Ninth Annual Napa Valley Film Festival Announces Film Line-Up

Festival to open with “Just Mercy,” close with World Premiere of “Verticals”

The ninth annual Napa Valley Film Festival (NVFF) has announced its film line-up, including Opening and Closing Night screenings. NVFF returns this fall with its five-day festival showcasing the year’s best new independent films, November 13-17. Organizers will showcase Napa Valley’s finest food and wine at all special events, including the Festival Gala, VIP receptions and Vintner Circle dinners, and will feature a lively series of filmmaker-chef collaborative demonstrations at the Monogram Appliances Demonstration Kitchen at the Oxbow Commons in downtown Napa. The seven screening venues located throughout the Valley include the Archer Hotel Napa, the historic Cameo Cinema, the CIA at Copia, Charles Krug Winery, Lincoln Theater, Native Sons, and the Uptown Theatre.

Napa Valley Film Festival Logo

We are excited to release another eclectic selection of highly-curated comedies and dramas from established and emerging filmmakers,” said Napa Valley Film Festival CEO Tom Tardio. “These films consist of inspiring and compelling stories that will thoroughly engage and entertain our festival-goers. At the intersections of film, food, and wine, the festival continues to deliver tremendously unique and exclusive experiences that only a world-class destination such as Napa Valley can provide and only that NVFF can deliver.”

Sneak Preview Night, Opening Night and Closing Night

NVFF will kick off with their Sneak Preview Night on Tuesday, November 12 with a special presentation of 20th Century Fox’s Ford v Ferrari. The film is inspired by the remarkable true story of visionary American car designer Carroll Shelby and the fearless British driver Ken Miles. Directed by James Mangold, the film stars Matt Damon, Christian Bale, Jon Bernthal, Caitriona Balfe, Tracy Letts, Josh Lucas, Noah Jupe, Remo Girone and Ray McKinnon.

The festival’s official Opening Night film on Wednesday, November 13 is Warner Bros.’ Just Mercy, a powerful and thought-provoking true story following young lawyer Bryan Stevenson and his history-making battle for justice. The film is directed by Destin Daniel Cretton and stars Michael B. Jordan, Brie Larson and Jamie Foxx.

Closing the festival on Sunday, November 17 is SOMMTV’s world premiere of Verticals, a series that showcases Napa Valley winemakers and the human condition through a bottle of wine. This premiere is also the launch of SOMMTV, the first food and wine dedicated streaming platform. The series is directed by Jason Wise.

Award Season Contenders

  • Clemency (Neon) – Years of carrying out death row executions have taken a toll on prison warden, Bernadine Williams. The emotional wedge in her marriage grows and memories of a recently botched execution plague her daily. As she prepares to end the life of another inmate, Bernadine must confront the psychological and emotional demons her job creates, ultimately connecting her to the man she is sanctioned to execute. Directed by Chinonye Chukwu and starring Alfre Woodard, Aldis Hodge, Wendell Price, Richard Schiff and Danielle Brooks.
  • Portrait of a Lady on Fire (Neon) – In 1760 France, Marianne is commissioned to paint the wedding portrait of Héloïse, a young woman who has just left the convent. Marianne arrives under the guise of companionship with the reluctant bride-to-be, observing Héloïse by day and secretly painting her by firelight at night. As the two women orbit one another, intimacy and attraction grow as they share Héloïse’s first moments of freedom. Héloïse’s portrait soon becomes a collaborative act of and testament to their love. Directed by Céline Sciamma and starring Noémie Merlant and Adèle Haenel.
  • To The Stars (Samuel Goldwyn Films) – Iris, a bespectacled and reclusive teen living in a god-fearing Oklahoma town in the 1960s, endures the booze-induced antics of her mother and daily doses of bullying from her classmates. She finds solace in Maggie, the charismatic and enigmatic new girl at school, who hones in on Iris’s untapped potential and coaxes her out of her shell. When Maggie’s mysterious past can no longer be suppressed, the small community is thrown into a state of panic, leaving Maggie to take potentially drastic measures and inciting Iris to stand up for her friend and herself. Directed by Martha Stephens and starring Kara Hayward, Liana Liberato, Malin Akerman, Tony Hale, Shea Whigham and Adelaide Clemens.
  • Troop Zero (Amazon Studios) – In a tiny Georgia town in 1977, a motherless girl named Christmas Flint dreams of life beyond the confines of her trailer-park home and hopes to make contact with outer space. When Christmas learns that the winners of the annual Birdie Scout Jamboree talent contest will be included on a recording to be sent into space for posterity, she tries to join the local Scouts troop. When she is rejected by the snobbish group of girls and their uptight leader Miss Massey, Christmas rallies a group of elementary-school outliers to start their own chapter. Troop Zero is an endearing and magical tale of friendship and individuality. Directed by Bert & Bertie and starring Viola Davis, Mckenna Grace, Jim Gaffigan, Mike Epps, Charles Shotwell and Allison Janney.

Special Presentations

  • Code & Response – 2018 was the worst year on record for natural disasters. Code & Response takes us into the heart of the aftermath of some of those disasters as we meet the first responders who are supported by innovative technology. Follow four coders from around the world (Japan, Puerto Rico, California, and Mexico) to learn about why they are getting involved, as well as how they are building technologies to help first responders save lives. Directed by Austin Peck.
  • Elsewhere – Bruno is still mourning his wife’s passing when his in-laws evict him from the home he and wife built together. Unwilling to let his beloved home fall into disrepair, Bruno sneaks back to the house and meets the new owner of the home, Marie. Determined to be the only person to make any changes to the house he built, Bruno poses as a local handyman and Marie hires him for renovations. As the two begin work on the house, Bruno is forced to face the reality that his wife is gone, and he learns to move on from his grief. Directed by Hernán Jiménez and starring Aden Young, Parker Posey, Ken Jeong, Beau Bridges and Jacki Weaver. World Premiere
  • From the Vine – Mark, a downtrodden CEO, is experiencing an ethical crisis at work. In an attempt to re-calibrate his moral compass, he travels back to his hometown in rural Italy. He finds newfound purpose by reviving his grandfather’s old vineyard, offering the small town of Acerenza a sustainable future and reconnecting with his family in the process. Combining magical realism and Italian neorealism, and set against the backdrop of Italian wine country, From the Vine is about returning to your roots and redefining your life when you’re at the bottom of the barrel. Directed by Sean Cisterna and starring Joe Pantoliano, Wendy Crewson, Marco Leonardi, Paula Brancati and Tony Cisterna.
  • Gay Chorus Deep South – In response to a wave of discriminatory anti-LGBTQ laws in Southern states, the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus embarks on a tour of the American Deep South. The tour brings a message of music, love, and acceptance to communities and individuals confronting intolerance. What emerges is a less divided America, where the lines that separate us in faith, politics, and sexual identity are erased through the soaring power of music, humanity, and a little drag. Directed by David Charles Rodrigues.
  • I Want My MTV – A nostalgic and thrilling ride, I Want My MTV takes its audience back to the beginning, when the idea of a television channel devoted to only videos seemed destined for failure. The chronicling of this unique journey provides a peek into how a team of young executives were tasked with growing this seed of an idea, which would quickly flourish into a beloved and often controversial cultural juggernaut. Features commentary from Sting, Billy Idol, The Eurythmics, Jerry Cantrell, Pat Benatar, and more. Directed by Patrick Waldrop and Tyler Measom, and starring Sting, Billy Idol, Pat Benatar, Dee Snider, Norman Lear, The Eurythmics , Darryl McDaniel and Jerry Cantrell.
  • It All Begins with a Song: The Story of the Nashville Songwriter – It All Begins with a Song: The Story of the Nashville Songwriter is a celebration of one of music’s most important yet underrated forces: the songwriter. These songwriters have penned melodies and lyrics for some of the biggest stars in the music industry, yet few know their names. Pull back the curtain to reveal the process of creating a successful song and learn more about the origins of some of the world’s most iconic hits. Directed by Anthony ‘Chusy’ Haney-Jardine.
  • The Land of High Mountains – The Land of High Mountains is the inspiring true story of the only pediatric hospital in Haiti. In a country where one third of the population is under fourteen years of age and foreign NGOs consistently come and go, Saint Damien Pediatric Hospital has been providing life-saving healthcare to the most vulnerable families for over thirty years. This is a powerful account of the incredible people, both Haitian and foreign who, despite encountering every conceivable obstacle, are working together to create a brighter future for their patients and for Haiti. Directed by Will Agee and starring Liferne Forestal, Phadoul Amisial, Fr. Rick Frechette, Dr. Renee Alce, Dr. Jacqueline Gautier, Fr. Enzo Del Brocco, Veline , Gaelle , Lourdy , Pierre Nadine, Sainfleur Jean Israel, Marie Yolene, Vilaire Meralin and Christiana Liberis.
  • Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound – Since the invention of sound in films, sound designers have been influencing the landscape of cinema. Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound shines a spotlight on the unsung heroes of sound design throughout cinematic history. Through interviews with legendary directors and some of the industry’s most-respected sound designers, we revisit film classics that helped shape the way we listen to and experience films today. Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound reveals the hidden impact of sound in cinema and how the auditory intake of a film holds so much power over an individual’s experience of storytelling. Directed by Midge Costin.
  • Martha: A Picture Story – In the 1970s, Martha Cooper was one of a handful of photographers documenting the first vivid images of graffiti appearing on New York City’s subway carriages. 20 years later, she discovers that her book Subway Art has become one of the most stolen books of all time – inspiring the spread of graffiti around the globe and making Martha an unexpected icon of the street art world. Now, at age 75, Martha must navigate her way through the vastly changed culture of the modern world. Directed by Selina Miles.
  • My Beautiful Stutter – After lifetimes of bullying, isolation, and failed fluency training, witness the incredible transformation of five kids who stutter when they enter a groundbreaking program through SAY, The Stuttering Association. Over the course of a year of events and workshops, these young people of wildly different backgrounds experience SAY’s revolutionary mantra: it’s okay to stutter. Directed by Ryan Gielen and starring Taro Alexander.
  • RUTH – Justice Ginsburg in Her Own Words – How does a person with three strikes against her rise to the highest court in the land, the U.S. Supreme Court? RUTH – Justice Ginsburg in Her Own Words tells the improbable story of how Ruth Bader Ginsburg became an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. It also reveals both the public and private sides of a resilient, resourceful woman who has survived the hostility of the profoundly male universe of government and law to become a revered Justice and icon for gender equality and women’s rights. Directed by Freida Lee Mock and starring Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Justice Goodwin Liu, Dean Erwin Chemerinsky, Irin Carmon, Shana Knizhnik, Delegate Jennifer Carroll Foy, M.E. Freeman, Lilly Ledbetter and Kathleen Peratis.
  • The Three Drinkers Do Scotch Whisky – Packed full of humour, personality, and flavour, The Three Drinkers do Scotch Whisky is a drinks-focussed travelogue, where three friends embark on a road trip through Scotland. From Dufftown and Islay to Elgin and Jura, they journey through breath-taking landscapes, visiting iconic distilleries and touching on Scottish culture, tourism and traditional dishes you can’t even pronounce. This is whisky for a new, global audience, from twenty-one to ninety-one. Directed by David Agrawal. World Premiere

OTHER FILM HIGHLIGHTS

Core Competitions (previously announced)

Narrative Competition

  • Bring Me an Avocado, Directed by Maria Mealla and starring Bernardo Peña, Sarah Burkhalter, Molly Ratermann, Candace Roberts.
  • Here Awhile, Directed by Tim True and starring Anna Camp, Steven Strait, and Joe Lo Truglio. World Premiere
  • Justine, Directed by Stephanie Turner and starring Glynn Turman, Darby Stanchfield, Josh Stamberg, Daisy Prescott, and Stephanie Turner.
  • Lucky Grandma, Directed by Sasie Sealy and starring Tsai Chin, Corey Ha, Michael Tow, Woody Fu, Yan Xi, Wai Ching Ho, and Clem Cheung.
  • The Nomads, Directed by Brandon Eric Kamin and starring Tika Sumpter and Tate Donovan.
  • Run This Town, Directed by Ricky Tollman and starring Ben Platt, Mena Massoud, Nina Dobrev, Damian Lewis, Jennifer Ehle, and Scott Speedman.
  • Standing Up, Falling Down, Directed by Matt Ratner and starring Billy Crystal, Ben Schwartz, Eloise Mumford, Grace Gummer, Caitlin McGee, David Castaneda, Debra Monk, and Jill Hennessy.
  • Stealing School, Directed by Li Dong and starring Celine Tsai, Jonathan Keltz, Michelle Monteith, Mpho Koaho, Darrin Baker, Jonathan Malen, Matthew Edison, and Vas Saranga. World Premiere

Documentary Competition

  • I Am Human, Directed by Taryn Southern and Elena Gaby.
  • Latter Day Jew, Directed by Aliza Rosen.
  • Motherload, Directed by Liz Canning.
  • The Pollinators, Directed by Peter Nelson.
  • The Remix: Hip Hop X Fashion, Directed by Lisa Cortes and Farah X.
  • The Story of Plastic, Directed by Deia Schlosberg.
  • This Is My Home, Directed by Karl Nickoley.
  • Well Groomed, Directed by Rebecca Stern.

Verge

  • Come As You Are, Directed by Richard Wong.
  • Greener Grass, Directed by Dawn Luebbe and Jocelyn DeBoer.
  • Hosea, Directed by Ryan Daniel Dobson. World Premiere
  • Last Call, Directed by Gavin Michael Booth.
  • Only, Directed by Takashi Doscher.
  • Speed of Life, Directed by Liz Manashil.
  • Treasure Trouble, Directed by Dan Erickson.
  • The Way You Look Tonight, Directed by John Cerrito.

Culinary Cinema

  • Breaking Bread, Directed by Beth Elise Hawk.
  • Funke, Directed by Gab Taraboulsy.
  • Nose to Tail, Directed by Jesse Zigelstein.
  • Nothing Fancy: Diana Kennedy, Directed by Elizabeth Carroll.
  • Stage: The Culinary Internship, Directed by Abby Ainsworth.
  • A Taste of Sky, Directed by Michael Lei.

The festival will also feature Short Film Programs with:

  • 17 Narrative Shorts
  • 11 Documentary Shorts

The Napa Valley Film Festival (NVFF) is a five-day celebration that blends the art of film, food, and wine together. Discover the best new independent films of the year, savor exquisite cuisine paired with legendary wines, and create lasting memories found only in the Napa Valley. The Napa Valley Film Festival is presented by Cinema Napa Valley, a registered 501c3 non-profit organization headquartered in Napa, California. Cinema Napa Valley’s mission is to celebrate the cinematic arts and enrich the community by presenting an annual world-class festival and year-round education and outreach programs. The Napa Valley Film Festival takes place November 13-17, 2019. Visit napavalleyfilmfest.org for more information on passes and festival events.

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Presenting Sponsor: Rolls-Royce

Major Sponsor: Meadowood Napa Valley

Leading Sponsors: AVMS, Charles Krug Winery, Colorzone, DoNapa, Monogram, Raymond Vineyards, Viking Cruises, Westin Verasa Napa


Supporting Sponsors: Archer Hotel Napa, Blackbird Vineyards, Blanc Creatives, Cathay Pacific, De’Longhi, Estate Events by Meadowood, Farmstead at Long Meadow Ranch, Materra | Cunat Family Vineyards, Peroni Italy, The Studio by Feast It Forward, Twin Dolphin Los Cabos, Whole Foods Market, Yountville Chamber of Commerce

Media Sponsors: Travel + Leisure, Variety, Wine Spectator

Nordstrom Opens Its Doors At The SoNo Collection In Norwalk, CT

This New Location Marks The Company’s Second Connecticut Store and The First Of Two East Coast Openings This Fall

This past week, leading fashion retailer Nordstrom, Inc. opened the doors to Nordstrom the SoNo Collection, the company’s second full-line store in Connecticut. The three-level, 140,000 square-foot store features the latest store design, a brand-new service concept, a new beauty and wellness experience, and a comprehensive offering of clothing, shoes and accessories for the entire family. The first Nordstrom store in Connecticut opened at Westfarms Mall in Farmington in 1997.

Nordstrom Incorporated Logo

The SoNo Collection (100 N. Water St, Norwalk, CT 06854 +1-203-299-0701) is a new 83-store strong shopping, dining, art, and entertainment destination located near I-95 in South Norwalk, Connecticut , just one hour outside of New York City. The SoNo Collection has a lot to offer, including an expansive selection of your favorite fashion retailers and an abundance of one-of-a-kind art and entertainment experiences in Fairfield County.

Nortdstrom’s newest store design concept includes lighter fixtures, more windows and natural light that connect the shopping experience to the outside world. The goal was to create spaces where customers want to spend their leisure time, to encourage a sense of discovery for new brands or styles they haven’t tried before.

Women’s apparel features fashion in a variety of price points including of-the-moment brands like rag & bone, Veronica Beard, FRAME, and Saloni; designer brands including Missoni, Carolina Herrera and Oscar de la Renta; and exclusive and limited distribution brands like Madewell, Topshop and more than 35 Nordstrom Made labels. In shoes, customers can find everything from Nike to Doc Martens to Christian Louboutin, including several Nordstrom Exclusive styles from Valentino, Prada, Golden Goose and Givenchy. The store also has four specialty handbag boutiques including Chloe, Longchamp, Givenchy and Mansur Gavriel.

Selection of Women’s Fashion at Nordstrom The SoNo Collection
Selection of Women’s Fashion at Nordstrom The SoNo Collection
Selection of Jeans at Nordstrom The SoNo Collection

Customers will also find the retailer’s latest beauty concept Nordstrom Beauty Haven, which highlights wellness, haircare and beauty tools with top trending brands and services to pamper customers from head-to-toe – whether they have 30-minutes or three hours. Services include:

  • Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Suite: A boutique brow experience with experts trained to reshape and sculpt using the Anastasia method.
  • Base Coat Nail Salon: Featuring manicures and pedicures using plant-based and mostly chemical-free products.
  • Light Salon: This light bar service brings convenient and effective five to sixty-minute treatments to customers using the latest LED technology. The facial bar offers various treatments ranging from spot treatments to peels.

Additional beauty brands include dedicated boutiques by Chanel, Atelier Cologne, Diptyque, Jo Malone, and Kiehl’s, as well as Charlotte Tilbury, Sulwhasoo, Arcona, Herbivore, Kopari and La Mer.

Selection of Men’s Fashion at Nordstrom The SoNo Collection
Selection of boots in the Shoe Salon at Nordstrom The SoNo Collection

Men’s Shoes and clothing include designer brands like Ksubi, Norse Projects, and Christian Louboutin, as well as Madewell Men, Patagonia and Topman, to name a few. The Kid’s Wear department features Tucker + Tate, Miles Baby and Mini Boden, and the store also has an At Home department, a full-service bistro-style restaurant Bazille, and Ebar, for artisan coffee and snacks.

Selection of handbags at Nordstrom The SoNo Collection

We’re eager to welcome customers to showcase our latest store design and some of the company’s most exciting new beauty and service concepts, in addition to great fashion at a breadth of price points,” said Molly Carmody, Nordstrom the SoNo Collection store manager. “We can’t wait for customers to experience the best of what we have to offer and look forward to welcoming them right here in Norwalk.”

As the retail landscape continues to evolve, Nordstrom is looking to make shopping in-store and online a seamless experience that’s easy, convenient and serves customers on their terms. The answer? A new service concept called Express Services, launching at Nordstrom the SoNo Collection for the first time. This new department features a dedicated 2,700 sq. ft. area where customers can pick-up online orders, try them on, issue express returns and access in-store alterations and tailoring services all in one place. Additional services include Curbside Pickup, complimentary Personal Styling, bra and prosthesis fitters, and more.

Opening Day kicked off at 8 a.m. with Beauty Bash – a high energy beauty party – just outside the store’s SoNo Collection mall entrance. Customers enjoyed a preview of the store’s exciting cosmetics selection as well as one-on-one time with Nordstrom beauty experts who provided inside scoop on fall beauty trends. More than 320 employees welcomed customers when the doors officially opened at 10 a.m.

The night before opening, Nordstrom hosted Nordstrom Night Out – an opening party that raised more than $80,000 for Fairfield County’s Community Foundation and Domestic Violence Crisis Center. More than 1,000 guests were in attendance to experience an exclusive preview of the new store while enjoying cocktails, gourmet delights and desserts; entertainment from artists DJ Alkimist, Boutique Jazz and DJ Ian Wallace; fall fashion presentations and an opportunity to shop the season’s best looks.

At the end of the month, Nordstrom the SoNo Collection will be joined by Nordstrom NYC – the company’s first flagship store in New York City, opening October 24. NordstromThe Men’s Store NYC opened in April of 2018.

New Culinary Adventure Series, 100 Days, Drinks, Dishes & Destinations With Leslie Sbrocco, Debuts on American Public Television

A new 13-part culinary adventure series for American Public Television, 100 Days, Drinks, Dishes & Destinations (www.100DaysDrinksDishesDestinations.com) with libations expert, Leslie Sbrocco, debuts nationwide on October 26, 2019. 100 Days, Drinks, Dishes & Destinations is distributed by American Public Television.

100 Days Drinks Destinations Logo

As Sbrocco says, “I hope the show is a viewer’s virtual passport to delicious.”

An Emmy– & James Beard Award-winning wine author and food television host, Sbrocco’s job is to eat and drink the world…and she does it with passion. On the series, Leslie’s ever-expanding bucket list not only encourages viewers to spend 100 days visiting remarkable places, but also to indulge in hundreds of palate-pleasing experiences.

From classic eats to unexpected drinks, iconic attractions to undiscovered treasures, viewers are taken on a virtual vacation in every mouth-watering show as Leslie shares her knowledge and humorous take on traveling the world with glass and fork in hand.

Her fun-loving journeys around the globe kick off this Fall with six episodes, then another seven shows will begin airing in Spring of 2020. Each half-hour episode focuses on unique combinations of drinks, dishes and destinations that are woven together in a fabric of shared histories, cultural touchpoints, and fascinating people.

In the inaugural season, Leslie ventures to Europe and pairs Austrian sparkling wine, Sekt, with sausage at wurst stands in Vienna. She journeys to Linz, Austria, to sip schnapps and make Linzertorte. In Hungary, Leslie visits Tokaj’s centuries-old caves where sweet wine was made for Hungarian royals. Back in Budapest, she savors the flavors of goulash, hits hip ruin bars, and tastes legendary elixirs. In Normandy, France, Leslie imbibes liquid apple specialties —cider and Calvados —and crafts classic Camembert cheese.

Episodes in the United States include learning tea-steeping etiquette in San Francisco’s Chinatown with an 89-year-old master. Soaking in volcanic mud baths in California’s quaint town of Calistoga where Leslie not only dips in a toe, but dives in whole-heartedly. She strolls the streets of Nevada’s Virginia City to drink in its eclectic history. And, don’t forget Honky Tonk, whiskey and hot chicken in Nashville, Tennessee, and Beauty, Biltmore, and Beer in Asheville, North Carolina.

Host Leslie Sbrocco (PRNewsfoto/100 Days, Drinks, Dishes & Dest)

An award-winning author, speaker, wine consultant, television host, and founder of the new multi-media company, Thirsty Girl, Leslie Sbrocco’s entertaining approach makes exploring wine, travel, and food fun.

Sbrocco’s first book, Wine for Women: A Guide to Buying, Pairing and Sharing Wine (William Morrow), has been excerpted by two national magazines — Redbook and Family Circle — and won the coveted Georges Duboeuf Best Wine Book of the Year award. Her second book, The Simple & Savvy Wine Guide, (William Morrow) was released to wide acclaim and she is currently at work on her third book, Adventures of a Thirsty Girl.

As Tasting Notes columnist for Epicurious.com, and contributor to numerous online and print publications, Sbrocco’s monthly musings are enjoyed by thousands. Her work has been published in outlets such as O, the Oprah magazine, Coastal Living, Woman’s Day, Good Housekeeping, Glamour, and Santé.

Prior to completing Wine for Women, Leslie was a columnist for The New York Times online and Cooking with the Times and General Manager/Co-founder of WineToday.com, the wine site of The New York Times Company.

Whether appearing on television as the wine expert for the cooking show Seasonings, cable television’s On the Vine series, CBS’s Evening Magazine, or in regular appearances on the Today Show, Sbrocco’s humor and passion resonates with viewers. Her television project as host of the PBS series Check, Please! Bay Area won both the coveted James Beard award and three Emmy awards. Sbrocco is also a featured judge on the PBS national series, The Winemakers.

A sought-after speaker, Sbrocco has spoken at events ranging from O magazine‘s “Hi Gorgeous” tour to the American Dietetic Association national convention. She has been the keynote speaker at numerous wine events including the Boston Wine Expo, SF Food.Wine. Chefs, Pinot Noir New Zealand, and the Washington D.C. International Wine and Food show. Her corporate clients have included RedPrairie, Cisco Systems, Optos, Ketchum, Southern Wine and Spirits, Target, Jackson-Lewis, Vineyard Bank, and Fleishman-Hillard.

She has consulted for companies as varied as Harry & David, the Kimpton Hotel Group and Virgin America Airlines. She has also been a wine educator for Crystal Cruises and Holland America Cruise Lines. Furthermore, Sbrocco is a respected judge at a number of the largest wine competitions both domestically and globally including the Concours Mondial and the San Francisco and Los Angeles International Wine and Spirits Competitions.

American Public Television (APT) is the leading syndicator of high-quality, top-rated programming to the nation’s public television stations. Founded in 1961, APT distributes 250 new program titles per year and one-fourth of the top 100 highest-rated public television titles in the U.S. APT’s diverse catalog includes prominent documentaries, performance, news and current affairs programs, dramas, how-to programs, children’s series and classic movies. To find out more about APT’s programs and services, visit APTonline.org.

100 Days, Drinks, Dishes & Destinations is brought to you by KQED Presents. KQED serves the people of Northern California with a public-supported alternative to commercial media. An NPR and PBS affiliate based in San Francisco, KQED is home to one of the most listened-to public radio stations in the nation, one of the highest-rated public television services and an award-winning education program. A trusted news source and leader and innovator in interactive technology, KQED takes people of all ages on journeys of exploration — exposing them to new people, places and ideas. www.kqed.org.

This show is made possible by the generous support of the following underwriters:

– A family-owned company celebrating 17 years on the river, AmaWaterways offers unforgettable river cruises with 24 ships sailing Europe’s Danube, Rhine, Moselle, Main, Rhône, Seine, Garonne, Dordogne, Dutch and Belgian Waterways and Douro Rivers, Southeast Asia’s Mekong and Africa’s Chobe River. Led by experienced river cruise co-founders Rudi Schreiner and Kristin Karst, the company is renowned for its innovative stateroom design featuring unique “twin balconies”; its wellness activities including a wide choice of included shore excursions featuring biking and hiking options for the active traveler; and its award-winning dining—including The Chef’s Table specialty restaurant as well as complimentary fine wine, beer and soft drinks with lunch and dinner.

Josh Cellars offers bold, complex and approachable wines for drinking with family and friends. Sourced from vineyards across California, Josh Cellars offers eight varietals: Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Noir, Merlot, Rosé, Prosecco and a red blend, “Legacy.” Josh Cellars wines are available at retailers nationwide.

Visit Napa Valley is the official destination management organization for the Napa Valley, with a mission to promote, protect and enhance the region’s position as an attractive travel destination and enhance its public image as a dynamic place to visit, live and work. For additional information on the Napa Valley, or to plan your Napa Valley experience, please explore VisitNapaValley.com

Major Exhibition, Exploring How Designers Today Are Shaping The Future, To Premiere At The Philadelphia Museum Of Art, October 22, 2019–March 8, 2020

Designs for Different Futures is organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Art Institute of Chicago.

The role of designers in shaping how we think about the future is the subject of a major exhibition that will premiere at the Philadelphia Museum of Art this fall. Designs for Different Futures (October 22, 2019–March 8, 2020) brings together some 80 works that address the challenges and opportunities that humans may encounter in the years, decades, and centuries ahead. Organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and the Art Institute of Chicago, Designs for Different Futures will be presented at the Walker (September 12, 2020–January 3, 2021) and the Art Institute of Chicago (February 6–May 16, 2021) following its presentation in Philadelphia.

Among the questions today’s designers seek to answer are: What role can technology play in augmenting or replacing a broad range of human activities? Can intimacy be maintained at a distance? How can we negotiate privacy in a world in which the sharing and use of personal information has blurred traditional boundaries? How might we use design to help heal or transform ourselves, bodily and psychologically? How will we feed an ever-growing population?

“Another Generosity,” designed 2018 by Eero Lundén, Ron Aasholm, and Carmen Lee of Lundén Architecture Company in collaboration with Bergent, BuroHappold Engineering, and Aalto University (Courtesy of the designers). Photograph © Andrea Ferro. Image courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

While no one can precisely predict the shape of things to come, the works in the exhibition are firmly fixed on the future, providing design solutions for a number of speculative scenarios. In some instances, these proposals are borne of a sense of anxiety, and in others of a sense of excitement over the possibilities that can be created through the use of innovative materials, new technologies, and, most importantly, fresh ideas.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, stated: “We often think of art museums as places that foster a dialogue between the past and the present, but they also can and should be places that inspire us to think about the future and to ask how artists and designers can help us think creatively about it. We are delighted to be able to collaborate with the Walker Art Center and the Art Institute of Chicago on this engaging project, which will offer our visitors an opportunity to understand not only how designers are imagining—and responding to—different visions of the futures, but also to understand just how profoundly forward-looking design contributes in our own time to shaping the world that we occupy and will bequeath as a legacy to future generations.

“PhoeniX Exoskeleton,” designed around 2013 by Dr. Homayoon Kazerooni for suitX (Courtesy of the manufacturer). Photograph ©suitX. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.
Lia: The Flushable and Biodegradable Pregnancy Test,” designed 2018 by Bethany Edwards and Anna Couturier Simpson (Courtesy of the designer). Photograph courtesy of LIA Diagnostics. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

Thinking about the future has always been part of the human condition. It has also been a perennial field of inquiry for designers and architects whose speculations on this subject—ranging from the concrete to the whimsical—can profoundly affect how we imagine what is to come. Among the many forward-looking projects on view, visitors to Designs for Different Futures will encounter lab-grown food, robotic companions, family leave policy proposals, and textiles made of seaweed.

Some of these possibilities will come to fruition, while others will remain dreams or even threats,” said Kathryn Hiesinger, the J. Mahlon Buck, Jr. Family Senior Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700, who coordinated the exhibition in Philadelphia with former assistant curator Michelle Millar Fisher. “We’d like visitors to join us as we present designs that consider the possible, debate the inevitable, and weigh the alternatives. This exhibition explores how design—understood expansively—can help us all grapple with what might be on the horizon and allows our imaginations to take flight.”

Alien Nation: Parade 0,” designed 2017 by Lisa Hartje Moura for HEAD-Genève (Private Collection) Photograph © Head-Genève, Michel Giesbrecht, 2017. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

The exhibition is divided into 11 thematic sections. In Resources, visitors will encounter an inflatable pod measuring 15 feet in diameter, part of the work Another Generosity first created in 2018 by Finnish architect Eero Lundén and designed in this incarnation in collaboration with Ron Aasholm and Carmen Lee. The pod slowly expands and contracts in the space, responding to changing levels of carbon dioxide as visitors exhale around it, and provoking questions about the ongoing effect of the human footprint on the environment.

“Svalbard Global Seed Vault,” designed 2008 by Peter W. Søderman, Barlindhaug Consulting (Exhibition display courtesy of USDA Agricultural Research Service, National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation). Photograph courtesy of Global Crop Diversity Trust. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.
Recyclable and Rehealable Electronic Skin,” designed 2018 by Jianliang Xiao and Wei Zhang (Courtesy of the designer). Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019

The section titled Generations will explore ways in which the choices we make today may contribute to the well-being or suffering of those who come after us. Here, visitors will find a model of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, a repository that stores the world’s largest collection of crop seeds. Located within a mountain on a remote island near the Arctic Circle, the facility is designed to withstand natural or human-made disasters. The Earths section of the exhibition speculates on the challenges of extra-terrestrial communication in Lisa Moura’s Alien Nations installation and showcases typeface from the 2016 science-fiction film Arrival.

“Future Library,” 2014–2114, designed by Katie Paterson (Exhibition display gift of the Future Library Trust, 2018 and purchased with the European Decorative Arts Revolving Fund, 2018). Photograph © Bjørvika Utvikling by Kristin von Hirsch, 2017. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

In Bodies, designers grapple with choices about how our physical and psychological selves might look, feel, and function in different future scenarios. Featured here is one of the world’s lightest and most advanced exoskeletons, designed to help people with mobility challenges remain upright and active. Also notable is the CRISPR Kit, an affordable and accessible gene-editing toolbox, which has the potential to revolutionize biomedical research and open opportunities for gene therapy and genetic engineering.

“ZXX Typeface,” designed 2012, by Sang Mun (Courtesy of the designer). Photograph © Sang Mun. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

Intimacies is a section that explores how technologies and online interfaces may affect love, family, and community. Here, urban experiences of sex and love are the focus of Andrés Jaque’s Intimate Strangers, an audio-visual installation focusing on the gay dating app. Through internet-enabled devices, designers explore the possibility of digitally mediated love and sex, suggesting what advanced digital networks hold for human sexuality.

Cricket Shelter: Modular Edible Insect Farm,” designed 2016 by Mitchell Joachim (Courtesy of the designer). Photograph © Mitchell Joachim, Terreform ONE. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

Foods contains projects that explore the future of the human diet. Among them is a modular edible-insect farm, Cricket Shelter, by Terreform ONE, which offers a ready source of protein for impending food crises. A kitchen installation suggests how technology and design may contribute to new modes of food production, including an Ouroboros Steak made from human cells.

“Circumventive Organs, Electrostabilis Cardium (film still),” designed 2013 by Agi Haines (Courtesy of the designer). Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

Additional sections of the exhibition will focus on the future of Jobs and how Cities will function and look 100 years from now—with robotic baby feeders, driverless cars, and other developments—affording a glimpse at how we might navigate living beyond this planet. Shoes grown from sweat are among the innovations visitors will find in a section devoted to Materials, while Power will look at how design may affect our citizenship and help us retain agency over such essentials as our DNA, our voices, and our electronic communications in a future where the lines between record-keeping, communication, and surveillance blur. Data acknowledges and questions the different ways that information might be collected and used, with all its inherent biases and asymmetries, to shape different futures.

Raising Robotic Natives,” designed 2016 by Stephen Bogner, Philipp Schmitt, and Jonas Voigt (Courtesy of the designers) Photograph © Stephan Bogner, Philipp Schmitt, and Jonas Voigt. Image courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

The curatorial team is comprised of: at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Kathryn B. Hiesinger, The J. Mahlon Buck, Jr. Family Senior Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700, and Michelle Millar Fisher, formerly The Louis C. Madeira IV Assistant Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700; At the Walker Art Center, Emmet Byrne, Design Director and Associate Curator of Design; and at the Art Institute of Chicago, Maite Borjabad López-Pastor, Neville Bryan Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design, and Zoë Ryan, the John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design. Consulting curators are Andrew Blauvelt, Director, Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and Curator-at-Large, Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Colin Fanning, Independent Scholar, Bard Graduate Center, New York; and Orkan Telhan, Associate Professor of Fine Arts (Emerging Design Practices), University of Pennsylvania School of Design, Philadelphia.

Kathryn B. Hiesinger is the J. Mahlon Buck, Jr. Family Senior Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Her work focuses on decorative arts and design from the mid-nineteenth century to the present and includes the exhibitions and publications Zaha Hadid: Form in Motion (2011), Out of the Ordinary: The Architecture and Design of Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates (2001), Japanese Design: A Survey since 1950 (1994) and Design since 1945 (1983).

Michelle Millar Fisher is the Ronald C. and Anita L Wornick Curator of Contemporary Decorative Arts at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She is a graduate of the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and is currently completing her doctorate in architectural history at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She is the co-author, with Paola Antonelli, of Items: Is Fashion Modern? (2017).

Emmet Byrne is the Design Director and Associate Curator of Design at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. He provides creative leadership and strategic direction for the Walker in all areas of visual communication, branding, publishing, while overseeing the award-winning in-house design studio. He was one of the founders of the Task Newsletter in 2009 and is the creator of the Walker’s Intangibles platform.

Maite Borjabad López-Pastor is the Neville Bryan Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design at the Art Institute of Chicago. She is an architect and curator educated at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid and Columbia University, New York. She is the author and curator of Scenographies of Power: From the State of Exception to the Spaces of Exception (2017). Her work revolves around diverse forms of critical spatial practices, operating across architecture, art, and performance.

Zoë Ryan is the John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design at the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the editor of As Seen: Exhibitions That Made Architecture and Design History (2017) and curator of In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury (2019) and the 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial, The Future is Not What it Used to Be. Her projects explore the impact of architecture and design on society.

Centered on the innovative contemporary design objects, projects, and speculations of the exhibition’s checklist, the accompanying volume proposes design as a means through which to understand, question, and negotiate individual and collective futures, giving provocative voice to the most urgent issues of today. It asks readers to contemplate the design context within broader historical, social, political, and aesthetic spectrums. Designs for Different Futures addresses futures near and far, exploring such issues as human-digital interaction, climate change, political and social inequality, resource scarcity, transportation, and infrastructure.

The primary authors are Kathryn B. Hiesinger, Michelle Millar Fisher, Emmet Byrne, Maite Borjabad López-Pastor, and Zoë Ryan, with Andrew Blauvelt, Colin Fanning, Orkan Telhan, Juliana Rowen Barton, and Maude de Schauensee. Additional contributions include texts by V. Michael Bove Jr. and Nora Jackson, Christina Cogdell, Marina Gorbis, Srećko Horvat, Bruno Latour, Marisol LeBrón, Ezio Manzini, Chris Rapley, Danielle Wood, LinYee Yuan, and Emma Yann Zhang; and interviews with Gabriella Coleman, Formafantasma (Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin), Aimi Hamraie and Jillian Mercado, Francis Kéré, David Kirby, Helen Kirkum, Alexandra Midal, Neri Oxman, and Eyal Weizman.

Designs for Different Futures will be distributed by Yale University Press. The book was overseen by Philadelphia Museum of Art publishing director Katie Reilly and editors Katie Brennan and Kathleen Krattenmaker. It is designed by Ryan Gerald Nelson, Senior Graphic Designer at the Walker Art Center, under the direction of Walker design director Emmet Byrne.

Futures Therapy Lab

As part of the exhibition, visitors to the Philadelphia Museum of Art galleries will also encounter a space for community meetups, public programs, school visits, and self-directed activities. The Futures Therapy Lab will weave personal connections between visitors and the exhibition as part of a collaboration between the museum’s Education Department and the curatorial team. Weekly programs, many of which will occur on Pay-What-You-Wish Wednesday Nights, will connect visitors with designers, artists, and locally based creatives. The Futures Therapy Lab will contain a crowdsourced Futures Library that includes everything from science-fiction books to the exhibition catalogue. “Thinking about possible futures is both exhilarating and anxiety-provoking,” said Emily Schreiner, the Zoë and Dean Pappas Curator of Education, Public Programs. “The Futures Therapy Lab is a place for conversation, critique, and creativity in which visitors can imagine their own hopes, fears and solutions for the future through reflection, discussion, and art making.”

View Full Schedule of Related Public Programs

In Philadelphia, this exhibition is generously supported by the Annenberg Foundation Fund for Major Exhibitions, the Robert Montgomery Scott Endowment for Exhibitions, the Kathleen C. and John J.F. Sherrerd Fund for Exhibitions, Lisa Roberts and David Seltzer in Honor of Collab’s 50th Anniversary, the Women’s Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Laura and William C. Buck Endowment for Exhibitions, the Harriet and Ronald Lassin Fund for Special Exhibitions, the Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Exhibition Fund, and an anonymous donor.

Related Programs

The Futures Therapy Lab will host a series of weekly happenings:

Artists in the Lab

Artists and designers share their work through talks, demonstrations, and workshops. Wednesday Nights, 5:00–8:45 p.m.

The Designer is In

Talk it out. One-on-one sessions with local designers offer new perspectives on your everyday life. Thursdays & Saturdays, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Sci-Fi Sundays

Drop-in readings that explore narratives of the future. Select Sundays, 2:00–3:00pm

Dr.Organic® Lands in The United States

Dr.Organic®, a full range, award-winning personal care brand founded in the United Kingdom is now available in the US. Inspired by a need for naturally-sourced, effective and affordable skincare products, the brand prides itself on a selection of organic, active ingredients that are cruelty free and free from parabens, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), artificial colors, phthalates, petroleum, glycols, cocamide diethanoalamine (DEA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), isothiazolinones, mineral oil, and silicones. Dr.Organic is now available on Ulta.com and will be available exclusively in-store at select Ulta locations nationwide beginning Sunday, October 20.

Dr.Organic®

Today, more than 40% of women say that “made with organic or natural ingredients” is one of their top three reasons for choosing new skincare products, making Dr.Organic a must-have for skincare enthusiasts this fall.§

Clean beauty^ means the world to us, and more importantly, consumers are looking for organic, naturally-sourced options. That’s why we knew we had to bring this premium UK brand stateside,” says Rimma Fehling, VP of Incubator and New Ventures at The Nature’s Bounty Co. “Until now, it was difficult to find a collection that is organic while also being affordable and effective – Dr.Organic fills this important gap in the beauty space.

Dr.Organic® Full Product Line

Dr.Organic includes four key ingredient ranges – Aloe Vera, Rose, Snail Gel, and Tea Tree. Each collection targets a different skin area, from fine lines and oil control to dryness. Additionally, Aloe Vera provides deep nourishing and hydrating benefits to the skin. Collection details include:

Dr.Organic® Rose Collection
  • Aloe Vera: Harvested from Mexico, organic Aloe Vera is a naturally hydrating ingredient renowned for cooling, calming and soothing dry, irritated and sun-exposed skin.
  • Rose: This heavenly scented essence restores and hydrates all skin types. Extracted from organic roses, Rose Otto is one of the highest quality rose oils in the world. Renowned for its beautiful floral fragrance and naturally soothing properties.
  • Snail Gel: Rich in collagen, elastin and glycolic acid, snail mucin naturally hydrates and rejuvenates aging skin. Snail farmers discovered the healthy aging properties of snail mucin when they realized how soft their hands felt after a day’s work. Dr.Organic gel is humanely sourced from snails living in natural habitats in France.
  • Tea Tree: Known for its purifying properties, Tea Tree oil is ideal for balancing out oily and combination skin. Hailing from Australia, organic Tea Tree Oil is a stimulating essential oil trusted by the Aborigines for centuries.
Dr.Organic® Snail Collection

The full 20-piece collection includes:

Aloe Vera

Dr.Organic® Aloe Collection
Dr.Organic® Tea Tree Collection

The Nature’s Bounty Co. is a privately held, global leader in health and wellness with a rich history and proven track record in the nutritional market. As a manufacturer, marketer and online seller of vitamins, dietary supplements, minerals, herbals, protein bars and powders, and ethical beauty products, the company is committed to supporting consumers’ wellness needs through high quality products backed by science. The brands of The Nature’s Bounty Co. are some of the most trusted in the world including Nature’s Bounty®, Pure Protein®, Solgar®, Osteo Bi-Flex®, Dr.Organic®, Sundown®, Body Fortress®, MET-Rx® and Ester-C®.

§ Source: Kantar Consulting 2018 USM Beauty Concerns for Females Data

^Clean defined as all products free from parabens, sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), artificial colors, phthalates, petroleum, glycols, cocamide diethanoalamine (DEA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), isothiazolinones, mineral and silicones

Philadelphia Museum of Art Presents Major Exhibition Highlighting The Art to Wear Movement

This fall, the Philadelphia Museum of Art presents Off the Wall: American Art to Wear, (November 10, 2019 – May 17, 2020) a major exhibition that highlights a distinctive American art movement that emerged in the late 1960s and flourished during the following decades. It examines a generation of pioneering artists who used body-related forms to express a personal vision and frames their work in relation to the cultural, historical and social concerns of their time. Focusing on iconic works made during the three decades between 1967 and 1997, the exhibition features over 130 one-of-a-kind works by more than sixty artists. Comprised primarily of selections from a promised gift of Julie Schafler Dale, it will also include works from the museum’s collection and loans from private collections. Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same title, co-published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and CEO, said: “This exhibition will introduce to our visitors an exceptionally creative and adventurous aspect of American art which took the body as a vehicle for its expression. We are not only deeply grateful to Julie Dale for her extraordinary gifts and support of the museum but also see this as an opportunity to acknowledge the dynamic role she played in nurturing the growth and development of this movement.”

Susanna Lewis, Moth Cape, 1979. Machine knitted, appliquéd wool; beads. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

The champions of Art to Wear during the early years were a few forward-thinking museums, among them New York’s Museum of Contemporary Crafts (Museum of Art and Design), collectors, and galleries such as Sandra Sakata’s Obiko, founded in 1972 in San Francisco, and Julie Schafler Dale’s Julie: Artisans Gallery, which opened the following year on Madison Avenue in New York. For over 40 years, Dale’s gallery was a premier destination for presenting one-of-a-kind wearable works by American artists. Through her gallery installations and rotating window displays, she gave visibility to the Art to Wear movement. In 1986, she brought further recognition to the art form by publishing the seminal book Art to Wear—from which the title of this exhibition is taken—which provided in-depth profiles of artists alongside photographs by Brazilian fashion photographer Otta Stupakoff. Dale’s gallery closed in 2013.

Bill Cunningham, Griffin Mask, 1963. Molded, stitched, and glued feathers, sparterie, wire, jersey, and velour. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

Off the Wall is arranged in nine sections; the titles of some are derived from popular music of the ‘60s and ‘70s to suggest the wide-ranging concerns of the artists. The introductory section, The Times They Are A Changin’ (Bob Dylan, 1964), contains works by Lenore Tawney, Dorian Zachai, Claire Zeisler, Ed Rossbach, and Debra Rapoport to illustrate how textile artists in the late ‘50s and ‘60s liberated tapestry weaving from the wall, adapting it to three-dimensional sculptural forms inspired by pre-Columbian weaving.

Dina Knapp, See It Like a Native: History Kimono #1, 1982. Painted, appliquéd, and Xerox-transferred cotton, polyester, plastic, and paper. Promised gift of Julie Schafler Dale Collection.
Ana Lisa Hedstrom, Pieced Silk Faille Kimono, circa 1992. Pieced shibori dyed silk pique weave. The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.
Tim Harding, Garden: Field of Flowers, 1991. Quilted, layered, slashed and rayed cotton. 56 x 67 x 3 inches. Museum of Arts and Design, New York.

In 1969, a group of five students at Pratt Institute studying painting, sculpture, industrial design, multimedia, and graphic design taught each other how to crochet, leading to remarkable outcomes. Janet Lipkin, Jean Cacicedo, Marika Contompasis, Sharron Hedges, and Dina Knapp all created clothing-related forms that they would describe as wearable sculpture, thus establishing a cornerstone of the Art to Wear movement. A highlight in this section is a wool crochet and knit Samurai Top, 1972, by Sharron Hedges, modeled by the young Julie Dale for the book Creative Crochet, authored by two of the artist’s friends, Nicki Hitz Edson and Arlene Stimmel.

Sharron Hedges, Midnight Sky (Julie’s Coat), 1977. Wool, crocheted. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

The next section, Good Vibrations (Beach Boys, 1966), traces the migration of many of these young artists from the East Coast to the West Coast where they joined California’s vibrant artistic community and connected with Sandra Sakata’s Obiko. A pair of colorful denim hand-embroidered mini shorts by Anna VA Polesny embroidered while traveling conveys this new youthful spirit. Pacific Rim influences are evident in the Japanese kimono form as a blank canvas offering infinite possibilities for pattern and design. Katherine Westpahl’s indigo blue resist-dyed cotton work, A Fantasy Meeting of Santa Claus with Big Julie and Tyrone at McDonald’s, 1978, and Janet Lipkin’s Mexico at Midday, a coat made in 1988 are exceptional examples. A range of counter-culture influences, evoking ceremony and spirituality, pervade this section.

Ben Compton, Ivory Gypsy, 1974. Cotton Kota-weave, batiste, crochet lace, and ball fringe; nylon braid; hand-block printed, partially bleached and over-dyed, tie-dyed, appliquéd, and hand-and machine sewn. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Gift of Anne Byrne Kronenfeld. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

Come Together (The Beatles, 1969) responds to the popular use of assemblage in art-making, especially the use of nontraditional materials. It also looks at the art of performance, reflected in Ben Compton and Marian Clayden’s Nocturnal Moth, 1974, inspired by Federico Fellini’s film La Dolce Vita (1960). “Mother Earth,” a nod to the publication Mother Earth News Magazine, looks to nature and environmental concerns while This Land is Your Land (Woodie Guthrie, 1940) explores iconic American imagery including reference to the American West and Native American cultures. Examples in this section include Joan Ann Jablow’s Big Bird cape, 1977, made entirely of recycled bird feathers, and Joan Steiner’s Manhattan Collar, 1979, which reimagines New York’s skyline in miniature.

Joan Ann Jablow, Big Bird, 1977. Feathers, wool knit, silk/polyester. Courtesy Harrie George Schloss. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.
Susanna Lewis, Off We Go into the Wild Blue Yonder, 1977. Knitted and appliquéd wool, rayon, angora, satin, and lamé. Private Collection.
Nina Vivian Huryn, Tree Outfit, 1976. Tooled, painted, laced, and stitched leather, suede, antique shoe buttons, and satin. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

Other Worlds explores fantasy and science fiction, two genres that offered young people an escape from the period’s cultural and political upheavals. Noteworthy here are works by Jean Cacicedo and Nina Huryn, both of whom riff on one of the most widely read English language books at the time, J.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy Lord of the Rings (1965). Cacicedo responded with a portrait of Treebeard, 1973, a Tolkien character, while Huryn created her own fantasy world in Tree Outfit, with its flowing pants, loose shirt and leather sleeveless jacket containing forest and folklore imagery, a work made especially for Julie: Artisans Gallery in 1976. Other artists turned to dreams, such as Susanna Lewis, who created Moth Cape, 1979, in response to a nightmare that she had of a giant moth enveloping her body.

Debra Rapoport, Epaulets and Hood, 2017. Cardboard, used tea bags, egg cartons, paper, cork, feather. Courtesy of the artist.
Janet Lipkin, Flamingo Jacket, 1982. Hand-dyed, machine-knitted, and stuffed wool and angora. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.
Sheila Perez Ghidini, Combat Vest, circa 1985. Molded plastic figures on quilted plain weave supplemental warp and weft patterning. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

A section called I Am Woman (Helen Reddy, 1971) underscores the ways in which artists invoked feminism directly and indirectly in Art to Wear. Janet Lipkin, for example, invested her works with symbols of freedom while searching for new directions in her life, as seen in Bird Coat, 1972, Flamingo, 1982, and Transforming Woman, 1992. Other works like Combat Vest, 1985, by Sheila Perez, feature plastic toy soldiers as protective armor for the chest area, while Nicki Hitz Edson’s Medusa Mask, 1975, is a wild expression of fraught emotions surrounding the breakup of her marriage.

Nicki Hitz Edson, Medusa Mask, 1975. Crocheted wool. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.
Jo-Ellen Trilling, Preposition Jacket, 1989. Tinted and ink drawings on cotton canvas, pieced silk plain weave, rayon binding appliqué, plastic and metal skeletons appliqué and pendants. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

Colour My World (Chicago, 1970) reflects the buoyant rainbow color spectrum that was ubiquitous during this era. Recently published works on color theory by Johannes Itten and Josef Albers provided a cornerstone of the new art education. For Linda Mendelson, color, typography, and text became inseparable. She adapted Albers’s ideas relating to after-images in Big Red, and linked color progression with lines from a poem titled Coat by William Butler Yeats from which she drew inspiration. Other artists such as Tim Harding created an effect similar to impressionist brush strokes by slashing and fraying dyed fabrics, as seen in his colorful coat Garden: Field of Flowers, 1991.

Linda J. Mendelson, In Kyo-Kawara, 2015, Wool machine knitted, plastic buttons. Promised gift of The Julie Schaffler Dale Collection.

The final section Everybody’s Talkin’ (Harry Nilsson, 1969) explores the use of text in Art to Wear. JoEllen Trilling engages in visual word play using common prepositions on a jacket, while Jean Cacicedo channels her grief over her father’s death using words taken from the bible that celebrated his life in My Father’s House, 1994.

Anna VA Polesny, International Levi’s, 1973. Denim hand embroidered with cotton thread. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles, who organized the exhibition, said: “We are looking back at this period with a fresh lens through which to consider a uniquely American art form that continues to have a worldwide influence. With roots and connections in fine arts, fiber art, craft, performance and fashion, there are so many important artists to appreciate. For this reason I am delighted by the opportunity to cast a light on such extraordinary talents, including so many adventurous women who deserve much greater recognition.”

Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same name co-published the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press, co-authored by exhibition curators Dilys E. Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and independent textile scholar and curator Mary Schoeser, with a contribution written by Julie Schafler Dale. The volume provides the social, political, and artistic context for Art to Wear. ISBN 9780876332917.

Curators: Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles and Mary Schoeser, Independent Textile Historian and Curator

This exhibition has been made possible by Julie Schafler Dale, PNC, The Coby Foundation, the Arlin and Neysa Adams Endowment Fund, Catherine and Laurence Altman, the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other generous donors.

Exhibition Of Large-Scale, Immersive Installations to be Highlight of the Newly Expanded Museum of Modern Art, New York (MoMA)

The Museum of Modern Art will inaugurate its latest transformation on New York City’s Wesr 53rd Street with Surrounds: 11 Installations, opening in The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions, in The Peggy and David Rockefeller building, on October 21, 2019. The presentation, spanning the entire sixth floor, presents 11 watershed installations by living artists from the past two decades, all drawn from the Museum’s collection and on view at MoMA for the first time. Each installation will occupy its own gallery, providing an individualized, immersive experience.

Surrounds is organized by Quentin Bajac, former Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, Christian Rattemeyer, Harvey S. Shipley Miller Associate Curator for Drawings and Prints, Yasmil Raymond, Associate Curator, Department of Painting and Sculpture, Sean Anderson, Associate Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, and Joshua Siegel, Curator, Department of Film, with the assistance of Lucy Gallun, Associate Curator, Department of Photography, Erica Papernik-Shimizu, Associate Curator, Department of Media and Performance, Arièle Dionne-Krosnick, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, and Taylor Walsh, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints.

Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller. The Killing Machine. 2007. Pneumatics, robotics, electromagnetic beaters, dentist chair, electric guitar, CRT monitors, computer, various control systems, lights, and sound (approx. 5 min.). 9′ 10″ x 13′ 1″ x 8′ 2″ (118 x 157 x 98 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the Julia Stoschek Foundation, Düsseldorf, and the Dunn Bequest. © 2019 Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller. Photo: Seber Ugarte & Lorena López. Courtesy the artists and Luhring Augustine, New York.

Surrounds includes work by Jennifer Allora (American, b. 1974) and Guillermo Calzadilla (Cuban, b. 1971), Sadie Benning (American, b. 1973), Janet Cardiff (Canadian, b. 1957) and George Bures Miller (Canadian, b. 1960), Sou Fujimoto (Japanese, b. 1971), Sheila Hicks (American, b. 1934), Arthur Jafa (American, b. 1960), Mark Manders (Dutch, b. 1968), Rivane Neuenschwander (Brazilian, b. 1967), Dayanita Singh (Indian, b. 1961), Hito Steyerl (German, b. 1966), and Sarah Sze (American, b. 1969).

Mark Manders. Room with Chairs and Factory. 2002-2008.Wood, iron, rubber, painted polyester, painted ceramic, painted canvas, unpainted canvas, painted wig, chair, and offset print on paper. 125 1/4 x 94 1/2 x 159 1/2 inches; 318 x 240 x 405 cm (factory and figure), 29 1/2 x 57 1/2 x 36 inches; 74.9 x 146.1 x 91.4 cm (chair and newspapers).The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Committee on Painting and Sculpture Fund. © 2019 Mark Manders, courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York / Los Angeles

Each work included in the exhibition was conceived out of different individual circumstances—as a contribution to a biennial, as an element of a larger ongoing body of work, as a response to a classic work of art history, or as a stand-alone work unrelated to others—but the installations are united in their ambition and scope, marking decisive shifts in the careers of their makers and the broader field of contemporary art.

Allora & Calzadilla. Fault Lines. 2013. Ten metamorphic and igneous rocks, live performance by two boy soprano singers. Dimensions variable. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Bob Rennie. © 2019 Allora & Calzadilla. Installation view: Allora & Calzadilla: Fault Lines, Gladstone Gallery, New York, September 13 – October 11, 2014. Courtesy the artists and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels. Photography by David Regen

The exhibition is made possible by Bank of America, MoMA’s opening partner.

Generous funding is provided by Agnes Gund.

Leadership contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund, in support of the Museum’s collection and collection exhibitions, are generously provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley, Eva and Glenn Dubin, The Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund, Alice and Tom Tisch, The David Rockefeller Council, Anne Dias, Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., Kenneth C. Griffin, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro, The Keith Haring Foundation, and The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Major contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund are provided by the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, Clarissa Alcock and Edgar Bronfman, Jr., Agnes Gund, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

MoMA Audio is supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies.