The Whitney To Present The First Andy Warhol Retrospective Organized by a U.S. Institution Since 1989

Andy Warhol—From A To B And Back Again, The First Major Reexamination Of Warhol’s Art In A Generation, To Open At The Whitney On November 12

Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again—the first Andy Warhol retrospective organized in the U.S. since 1989, and the largest in terms of its scope of ideas and range of works—will be an occasion to experience and reconsider the work of one of the most inventive, influential, and important American artists. With more than 350 works of art, many assembled together for the first time, this landmark exhibition, organized by The Whitney Museum of American Art, will unite all aspects, media, and periods of Warhol’s forty-year career. Curated by Warhol authority Donna De Salvo, Deputy Director for International Initiatives and Senior Curator, with Christie Mitchell, curatorial assistant, and Mark Loiacono, curatorial research associate, the survey debuts at the Whitney on November 12, 2018, where it will run through March 31, 2019.

 

While Warhol’s Pop images of the 1960s are recognizable worldwide, what remains far less known is the work he produced in the 1970s and 80s. This exhibition positions Warhol’s career as a continuum, demonstrating that he didn’t slow down after surviving the assassination attempt that nearly took his life in 1968, but entered into a period of intense experimentation, continuing to use the techniques he’d developed early on and expanding upon his previous work. Taking the 1950s and his experience as a commercial illustrator as foundational, and including numerous masterpieces from the 1960s, Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again tracks and reappraises the later work of the 1970s and 80s through to Warhol’s untimely death in 1987.

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Andy Warhol (1928–1987), Self-Portrait, 1964. Acrylic, metallic paint, and silkscreen ink on linen, 20 x 16 in. (50.8 x 40.6 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; gift of Edlis/Neeson Collection. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York

(Following its premiere at the Whitney, the exhibition will travel to two other major American art museums, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and The Art Institute of Chicago. Bank of America is the National Tour Sponsor)

Perhaps more than any artist before or since, Andy Warhol understood America’s defining twin desires for innovation and conformity, public visibility and absolute privacy,” noted De Salvo. “He transformed these contradictory impulses into a completely original art that, I believe, has profoundly influenced how we see and think about the world now. Warhol produced images that are now so familiar, it’s easy to forget just how unsettling and even shocking they were when they debuted. He pioneered the use of an industrial silkscreen process as a painterly brush to repeat images ‘identically’, creating seemingly endless variations that call the very value of our cultural icons into question. His repetitions, distortions, camouflaging, incongruous color, and recycling of his own imagery anticipated the most profound effects and issues of our current digital age when we no longer know which images to trust. From the 1950s until his death, Warhol challenged our fundamental beliefs, particularly our faith in images, even while he sought to believe in those images himself. Looking in this exhibition at the full sweep of his career makes it clear that Warhol was not just a twentieth-century titan but a seer of the twenty-first century as well.

Occupying the entirety of the Whitney’s fifth-floor Neil Bluhm Family Galleries, the adjacent Kaufman Gallery, the John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation Lobby Gallery, the Susan and John Hess Family Gallery and Theater, Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again will be the largest exhibition devoted to a single artist yet to be presented in the Whitney’s downtown location. Tickets will be available on the Whitney’s website beginning in August.large_68.25_warhol_resized

Through his carefully cultivated persona and willingness to experiment with non-traditional art-making techniques, Andy Warhol (1928–1987) understood the growing power of images in contemporary life and helped to expand the role of the artist in society, making him one of the most distinct and internationally recognized American artists of the twentieth century. This exhibition sets out to prove that there remains far more to Warhol and his work than is commonly known. While the majority of exhibitions, books, articles, and films devoted to Warhol’s art have focused on a single medium, subject, series, or period, Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again will employ a chronological and thematic methodology that illuminates the breadth, depth, and interconnectedness of the artist’s production: from his beginnings as a commercial illustrator in the 1950s, to his iconic Pop masterpieces of the early 1960s, to the experimental work in film and other mediums from the 1960s and 70s, to his innovative use of readymade abstraction and the painterly sublime in the 1980s. The show’s title is taken from Warhol’s 1975 book, The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (From A to B and Back Again), an aphoristic memoir in which the artist gathered his thoughts on fame, love, beauty, class, money, and other key themes.

Building on a wealth of new materials, research and scholarship that has emerged since the artist’s untimely death in 1987, as well as De Salvo’s own expertise and original research conducted by the Whitney’s curatorial team, the checklist of works has been carefully selected from amongst the thousands of paintings, drawings, prints, sculptures, films, videos, and photographs that Warhol produced during his lifetime.

Adam D. Weinberg, the Alice Pratt Brown Director of the Whitney, commented: “This exhibition takes a fresh focus, while continuing the Whitney’s decades-long engagement with Warhol’s work which we presented in 1971 in a traveling retrospective and in Andy Warhol: Portraits of the 70s, organized by the Whitney in 1979–80. Few have had the opportunity to see an in-depth presentation of his career, and account for the scale, vibrant color, and material richness of the objects themselves. This exhibition, to be presented in three cities, will allow visitors to experience the work of one of America’s greatest cultural figures firsthand, and to better comprehend Warhol’s artistic genius and fearless experimentation.”

Early Work

The exhibition covers the entirety of Warhol’s career, beginning with a concentrated focus on the commercial and private work he made between 1948 and 1960. Arriving in New York from his native Pittsburgh in the summer of 1949, Warhol began his career in an advertising world that was increasingly technological, and, concurrently, an art world obsessed with originality and the authenticity of the hand-made mark. The 1950s were a foundational period for the artist, a young gay man, beginning to find his way in the city. Though far less known than his later work, the commercial art that Warhol produced during his first decade in New York lays the groundwork for many of the themes and aesthetic devices that he would develop throughout the length of his career. Continue reading

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Reader’s Digest Reveals the 2018 Top Ten “Nicest Places In America”

Now America Votes to Decide Which Place Will be Featured on “Good Morning America” and the Cover of Reader’s Digest

Reader’s Digest has named the 10 finalists of its second annual search for “The Nicest Place in America,” a national crowd-sourced effort to uncover places where people are kind and treat each other with respect. In an era of cultural and political divides, “Nicest Places” is Reader’s Digest’s response.Readers Digest Logo

The nationwide search received 450 submissions. The finalists were selected by Reader’s Digest editors along with input from a panel of guest judges from partner organizations, including Robin Roberts, co-anchor of ABC’s “Good Morning America.

Readers Digest Top 10 Nicest Places America

Reader’s Digest “Nicest Places in America”

Here are the 10 Nicest Places in America:

Bothell, WAIn Bothell, every May 10 is “Cup of Kindness” day, when everyone is urged to share a good deed, a movement that was born from an unlikely friendship. The other 364 days are pretty special, too.  How do you celebrate a birthday in Bothell? Well, if you’re one local resident, you do it by collecting charity for those in the community who are less fortunate.

Ellijay, GA: Ellijay is the kind of town where locals make a seat at the table for you, whether they know you or not, and the infectious kindness of Ellijay makes it impossible not to be drawn in. Families stop into town for a day. Then for a vacation season. Then for a lifetime.

Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, MD: Come for the books, stay for the legal advice, job assistance, and other extras that make this public library system a haven in the heart of a troubled city. The Enoch Pratt Free Library is a place where lives are changed.

Kalamazoo, MI: The city has made a promise to all of its high-school students: If you get into a state college, it’s paid for – as long as you keep your grades up. It’s called The Kalamazoo Promise. After gun violence marred the city a few years back, the city gave itself a new motto as it supported survivors: “Kalamazoo Strong.”

Katy, TX: Hurricane Harvey couldn’t wash away the spirit of kindness in this Houston-area city—perhaps best exemplified by the owner of a fully stocked store awaiting its grand opening: he opened his doors and told first responders to come take what they needed.

Life Moves Yoga in Killeen, TX: Who says tough guys and gals don’t do yoga? Drop into the Life Moves Yoga studio in Killeen, Texas, just outside the gates of the nation’s largest army base at Fort Hood. There, you’ll find a healthy home away from home geared to soldiers, including wounded warriors, and their spouses facing long separations due to deployments.

Mower County, MN: Paying it forward is a way of life in Mower County, where one small plumbing business, built from the ashes of tragedy, has changed the lives of so many folks in the area who just need a little help. Even in a state known for “Minnesota Nice,” the people of Mower County stand out.

North Evergreen Street in Burbank, CA: Despite being smack-dab in the middle in one of the world’s most populated areas, this tiny enclave feels like a small town. Neighbors look out for one another, locking each other’s doors when one forgets, sharing vegetables from their gardens, and supporting each other in good times and bad.

North Riverside, IL: Is there a rule book for being nice? In North Riverside there is. The town has put together a 65-page manual on caring for each other that can be boiled down into one dictate: the Golden Rule.

Yassin’s Falafel, Knoxville, TN: Syrian refugee Yassin Terou couldn’t speak English when he arrived in Knoxville, Tennessee, seven years ago. Today, he is embraced by locals as a leader in the city for his charitable outreach, and his falafel restaurants are known as a safe place for all who enter. Continue reading

David Wojnarowicz Retrospective At The Whitney Explores The Enduring Resonance Of An Artist Who Merged The Personal And The Political

This summer, the most complete presentation to date of the work of artist, writer, and activist David Wojnarowicz will be on view in a full-scale retrospective organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art. David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night is the first major re-evaluation since 1999 of one of the most fervent and essential voices of his generation.

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David Wojnarowicz with Tom Warren, Self-Portrait of David Wojnarowicz, 1983–84. Acrylic and collaged paper on gelatin silver print, 60 × 40 in. (152.4 × 101.6 cm). Collection of Brooke Garber Neidich and Daniel Neidich, Photograph by Ron Amstutz. (The exhibition is organized by David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, and David Kiehl, Curator Emeritus, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.)

Opening at the Whitney on July 13 and running through September 30, David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night features more than a hundred works by the artist and is organized by two Whitney curators, David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, and David Kiehl, Curator Emeritus. The exhibition, which will be installed in the Museum’s fifth floor Neil Bluhm Family Galleries through September 30, draws upon the scholarly resources of the Fales Library and Special Collections (NYU), the repository of Wojnarowicz’s archive, and is also built on the foundation of the Whitney’s extensive holdings of Wojnarowicz’s work, including thirty works from the Museum’s collection. It will travel to the Museo Reina Sofía, Madrid, in May 2019, and to Mudam Luxembourg – Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean, Luxembourg City, in November 2019.

Scott Rothkopf, Deputy Director for Programs and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, remarked, “Since his death more than twenty-five years ago, David Wojnarowicz has become an almost mythic figure, haunting, inspiring, and calling to arms subsequent generations through his inseparable artistic and political examples. This retrospective will enable so many to confront for the first time, or anew, the groundbreaking multidisciplinary body of work on which his legacy actually stands.”

Beginning in the late 1970s, David Wojnarowicz (1954–1992) created a body of work that spanned photography, painting, music, film, sculpture, writing, performance, and activism. Joining a lineage of iconoclasts, Wojnarowicz (pronounced Voyna-ROW-vich) saw the outsider as his true subject. His mature period began with a series of photographs and collages that honored—and placed himself among—consummate countercultural figures like Arthur Rimbaud, William Burroughs, and Jean Genet. Even as he became well-known in the East Village art scene for his mythological paintings, Wojnarowicz remained committed to writing personal essays. Queer and HIV-positive, Wojnarowicz became an impassioned advocate for people with AIDS at a time when an inconceivable number of friends, lovers, and strangers—disproportionately gay men—were dying from the disease and from government inaction.

After hitchhiking across the U.S. and living for several months in San Francisco, and then in Paris, David Wojnarowicz settled in New York in 1978 and soon after began to exhibit his work in East Village galleries. Largely self-taught, Wojnarowicz came to prominence in New York in the 1980s, a period marked by great creative energy and profound cultural changes. Intersecting movements—graffiti, new and no wave music, conceptual photography, performance, neo-expressionist painting—made New York a laboratory for innovation. Unlike many artists, Wojnarowicz refused a signature style, adopting a wide variety of techniques with an attitude of radical possibility. Distrustful of inherited structures, a feeling amplified by the resurgence of conservative politics, Wojnarowicz varied his repertoire to better infiltrate the culture.

His essay for the catalog accompanying the exhibition Witnesses: Against Our Vanishing (curated by Nan Goldin at Artists Space in 1989–90) came under fire for its vitriolic attack on politicians and leaders who were preventing AIDS treatment and awareness. The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) threatened to defund the exhibition, and Wojnarowicz fought against this and for the first amendment rights of artists. Continue reading

“Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” Opens April 6 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Exhibition Examines A Rare Portfolio Presented In Its Entirety For The First Time

Diane Arbus (1923—1971) was one of the most original and influential artists of the 20th century. “Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” forges new ground as the first exhibition to focus on the portfolio Arbus was working on at the end of her life. This heretofore missing piece from her biography was as important to her evolving artistic identity as it was to the broader public recognition of photography as a fine-art practice. Central to the transition Arbus was making away from magazine work at the time of her death, the portfolio bridges a lifetime of modest recognition with a posthumous career of extraordinary acclaim.

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Photo Credit: Diane Arbus, A woman with her baby monkey, N.J. 1971, 1971, gelatin silver print, 14 7/8 x 15 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum; Museum purchase. © The Estate of Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” is on view from April 6, 2018, to Jan. 21, 2019, at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The exhibition is organized by John Jacob, the McEvoy Family Curator for Photography. The museum is the only venue for the exhibition.

Having started her career as a studio photographer with her husband Allan Arbus, Diane Arbus quit the studio in 1956 and later studied with Lisette Model at the New School in New York City. She became a magazine photographer, working on assignment for high-profile periodicals including Esquire and Harpers Bazaar. In 1963 she was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship for a project that focused on American customs. The Guggenheim was among the most prestigious of fellowships available to artists, including photographers, making it an important source of financial and artistic support for those like Arbus who sought to break free from the strictures of magazine photography. Her later work was emotionally complex and explored subject matter outside of the mainstream, such as portraits of individuals whose professional, personal or physical attributes deviated from what was considered normal or acceptable in Arbus’ time, and photographs that frankly captured sexuality or revealed underlying currents of domestic tension and dysfunction.

At the time of her death, Arbus was already a growing influence on the field of photography but not widely known to the larger public. It was her portfolio, A box of ten photographs, that initiated the transition, connecting her past as a magazine photographer with her emergence as a serious artist. The publication of six photographs from the portfolio in Artforum and the presentation of the complete portfolio at the Venice Biennale were the first steps toward the almost mythical status of Arbus today.

Stephen Frank, Diane Arbus with her photograph Identical twins, Roselle, N.J. 1966, during a lecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1970. © Stephen A. Frank

Stephen Frank, Diane Arbus with her photograph Identical twins, Roselle, N.J. 1966, during a lecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1970. © Stephen A. Frank

This exhibition sheds new light on a crucial and often overlooked stage in Arbus’ career, as well as on a transformational moment in the history of contemporary photography,” said Stephanie Stebich, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director at the Smithsonian American Art. “The museum was an early champion of photography as an important art form reflecting the American experience. We’re proud of the role that SAAM played in bringing the work of Diane Arbus to wider recognition in the 1970s and are pleased to present A box of ten photographs in its entirety to a new generation.

In late 1969, Arbus began to work on a portfolio. At the time of her death in 1971, she had completed the printing for eight known sets of a planned edition of 50 of A box of ten photographs, as she titled it, only four of which she sold during her lifetime. Two were purchased by photographer Richard Avedon; another by artist Jasper Johns. A fourth was purchased by Bea Feitler, art director at Harper’s Bazaar. For Feitler, Arbus added an 11th photograph, “A woman with her baby monkey N.J. 1971.” This is the first exhibition to focus exclusively on A box of ten photographs, using the set that Arbus assembled especially for Feitler. It was acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 1986, and it is the only one of the portfolios completed and sold by Arbus that is publicly held. Continue reading

John A. Farrell To Be Awarded New-York Historical Society’s 2018 Barbara And David Zalaznick Book Prize In American History For Richard Nixon: The Life

$50,000 Prize and Title of American Historian Laureate to Be Presented at Weekend with History Friday, April 13, 2018

Pam Schafler, chair of New-York Historical Society’s Board of Trustees, and Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of New-York Historical, announced that author John A. Farrell will be honored with New-York Historical’s annual Barbara and David Zalaznick Book Prize in American History for Richard Nixon: The Life (Penguin Random House, 2017).

The award recognizes the best book of the year in the field of American history or biography. Mr. Farrell will receive a $50,000 cash award, an engraved medal, and the title of American Historian Laureate, which will be presented on April 13, 2018. The ceremony is part of New-York Historical’s 13th annual Chairman’s Council Weekend with History, a two-day event featuring an array of speakers discussing important historical events that have made an impact on New York City and the nation.

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New-York Historical Society logo

Selected by a prize committee comprising historians and New-York Historical leadership from a field of more than 136 submissions, Richard Nixon: The Life is a defining portrait of a man who led America in a time of turmoil and left the nation divided. We live today, Farrell shows, in a world Richard Nixon made. Within four years of his first political victory, Nixon was a U.S. senator; in six, the vice president of the United States of America. Nixon’s sins as a candidate were legion; and in one unlawful secret plot, as Farrell reveals, Nixon acted to prolong the Vietnam War for his own political purposes. Finally elected president in 1969, Nixon packed his staff with bright young men who devised forward-thinking reforms addressing health care, welfare, civil rights, and protection of the environment. It was a fine legacy, but Nixon cared little for it. He aspired to make his mark on the world stage instead, and his 1972 opening to China was the first great crack in the Cold War. Continue reading

The British Library Exhibition, Harry Potter: A History of Magic, to open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018

The British Library Is Bringing A Major Exhibition To The U.S. For The First Time

Harry Potter: A History Of Magic Will Be On View At The British Library In London, October 20, 2017 – February 28, 2018

The British Library and the New-York Historical Society are delighted to announce that Harry Potter: A History of Magic will open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018, following its run at the British Library in London from October 20, 2017 – February 28, 2018.

Harry Potter: A History of Magic

The British Library Exhibition, Harry Potter: A History of Magic, to open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018

The exhibition’s New York opening marks the 20th anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in the U.S. by Scholastic, following the 20th-anniversary celebrations of the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in the U.K. in 2017.

Ahead of the U.K. opening in London, Harry Potter: A History of Magic has already sold over 25,000 tickets—the highest amount of advance tickets ever sold for a British Library exhibition. Tickets are available to buy from the British Library website.

The first book in the series of Harry Potter novels, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, was originally published by Bloomsbury in 1997. Since then Bloomsbury has published all seven of the Harry Potter novels in children’s and adult editions, three charity books―Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Quidditch Through the Ages and The Tales of Beedle the Bard, and the ILLUSTRATED EDITION of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Bloomsbury is also the publishers for the physical audiobooks of the entire series.

The exhibition unveils rare books, manuscripts, and magical objects from the British Library’s collection, capturing the traditions of folklore and magic at the heart of the Harry Potter stories. Exploring the subjects studied at Hogwarts, the exhibition includes original drafts and drawings by J.K. Rowling and Harry Potter illustrator Jim Kay, going on display for the first time.

As it travels from London to New York, the exhibition will evolve to include U.S.-specific artifacts from New-York Historical’s collection and items from U.S. Harry Potter publisher Scholastic’s collection.

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest research libraries. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research, and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection. The Library’s collection has developed over 250 years and exceeds 150 million separate items representing every age of written civilization and includes books, journals, manuscripts, maps, stamps, music, patents, photographs, newspapers and sound recordings in all written and spoken languages. Up to 10 million people visit the British Library website―www.bl.UK ―every year where they can view up to 4 million digitized collection items and over 40 million pages. (See more at: www.bl.uk.) Continue reading

Fiji Lands On All Three Covers of The Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2017 Issue

Secluded VOMO Island Resort and the Idyllic Mamanuca Islands Serve as Backdrop

Tourism Fiji is proud to announce that selected islands of Fiji are featured on all three covers of the highly anticipated Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2017 issue. Hitting newsstands, the web and social platforms today, the annual Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue has an unprecedented reach of over 60 million readers worldwide.

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Kate Upton as photographed in Fiji. (Photo Credit to Yu Tsa/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED)

Nestled in the sparkling waters of the South Pacific, Fiji’s 333 islands are known for their endless stretches of white sand beaches, crystal-clear ocean waters, lush jungles and picturesque waterfalls. During the shoot, SI Swimsuit shot in locations including VOMO Island and Vomo Lailai (Little Vomo), situated between Fiji’s two western island chains called the Mamanucas and the Yasawas. Shoots also took place on Mana Island and Modriki Island in the Mamanuca island chain, places revered for their natural beauty and featured in previous film and television productions, including the iconic film “Castaway” and television show, “Survivor.” These locations were selected for their stunning landscapes, yet also for their secluded nature. The models on the shoot included Hannah Ferguson, Danielle Herrington, Bojana Krsmanovic, Ashley Graham and Kate Upton.

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Kate Upton in the Fiji Islands for the Sports Illustrated 2017 Swimsuit Issue Photo Shoot. (Photo Credit: Yu Tsa/Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2017)

Fiji is your quintessential paradise, and rightly so!” said MJ Day, Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Assistant Managing Editor. “Tons of tiny islands each with their own look and feel, gorgeous coral-lined beaches decorated with palm trees like it’s straight out of a postcard. VOMO Resort was the perfect base camp for our 2017 shoot. After arriving via helicopter, feeling like a royal, we were greeted by the most perfect beaches…and some black tipped sharks in the shallows (don’t worry, they’re harmless)! The crew enjoyed some of the freshest seafood we have ever had, one lunch eating sashimi from a fish that Hannah Ferguson caught herself. Fiji snagged the 2017 cover, so I think that speaks for itself.”

The models and crew were transported from Los Angeles (LAX) via Fiji Airways, who offers the only non-stop flights from the U.S. to paradise. After arriving in Fiji, the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit crew focused its multi-day destination shoot on the exclusive, luxurious 225-acre-island escape that is VOMO Island Resort. The resort features a choice of four room types ranging from laidback beachfront cottages (or Bures as they are known in Fijian) to the sophisticated 4-bedroom “Residence,” which includes your own Fijian butler. Located only a five-minute boat ride off VOMO Island is Vomo Lailai (Little Vomo); a deserted island that can be rented out for a day of romance and privacy. Guests can indulge in a gourmet champagne picnic delivered to the island upon request.tourism-fiji

Fiji is much more than just its pristine beaches and idyllic tropical islands as showcased in SI Swimsuit 2017,” said Matthew Stoeckel, CEO of Tourism Fiji. “Fiji is world renowned for its authentic, friendly hospitality and it’s the interaction that visitors have with the Local Fijians that make Fiji such a captivating destination. At every resort, guests are always greeted by name and the small guest-to-staff ratio makes the interaction personal and memorable,” concludes Stoeckel.

These personal and heartfelt interactions with visitors further create the notion of Fiji as a transformational destination. Many visitors are highly impacted by the Fijian culture and experience a shift of perspective during their stay. Fiji provides visitors with the opportunity of self-reflection and the development of a deeper communion with nature and culture.

Those interested in learning more about Fiji’s islands, VOMO Island Resort and the places featured on the covers of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2017 are invited to click on www.fiji.travel/us/Swim2017.

You can also check out all photos from Swimsuit 2017 on si.com/swimsuit and to see additional images from SI Swimsuit 2017 on location in Fiji, click here: Swim Daily.

Join the conversation about the shoot with the trending hashtags across social media: #SISwim & #FijiNow.