Walker Art Center's Out There 2020: Annual Festival of Performance Alternatives at The Walker Arts Center

Program Features Tina Satter / Half Straddle; Miguel Gutierrez; Ligia Lewis, and Back to Back Theatre

OUT THERE IS BACK WITH 20/20 VISION. Through a range of theatrical aesthetics, this year’s slate of international artists engage us with revelatory works by turns playful and dark, political and personal, gothic and supernatural. They interrogate labels and preconceptions, the artificial and the organic. This year, two artists new to the Walker and two returning favorites push back and look forward, reframe and reposition. Their concerns are ours: identity, race, sexuality, and the meaning of intelligence.


Tina Satter / Half Straddle: Is This A Room: Reality Winner Verbatim Transcription

Out There: Tina Satter/ Half Straddle, Is This A Room. Photo: © Paula Court courtesy of The Kitchen Half Straddle

January 9–January 11, 2020, 8pm

“Is This A Room is a beautiful work—impassioned yet made with a cool hand; straight-faced yet often funny. It is also devastating because damn, the real world is a hell of a writer.” —Artforum

After the FBI interrogated Reality Winner, a 25-year-old former Air Force linguist, the transcript of the encounter ignited director Tina Satter’s theatrical imagination. Satter’s company Half Straddle replicates, word by word, the verbal dance between the whip-smart Winner and reality-twisting agents, demonstrating how military interrogation tactics, toxic masculinity, and systemic marginalization resulted in her conviction for espionage. Funny and suspenseful, engaging and enraging, the production re-creates one afternoon spent in a bizarre and secret world—the turning point of a personal life wrenched irrevocably into the political. Program length: 70 minutes.

Tina Satter is an American writer and director for theater and film who was a recipient of a 2016 Foundation for Contemporary Arts Award, a 2014 Doris Duke Artist Impact Award, and was named an Off-Off Broadway Innovator to Watch by Time Out New York. With Half Straddle, she has written and directed ten original full-length plays, and re-imagined them for a range of spaces as they have toured to numerous theaters and festivals in the U.S. and internationally.

Meet the Artists

  • Thursday, January 9: Post-show reception with the artists in Cityview Bar
  • Friday, January 10: Post-show Q&A with the artists onstage.


Miguel Gutierrez:
This Bridge Called My Ass

Out There: Miguel Gutierrez, This Bridge Called My Ass. Photo: Ian Douglas

January 16–17, 8pm, January 18 4pm & 8pm, Walker Commission

A dense, audacious and wickedly funny work that…contains multitudes and unflinchingly bears their weight.”New York Times

Movement artist Miguel Gutierrez‘s second Walker commission provocatively investigates identity politics, Latinx clichés, and Western concepts of form, drawing from (in part) the influences of the groundbreaking 1981 feminist anthology This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. Gutierrez and five diverse Latinx performers amplify stereotypes to move past respectability politics within an unstable environment of bodies, light, sound, and text (in Spanish, with surtitles). The chaotic, playfully erotic production concludes with an over-the-top version of an absurdist telenovela. Contains nudity and sexual content. Program length: 90 minutes.

Miguel Gutierrez is a choreographer, composer, performer, singer, writer, educator and advocate who has lived in New York for over twenty years. He is fascinated by the time-based nature of performance and how it creates an ideal frame for phenomenological questions around presence and meaning-making. His work proposes an immersive state, for performer and audience alike, where attention itself becomes an elastic material. He believes in an approach to art making that is fierce, fragile, empathetic, political, and irreverent.

Meet the Artists

  • Thursday, January 16: Post-show reception with the artists in Cityview Bar
  • Friday, January 17: Post-show Q&A with the artists onstage
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Walker Art Center and the SPCO’s Liquid Music Series Present Kate Wallich + The YC x Perfume Genius

The beautifully constructed dance worlds of Seattle-based choreographer Kate Wallich meld with the gloriously ornate theatrical music of pop/electronic hero Perfume Genius to create the evening-length The Sun Still Burns Here. This radical integration of dance and live music features outstanding performers burning through a postmodern swirl of classical and contemporary movement. The piece delves into what the artists describe as “a spiritual unraveling of romantic decay.” (Seattle Times).

Kate Wallich and The YC & Perfume Genius: The Sun Still Burns Here. Photo Credit: Agustin Hernandez

Kate Wallich is a Seattle-based choreographer, director and educator. Named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch” in 2015, she has left a significant mark in the Pacific Northwest through commissions and presentations from leading local, national and international institutions including: On the Boards, Seattle Theater Group, Velocity Dance Center, Seattle Art Museum, Pacific Northwest Ballet, Whim W’Him and Northwest Dance Project, Walker Art Center with Liquid Music, MASS MoCa, The Joyce Theater, Jacob’s Pillow Inside/Out, Newfields/IMA, ICA Boston, Danse and SPOTLIGHT: USA in Bulgaria. In 2010, she co-founded her company The YC with Lavinia Vago and has gone on to create five evening-length works and three large-scale, site-specific works with the company. Also in 2010, she founded an all-abilities, community-focused class Dance Church® (no religious affiliation) which reaches over 550+ attendees per week and is taught weekly by professional dance artists in New York City, Seattle, Portland, Indianapolis, Salt Lake City, Los Angeles and more. Dance Church has partnered with local and national organizations including Gibney, Mark Morris Dance Center, LA Dance Project, Newfields/IMA, BodyVox, Adidas Studio London, Velocity, On the Boards, The Sweat Spot, Design Week Portland and goop among others.

Kate Wallich and The YC & Perfume Genius: The Sun Still Burns Here. Photo Credit: Agustin Hernandez

“Mike Hadreas, the artist better known as Perfume Genius, has always been a physically expressive performer, and he’s made dance a crucial part of his generally stunning live shows and videos. And now he’s about to make it a focus.” —Stereogum

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Walker Art Center presents SQÜRL Live Performance to Silent Films by Man Ray

Director Jim Jarmusch and composer Carter Logan (aka avant-garde post-rock duo SQÜRL) perform live to four surrealist and dreamlike silent films by artist Man Ray. They’ll create the semi-improvisational scores onstage in Walker Cinema, with loops, synthesizers, and effected guitars that display the band’s experimental, ambient, and drone-like tendencies. Featuring Le retour à la raison (Return to Reason) (1923), Emak Bakia (1926), L’étoile de mer (The Starfish) (1928), and Les mystères du château de dé (The Mysteries of the Château de Dé) (1929). 68 min.

Jim Jarmusch and Carter Logan of Sqürl, 2019. Photo courtesy Sara Driver.

SQÜRL is an enthusiastically marginal rock band from New York City who like big drums & distorted guitars, cassette recorders, loops, feedback, sad country songs, molten stoner core, chopped & screwed hip-hop, and imaginary movie scores. SQÜRL began in 2009 when Jim Jarmusch and Carter Logan teamed with producer/engineer Shane Stoneback to record some original music for the film The Limits of Control.

Following these scoring sessions Jarmusch, Stoneback, and Carter continued to record new originals while also exploring the back-alleys of American country, noise, and psychedelia. In 2014, SQÜRL collaborated with Dutch lutenist Jozef Van Wissem to compose and perform the score for the film Only Lovers Left Alive. Bridging ancient and modern sounds, the score serves as a reflection of the distinct textures of Detroit and Tangier. Following their work on Only Lovers Left Alive, Jarmusch and Logan began a new live sonic exploration: scoring four silent films by American Dada and Surrealist artist Man Ray. The performance had its live debut in NYC in 2015 and SQÜRL have continue to tour with the films to this day. With their 2016 score for the film Paterson, SQÜRL dove deeper into the ocean of ambient electronic music on a quest for new ecstatic sounds to enrich the poetry of the film. The following year, the band released EP #260 on Sacred Bones Records, embracing their darker approach to density, tension, elation and release.

Jim Jarmusch and Carter Logan of Sqürl. Photo courtesy the artists.

The band’s most recently released recording—the score to the The Dead Don’t Die—is a true expression of where SQÜRL stand at the center of a decade of sonic exploration. It is the culmination of their passion for analog synthesis and guitar violence. It is at once a tribute to the classic sounds of horror and sci-fi, as well as a decapitation of traditional film scores. It is naturally supernatural.

2020 will find SQÜRL back on the road and in support of their upcoming release: a tribute to the legendary cinematographer Robby Müller.


Films by Man Ray, Music by SQÜRL
 
takes place Friday, February 7 at 7 pm in the Walker Cinema. Tickets are $25 ($20 Walker members, students, and seniors). Visit walkerart.org/cinema for tickets and info.

These titles by Man Ray are also in the Walker Art Center’s Ruben/Bentson Moving Image collection. Major support to preserve, digitize, and present the Ruben/Bentson Moving Image Collection is generously provided by the Bentson Foundation.

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Website
Tiny Mixtapes interview
New York Times Magazine interview

The Whitney Announces 2020 Exhibition Schedule

It looks as if it will be another banner year of thought-provoking and wide-ranging exhibitions during the coming year at The Whitney Museum of American Art. (And one should not expect any less.) Announcing the schedule for 2020 at the Whitney Museum of American Art, Scott Rothkopf, Senior Deputy Director and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, noted: “In 2020 the Whitney will celebrate its ninetieth anniversary and fifth year downtown, so we’ve created a program that truly honors the spirit of artistic innovation both past and present. We remain focused on supporting emerging and mid-career artists, while finding fresh relevance in historical surveys from across the twentieth century. Also turning ninety, Jasper Johns closes out the year with an unprecedented retrospective that will reveal this American legend as never before to a new generation of audiences.”

Exterior shot of the The Whitney building. Photograph by Ben Gancsos ©2016

On February 17 the Museum opens Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945, a major historical look at the transformative impact of Mexican artists on the direction of American art from the mid-1920s until the end of World War II. On October 28, in collaboration with the Philadelphia Museum of Art, a landmark retrospective of the work of Jasper Johns goes on view simultaneously at both museums, paying tribute to the foremost living American artist. In addition, the Whitney will devote exhibitions to Julie Mehretu and Dawoud Bey, prominent midcareer artists. The Mehretu exhibition, co-organized by the Whitney with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, encompasses over two decades of the artist’s work, presenting the most comprehensive overview of her practice to date. In November, Dawoud Bey, one of the leading photographers of his generation, will receive his first full-scale retrospective, co-organized by the Whitney and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA).

The Whitney Museum of American Art

The Museum will also present Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist—organized by the Phoenix Art Museum—the first exhibition of work by the visionary symbolist in nearly a quarter century; and Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop, an unprecedented exhibition organized by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, which chronicles the formative years of this collective of Black photographers who lived and worked in New York City. The year will also bring a range of focused exhibitions dedicated to emerging and midcareer artists, including Darren Bader, Jill Mulleady, Cauleen Smith, and Salman Toor, as well as Dave McKenzie and My Barbarian, who continue the Whitney’s commitment to performance and its many forms.

In September the Museum will also unveil David Hammons’s monumental public art installation Day’s End on Gansevoort Peninsula, across the street from the Whitney. The debut of this public artwork will be preceded by an exhibition entitled Around Day’s End: Downtown New York, 1970–1986, which will present a selection of works from the Museum’s collection related to the seminal work that inspired Hammons’s sculpture: Gordon Matta-Clark’s Day’s End (1975).

MAJOR EXHIBITIONS AND EVENTS

Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945”, February 17–May 17, 2020

Jacob Lawrence. Panel 3 from The Migration Series, From every Southern town migrants left by the hundreds to travel north.,1940–41. Casein tempera on hardboard 12 × 18 in. (30.5 × 45.7 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC; acquired 1942. © 2019 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The cultural renaissance that emerged in Mexico in 1920 at the end of that country’s revolution dramatically changed art not just in Mexico but also in the United States. With approximately 200 works by sixty American and Mexican artists, Vida Americana reorients art history, acknowledging the wide-ranging and profound influence of Mexico’s three leading muralists—José Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros, and Diego Rivera—on the style, subject matter, and ideology of art in the United States made between 1925 and 1945. By presenting the art of the Mexican muralists alongside that of their American contemporaries, the exhibition reveals the seismic impact of Mexican art, particularly on those looking for inspiration and models beyond European modernism and the School of Paris.

Diego Rivera. The Uprising, 1931. Fresco on reinforced cement in a galvanized-steel framework, 74 × 94 1/8 in. (188 × 239 cm). Collection of Marcos and Vicky Micha Levy © 2019 Banco de México–Rivera–Kahlo/ARS. Reproduction authorized by the National Institute of Fine Arts and Literature (INBAL), 2019

Works by both well-known and underrecognized American artists will be exhibited, including Thomas Hart Benton, Elizabeth Catlett, Aaron Douglas, Marion Greenwood, Philip Guston, Eitarō Ishigaki, Jacob Lawrence, Isamu Noguchi, Jackson Pollock, Ben Shahn, Thelma Johnson Streat, Charles White, and Hale Woodruff. In addition to Orozco, Rivera, and Siqueiros, other key Mexican artists in the exhibition include Miguel Covarrubias, María Izquierdo, Frida Kahlo, Mardonio Magaña, Alfredo Ramos Martínez, and Rufino Tamayo.

María Izquierdo. My Nieces, 1940. Oil on composition board, 55 1/8 × 39 3/8 in. (140 × 100 cm). Museo Nacional de Arte, INBAL, Mexico City; constitutive collection, 1982 © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City. Reproduction authorized by El Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura, 2019.

Organized by Barbara Haskell, curator, with Marcela Guerrero, assistant curator; Sarah Humphreville, senior curatorial assistant; and Alana Hernandez, former curatorial project assistant. (See previously-posted article here.)

Julie Mehretu, June 26–September 20, 2020

Julie Mehretu, Invisible Sun (algorithm 4, first letter form), 2014, ink and acrylic on canvas 119 1⁄2 × 167 in., private collection, © Julie Mehretu, photograph by Carolina Merlano
Julie Mehretu, Black City, 2007. Ink and acrylic on canvas, 120 x 192 in. (304.8 x 487.7 cm). François Pinault Collection, Paris | Photo credit: Tim Thayer

This mid-career survey of Julie Mehretu (b. 1970; Addis Ababa, Ethiopia), co-organized by The Whitney with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), covers over two decades of the artist’s career and presents the most comprehensive overview of her practice to date. Featuring approximately forty works on paper and more than thirty paintings dating from 1996 to today, the exhibition includes works ranging from her early focus on drawing and mapping to her more recent introduction of bold gestures, saturated color, and figuration. The exhibition will showcase her commitment to interrogating the histories of art, architecture, and past civilizations alongside themes of migration, revolution, climate change, and global capitalism in the contemporary moment. Julie Mehretu is on view at LACMA November 3, 2019–March 22, 2020, and following its presentation at the Whitney from June 26 through September 20, 2020, the exhibition will travel to the High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA (October 24, 2020–January 31, 2021); and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN (March 13–July 11, 2021).

Julie Mehretu, Hineni (E. 3:4), 2018, ink and acrylic on canvas, 96 × 120 in., Centre Pompidou, Paris, Musée national d’art moderne/Centre de création industrielle; gift of George Economou, 2019, © Julie Mehretu, photograph by Tom Powel Imaging
Julie Mehretu, Stadia II, 2004, ink and acrylic on canvas, 108 × 144 in., Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, gift of Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn and Nicolas Rohatyn and A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund 2004.50, © Julie Mehretu, photograph courtesy of the Carnegie Museum of Art

Julie Mehretu is curated by Christine Y. Kim, associate curator in contemporary art at LACMA, and Rujeko Hockley, assistant curator at the Whitney.

Jasper Johns, Opens October 28, 2020

Jasper Johns (b. 1930), Three Flags, 1958. Encaustic on canvas, 30 5/8 × 45 1/2 × 4 5/8 in. (77.8 × 115.6 × 11.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Gilman Foundation, Inc., The Lauder Foundation, A. Alfred Taubman, Laura-Lee Whittier Woods, Howard Lipman, and Ed Downe in honor of the Museum’s 50th Anniversary 80.32. Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Jasper Johns (b. 1930) is arguably the most influential living American artist. Over the past sixty-five years, he has produced a radical and varied body of work marked by constant reinvention. In an unprecedented collaboration, the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Whitney will stage a retrospective of Johns’s career simultaneously across the two museums, featuring paintings, sculptures, drawings, and prints, many shown publicly for the first time. Inspired by the artist’s long-standing fascination with mirroring and doubles, the two halves of the exhibition will act as reflections of one another, spotlighting themes, methods, and images that echo across the two venues. A visit to one museum or the other will provide a vivid chronological survey; a visit to both will offer an innovative and immersive exploration of the many phases, facets, and masterworks of Johns’s still-evolving career.

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Walker Art Center Presents Choreographers’ Evening 2019

A Night of 11 Experimental Dance Works Plus 2 Preshow Performances Curated by SuperGroup

Celebrating Minnesota dance and performance while expanding a post-Thanksgiving tradition at the Walker, this year’s Choreographers’ Evening is curated by SuperGroup—the deliriously inventive performance collaboration of Erin Search-Wells, Sam Johnson, and Jeffrey Wells. The evening features a diverse array of 13 fresh, provocative, compelling, and experimental works by ever-evolving local dancemakers.

Choreographers’ Evening 2019 features Emily Gastineau, Erika Hansen, Mathew Janczewski, Cecil Neal, Leah Nelson, Margaret Ogas, Sharon Picasso, Eva Reed and Piper Rolfes, Kayla Schiltgen, Judith H. Shuǐ Xiān, Deja Stowers, Shanan Tolzin and Kristina de Sacramento, and Julie Warder.

SuperGroup. (from left) Erin Search-Wells, Sam Johnson, and Jeffrey Wells. Photo Credit: Bobby Rogers, Courtesy of Walker Arts Center)

On curating the evening, SuperGroup said, “We chose the pieces for Choreographers’ Evening based on our group instinct. From years of creating together, we’ve developed a strong interest in performance that is densely layered; work that considers a multitude of complex issues in a multitude of ways and leaves room for disagreement and incongruity. In some ways, we approached curating this evening as we might the creation of our own work—looking for ways that varied content, forms, and concepts can coexist and converse. Reorganizing how we see the world by building, contradicting, engaging, and reflecting with and for each other.

2019 Choreographers; Evening Grid (Photo Credit: Bobby Rogers. Courtesy: Walker Arts Center)

Pre-show Performancesm 3:30 & 6:30 pm
Come early to experience a preshow featuring two performances by Erika Hansen and Leah Nelson that take place in the public spaces or lobby of the McGuire Theater (locations to be announced). Both pieces occur concurrently on a loop for the duration of the preshow. Then take a seat in the theater for a showcase of 11 performances.

ABOUT SUPERGROUP

2019 Choreographers Evening Portrait of SuperGroup by Bobby Rogers. L-R: Erin Search-Wells, Sam Johnson, and Jeffrey Wells. Courtesy of Walker Arts Center

SuperGroup, a performance collaboration of Erin Search-Wells, Sam Johnson, and Jeffrey Wells), a Minneapolis-based performance collaboration. Since forming in 2007, they have presented work at venues across the Twin Cities including the Bryant Lake Bowl, the Red Eye, Bedlam Theatre, the Ritz, and the Walker Art Center, as well as nationally at the Invisible Dog Art Center (NYC, presented by the Joyce Theater), Velocity Dance Center (Seattle), Philadelphia Dance Projects/Temple University (Philadelphia), and ODC (San Francisco). Their work has been supported through commissions from the Walker Art Center, the Red Eye Theater, and the Southern Theater, and through grants from the Jerome Foundation, the SCUBA Touring Network, the Metropolitan Regional Arts Council of MN, the MN State Arts Board, and the McKnight Foundation. The group’s latest projects include: Research COUNCIL, an episodic series of 10 shows happening monthly at the Bryant Lake Bowl; COUNCIL, a new performance that will be developing in part through a MANCC residency in 2020, and the recently published performance score/script In Which _______ and Others Discover the End, co-created with Rachel Jendrzejewski and available through Plays Inverse

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Walker Art Center Presents the 33rd British Arrows Awards this Holiday Season

BRITISH ARROWS AWARDS 2019
Friday, November 29–Sunday, December 29
Walker Cinema
Program length: 72 Minutes
Total screenings: 95

Celebrate the UK’s most innovative and daring commercials from the creative world of British advertising. One of the Walker’s most popular traditions back for the 33rd year, the British Arrows Awards showcases an eclectic mix of riveting mini-dramas, high-tech extravaganzas, wacky comedy, and vital public service announcements.

The British Arrows is a much-loved program in the Twin Cities with many people attending year after year. The audiences are moved by the program, which can be a unique cross-cultural experience, as they try to figure out brands and products that are not available in the U.S., but are cleverly conveyed. It’s a unique experience for American audiences to view ads that are not invested in the hard sell; rather, gaining interest in products and services through humor, pathos and a dynamic cinematography. Although there are 95 screenings this year, they are sure to sell out quickly.

Megaforce’s Nothing Beats a Londoner for Nike. Photo courtesy British Arrows 2019.

BRITS NIGHT, Friday, December 6, 7 and 9 pm

Come early and celebrate with a cash bar, plus music by DJ Simon Husbands of KFAI’s True Brit Radio. Introduced by Clare Donald and Jani Guest, British Arrows board co-chairs, and Lisa Lavender, operations director.

Megaforce’s Nothing Beats a Londoner for Nike. Photo courtesy of British Arrows 2019.

SCREENING SCHEDULE

  • Friday, November 29: 3, 5, and 7 pm
  • Saturday, November 30: 3, 5, and 7:30 pm
  • Sunday, December 1: 3, 5, and 7 pm
  • Friday, December 6: 7 and 9 pm: Brits Night. Introduced by Clare Donald and Jani Guest, British Arrows board co-chairs, and Lisa Lavender, operations director.
  • Saturday, December 7: 5 and 7 pm
  • Sunday, December 8: 1, 3, and 5 pm
  • Thursday, December 12: 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Friday, December 13: 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Saturday, December 14: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Sunday, December 15: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 pm
  • Tuesday, December 17: 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Wednesday, December 18: 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Thursday, December 19: 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Friday, December 20: 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Saturday, December 21: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Sunday, December 22: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 pm
  • Thursday, December 26: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Friday, December 27: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Saturday, December 28: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 pm
  • Sunday, December 29: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 pm
Sam Brown and Tom Barbor’s The Dragon Challenge for Jaguar Land Rover. Photo courtesy of British Arrows 2019.
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Walker Art Center Debuts New Music/Theater Work from Ted Hearn

Walker Arts Center and Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra’s Liquid Music Series Present the World Premiere of Commissioned Music/Theater work In Your Mouth by Ted Hearne

With Real Time Installation by Conceptual Artist Rachel Perry and Stage Direction by Daniel Fish

One of the brightest compositional talents of the millennial generation.” – Russell Platt, The New Yorker

The lush, stingingly true poetry of Dorothea Lasky has inspired composer Ted Hearne‘s new theatrical song cycle, igniting hearts and minds with ferocity and grace. With frank observations of the everyday intertwined with revelatory maneuverings of his own voice, Hearne’s music—a smart mélange of traditional and contemporary tonalities with an accessible pop sheen—is backed by a quintet of in-demand musicians. This intimate 12-song suite engages audiences in a complicated, loving meditation on the personal and domestic, while savoring the depths of the wildness within. Intensifying the performance is real-time installation by conceptual artist Rachel Perry (shown above: Perry’s Blue Falling, 2019) and stage direction by Daniel Fish.

Walker Arts Center logo

What began as a personal, visceral connection to the stark and emotional poetry of Dorothea Lasky turned into a set of songs that explores wildness within the eye of the beholder,” says Hearne. “I’m so excited and grateful to be working with the brilliant Rachel Perry and Daniel Fish, who with their perspectives each bring incredible rigor and beauty to this project. Working with the Walker as a commissioning and presenting partner is a dream come true and I’m honored to participate in their rich programming.”

Co-commissioned and copresented by the SPCO’s Liquid Music Series and the Walker Art Center, The world premiere performances take place Thursday, November 21 and Friday, November 22 at 8pm in the Walker Arts Center’s McGuire Theater. Tickets are $26 ($20.80 Walker members).

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra’s Liquid Music Series, named “Best of Classical” by The New York Times, develops innovative new projects with iconoclastic artists in unique presentation formats. Liquid Music performances invite adventurous audiences to discover the new and the fascinating within the flourishing landscape of contemporary chamber music. Visit liquidmusic.org to learn more.

Photo: Jen Rosenstein

Composer, singer, bandleader and recording artist Ted Hearne (b.1982, Chicago) draws on a wide breadth of influences ranging across music’s full terrain, to create intense, personal and multi-dimensional works. The New York Times has praised Mr. Hearne for his “tough edge and wildness of spirit,” and “topical, politically sharp-edged works.” Pitchfork called Hearne’s work “some of the most expressive socially engaged music in recent memory—from any genre,” and Alex Ross wrote in The New Yorker that Hearne’s music “holds up as a complex mirror image of an information-saturated, mass-surveillance world, and remains staggering in its impact.” Hearne’s album Sound From the Bench, a cantata for choir, electric guitars and drums setting texts from U.S. Supreme Court oral arguments and inspired by the idea of corporate personhood, was a finalist for the 2018 Pulitzer Prize. Ted Hearne’s latest release and first album of solo and chamber works, Hazy Heart Pump, is now available on New Focus Recordings.

RACHEL PERRY
Lost in My Life (Fruit Stickers Standing with Round) 2019
archival pigment print
90 x 60 inches
Courtesy the Artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery
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