New-York Historical Society Accepting Applications For 2018-2019 Fellowships

New Fellows Welcomed for the 2017-2018 Academic Year

The New-York Historical Society is now accepting applications for its prestigious fellowship program for the 2018–2019 academic year. Leveraging its rich collections of documents, artifacts, and works of art detailing American history from the perspective of New York City, New-York Historical’s fellowships—open to scholars at various times during their academic careers—provide scholars with material resources and an intellectual community to develop new research and publications that illuminate complex issues of the past. Visit nyhistory.org/library/fellowships for instructions and application checklists for each fellowship.

 

The application deadline for all fellowships is January 8, 2018. The available fellowships include:

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Predoctoral Fellowships in Women’s History
The two recipients of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship in Women’s History should have a strong interest in the fields of women’s and public history. This unique part-time fellowship introduces young scholars to work outside the academy in public history and may not directly correspond with their dissertation research. They must be currently enrolled students in good standing in a relevant Ph.D. program in the humanities. The Predoctoral Fellows will be in residence part time at the New-York Historical Society for one academic year, between September 5, 2018, and June 29, 2019, with a stipend of $15,000 per year. This position is not full time and will not receive full benefits.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship
The fellowship is available to individuals who have completed their formal professional training and have a strong record of accomplishment within their field. There is no restriction relating to age or academic status of applicants. Foreign nationals are eligible to apply if they have lived in the United States for at least three years immediately preceding the application deadline. The ten-month residency will carry a stipend of $42,000, plus benefits. This fellowship will begin September 5, 2018, and will end June 29, 2019.

Bernard and Irene Schwartz Fellowships
Offered jointly with the Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at the New School, two Bernard and Irene Schwartz Fellowships are open to scholars who will have completed their Ph.D. in History or American Studies before the end of the 2017-2018 academic year. Fellows will teach one course per semester at Eugene Lang College in addition to conducting focused research in residence at the New-York Historical Society. These fellows carry a stipend of $60,000, plus benefits. The fellowship will begin September 1, 2018, and will end June 29, 2019.

Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation – Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship
This fellowship will be awarded to an early-career scholar. Research projects should expand public understanding of New York State history and should include research based on the collections and resources of the New-York Historical Society. This ten-month residency will carry a stipend of $60,000, plus benefits. The fellowship will begin September 5, 2018, and will last through June 29, 2019.

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowships
The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship will be awarded to a candidate who has earned their Ph.D. between 2013 and 2015. Research projects should be based in some way on the collections and resources of New-York Historical. This ten-month residency will carry a stipend of $60,000, plus benefits. The fellowship will begin September 5, 2018, and will last through June 29, 2019.

Short-Term Fellowships
New-York Historical Society awards a variety of short-term fellowships to enable researchers to conduct research on site for two-to-four week periods. Each award brings with it a stipend of $2,000. The fellowship period runs from July 1, 2018, through June 29, 2019. Applicants should apply simply for a short-term fellowship. New-York Historical will decide which fellowship to award a successful applicant based on the particular proposal.

2017-2018 Fellows at the New-York Historical Society

New-York Historical is also pleased to announce 12 fellows, now in residence during the 2017–2018 academic year. New-York Historical offers fellowships to scholars dedicated

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New-York Historical Society logo

to understanding and promoting American history. Fellowship positions at the New-York Historical Society are made possible by the generous support of Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, Sid Lapidus, the Lehrman Institute, and Patricia and John Klingenstein. All fellows receive research stipends while in residency, and Bernard & Irene Schwartz Fellows each teach two courses at Eugene Lang College at the New School for Liberal Arts during their year as resident scholars.

This year’s fellows are: Continue reading

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Major Gifts To Academy Museum Of Motion Pictures Advance Fundraising Campaign Above $300 Million Mark

Far-Reaching Contribution from Bloomberg Philanthropies for Digital Engagement, and Naming Gifts from Netflix, the Charles V. Roven Family Foundation and the Thomas Spiegel Family Foundation

Kerry Brougher, Director of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, today announced three major gifts toward the creation of this institution, bringing fundraising to more than $300M, nearly 80 percent of its $388M campaign goal. When it opens in 2019, the Academy Museum will be the world’s premier film museum—located in Los Angeles, the acknowledged moviemaking capital of the world.

Designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Renzo Piano, the Academy Museum will restore and revitalize the historic Saban Building at the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. The Academy Museum will feature six floors of exhibition spaces, a movie theater, education areas, special event spaces, conservation areas, and a café and store. A new spherical addition will connect to the Saban Building with glass bridges and will feature a state-of-the-art 1,000-seat theater and a rooftop terrace. The Academy is currently raising $388 million to support the building, exhibitions, and programs of the Academy Museum. The campaign was launched in 2012, headed by chair Bob Iger and co-chairs Annette Bening and Tom Hanks.

Academy Museum Of Motion Pictures

When it opens in 2019, the Academy Museum will be the world’s premier film museum—located in Los Angeles, the acknowledged moviemaking capital of the world.

Bob Iger, CEO of The Walt Disney Company and Chair of the Campaign for the Academy Museum, said, “We’re enormously grateful to Bloomberg Philanthropies, Netflix, the Charles V. Roven Family Foundation and the Thomas Spiegel Family Foundation for their generous support, and are thrilled to welcome them to a growing community of extraordinary donors who share our vision and are helping us build an Academy Museum as dynamic and vibrant as the art it celebrates.

Bloomberg Philanthropies has provided generous funding for the development of the museum’s wide-ranging digital engagement platforms through its Bloomberg Connects program, a global initiative that helps cultural institutions innovate and engage audiences. Designed to enhance the on-site visitor experience and provide access to an off-site global audience, the digital platforms will enable the Academy Museum to inspire a deeper understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of motion pictures.

Academy Museum_Aerial Facing South

Academy Museum Aerial Facing South

Brougher said, “The Academy Museum is going to be the permanent home for the art of film in its storied past, amazing present, and fast-evolving future. Film has always been at the forefront of technology, which is why it’s so important for us to have the digital platform that Bloomberg Philanthropies’ support is allowing us to create. For visitors to the Academy Museum, the creativity and innovation of the museum’s digital engagement will provide a unique experience only the Academy can offer.”

Netflix, the Charles V. Roven Family Foundation and the Thomas Spiegel Family Foundation have contributed gifts to name spaces within the Academy Museum’s Saban Building, designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop. Spaces named in recognition of these gifts are the Netflix Gallery Terrace on the second floor and the Charles V. Roven Family Foundation and the Thomas Spiegel Family Foundation Terrace on the fifth floor.

Ron Meyer, Vice Chairman of NBC Universal and Chair of the newly established Board of Trustees of the Academy Museum, said, “We are fortunate to have the support of our new donors. They understand our aim of enlightening the public as no other museum can about the art, science, and history of the world’s motion pictures.” Continue reading

Art News: The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994

STEPHEN BARKER, “The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994”

Exhibition dates: September 14 – October 28, 2017

Daniel Cooney Fine Art (508-526 West 26th Street, Suite 9C, New York, NY 10001, 212 255 8158. dan@danielcooneyfineart.com. Hours: Wednesday – Saturday 11 – 6) is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of photographs, “The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994“, by renowned photographer Stephen Barker. The exhibit will showcase approximately 15 never before seen black and white photographic portraits of AIDS activists – in the studio and at home – taken by Barker during his time working within the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) 1991-1994, and Barker’s unique artist’s book Funeral March, which chronicles the carrying of Mark Fisher’s body in an open coffin from Judson Church, up Sixth Avenue, to the steps of the Republican National Committee on the eve of the presidential election in 1992.

Rod Sorge (1969-1999) ACT UP Needle Exchange, 1991

Rod Sorge (1969-1999) ACT UP Needle Exchange, 1991

Barker became involved with ACT UP in the late 80s working primarily with the needle exchange program. The photographs were never intended as an encyclopedic project, but rather the portraits evolved organically out of Barker’s working relationships, friendships, and intimacies. The exhibition is especially timely during this 30th anniversary year of ACT UP when once again all underserved communities, including those living with HIV/AIDS, are threatened by our own government. It is a call to arms for activism and a reminder of the distance we have traveled and battles we have won.

Stephen Barker, 'Gay Wachman, ACT UP Needle Exchange,' 1992, Gelatin Silver Print

Stephen Barker, ‘Gay Wachman, ACT UP Needle Exchange,’ 1992, Gelatin Silver Print

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New-York Historical Society To Present Unprecedented Exhibition On The History Of The Vietnam War

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975, On View October 4, 2017 – April 22, 2018

One of the major turning points of the 20th century, the Vietnam War will be the subject of an unprecedented exhibition presented by the New-York Historical Society from October 4, 2017April 22, 2018. Bringing the hotly contested history of this struggle into the realm of public display as never before, the exhibition will offer a chronological and thematic narrative of the conflict from 1945 through 1975 as told through more than 300 artifacts, photographs, artworks, documents, and interactive digital media.

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American infantrymen crowd into a mud-filled bomb crater and look up at tall jungle trees seeking out Viet Cong snipers firing at them during a battle in Phuoc Vinh, north-northeast of Saigon in Vietnam’s War Zone D, June 15, 1967. Henri Huet / Associated Press

Objects on display will range from a Jeep used at Tan Son Nhut Air Base to a copy of the Pentagon Papers; from posters and bumper stickers both opposing and supporting the U.S. war effort to personal items left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC; from indelible news photographs (such as Eddie Adams’ Execution) to specially commissioned murals by contemporary artist Matt Huynh. While no gallery exhibition can provide a comprehensive, global perspective on this vast subject, the materials brought together in The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 will comprise a sweeping and immersive narrative, exploring, from a primarily American viewpoint, how this pivotal struggle was experienced both on the war front and on the home front. The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 was curated by Marci Reaven, New-York Historical Society vice president for history exhibitions.

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Interior of the USNS General Nelson M. Walker. Courtesy of Art and Lee Beltrone, Vietnam Graffiti Project, Keswick, VA. American servicemen initially traveled to Vietnam aboard WWII-era troop ships like the General Nelson M. Walker. Nearly 5,000 Marines and G.I.s crowded the Walker on each three-week voyage from Oakland, California to Danang or Qui Nhon, South Vietnam.

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 signals a new ambition for the New-York Historical Society, which is to include in our exhibition program histories that are not only difficult but also as yet unresolved,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president, and CEO of New-York Historical. “This monumental exhibit challenges received wisdom about the origins and consequences of the War, relying on sources only recently made available to scholars as well as first person accounts of those who fought. As the exhibition shows, the War continues to provoke debate and discussion today and to dominate much of our thinking about military conduct and policy. The Vietnam War was the longest armed conflict of the 20th century, and today—more than 40 years after it ended―it continues to influence both public policy and personal convictions. We are grateful for the opportunity to offer the public a chance to better understand events and protagonists of the 20th century that reverberate well into the 21st.

Exhibition Overview

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 sets the scene for the coming conflict through a display in an introductory gallery, where texts and materials about the onset of the Cold War document how the U.S. and its allies began to maneuver against the Communist bloc in regional confrontations after World War II while avoiding head-on engagement between the nuclear powers. Objects on view include a series of oil paintings by Chesley Bonestell imagining the destruction of New York City by Soviet atomic bombs and a newsreel from 1950 making the case for U.S. military action in Korea.

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Men of the 173rd Airborne Brigade on a search and destroy patrol after receiving supplies, 1966. National Archives at College Park, MD. The primary mission of U.S. forces was to destroy the enemy and their logistical network. American ground troops operated throughout South Vietnam, supported by naval and air campaigns. They defended the DMZ, pursued units in the hills along the Central Coast, combed through Viet Cong base areas in the Iron Triangle, and ranged across the upper Mekong Delta as part of an Army-Navy mobile riverine force.

The exhibition then takes up the story of Vietnam by recalling the successful struggle of the Communist-nationalist coalition Viet Minh to force France to abandon its claim to Vietnam, then part of the French colony known as Indochina. Archival footage from a CBS News broadcast illustrates the “domino theory” put forward by the Eisenhower administration in support of its desire to halt the spread of Communism in Asia, a mindset which contributed to the partitioning of Vietnam into North and South. Among the objects representing the experiences of the North Vietnamese and southern insurgents are a 1962 painting by the Hanoi-based artist Tran Huu Chat and a bicycle of the sort used by North Vietnamese forces for transport of arms along the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Also on view is a scale model of the USS Maddox, one of the destroyers involved in the Gulf of Tonkin encounter with North Vietnamese forces in August 1964, which gave the Johnson Administration grounds for seeking Congressional authorization to increase U.S. military operations without a declaration of war.

On July 28, 1965, President Johnson spoke to the nation on TV to explain that it was up to America to protect South Vietnam and fight communism in Asia and that to be driven from the field would imperil U.S. power, security, and credibility. He also announced a dramatic escalation in the military draft.

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Draft card. Courtesy of Joseph Corrigan, C Troop, 2nd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, Dak To, Vietnam 1967–68. President Johnson’s order to send more troops to Vietnam affected all men between the ages of 18 and 26. Registration for military service was compulsory. The Selective Service called up only the men needed while excusing the rest through deferments. Twenty-seven million American men were of draft age during the war. Forty percent served in the military, and about 2.5 million went to Vietnam.

Objects on view, like an original draft card, and displays will address various responses to the draft, which affected all men between the ages of 18 and 26. Archival footage of Johnson’s address announcing the doubling of the draft will be shown. Artifacts, such as graffiti created by soldiers on their canvas berths, from the troopship General Walker, which ferried draftees during the three-week voyage to Vietnam, will demonstrate the personal side of soldiers as they headed toward war.

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Detail. Tran Huu Chat, Spring in Tay Nguyen, 1962 and 2016. Lacquer engraving. New-York Historical Society. Hanoi art student Tran Huu Chat received high marks in 1962 for his lacquer engraving that depicted Ho Chi Minh and the Viet Minh organizing among the people to depose the French colonialists. Fellow Vietnamese would have understood that the artist was using the heroism of the Viet Minh to symbolically refer to the National Liberation Front, organized in 1960 to oppose the Diem regime and its U.S. backers. The original artwork hangs in Hanoi’s Vietnam National Museum of Fine Arts. The 84-year-old Tran Huu Chat made an exact reproduction for this exhibition.

With this escalation of U.S. military involvement, the exhibition moves into a section that examines the conduct of the war and its repercussions both in the field and among American civilians. Two large, illustrated murals by noted artist and illustrator Matt Huynh, titled War Front and Home Front, depict key aspects of the years 1966 and 1967. War Front depicts the four combat zones in South Vietnam to show differing types of combat and highlight significant moments and battlegrounds. Home Front illustrates activity in the United States, including the Spring Mobilization, the largest antiwar demonstration to that date in American history, in which hundreds of thousands marched through midtown Manhattan on April 15, 1967.

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71st Evacuation Hospital patch belonging to Barbara Chiminello (left) and 57th Medical Detachment patch belonging to Thomas Chiminello (right). Courtesy of Barbara, Philip, and Eugene Chiminello. Siblings Thomas and Barbara Chiminello served alongside one another in Vietnam—Tommy as a Medevac helicopter pilot and Barbara as a nurse. These are their unit patches. In October 1967, Barbara received devastating news. Tommy and his crew had all been killed while responding to an urgent evacuation request.

The mural also shows a pro-war demonstration from May 1967 and other scenes of the war’s impact on national life. Interactive kiosks placed next to both murals bring them to life, allowing visitors to explore the events depicted through videos and photographs. Notable objects displayed in this section include a poster of a woman fighter in support of the southern insurgents, recreated by Tran Thi Van; helmets worn by U.S. and South Vietnamese government soldiers, dog tags, military patches, and field implements; letters from soldiers to their loved ones back home; a condolence letter on the death of a son; period magazines; posters and buttons both demanding an end to the war and urging support for the military effort; and a recording of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s April 1967 speech against the war. Continue reading

Parsons School of Design Announces New Couture Course Inspired by Iconic Designer Norman Norell

The New School’s Parsons School of Design announces the “Norell x Parsons” course as part of the spring 2017 couture curriculum. A creative collaboration conceived in partnership with Parsons, Parlux Ltd., and Neiman Marcus, the unique program addresses the emerging, modern day challenges facing a new generation of fashion industry talent, inspired by the legacy of American designer, Norman Norell.parsons_logo

Fusing the worlds of fashion, art, and commerce, “Norell x Parsons” challenges students to interpret the Norell brand heritage through a contemporary couture approach, practice, and development over the course of one semester. Students will design and create a piece based on Norell’s classic designs, while also learning the necessary skills to creatively lead a fashion house in the current fashion industry.

The Parsons School of Design, founded in 1896, is one of the leading institutions for art and design education in the world. Based in New York but active around the world, the school offers undergraduate and graduate programs in the full spectrum of art and design disciplines, as well as online courses, degree, and certificate programs. Critical thinking and collaboration are at the heart of a Parsons education. Parsons graduates are leaders in their respective fields, with a shared commitment to creatively and critically addressing the complexities of life in the 21st century.

A Selection Committee including Fashion Designer and Parsons Alumni, Jason Wu, Parsons Dean of Fashion, Burak Cakmak, The Fashion Group International President, Margaret Hayes, Fashion Designer and Author, Jeffery Banks, CR Fashion Book Online Director, Ray Siegel, Parlux Ltd. President and The Fashion Group International Chairman of the Board, Donald Loftus, Neiman Marcus Senior Vice President & Fashion Director, Ken Downing, photographer Michael Avedon and Parsons Faculty will evaluate the creative concepts of each student designer.

Renowned for his legendary aesthetic that revolutionized American ready-to-wear and the American designer fragrance industry, Norell was one of the first American fashion designers to launch a namesake fragrance. Following the 2015 launch of the re-mastered iconic scent, Norell New York, Norell Elixir launched in fall 2016 exclusively at Neiman Marcus.

This course aims to arm students with the knowledge needed to succeed in today’s ever-challenging fashion and retail environments,” said Loftus.Norell’s legacy highlights the evident synergies between designer fashion and fragrance, and the value of a brand embracing both style and scent to effectively position itself among today’s luxury lifestyle powerhouses.”

Creating the future of fashion can only be achieved with a passionate understanding of the past,” said Downing. “I’m excited for the next generation of the industry’s great talents to uncover the brilliance of Norman Norell, as they forge a new path in fashion history.

At the conclusion of the couture course, the Norell New York’s leadership team will select one winning design that will be showcased in the Neiman Marcus Christmas Book, a longstanding retail partner, and made available to sell as a special order.

Creative directors at today’s fashion houses often look to a company’s archives for history, inspiration, and creativity to understand a brand’s DNA before establishing their own, modern imprint for the brand,” said Cakmak. “This course will offer our students important hands-on industry experience, and help prepare them to enter a new era of creative direction in the fashion industry.”

The student winner will be announced in May 2017.

The Jewish Museum Announces New, Major Collection Exhibition to Open Fall 2017

The Jewish Museums long-running collection exhibition, Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey, originally mounted in 1993, recently close, making way for a major, new collection display, Scenes from the Collection, opening in Fall 2017. Culture and Continuity’s last day on view was Sunday, February 12, 2017.

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The Jewish Museum (New York) logo

The Jewish Museum‘s unparalleled collection spans 4,000 years of Jewish culture through nearly 30,000 objects, including painting, sculpture, photography, decorative arts, ceremonial objects, antiquities, works on paper, and media. Scenes from the Collection will transform the Museum’s third floor and feature over 650 works from antiquities to contemporary art – many of which will be on view for the first time at the Museum. The exhibition was designed by Tsao & McKown Architects.

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Hanukkah Lamp, Orivit-Aktiengesellschaft (1900-1905), Köln-Braunsfeld (Germany), 1900-05. White metal: cast and silver-plated; glass: mold formed, 13⅞ x 12¾ x 5 5/16 in. (35.3 x 32.4 x 13.5 cm). The Jewish Museum, New York, Gift of Dr. Harry G. Friedman (?), F 3573.

The new exhibition will be divided into eight different sections, or scenes, highlighting the diversity and depth of the collection. The new installation will present the collection as a reflection of the continual evolution that is the essence of Jewish identity, as well as a powerful expression of artistic and cultural creativity.

Scenes from the Collection will immerse our visitors in a dynamic and engaging experience. Developed collaboratively among the Museum’s curatorial staff, the new installation is a reflection of the Jewish Museum’s unique position as an art museum exploring Jewish culture and identity through a contemporary lens,” said Claudia Gould, Helen Goldsmith Menschel Director of the Jewish Museum.

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Torah Binder, Rabat (Morocco), 19th century. Cotton: embroidered with silk thread, 9 1/2 × 103 3/4 in. (24.1 × 263.5 cm). The Jewish Museum, New York, Gift of Sonia Cohen Azagury, 2004-64.

In addition, Scenes from the Collection will be flexible, with four scenes changing annually, and one changing every six months, so that different subjects can be examined while more of the collection is on view. The stories the works of art tell will illuminate multiple perspectives on being Jewish in the past and present, how Jewish culture intersects with art and the art world, and how it is part of the larger world of global interconnections.

The eight scenes are:

Origins

Scenes from the Collection will start from the beginning – the year 1904 when the Museum was founded with a gift of ceremonial objects from Judge Mayer Sulzberger. Central to this section will be the question of what, why, and how the Museum has collected and what this says about the changing identity of the institution, the Jewish community, and the art world.

Constellations

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Laurie Simmons (American, b. 1949), Woman Listening to Radio, 1978. Gelatin silver print, sheet: 7 15/16 × 9 15/16 in. (20.2 × 25.2 cm); image: 5 3/16 × 8 in. (13.2 × 20.3 cm). The Jewish Museum, New York, Purchase: Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation Fund, 2013-1. © Laurie Simmons, image courtesy of the artist and Salon 94, New York

In “Constellations,” over 50 of the most visually powerful and culturally significant works in the collection – from antiquities to the twenty-first century – will be exhibited as individual gems but with powerful thematic connections to one another. Such issues will be explored as transforming and transcending tradition, cultural distinctiveness and universality, and ever-changing notions of identity. Groups of works will relate to each other aesthetically or contextually, creating multiple conversations. For example, three works that can be seen as challenging tradition are Peter Blume’s Pig’s Feet and Vinegar (1927), Laurie SimmonsWoman Listening to Radio (1978), and Nicole Eisenman’s Seder (2011).

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Nicole Eisenman (American, b. France, 1965), Seder, 2010. Oil on canvas, 39 1/16 × 48 in. (99.2 × 121.9 cm). The Jewish Museum, New York, Purchase Lore Ross Bequest; Milton and Miriam Handler Endowment Fund; and Fine Arts Acquisitions Committee Fund, 2011-3 © Nicole Eisenman.

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CuriosityStream™ Launches Print Ad Campaign That Positions The New SVOD Service As “the Antidote To ‘Reality’ TV”

TV Commercials To Increase Brand Awareness Will Air Concurrently On Networks Including Fox News, CNN and Bloomberg

The Independently-Owned, Ad-Free SVOD Service Created By The Discovery Channel Founder Now Offers Over 1,500 Titles In History, Science, Nature, And Technology

All Titles Are Available For Instant Access By Subscribers With Annual And Monthly Subscription Plans Available for SD, HD, and 4K Streamingcuriositystream

John Hendricks, the Founder of CuriosityStream and the Founder and Former Chairman of Discovery Communications, announced today that CuriosityStream, which is currently available in 196 countries worldwide, is launching its first print ad campaign with a theme of positioning the SVOD service as “the antidote to ‘reality’ TV.curiositystream-logo-1

During the week of February 6, 2017, the print campaign will launch in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and other major newspapers. Concurrent with the print campaign, CuriosityStream has begun to test television commercials designed to increase brand awareness. With commercials currently being tested on networks such as CNN, Fox News, and Bloomberg, the TV campaign has been created around the theme “Long Live the Curious.”

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John Hendricks

Hendricks stated, “The economic realities of ad-supported linear television have understandably driven most cable networks toward ‘reality’ TV programming which appeals to the large audiences for amusement content. As a result, the curious 25% of television viewers have witnessed a dramatic loss of choice in high-quality programs in science, history, nature, and technology. CuriosityStream is now available worldwide with a mission to satisfy the demand of audiences who are eager to learn about the mysteries of civilization, recent advances in science, fascinating breakthroughs in technology, in-depth explorations of current events, and the wonders of nature.” Continue reading