face, beautiful inside and out, and a hard-working, grounded woman who will be a beacon to many younger girls who can see themselves in her.”

Two of my role models are Tyra Banks and Beyoncé, so the fact that I get to join this incredible group of women as I become the third black model on the cover of SI Swimsuit is a dream come true,” said Danielle Herrington, 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit cover model. “I am so excited to be part of this iconic brand that has long given identity and voice to women of all shapes, colors, and beliefs. I hope that young girls who look at this cover are inspired to dream as big as I did and work hard to attain all their goals.”

This year’s issue marks several “firsts” for SI Swimsuit:

  • In Her Own Words” – The “In Her Own Words” project, which debuts in 2018, was conceived to deliver a message of empowerment, beauty, confidence, and self-acceptance. Featuring models painted in words they chose, this platform allowed the voice, the strength and the passion of these women to be expressed in the rawest form: on the naked body. With a stripped-down studio and an all-female crew, SI gave full creative control to the women as they became their own canvas. Models and activists such as Aly Raisman and Paulina Porizkova participated in the project. Sailor Brinkley Cook, a photography student at Parsons School of Design, and Robyn Lawley, an aspiring videographer, joined the crew, taking behind-the-scenes photos and capturing video of the intimate shoot.

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Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture Exhibits Emancipation Proclamation and 13th Amendment

Original copies of the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment are on display in the “Slavery and Freedom” exhibition on Concourse One of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. The documents share exhibition space with a restored slave cabin used in the early 1800s to house enslaved families on a plantation on Edisto Island, S.C. The Emancipation Proclamation and 13th Amendment are on a long-term loan to the museum by philanthropist David M. Rubenstein, Smithsonian Regent and co-founder and co-executive chairman of The Carlyle Group.

National Museum of African American History and Culture logo

National Museum of African American History and Culture logo

These two original documents show a nation in transition: they mark a powerful shift in America’s relation to the millions of enslaved blacks who had been bought and sold and considered property,” said Lonnie G. Bunch III, founding director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. “Showcasing the documents in the museum helps to illuminate an often overlooked story of how the enslaved, through self-emancipation and other resistance methods, forced the federal government to create policies that led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment.

The Emancipation Proclamation and the 13th Amendment to the Constitution are among the most important documents in the history of the United States. With the Emancipation Proclamation, issued by President Abraham Lincoln to take effect Jan. 1, 1863, the aim of the Civil War evolved to include the liberation of enslaved African Americans in 10 rebellious states. The 13th Amendment, which passed Dec. 6, 1865, made slavery illegal in the United States.

On Sept. 22, 1862, Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. Under his wartime authority as Commander-in-Chief, he ordered that, as of Jan. 1, 1863, all enslaved individuals in all areas still in rebellion against the United States “henceforward shall be free.” African Americans could also enlist in the armed forces. The proclamation was limited in scope but revolutionary in impact. The war to preserve the Union also became a war to end slavery.

Lincoln considered the Emancipation Proclamation to be the crowning achievement of his time in office. “I never, in my life, felt more certain that I was doing right, than I do in signing this paper,” he declared. “If my name ever goes into history it will be for this act, and my whole soul is in it.”

The 13th Amendment completed what free and enslaved African Americans, abolitionists and the Emancipation Proclamation set in motion. On Dec. 6, 1865, the U.S. government abolished slavery by amending the Constitution to state: “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

Slavery in America often destroyed enslaved families and communities, and yet African Americans survived it with their humanity intact,” Bunch added. “Their stories have shaped the American story and remind us of the enduring power of the human spirit. We are grateful to David Rubenstein—his generosity and his vision—for making these documents available to the museum and to the millions of visitors who will see them. The nation is honored by what he has done.”


The Whitney To Host A Variety Of Performances And Programs With Artists And Critics In February

mecca vazie andrews and the MOVEMENT: [title]
Saturday, February 3, 2018. 4 pm

An immersive performance in dialogue with the work of Laura Owens, mecca vazie andrews and the MOVEMENT’s [title] combines movement, sound, and projection. The running time is approximately fifty minutes. This program is organized in conjunction with Laura Owens in collaboration with 356 S. Mission Rd.

Tickets are required for the performance ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors, plus Museum admission; free for members).

What Art Speaks to These Times
Wednesday, February 7, 6:30 pm

What does it mean to be an artist in this political moment? An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017 examines how artists have confronted the political and social issues of their day. This panel brings together four artists in the exhibition to speak about their individual aesthetic approaches to the political urgencies of our present moment. Speakers include artists Ja’Tovia Gary, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Julie Mehretu, and Dread Scott. Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator, moderates the discussion.

Tickets are required ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors). This event will also be livestreamed on Facebook.

Toyin Ojih Odutola in conversation Yaa Gyasi with Texas Isaiah
Friday, February 9, 6:30 pm

In her exhibition To Wander Determined, Toyin Ojih Odutola presents an interconnected series of fictional portraits, chronicling the lives of two aristocratic Nigerian families. For this program, Ojih Odutola invites novelist Yaa Gyasi, whose debut novel Homegoing received the National Book Critics Circle’s John Leonard Award for Best First Book, and visual narrator Texas Isaiah, whose work documents gender, race, and sexuality, to discuss their respective practices as artists and their overlapping and intersecting interests, from narrative and portraiture to migration and dislocation. The conversation is moderated by Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator.The Whitney logo

This event has reached ticketing capacity but will be live-streamed on Facebook. A limited number of standby tickets may be available at the admissions desk on a first-come, first-served basis. The standby line will open one hour prior to the program’s start time.

Where He Was: Auden in America
Sunday, February 25, 3 pm

Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960, takes as its starting point a poem by W.H. Auden, September 1, 1939, which considers the ‘euphoric dream’ of American life on the cusp of world war, through the eyes of a foreigner, an Englishman. But why was Auden’s understanding of his adopted homeland so enduringly clear-eyed? Join two other U.S.-based émigré writers, poet Paul Muldoon and professor Michael Wood, for a conversation about Auden in America. A collaboration with the London Review of Books, their discussion will draw on Wood’s writing about Auden for the LRB, and Muldoon’s pastiche of his work in the poem 7, Middagh Street, to reflect on the USA’s significance for Auden, and vice versa, and why outsider perspectives can be the best mirror for a nation seeking to understand itself.

Tickets are required ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors).

For a complete listing of upcoming programs, please visit

An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017 is organized by David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection; Jennie Goldstein, assistant curator; and Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator; with David Kiehl, curator emeritus; and Margaret Kross, curatorial assistant.

Laura Owens is organized by Scott Rothkopf, Deputy Director for Programs and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, with Jessica Man, curatorial assistant.

Toyin Ojih Odutola: To Wander Determined is organized by Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator and Melinda Lang, curatorial assistant.

Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960 is organized by David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, with Jennie Goldstein, assistant curator, and Margaret Kross, curatorial assistant.

Major support for An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017 is provided by The American Contemporary Art Foundation, Inc., Leonard A. Lauder, President.

Significant support is provided by the Ford Foundation. Major support for Laura Owens is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the Whitney’s National Committee.

Significant support is provided by Nancy and Steve Crown; Candy and Michael Barasch; The Brown Foundation, Inc., of Houston; Mariel and Jack Cayre; Marcia Dunn and Jonathan Sobel; and anonymous donors.

Generous support is provided by Fotene Demoulas and Tom Coté, Charlotte Feng Ford, Allison and Warren Kanders, and Ashley Leeds and Christopher Harland.

Additional support is provided by Rebecca and Martin Eisenberg, Susan and Leonard Feinstein, and the Nina and Frank Moore Family Foundation.

Generous endowment support is provided by Lise and Michael Evans, Sueyun and Gene Locks, and Donna Perret Rosen and Benjamin M. Rosen.

Curatorial research and travel for this exhibition were funded by an endowment established by Rosina Lee Yue and Bert A. Lies, Jr., MD.

Toyin Ojih Odutola: To Wander Determined is sponsored by Audi of America. Major support is provided by the John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation. Generous support is provided by Jackson Tang. Additional support is provided by Bernard I. Lumpkin and Carmine D. Boccuzzi. Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960 is sponsored by Delta.

Crystal River Cruises Unveils Comprehensive New Collection Of Curated Destination Experiences

Line Debuts More Than 225 Excursions Designed To Cater To Travelers’ Personal Tastes In Europe’s Most Beautiful Locales

Crystal River Cruises today announced details of its new collection of destination experiences for voyages along Europe’s Danube, Rhine and Main rivers. By sea, river, land or air, Crystal has redefined the way the world views luxury travel. The world-renowned Crystal Experience – featuring global journeys with Crystal Cruises, Crystal River Cruises, Crystal Yacht Expedition Cruises, Crystal AirCruises and Crystal Air – continues to entice the world’s most discerning travelers with incomparable luxury and unparalleled personal service. Crystal will expand its fleet with the upcoming Crystal Debussy and Crystal Ravel river ships, the Crystal Endeavor expedition yacht and an entirely new class of ocean ships over the next five years.

Crystal River Cruises

Crystal River Cruises

Debuting in 2018, the newly added offerings focus on authenticity and are tailored to travelers’ individual interests, featuring smaller group sizes and unique details. Nearly 200 enriching excursions are included, with additional pursuits also available at a cost. The shore-side excursions highlight the multi-faceted character of each destination and comprise five types of experiences including:

  • Personal Connections – Those looking to explore the culture of a destination can enjoy a one-of-a-kind tour hosted by local residents, artisans and experts;
  • Tantalizing Gastronomy – Guests can relish in the signature culinary styles and specialties of the destination with a variety of dining and hands-on cooking opportunities;
  • Cultural Discoveries – Guests will enjoy comprehensive insight from expert guides into historical landmarks, museums, iconic sites and architectural marvels;
  • Exhilarating Adventures – Active cruise travelers can participate in a selection of invigorating pursuits that combine historical and cultural experiences;
  • Design Your Time – For a more tailored vacation, guests can choose this option, which features a concierge service that designs unique private tours as well as a menu of customized choices.

“Every detail of the Crystal River Cruises’ curated destination program has been revamped to focus on choices, and offer more intimate, immersive experiences that perfectly suit travelers’ preferences and properly showcase the charm and beauty of the destinations,” says Walter Littlejohn, managing director and vice president of Crystal River Cruises. “While each locale offers its own distinct ‘can’t-miss’ experiences, we recognize that every guest brings his or her own distinct style of exploration, and we strive to cater to that individuality.”Crystal River Cruises-Crystal-Bach-Danube-River

With many destinations offering more than a dozen choices for shore-side discovery, some of the new experiences featured on voyages in Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Switzerland, Slovenia, Belgium, Netherlands, Hungary, Croatia and Serbia include:

Nearly 200 Inclusive Adventures including:

  • Immersive culinary experience in the foodie haven of Rotterdam;
  • String & opera performance in a historic Antwerp cathedral;
  • A full day exploring Salzburg from Linz;
  • Horse show & carriage ride at Lázár Equestrian Park;
  • An owner-hosted tasting at Schlagkamp Winery in Cochem;
  • Cycle to Veitshochheim Castle and its Rococo Garden in Wurzburg;
  • Behind-the-scenes tour of Amsterdam’s greenhouses, where the famous tulips are cultivated.

Dozens of Optional Experiences including:

  • Vintage photography adventure in Vukovar;
  • Hands-on instruction in Linzer torte baking;
  • Private home cooking lesson in Kehl;
  • Wine tasting in the renowned cellars of Vienna’s Palais Coburg;
  • Canoe through the romantic canals of Strasbourg;
  • Explore Budapest by Trabant Cars;
  • Hands-on creativity in one of Novi Sad’s last remaining tapestry workshops;
  • Horseback riding through the forests of Novi Sad’s Fruška Gora National Park.

Each river itinerary will also feature inclusive Signature Events – special events that offer rare access and musical performances in iconic landmarks including Vienna’s Belvedere Palace, Linz’s St. Florian Monastery, Rüdesheim’s Monastery Eberbach, and others.

To ensure that every detail of each experience is in line with Crystal’s exacting standards of service, excursion group sizes are limited to no more than 15 guests; for larger groups, guides are available to lead the tours in German, Spanish, Portuguese and other languages upon request. Crystal Collection shore excursions offer guest transport to iconic sites and regions via spacious motor coaches that include free WiFi.

Guests can fully embrace the culture, flavors, history and activities of each destination with the expansive selection offered aboard Crystal Mozart, Crystal Bach, Crystal Mahler, Crystal Debussy and Crystal Ravel. Fares for Crystal River Cruises start at $3,175 per person including Early Booking Savings of up to $1000 per suite.

For more information and Crystal reservations, contact a travel agent, call 888.799.2437, or visit Join the hundreds of thousands who follow Crystal Cruises’ Facebook page and @crystalcruises on Twitter and Instagram, and engage in the conversation with #crystalcruises.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Announces Schedule of Spring and Summer 2018 Exhibitions

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced the schedule of its upcoming spring and summer seasons. Highlights of the upcoming 2018 exhibition season are:

Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism

Exhibition Dates: January 17–July 15, 2018

Exhibition Location: Gallery 851

William Wegman, Before-After

William Wegman, Before/On/After (detail), 1972. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Vital Projects Fund Inc. Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, 2016. © William Wegman, Courtesy the artist

Opening at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on January 17, the exhibition Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism will survey Conceptual Art as it developed in Southern California in the 1970s. The show is occasioned by the artist William Wegman’s extraordinary recent gift to the Museum of 174 short videos that he made between 1970 and 1999—his entire career in the medium. A 90-minute selection of videos from this gift will be shown along with photographs and drawings by Wegman as well as drawings, prints, and photographs by his contemporaries in Southern California—John Baldessari, Vija Celmins, Douglas Huebler, Ed Ruscha, and others.

Wegman took up video while teaching painting at the University of Illinois in the mid-1960s. Like many artists using the then-new medium, Wegman appreciated video—like photography—for its lo-fi reproducibility and anti-artistic qualities. Also, unlike film, where the negative must be developed and processed before viewing, video was like a sketchbook that allowed revision in real time.

It wasn’t until Wegman moved to Southern California in 1970 that his video production took off. Although he lived in Los Angeles for only three years, the artist found his method: short, staged vignettes using everyday items in which expectations are reversed and puns and homonyms pursued to absurd conclusions.

The artist’s key early collaborator for most of these short videos was his dog, a Weimaraner called Man Ray, who enthusiastically participates in the goings-on. In contrast to other early adopters of video, Wegman eschewed an aesthetic of boredom to focus on humorous, improvised scenarios in which he deflated the pretensions of painting and sculpture while also lampooning the pieties and self-seriousness of Conceptual Art—at a time when it was being codified and institutionalized. Beneath the slacker humor, however, are poignant points about failure and the reversal of expectations that resonate with work by other West Coast Conceptualists—the friends and fellow travelers also featured in the exhibition.

Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism is organized by Doug Eklund, Curator in the Department of Photographs at The Met.

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris

Exhibition Dates: January 23–April 15, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue, Gallery 918, Lila Acheson Wallace Wing

Joseph Cornell (American, 1903–1972). Homage to Juan Gris, 1953–54.

Joseph Cornell (American, 1903-1972). Homage to Juan Gris, 1953-54. Box construction. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Purchased: John D. McIlhenny Fund. Art © The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

On October 22, 1953, Joseph Cornell wrote in his diary: “Juan Gris/Janis Yesterday.” He was referring to the previous day’s outing, when, on one of his frequent trips to the gallery district in midtown Manhattan, Cornell visited the Sidney Janis Gallery on East 57th Street. Among a presentation of approximately 30 works by modern artists, one alone captivated Cornell—Juan Gris’s celebrated collage The Man at the Café (1914), which is now a promised gift to the Museum as part of the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection.

This shadowy profile of a fedora-topped man immediately inspired Cornell to begin a new series: some 18 boxes, two collages and one sandtray created in homage to Juan Gris, whom he called a “warm fraternal spirit.”

When he began the Gris series in 1953, Cornell was an established artist, two decades into his career. His shadow box assemblages —a genre he is credited with pioneering—were exhibited regularly in major galleries and museums, and acquired by collectors and museums for their permanent collections. Cornell gathered his banal yet evocative materials during his forays in New York City or Long Island. His sources were many and varied; he made his assemblages from old journals and French history textbooks, postage stamps, fishing tackle, cordial glasses, clay pipes, and “flotsam and jetsam” to use his words. From these disparate fragments, Cornell wove together concepts, subjects, and lives that fascinated him. The complex network of references contained in each box often obscures, if not conceals, the artist’s intended theme or subject. For instance, in his Gris series, Cornell incorporated reproductions of Gris’s works into only one box, as well as in two collages and the one sandtray. Without these reproductions and the inscriptions Cornell made on some of the constructions, most of the works in his Gris series would be indistinguishable from those in his Aviary and Hotel series from around the same time – although for his homages to Gris he used the great white-crested cockatoo exclusively. Few viewers would have known about Cornell’s extensive notes found in his diaries and his Gris dossier, a working source file in which he stored materials for inspiration or later use. Cornell’s research on Gris included the acquisition of biographical publications and reviews on the Spanish-born artist, and he bolstered his knowledge of Gris and his art through conversations with artist friends such as Marcel Duchamp and Robert Motherwell.

In The Man at the Café, Gris worked in oil paint and pasted newsprint to present a mysterious male figure reading a newspaper, which obscures his face. The shapes of the man’s stylized fedora and its prominent black shadow cast against the café wall held a particular fascination for Cornell. For the central figure of his Gris series, Cornell selected a white cockatoo to contrast with the dramatic blacks, but he also embedded a reference to Gris’s shadow play and the fedora’s silhouette. Indeed, the bird, or its distinctive silhouette, appears in all but two of the boxes, with Cornell mimicking the relationship between positive and negative space by pasting the bird print to a wood cutout, outlining it, or echoing its contours with black paper.

Although Gris remained the initial catalyst for the series, Cornell also incorporated allusions to his own passions and pastimes as revealed in the foreign language texts, hotel advertisements, and maps. An aficionado of ballet and opera, Cornell attended performances in New York City and contributed illustrations to the Dance Index, a periodical edited by New York City Ballet co-founder Lincoln Kirstein in the 1940s. The white, feathered and tulle costumes of the principals dancing Swan Lake and La Sylphide reminded him of birds. Cornell was also enamored with the nineteenth century, the era of the romantic ballet and bel canto singing, and wove these birds of song and stage into the Gris series as well.

Completed over a period of 13 years, Cornell’s series of Gris shadow boxes is more extensive in number than any other that the artist openly dedicated to one of his admired luminaries of stage, screen, literature, or the visual arts. The main protagonist of Cornell’s Juan Gris series is a bird—the great white-crested cockatoo—specifically, an image taken from a 19th-century print of the species that Cornell repeatedly used along with Photostats or silhouettes of the bird’s form to explore the fascinating shadows that Gris produced in his own practice. At The Met, the exhibition Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris will reunite for the first time nearly a dozen boxes from Cornell’s Gris series together with the Cubist masterpiece, The Man at the Café.

The exhibition is made possible by the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust.

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris inaugurates a series of dossier exhibitions under the auspices of the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

As part of its mission to ensure the ongoing study of modern art with a particular focus on Cubism, the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center offers fellowships, lectures, and other programs to support new scholarship on the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection and other 20th-century art. Each dossier exhibition will be related to a work or group of works from the Collection. Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris and future projects in the series are intended to provide a deeper context for understanding Cubism, its protagonists, and greater influences, to contribute exceptional scholarship, and to offer a fresh approach to the subject of looking and thinking about modern art.

The exhibition is curated by Mary Clare McKinley, an independent art historian based in London and former Assistant Curator in the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A catalog, made possible by the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, accompanies the exhibition and contains a major essay, written by McKinley, and the first-ever documentary catalog of Cornell’s Gris series.

Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings

Exhibition Dates: January 30–May 13, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue, Floor 1, Gallery 746, The Erving and Joyce Wolf Gallery

Thomas Cole (American, 1801–1848). View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts,

Thomas Cole (American, 1801-1848). View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm-The Oxbow (detail), 1836. Oil on canvas, 51 1/2 x 76 in. (130.8 x 193 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1908

Met Museum to Explore Transatlantic Career of Renowned Painter Thomas Cole

Exhibition Marks 200th Anniversary of the Artist’s Arrival in America

Celebrated as one of America’s preeminent landscape painters, Thomas Cole (1801–1848) was born in northern England at the start of the Industrial Revolution, emigrated to the United States in his youth, and traveled extensively throughout England and Italy as a young artist. He returned to America to create some of his most ambitious works and inspire a new generation of American artists, launching a national school of landscape art. Opening January 30, the exhibition Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings will examine, for the first time, the artist’s transatlantic career and engagement with European art. With Cole’s masterwork The Oxbow (1836) as its centerpiece, the exhibition will feature more than three dozen examples of his large-scale landscape paintings, oil studies, and works on paper. Consummate paintings by Cole will be juxtaposed with works by European masters including J. M. W. Turner and John Constable, among others, highlighting the dialogue between American and European artists and establishing Cole as a major figure in 19th-century landscape art within a global context. The exhibition marks the 200th anniversary of Cole’s arrival in America.

The exhibition was organized by Elizabeth Kornhauser, the Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Painting and Sculpture at The Met, and Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University, with Chris Riopelle, Curator of Post-1800 Paintings at the National Gallery, London.

The exhibition follows the chronology of Cole’s life, beginning with his origins in recently industrialized northern England, his arrival in the United States in 1818, and his embrace of the American wilderness as a novel subject for landscape art of the New World. Early works by Cole will reveal his prodigious talent. After establishing himself as the premier landscape painter of the young United States, he traveled back to Europe.

The next section will explore in depth Cole’s return to England in 1829–31 and his travels in Italy in 1831–32, revealing the development of his artistic processes. He embraced the on-site landscape oil study and adopted elements of the European landscape tradition reaching back to Claude Lorrain. He learned from contemporary painters in England, including Turner, Constable, and John Martin, and furthered his studies in landscape and figure painting in Italy. By exploring this formative period in Cole’s life, the exhibition will offer a significant revision of existing accounts of his work, which have, until now, emphasized the American aspects of his formation and identity. The exhibition will also provide new interpretations of Cole’s work within the expanded contexts of the history of the British Empire, the rise of the United States, the Industrial Revolution, and the American wilderness, and Romantic theories of history.

Upon his return to America, Cole applied the lessons he had learned abroad to create the five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36). These works reveal a definition of the new American Sublime that comes to its fullest expression in The Oxbow (1836). Finally, the exhibition concludes with an examination of Cole’s legacy in the works of the next generation of American landscape painters whom Cole personally mentored, notably Asher B. Durand and Frederic E. Church.

Exhibition design is by Brian Butterfield, Senior Exhibition Designer; graphics are by Ria Roberts, Graphic Designer; and lighting is by Clint Ross Coller and Richard Lichte, Lighting Design Managers, all of The Met Design Department. After the presentation at The Met, the exhibition will be shown at The National Gallery, London (June 11–October 7, 2018).

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalog suitable for both scholars and the general public. With new information on Cole’s life and revisionist interpretations of his major work, the publication will also feature research by The Met’s conservation team into Cole’s methods as a painter, illuminating this previously neglected area. The catalog will be available for purchase in The Met Store (hardcover, $65). The catalog is made possible by the William Cullen Bryant Fellows of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A series of Education programs will complement the exhibition. MetLiveArts will feature a 40-minute acoustic performance by Sting in the Museum’s Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium on April 24, 25, and 26 (7:30 p.m.). Prior to each concert, ticket holders will enjoy a special viewing of the exhibition with curators Elizabeth Kornhauser and Tim Barringer. The April 24 performance of “Sting: Atlantic Crossings” is for Members only. Tickets will be available for purchase in early 2018.

On April 8 (2 p.m.), as part of MetSpeaks, American artist Ed Ruscha will discuss his seminal five-part Course of Empire series (1992 and 2003–5) with his friend, the author, and artist Tom McCarthy, who resides in London. Tickets for this event will be available for purchase.

Met curator Elizabeth Kornhauser and paintings conservator Dorothy Mahon will explore Cole’s work methods and techniques with artist Stephen Hannock on February 7 (6:00 p.m.), revealing the layers of meaning in Cole’s iconic painting, The Oxbow. This program is part of the Conversations With… series.

Elizabeth Kornhauser will moderate a Sunday at The Met discussion on April 15 (2 p.m.) on Cole’s role as a proto-environmental artist with scholars Alan Braddock and Rebecca Bedell and artist Michel Auder. (Auder’s 2017 work The Course of Empire was shown at the Documenta exhibition in Kassel, Germany.) These programs are free with Museum admission.

In a Gallery Performance on April 27 (6:00 p.m.), exhibition co-curator Tim Barringer will explore the musical and literary references that inspired Cole. This program is free with Museum admission, advance registration is required.

Education programs are made possible in part by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund and The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts.

The exhibition, organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The National Gallery, London, is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation, White & Case LLP, the Enterprise Holdings Endowment, and the Terra Foundation for American Art. It is also supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve

Exhibition Dates: February 6–May 27, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Breuer, Floor 2

Leon Golub (American, 1922–2004). Gigantomachy II (detail), 1966

Leon Golub (American, 1922-2004). Gigantomachy II (detail), 1966. Acrylic on linen, 9 ft. 11 1/2 in. x 24 ft. 10 1/2 in. (303.5 x 758.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts and Stephen, Philip, and Paul Golub, 2016 (2016.696). © The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Opening February 6, 2018 at The Met Breuer, Leon Golub: Raw Nerve will present a selective survey of this groundbreaking artist’s work. Timed to celebrate the 2016 gift to The Met of the monumental painting Gigantomachy II (1966) from The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts and Stephen, Philip, and Paul Golub, the exhibition will present highlights from Golub’s long, eminent career, drawn from distinguished private collections as well as the artist’s estate. Golub’s unflinching portrayals of power and brutality have profound relevance today, as does his belief in the ethical responsibility of the artist.

Born in Chicago, Golub (1922-2004) occupies a singular position in the history of mid to late 20th-century art. His devotion to the figure, his embrace of expressionism, his amalgamation of modern and classical sources, and his commitment to social justice distinguish his practice as an artist. The centerpiece of Leon Golub: Raw Nerve is Gigantomachy II, a commanding, epic work measuring nearly 10 by 25 feet. Created in 1966, two years after Golub joined the Artists and Writers Protest Group and began to lobby actively against the Vietnam War, this political allegory recounts the story of a mythic battle between the Olympian gods and a race of giants. In Golub’s contemporary retelling, there are no heroes, only anonymous men in various states of distress, their bodies riven by scars and wounds. Alongside this powerful and terrifying work, Leon Golub: Raw Nerve will feature paintings from all of the artist’s most important series, including Pylon, White Squad, Riot, and Horsing Around. These will be accompanied by a 1970 painting of a victim of the Vietnam War, as well as a suite of early paintings that reflect Golub’s study of antiquity, and a group of unsettling portraits of the Brazilian dictator Ernesto Geisel. Also on view will be works on paper that represent subjects of longstanding interest to the artist, from mercenaries, interrogators, and the victims of violence to political figures, nudes, and animals, all of them rendered in the raw, visceral style for which he is justly celebrated. Taken together, the works in Leon Golub: Raw Nerve, which spans the entire arc of Golub’s career, attest to his incisive perspective on the catastrophes that afflict human civilization as well as his critique of violence and belligerent masculinity.

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve is organized by Kelly Baum, Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Curator of Contemporary Art in The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. Continue reading