Legendary Bootmaker Of The American West, Lucchese, Announces New Collaborations And Retail Partnership With Neiman Marcus

Ralph Lauren, Brandon Maxwell, King Ranch, and Erin Wasson Help Mark the Brand’s 135th Year in Business

Lucchese Bootmaker, headquartered in El Paso Texas, is celebrating its 135th anniversary this year with a variety of partnerships and capsule collections. Known for making the finest cowboys boots on the planet, Lucchese has always balanced rugged, frontier traditions with an appeal to those focused on aesthetic.

Lucchese-Fall-News-Press-Release-Image

Lucchese Fall News Press Release Image

Below are a few of the highlights of how Lucchese is marking its anniversary this year:

Erin Wasson

Erin Wasson in the Jacqueline Boot: Designed with Texas native Erin Wasson, the Jacqueline boot ($1,595 with free ground shipping) is a traditional western silhouette for the modern woman. The smooth black goat is accented by white stitch pull holes and piping. Single stitch welt construction. Leather sole. Handmade in Texas.

  • ERIN WASSON: Continuing their presence in the style arena, Lucchese just released a limited collection of fashion-focused boots with model/designer Erin Wasson. The brand has partnered with another iconic Texas brand — Neiman Marcus – to provide wider access to both traditional boots and fashion boots alike. This move signifies a shift in consumer demand, as exotic cowboy boots are now becoming a staple in consumer wardrobes, available at a wider range of retailers ranging from Western-focused to luxury fashion.

    The King Ranch Barn Boot

    The King Ranch Barn Boot

  • KING RANCH: Lucchese has partnered with another legendary Texas brand, the King Ranch, to produce a limited edition collection of boots that are rugged enough for the harsh environment of South Texas. In addition to this partnership, Lucchese has released a well-reviewed technical product called the Barn Boot, its first foray into the “work boot” category. The mud and grime releasing outsole and cushioned insole was an immediate hit with both new and long-time Lucchese loyalists.
  • RALPH LAUREN: In addition to staying true to its roots with traditional products, Lucchese was in the spotlight during New York Fashion Week in September. Ralph Lauren, who has worn Lucchese boots for many years, selected them as his favorite bootmaker. Lucchese worked with Mr. Lauren to create co-branded boots which debuted in Central Park at the legendary designer’s 50th-anniversary collection show.
  • BRANDON MAXWELL: Fashion designer and fellow Texan Brandon Maxwell used custom boots as the invite for guests at his Spring/Summer 2019 New York Fashion Week show.”It was a dream to work with Lucchese on our invitations,” said Brandon. “Lucchese is a quintessential Texas brand so to share this bit of my home state with our guests immediately showcased hospitality. Seeing videos of friends and guests receive this big Texas dose of generosity made it all the more special.

Texas-based Lucchese is a legendary bootmaker and iconic brand of the American West. Applying the same craftsmanship principles and techniques since 1883, Lucchese artisans use only the finest leathers, preeminent materials and a proprietary twisted cone last to construct boots of unrivaled quality, fit, comfort and style.

Let’s Have A Parade™: The World-Renowned Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade® Kicks Off The Holiday Season

The 92nd edition of the iconic holiday event ushers in the season with its signature giant character balloons floats of fantasy, the nation’s finest marching bands, whimsical performance groups, music’s biggest stars, and the one-and-only Santa Claus

Performers include Bad Bunny, Barenaked Ladies, Bazzi, Ally Brooke, Kane Brown, Brynn Cartelli, Jack & Jack, John Legend, Leona Lewis, Ella Mai, Tegan Marie, Martina McBride, Rita Ora, Carly Pearce, Pentatonix, Anika Noni Rose and the cast & Muppets of Sesame Street, Diana Ross, Sugarland, Ashley Tisdale, Mackenzie Ziegler and Johnny Orlando

A spectacle like no other awaits millions as the 92nd Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade® kicks off the holiday season. Set to march through the streets of New York City on Thursday, November 22 at 9:00 a.m., the nation will celebrate Thanksgiving gathered with family and friends and more than 8,000 volunteers. Dressed as clowns, guiding the flight of larger-than-life character balloons, bringing the beat in the nation’s best marching bands and entertaining the crowds with their show-stopping performances, these participants will inspire and delight the nation. With the time-honored phrase, Let’s Have a Parade™, the spectacle begins for more than 3.5 million spectators in New York City and more than 50 million television viewers nationwide.

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The world-renowned Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade® officially kicks off the season with the 92nd edition of the holiday tradition on Thursday, Nov. 22 at 9 a.m. ET. (Graphic: Business Wire)

This year’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will redefine spectacle with a jaw-dropping mix of must-see entertainment for millions of spectators,” said Susan Tercero, executive producer of Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. “Featuring an amazing line-up of high flying balloons, dazzling animated floats, world-class marching bands and performance groups, the nation’s top music artists, and of course, the one-and-only Santa Claus, the Macy’s Parade will once again herald the arrival of the holiday season.

The Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade is the nation’s biggest and most anticipated holiday celebration. Broadcast nationally on NBC, with millions of families nationwide tuning in to watch the excitement unfold, the TODAY Show’s Savannah Guthrie, Hoda Kotb and Al Roker will host the three-hour broadcast from 9 a.m. – noon (in all time zones).

The 92nd Annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade will begin at 9 a.m. from 77th Street and Central Park West. The procession will march to Columbus Circle, turn onto Central Park South and march down 6th Avenue/Avenue of the Americas. At 34th Street, the Parade will make its final turn west and end at 7th Avenue in front of Macy’s Herald Square.MTDP_LOGO_18_TRI_COLOR_highres

On 34th Street, Broadway’s best shows will take a star turn in front of Macy’s famed flagship with special performances. In addition, the show-stopping Radio City Rockettes® will bring their signature high-kicking magic to Herald Square.

Since November of 1924, the Macy’s Parade has enthralled the nation and become synonymous with the start of the holiday season. For the 92nd edition, the line-up will feature 16 giant character balloons; 43 novelty balloons, heritage balloons, balloonicles, balloonheads and trycaloons; 26 floats; 1,200 cheerleaders and dancers; more than 1,000 clowns; and 12 marching bands.

STARS ON PARADE

The star power along the Parade route and in homes across the country will feature some of the nation’s most exciting performers. Appearing onboard one of Macy’s signature floating stages will be Bad Bunny, Barenaked Ladies, Bazzi, Ally Brooke, Kane Brown, Brynn Cartelli, Jack & Jack, John Legend, Leona Lewis, Ella Mai, Tegan Marie, Martina McBride, Rita Ora, Carly Pearce, Pentatonix, Anika Noni Rose and the cast & Muppets of Sesame Street, Diana Ross with her children and extended family (including Rhonda Ross, Tracee Ellis Ross, Chudney Ross, Ross Naess and Evan Ross with wife Ashlee Simpson-Ross), Sugarland, Ashley Tisdale, Mackenzie Ziegler and Johnny Orlando; with a special appearance by the one-and-only Santa Claus. Continue reading

2018 Holiday Gift Guide: Lands’ End Makes It an Easier and Merrier 2018 Holiday Season Filled with Great Gifts, Traditions, and Warmth

Look to Lands’ End for a social, snuggable, shoppable and smart holiday seasonLands End Heritage Logo

There are gifts, and then there are gifts from Lands’ End. Each item is thoughtfully designed, meticulously crafted and made-to-order with ease so that the gift giver and recipient alike can experience the delight of quality, the heart of five-star customer service and the integrity of a company that cares. Lands’ End today unveils its 2018 Holiday and Christmas Collection filled with something special for everyone on the list. The complete collection can be found in the Holiday Shop at landsend.com.

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With its new Scientific Warmth Ratings Guide Families on Outerwear Choices, Lands’ End Offers a Coat for Every Level of Warmth this holiday season

There’s a quality at Lands’ End that permeates everything we do. From our designers to the pickers and packers in the warehouse, we carry with us the heart of first-rate customer service. We strive to make the holiday season easier for busy families with quality gifts that they’ll be proud to present,” said Gill Hong, EVP, chief merchant and head of international at Lands’ End.

Lands’ End offers timeless, classic style and is a part of many family traditions with gifts such as fine cashmere sweaters and our handstitched, personalized Needlepoint Stockings. But we’re also modern, with gift ideas that are social media friendly, easy to shop and heartwarming during this busy season, making Lands’ End the smart stop for all our customers’ holiday shopping.”

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Lands’ End Makes It an Easier and Merrier 2018 Holiday Season Filled with Great Gifts, Traditions, and Warmth

Social Snapshots

‘Tis the season for sharing memorable moments on social media. Soon, pages and profiles will be lit up with holiday scenes including favorite gift ideas. Lands’ End offers gifts ideas for social media mavens that will look great when scrolling on smartphones and tablets.Hol_hires_1

For a primo family photo “op,” family Christmas pajamas in the same Rich Red Multi Plaid will look fantastic for the Christmas day around-the-tree shots. Kids’ graphic tees in holiday themes including snowflakes, a Christmas tree and snow plows bring personality to holiday baking pics. For outdoor snow play shots, consider colorful down coats and jackets with faux fur trim around the hood along with vivid, cold-weather accessories including the Fair Isle Stripe Scarf, Beanie Hat and Convertible Mittens. Buffalo Check in red and navy can be seen throughout the Lands’ End gift collections in sweaters, wraps, slippers, accessories and more. This pattern stands out in just about any photo and brings the holiday spirit. Felt Animal Slippers for women with delightful creatures such as a sheep, polar bears, and even a cow will pop on the page when shown photographed alongside the Kids Critter Slippers with a snowman, a penguin and more.

Even the family dog has a place at Lands’ End. Look for a complete collection of dog vests, dog beds, collars, leashes and even dog treats and a new Pup Tent at Lands’ End. Since pets are special, plus make the most adorable photos, customers are encouraged to tag their dog sporting the latest looks from Lands’ End with #LandsEndPets. Continue reading

Brooks Brothers, America’s Oldest Retailer, Marks 200-Year of American Style Excellence

Company was Founded by Henry Sands Brooks, Two Hundred Years Ago April 7, 1818

On April 7, 2018, Brooks Brothers, America’s oldest retailer, reached its milestone 200-year anniversary. Since opening its doors on April 7, 1818, in New York City, Brooks Brothers has grown from a small family haberdasher to become a global brand that has shaped and defined American style through its product innovations.

Brooks Brothers Logo

Brooks Brothers logo

Our anniversary today marks a significant and historic milestone not only for Brooks Brothers but also for the retail industry,” said Claudio Del Vecchio, Chairman, and CEO of Brooks Brothers. “This is a moment to celebrate two hundred years steeped in both tradition and innovation.

American fashion today is a result of years of groundbreaking innovations and revolutionary disruptions by Brooks Brothers. While perhaps best known today as a “classic” brand, it is important to note that the brand’s founder, Henry Sands Brooks (1772 – 1833), was no traditionalist at all. He was actually a dandy and an influencer among his peers, always on the lookout for the newest and most novel styles for his emporium in lower Manhattan selling “every new style of cloth, of the finest quality, made to order in the best and most fashionable mode.”

Brooks Brothers 346 Madison Avenue Flagship Store NYC Entrance

Brooks Brothers 346 Madison Avenue Flagship Store NYC Entrance

It is therefore ironic that some of Brooks Brothers’ most classic items today were the result of either invention and innovation — many radical for their time. In fact, Brooks Brothers is notably responsible for the introduction and popularization of some of fashion’s most iconic and enduring items, including the navy blazer, the reverse striped rep tie, the polo coat and the Number One Sack Suit. Even today’s athleisure trend has its origins in Brooks Brothers’ adaptations of sports clothes for daily life — most notably the 1900 invention of the Original Polo® Button-Down Oxford shirt. Finally, Brooks Brothers was responsible for the single most significant contribution to fashion — ready-to-wear tailored clothing, which was introduced to America in the mid-1800s as a consequence of the Gold Rush.

BROOKS BROTHERS Fall/Winter 2018 FIRENZE PALAZZO VECCHIO JANUARY 2018

Brooks Brothers Recent Fashion Show — BROOKS BROTHERS Fall/Winter 2018 FIRENZE PALAZZO VECCHIO JANUARY 2018 — in Florence Italy – Jan 10, 2018 (Photo Credit: Dan Lecca)

This sartorial passion was passed down from Henry to his sons, Elisha, Daniel, Edward, and John: the actual Brooks Brothers. These were fashion’s earliest influencers. For the past two centuries — and straight through to today — Brooks Brothers has outfitted an ever-changing world and is consistently pursuing quality and innovation, always with a respect for the past and an eye toward the future.

A Selection of Brooks Brothers Milestones:

  • Before there was the Eiffel Tower, Big Ben, the Statue of Liberty, Grand Central Terminal, and the cities of Hollywood and Chicago, there was Brooks Brothers.
  • In 1818, Henry Sands Brooks opened clothing shop “H. & D. H. Brooks & Co” on the corner of Catherine and Cherry Streets. The first recorded transaction was actually a loan to a friend.
  • In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln wore a custom-made Brooks Brothers coat to his second inauguration. Sadly, he was also wearing it when he was assassinated a month later.

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    Brooks Brothers Original Polo Button Down Oxford

  • In 1900, Brooks Brothers invented the original button-down-collar shirt after noticing that polo players in England were pinning down their collars while playing.
  • In 1902, Brooks Brothers introduced the reverse-stripe rep tie, an adaptation of British regimental ties.
  • In 1915, Brooks Brothers opened its 346 Madison Avenue flagship store, where it remains today.
  • In 1953, Brooks Brothers invented the first ever non-iron shirt.
  • In 1957, Brooks Brothers introduced Argyle socks to America.
  • In 1961, Brooks Brothers designed the “#2 suit” — a favorite of longtime customer President John F. Kennedy.
  • In 1976, Brooks Brothers launched a full women’s collection.
  • In 1979, Brooks Brothers was one of the first international brands to expand to Japan.
  • In 2008, Brooks Brothers acquired Southwick in Massachusetts so that it could resume the manufacturing of tailored clothing in America.
  • In 2016, Brooks Brothers appointed Zac Posen as creative director for the Women’s Collection.

Throughout its history, Brooks Brothers have forged relationships with generations of customers: artists and politicians, working people and captains of industry, and Hollywood legends, as well as 40 out of 45 U.S. Presidents.

Today, Brooks Brothers currently have more than 280 stores in the United States and more than 700 locations internationally in 45 countries and continue to lead with a pioneering spirit, continually developing materials and designs that deliver performance, innovation and high-quality design.

New Exhibition Explores Lost And Censured Murals Of Los Angeles That Exposed Unequal Treatment Of Mexicans And Mexican Americans

¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicana/o Murals under Siege” provides a historical backdrop to issues of social justice that continue to plague California and the nation today

Murals became an essential form of artist response and public voice during the Chicana/o Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. They were a means of challenging the status quo and expressing both pride and frustration at a time when other channels of communication were limited for the Mexican American community. Because they threatened established authority, Chicana/o murals were often censored, neglected, whitewashed, or destroyed.

California Historical Society Murales Rebeldes

New Exhibition, “¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicano/a Murals under Siege”, Explores Lost And Censured Murals Of Los Angeles That Exposed Unequal Treatment Of Mexicans And Mexican Americans. (PRNewsfoto/California Historical Society).

The California Historical Society presents its latest exhibition and companion publication,“¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicano/a Murals under Siege”, which provides an important historical backdrop to issues of social justice that sparked outrage in California more than a half-century ago and continue today and provides insight to similar injustice that plague today’s socio-political environment. ¡Murales Rebeldes! will be on view at the galleries of the California Historical Society, located at 678 Mission Street in San Francisco, from April 7 to September 16, 2018. Continue reading

“No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” Opens March 30 at Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery

Exhibition Brings Large-Scale Installations From Famed Desert Gathering to Washington

Cutting-edge artwork created at Burning Man, the annual desert gathering that is one of the most influential events in contemporary art and culture, will be exhibited in the nation’s capital for the first time this spring. “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” will take over the entire Renwick Gallery building, exploring the maker culture, ethos, principles and creative spirit of Burning Man. Several artists will debut new works in the exhibition. In addition to the in-gallery presentation, the Renwick exhibition will expand beyond its walls for the first time through an outdoor extension titled “No Spectators: Beyond the Renwick,” displaying sculptures throughout the surrounding neighborhood.

Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Totem of Confessions, 2015. Photo by Daniel L Hayes.

Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Totem of Confessions, 2015. Photo by Daniel L Hayes.

Burning Man is both a cultural movement and a thriving temporary city of more than 75,000 people that rises out of the dust for a single week each year in late summer in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. During that time, enormous experimental art installations are erected, some of which are then ritually burned to the ground. The desert gathering is a uniquely American hotbed of artistic ingenuity, driving innovation through its philosophies of radical self-expression, community participation, rejection of commodification and reverence for the handmade.

The scale, the communal effort and the technical challenges inherent in creating works for the desert are part of what sets Burning Man apart from other art experiences,” said Stephanie Stebich, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “It is an amazingly creative laboratory where innovators go to play and to push the boundaries of their craft. Displaying the art of Burning Man at the Renwick is the latest example of our focus on new directions in craft and making.”

FoldHaus, Shrumen Lumen, 2016. Photo by Rene Smith.

FoldHaus, Shrumen Lumen, 2016. Photo by Rene Smith.

Nora Atkinson, the museum’s Lloyd Herman Curator of Craft, is organizing the exhibition in collaboration with the Burning Man Project, the nonprofit organization responsible for producing the annual Burning Man event in Black Rock City, for facilitating and extending the culture that has issued from Burning Man into the wider world and for cultivating its principles reflecting an immediate, non-commercial and participatory culture. The outdoor extension of the exhibition is presented in partnership with Washington, D.C.’s Golden Triangle Business Improvement District, a 43-square-foot neighborhood that stretches from the White House to Dupont Circle. The Burning Man community across the globe was instrumental in suggesting artworks for inclusion in the exhibition.

No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” opens March 30, 2018. The Renwick is the sole venue for the exhibition, which will close in two phases. The first floor will showcase works by Candy Chang, Marco Cochrane, Duane Flatmo, Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Five Ton Crane Arts Collective, Scott Froschauer, Android Jones and Richard Wilks and will close Sept. 16, 2018. The second floor, featuring works by David Best, FoldHaus Art Collective, Aaron Taylor Kuffner, HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu), Christopher Schardt and Leo Villareal, will remain on view through Jan. 21, 2019. “No Spectators: Beyond the Renwick,” will be presented in the surrounding neighborhood through December 2018. Continue reading

New-York Historical Society To Explore “Fashion, Feathers, And The Rise Of Animal Rights” Activism In Honor Of Landmark Migratory Bird Reaty Act Centennial

“Feathers: Fashion and the Fight for Wildlife” On View April 6 – July 15, 2018

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Unidentified maker. Accessory set, including muff and tippet, 1880–99, United States Herring Gulls, feathers, silk. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection, 2009.300.2050a-c. This unusual muff and tippet, made with four adult Herring Gulls harvested during breeding season, demonstrates how accessory manufacturers exploited these birds. Gulls are and were great scavengers, and continue to be instrumental in cleaning our shorelines. The 19th-century fashion for their feathers and bodies, however, nearly drove them into extinction.

The New-York Historical Society presents a special exhibition that melds fashion, activism, and the history of the groundbreaking Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Feathers: Fashion and the Fight for Wildlife, on view April 6–July 15, 2018, examines the circumstances that inspired early environmental activists—many of them women and New Yorkers—to champion the protection of endangered birds. The exhibition showcases bird- and plumage-embellished clothing and accessories. It also features original watercolors by John James Audubon of birds endangered before the passage of the statute, models for The Birds of America, from the Museum’s renowned collection. The exhibition is part of the Year of the Bird, a centennial celebration of the Act organized by National Geographic, the National Audubon Society, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and BirdLife International. Recordings of bird songs from The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology—together with objects on loan from other institutions, books, ephemera, and photographs—animate the narrative.

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John James Audubon (1785–1851), Tundra Swan (Cygnus columbianus), Study for Havell pl. 411, 1838. Watercolor, graphite, oil, black ink, black chalk, and white gouache? with touches of pastel and glazing on paper, laid on card. Purchased for the New-York Historical Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.411 Swans’ down, the soft, fine, under-feathers, of swans were used for trimming clothes—as in the evening dress on display—and for cosmetic powder puffs. Tundra Swans once nested over most of North America but disappeared rapidly as civilization advanced westward. By the 1930s, fewer than 100 remained south of Canada. With protection from hunting and the disturbance of plumers, northwestern populations have rebounded. Today, their population is stable enough to sustain a limited hunting season in some areas.

Administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 was one of the first federal laws to address the environment, prohibiting the hunting, killing, trading, and shipping of migratory birds. It also regulated the nation’s commercial plume trade, which had decimated many American bird species to the point of near extinction.

Feathers: Fashion and the Fight for Wildlife commemorate the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act by delving into history and examining the economic and social circumstances that inspired the early environmentalists and activists who lobbied for this consequential legislation,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president, and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “As New York was the center of the nation’s feather trade, the exhibition also investigates how the act impacted the city’s feather importers, hat manufacturers, retailers, and fashion consumers—as well as how New York women played an important role in pushing for the legislation.”

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John James Audubon (1785–1851) with Maria Martin (1796–1863), Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus), Study for Havell pl. 379, 1836–37. Watercolor, graphite, black ink, and gouache with touches of pastel and selective glazing on paper laid on card. Purchased for the New-York Historical Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.379. Audubon painted three species of North American hummingbirds. He never saw the western Rufous Hummingbird alive, but painted it from specimens sent to him by the naturalist Thomas Nuttall. While naturalists always admired the hummingbirds they studied, the larger public’s appreciation of these sensationally beautiful creatures resulted from exposure in public arenas. Many pieces of hummingbird jewelry, like the Red-legged Honeycreeper earrings seen in the exhibition, were produced in England by Harry Emanuel, who in 1865 patented a process for insetting the heads in silver and gold mounts.

N-YHS Oppenheimer Editions AWC Plate 321 Roseate Spoonbill

John James Audubon (1785–1851), Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), Study for Havell pl. 321, ca. 1831–32; 1836. Watercolor, graphite, gouache, and black ink with touches of glazing on paper laid on Japanese paper. Purchased for the New-York Historical Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.321. Audubon admired these prehistoric-looking, wading birds, the largest North American member of the ibis family. The beauty of their feathers brought the species to the brink of extinction by 1920. Plume hunters invaded colonies to slaughter the birds for fans sold in the tourist trade. They survived after the Audubon Society dispatched wardens to protect them and urged the passage of strict conservation laws. Today, the Roseate Spoonbill is one of the great success stories of the conservation movement.

The first gallery of the exhibition, “A Fancy for Feathers,” presents examples of the late 19th- and early 20th-century fashion including feathered hats, boas, fans, aigrettes, jewelry, and clothing. Highlights include a gold and diamond aigrette hair ornament (1894) featuring the wispy feathers of a Snowy or Great Egret, which were scornfully called the “white badge of cruelty” by activists; a muff and tippet accessory set (1880–99) composed of four adult Herring Gulls created during a craze for gulls that nearly drove the sea birds to extinction; a folding brisé fan of swirling white feathers (1910–29); and a pair of earrings inset with hummingbird heads (ca. 1865). Painted miniatures on view from the late 19th and early 20th centuries portray women adorned with bird plumes, such as one professed bird lover, wearing a hat decorated with dyed ostrich feathers while holding an American robin and surrounded by caged birds. Feathers also adorned men’s regalia and hats.

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Unidentified maker. Red-Legged Honeycreeper hummingbird earrings, ca. 1865 Probably London, England Preserved bird, gold, metal. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Alfred Z. Solomon and Janet A. Sloane Endowment Fund, 2013, 2013.143a, b. Animal parts and insects decorated late 19thcentury jewelry. In 1865, London jeweler Harry Emanuel patented a method to inset hummingbird heads, skins, and feathers into gold and silver mounts. As objects of beauty as well as scientific fascination, the dazzling birds’ heads and feathers were prized as earrings, necklaces, brooches, and fans.

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George Bird Grinnell (1849–1938) From Nathaniel Pitt Langford, Diary of the Washburn Expedition to the Yellowstone and Firehole Rivers in the year 1870, n.p. St. Paul, MN: Yellowstone National Park, 1905 New-York Historical Society Library. Born in Brooklyn, Grinnell played a seminal role in American conservation. He lived as a youth in Audubon Park in upper Manhattan, previously the estate of the legendary naturalist-artist John James Audubon. There Grinnell was tutored by Lucy Bakewell Audubon, who encouraged his lifelong passion for wildlife and the natural world. After a later expedition to Yellowstone, his report included what may be the first official statement in opposition to the excessive killing of big game. In 1886, Grinnell founded the Audubon Society of New York, the forerunner of the National Audubon Society (1905). He launched it from its publication Audubon Magazine as “an association for the protection of wild birds and their eggs.”

Continue reading