The Museum Of Modern Art Appoints La Frances Hui Associate Curator In The Department Of Film

The Museum of Modern Art announces that La Frances Hui will join the Museum as Associate Curator in the Department of Film, beginning October 13. In this role, Ms. Hui will serve as a strategic collaborator in driving the department’s extensive calendar of programs, exhibitions, collections and scholarship under the leadership of Rajendra Roy, the Museum’s Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film. She joins MoMA following 15 years at the Asia Society in New York, where she served as Film Curator and Associate Director of Cultural Programs. During her tenure, she curated film series covering a wide spectrum of Chinese cinema, from silent classics to propaganda films to contemporary mainstream cinema and independent films. With expertise in a variety of Asian cinemas, she has also organized series featuring Japanese documentaries, New Wave Japanese cinema, contemporary Thai films, New Wave Iranian cinema, and popular Korean filmmaking.

La Frances Hui (PRNewsFoto/Museum of Modern Art)

La Frances Hui (PRNewsFoto/Museum of Modern Art)

MoMA’s commitment to cinema has always extended beyond North American centers of production to include work from innovative international filmmakers,” said Mr. Roy. “La’s rich knowledge of Asian cinema, combined with her unique professional experience in program development and implementation, will afford us with critical opportunities to engage with a spectrum of moving image artists in ever more essential ways.”

At Asia Society, Ms. Hui presented retrospectives of directors Tsai Ming-Liang, Jafar Panahi, Midi Z, and Shohei Imamura. In addition, she curated a series of independent Chinese documentaries for Film Southasia, Kathmandu and was co-curator of the 36th Asian American International Film Festival (2013), a festival dedicated to Asian and Asian American film and media.

The Museum of Modern Art‘s Department of Film marks its 80th anniversary in 2015. Founded in 1935 as the Film Library, it holds one of the strongest international collections of motion pictures in the world—totaling more than 30,000 films between the permanent and study collections—and is a leader in film preservation and a discoverer of emerging talent. Playing an essential role in MoMA‘s mission to collect, preserve, and exhibit modern and contemporary art, the Department of Film was awarded an Honorary Academy Award in 1978 “for the contribution it has made to the public’s perception of movies as an art form.”

“Soldier, Spectre, Shaman: The Figure and the Second World War” at The Museum of Modern Art

October 24, 2015–March 20, 2016

The Paul J. Sachs Drawing Galleries, third floor

The years surrounding World War II posed a creative and existential crisis, as artists struggled to respond to human, social, and cultural conditions in the wake of the horrors of combat, images of concentration camps, and the aftermath of the atomic bomb. Drawn entirely from MoMA’s collection, Soldier, Spectre, Shaman presents a range of artistic responses focused on the human figure, with the body serving as subject and object, mirror and metaphor.

Jean Fautrier (French, 1898-1964). Hostages Black Ground (Otages fond noir). 1944-47 (printed c. 1962). Etching, relief printed. Plate: 9 1/2 x 12 9/16″ (23.5 x 31.9 cm); sheet: 14 7/8 x 21 15/16″ (37.8 x 55.8 cm). Publisher: Édition Couturier, Paris. Printer: Jacques David, Paris. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Arthur B. Stanton Fund © 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Jean Fautrier (French, 1898-1964). Hostages Black Ground (Otages fond noir). 1944-47 (printed c. 1962). Etching, relief printed. Plate: 9 1/2 x 12 9/16″ (23.5 x 31.9 cm); sheet: 14 7/8 x 21 15/16″ (37.8 x 55.8 cm). Publisher: Édition Couturier, Paris. Printer: Jacques David, Paris. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Arthur B. Stanton Fund © 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

The exhibition features work in a variety of mediums by more than 30 international artists, including prints by David Smith and Chimei Hamada that confront the visceral realities of the battlefield landscape; Alberto Giacometti’s and Louise Bourgeois’s sculptures of spectral, shadowed, or dissolving bodies; Shomei Tomatsu’s post-atomic bomb photographs; and visions of mystical, divine, or otherworldly forms by Henri Michaux, Henry Darger, and Jeanne Reynal.

Shomei Tomatsu (Japanese, 1930-2012). Hibakusha Tomitarō Shimotani, Nagasaki. 1961. Gelatin silver print, 13 × 18 3/4″ (33 × 47.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist © 2015 Shomei Tomatsu

Shomei Tomatsu (Japanese, 1930-2012). Hibakusha Tomitarō Shimotani, Nagasaki. 1961. Gelatin silver print, 13 × 18 3/4″ (33 × 47.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the artist © 2015 Shomei Tomatsu

Organized by Lucy Gallun, Assistant Curator, Department of Photography, and Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator, Department of Drawings and Prints.

The Whitney Museum OF American Art To Debut Frank Stella: A Retrospective, Opening October 30

The most comprehensive career retrospective in the U.S. to date of the work of Frank Stella, co-organized by The Whitney Museum of American Art and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, will debut at the Whitney this fall. Frank Stella: A Retrospective brings together the artist’s best-known works installed alongside lesser known examples to reveal the extraordinary scope and diversity of his nearly sixty-year career. Approximately 100 works, including icons of major museum and private collections, will be shown. Along with paintings, reliefs, sculptures, and prints, a selection of drawings and maquettes have been included to shed light on Stella’s conceptual and material process. Frank Stella: A Retrospective is organized by Michael Auping, Chief Curator, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, in association with Adam D. Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Director, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, with the involvement of Carrie Springer, Assistant Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

The exhibition will be on view at the Whitney from October 30, 2015 through February 7, 2016, and at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth from April 17 through September 4, 2016; it will subsequently travel to the DeYoung Museum, San Francisco. This will be the inaugural special exhibition and the first career retrospective devoted to a living artist in the Whitney’s new downtown home on Gansevoort Street. It will fill the entire 18,000-square-foot fifth floor—the Museum’s largest gallery for temporary exhibitions. Annabelle Selldorf, Selldorf Architects, is doing the exhibition design for the Whitney installation.

A Stella retrospective presents many challenges,” remarks Auping, “given Frank’s need from the beginning of his career to immediately and continually make new work in response to previous series. And he has never been timid about making large, even monumental, works. The result has been an enormous body of work represented by many different series. Our goal has been to summarize without losing the raw texture of his many innovations.”

It’s not merely the length of his career, it is the intensity of his work and his ability to reinvent himself as an artist over and over again over six decades that make his contribution so important,” said Weinberg. “Frank is a radical innovator who has, from the beginning, absorbed the lessons of art history and then remade the world on his own artistic terms. He is a singular American master and we are thrilled to be celebrating his astonishing accomplishment.

Frank Stella.   Die Fahne hoch!,   1959.  Enamel on canvas, 121 5/8 x 72 13/16 in.  Whitney  Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene M. Schwartz and purchase, With funds from the John I.H. Baur Purchase Fund; the Charles and Anita Blatt Fund; Peter M. Brant; B.H. Friedman ; the Gilman Foundation, Inc.; Susan Morse Hilles; The Lauder Foundation;  Frances and Sydney Lewis; the Albert A. List Fund; Philip Morris Incorporated; Sandra Payson;  Mr. and Mrs. Albrecht Saalfied; Mrs. Percy Uris; Warner Communications, Inc. and the National Endowment for the Arts  75.22  © 2014 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Frank Stella. Die Fahne hoch!, 1959. Enamel on canvas, 121 5/8 x 72 13/16 in.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene M. Schwartz and purchase,
With funds from the John I.H. Baur Purchase Fund; the Charles and Anita Blatt Fund; Peter M. Brant;
B.H. Friedman ; the Gilman Foundation, Inc.; Susan Morse Hilles; The Lauder Foundation;
Frances and Sydney Lewis; the Albert A. List Fund; Philip Morris Incorporated; Sandra Payson;
Mr. and Mrs. Albrecht Saalfied; Mrs. Percy Uris; Warner Communications, Inc. and the National
Endowment for the Arts 75.22 © 2014 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Born in Malden, Massachusetts, in 1936, Frank Stella attended Phillips Academy, Andover, and then Princeton University, where he studied art history and painting. In college, he produced a number of sophisticated paintings that demonstrated his understanding of the various vocabularies that had brought abstract painting into international prominence. After graduating in 1958, Stella moved to New York and achieved almost immediate fame with his Black Paintings (1958–60), which were included in The Museum of Modern Art’s seminal exhibition Sixteen Americans in 1959–60.

The Leo Castelli Gallery in New York held Stella’s first one-person show in 1962. The Museum of Modern Art, under William Rubin’s stewardship, presented his first retrospective only a few years later, in 1970, when Stella was only thirty-four years old. A second retrospective was held at MoMA in 1987. Since then, Stella has been the subject of countless exhibitions throughout the world, including a major retrospective in Wolfsburg in 2012. Frank Stella: A Retrospective is the first survey of the artist’s career in the U.S. since 1987. He was appointed the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University in 1983. “Working Space,” his provocative lecture series (later published as a book), addresses the issue of pictorial space in postmodern art. Stella has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the 2009 National Medal of Arts and the 2011 Lifetime Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award from the International Sculpture Center, as well as the Isabella and Theodor Dalenson Lifetime Achievement Award from Americans for the Arts (2011) and the National Artist Award at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Aspen (2015).

Frank Stella, Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985. Oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum. 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Frank Stella, Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985. Oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum. 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Throughout his career, Stella has challenged the boundaries of painting and accepted notions of style. Though his early work allied him with the emerging minimalist approach, Stella’s style has evolved to become more complex and dynamic over the years as he has continued his investigation into the nature of abstract painting.

Adam Weinberg and Marla Price, Director of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, note in the directors’ foreword to the catalogue, “Abstract art constitutes the major, and in many ways, defining artistic statement of the twentieth century and it remains a strong presence in this century. Many artists have played a role in its development, but there are a few who stand out in terms of both their innovations and perseverance. Frank Stella is one of those. As institutions devoted to the history and continued development of contemporary art, we are honored to present this tribute to one of the greatest abstract painters of our time.

The exhibition begins with rarely seen early works, such as East Broadway(1958), from the collection of Addison Gallery of American Art, which show Stella’s absorption of Abstract Expressionism and predilections for colors and composition that would appear throughout the artist’s career.

Stella’s highly acclaimed Black Paintings follow. Their black stripes executed with enamel house paint were a critical step in the transition from Abstract Expressionism to Minimalism. The exhibition includes such major works as Die Fahne hoch! (1959), a masterpiece from the Whitney’s own collection, and The Marriage of Reason and Squalor II (1959) from The Museum of Modern Art’s collection. A selection of the artist’s Aluminum and Copper Paintings of 1960–61, featuring metallic paint and shaped canvases, further establish Stella’s key role in the development of American Minimalism.

Even with his early success, Stella continued to experiment in order to advance the language of abstraction. The chronological presentation of Stella’s work tracks the artist’s exploration of the relationship between color, structure, and abstract illusionism, beginning with his Benjamin Moore series and Concentric Square Paintings of the early 1960s and 70s—including the masterpiece Jasper’s Dilemma (1962). In his Dartmouth, Notched V, and Running V paintings, Stella combines often shocking color with complex shaped canvases that mirror the increasingly dynamic movement of his painted bands. These were followed by the even more radically shaped Irregular Polygon Paintings, such as Chocorua IV (1966) from the Hood Museum, with internally contrasting geometric forms painted in vibrant fluorescent hues; and the monumental Protractor Paintings, such as Harran II (1967) from the Guggenheim‘s collection, composed of curvilinear forms with complex chromatic variations. Continue reading

Hennessy And World-Renowned Artist Ryan McGinness Team Up For The New Limited Edition Bottle

Continuing a legacy of artistic collaboration that spans centuries, Hennessy has partnered with multi-disciplinary artist Ryan McGinness to create the new Hennessy V.S Limited Edition by Ryan McGuinness Bottle, now available for purchase online and at select wine & spirits retailers nationwide. McGinness will also embark on a global tour with Hennessy beginning in August, with four US stops: New York, Miami, Philadelphia and Los Angeles.

Hennessy V.S Limited Edition by Ryan McGinness Bottle and Case

Hennessy V.S Limited Edition by Ryan McGinness Bottle and Case

In 2015, the Maison Hennessy celebrates 250 years of an exceptional adventure that has linked the Hennessy and Fillioux families for seven generations and spanned five continents. It began in the French region of Cognac, the seat from which the Maison has constantly passed down the best the land has to give, from one generation to the next. Hennessy’s success and longevity are also the result of the values the Maison has upheld since its creation: a constant quest for innovation, and an unwavering commitment to Creation, Excellence, Legacy, and Sustainable Development.

The new Hennessy V.S Limited Edition is the fifth in a series that has included critically acclaimed artists, KAWS, Futura, Os Gemeos and Shepard Fairey, the collaboration with McGinness is a perfect embodiment of Hennessy’s 250 years of dedication to the art of blending. McGinness acknowledges the strong similarities between his artistic approach and the creation of Hennessy Cognac: “My process of combining elements and compounds to form mixtures parallels Hennessy’s artful blending of eaux-de-vie to create Cognac. The shared approach to our crafts is part science and part art.

Hennessy V.S Limited Edition Bottle by Ryan McGinness glows in the dark under black lighting

Hennessy V.S Limited Edition Bottle by Ryan McGinness glows in the dark under black lighting


The label on each individually numbered 750ml bottle features an innovative brand first: a radiating pattern in bright fluorescent colors that is illuminated when the bottle is placed under a black light. True to his style, McGinness also re-interpreted icons within Hennessy’s motif, including the brand’s coat of arms, and highlighted the bottle’s metadata – information found on the back of the label in fine print – through unique visual symbology. Known for using the visual language of contemporary symbology, the New York-based McGinness is credited with elevating the status of the icon to fine art. His works have been exhibited in museums around the world.
Ryan McGinness’ work reflects a fresh, energetic use of multiple elements- from colors to icons-to create designs of enduring impact. We are thrilled to be partnering with Ryan McGinness during our 250th Anniversary year. This new Hennessy V.S Limited Edition bottle design embodies his passion and commitment to his craft, the same characteristics Hennessy has pursued since 1765,” said Rodney Williams, Executive Vice President of Spirits, Moet Hennessy USA.
In addition to the 750ml bottle ($32), a limited number of deluxe sets in commemorative gift boxes ($150) are available. The Hennessy V.S Limited Edition by Ryan McGinness Deluxe Set features two individually numbered 750ml bottles with different adaptations of the design by the artist in black and fluorescent colors on a black background. The Deluxe set also includes a keepsake booklet, providing a special inside look at the collaboration, and two exclusive artwork coasters.

Ryan McGinness holds the Hennessy V.S Limited Edition bottle in his Chinatown Studio

Ryan McGinness holds the Hennessy V.S Limited Edition bottle in his Chinatown Studio

American artist Ryan McGinness is one of the most noted visual virtuosos of our time. Amidst a 20-plus year career of professional design work and exhibition, the Virginia-born artist has been heralded as “an art star” and “a leading pioneer of the new semiotics” by internationally regarded publications like The New York Times, Black Book and Vogue. McGinness has created some of the most renowned symbol-driven vernacular in the contemporary art world and his works have graced prestigious galleries and museums in United States and around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, MUSAC in Spain, and the Misumi Collection in Japan.
For more information about the Hennessy V.S Limited Edition bottle by Ryan McGinness, visit Hennessy.com

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART TO PRESENT MAJOR RETROSPECTIVE OF DONALD JUDD IN 2017

I made my work to be intelligible to me, with the casual assumption that if it made sense to me, it would to someone else.” —Donald Judd, “Art and Architecture,” 1983

In the fall of 2017, The Museum of Modern Art will present the most comprehensive exhibition of the work of Donald Judd (American, 1928–1994) to date. Comprising more than 100 works of art gathered from public and private collections around the world, this retrospective aims to provide a multifaceted perspective on Judd. Organized by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture, in collaboration with Judd Foundation, the exhibition will be installed in the Museum’s second-floor Contemporary Galleries. Building on intensive curatorial research, the exhibition will advance scholarship on Judd’s art and introduce his work to new generations of viewers. MoMA will be the sole venue for the exhibition.

Donald Judd (American, 1928–1994). Untitled (Stack). 1967. Lacquer on galvanized iron, twelve units, each 9 x 40 x 31″ (22.8 x 101.6 x 78.7 cm), installed vertically with 9″ (22.8 cm) intervals. The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Helen Acheson Bequest (by exchange) and gift of Joseph Helman. © Judd Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York

Donald Judd (American, 1928–1994). Untitled (Stack). 1967. Lacquer on galvanized iron, twelve units, each 9 x 40 x 31″ (22.8 x 101.6 x 78.7 cm), installed vertically with 9″ (22.8 cm) intervals. The Museum of Modern Art, NY. Helen Acheson Bequest (by exchange) and gift of Joseph Helman. © Judd Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York

“Half a century after Judd established himself as a leading figure of his time, his legacy demands to be considered anew,” said Ms. Temkin. “The show will cover the entire arc of Judd’s career, including not only quintessential objects from the 1960s and 1970s, but also works made before he arrived at his iconic formal vocabulary, and selections from the remarkable developments of the 1980s.

Donald Judd (American, 1928–1994). Untitled. 1991. Painted aluminum, 59″ x 24′ 7 1/4″ x 65″ (150 x 750 x 165 cm) Bequest of Richard S. Zeisler and gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (both by exchange) and gift of Kathy Fuld, Agnes Gund, Patricia Cisneros, Doris Fisher, Mimi Haas, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, and Emily Spiegel. © Judd Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York

Donald Judd (American, 1928–1994). Untitled. 1991. Painted aluminum, 59″ x 24′ 7 1/4″ x 65″ (150 x 750 x 165 cm) Bequest of Richard S. Zeisler and gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (both by exchange) and gift of Kathy Fuld, Agnes Gund, Patricia Cisneros, Doris Fisher, Mimi Haas, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, and Emily Spiegel. © Judd Foundation, licensed by VAGA, New York

The exhibition and its catalogue will address the great breadth of Judd’s artistic vision, which encompassed not only sculptural forms but also painting, printmaking, writing, art criticism, architecture, furniture design, and land preservation, as represented in Judd’s permanently installed homes and studios in Marfa, Texas, and at 101 Spring Street, New York.

The Judd Foundation is a non-profit created by Donald Judd to preserve his private living and working spaces in downtown New York and Marfa, Texas. The Foundation promotes a wider understanding of Judd’s artistic legacy by providing access to these spaces and by developing scholarly and educational programs that offer direct engagement with Judd’s work and ideas.

The Foundation maintains sixteen properties in New York and Texas. Collectively, these properties comprise more than 126,000 square feet of permanently-installed spaces, including sculptures, paintings, prints, drawings and furniture by Judd and his contemporaries, as well as the artist’s writings and archive. Judd Foundation’s current initiatives include the Donald Judd Archive, conservation, publications, exhibitions and The Donald Judd Catalogue Raisonné. The Catalogue Raisonné will further scholarship on Judd’s work by offering a comprehensive overview of his oeuvre as well as a complete chronology, bibliography and exhibition history.

One of the most important aspects for the understanding of Don’s work is to see it in context with the spaces or with other works of his. This exhibition will give us a good chance to demonstrate just how the art came into being and what Don accomplished with it. In context the individual works gather meaning,” said Flavin Judd, Co-President, Judd Foundation.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card. Major support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.

Coming Soon: Making Music Modern: Design for Eye and Ear at The Museum of Modern Art, New York

November 15, 2014–November 15, 2015

Philip Johnson Architecture and Design Galleries, third floor

Jonathan Ive, Apple Industrial Design Group. iPod. 2001. Polycarbonate plastic and stainless steel, 4 x 2 1/2 x 7/8″ (10.2 x 6.4 x 2.2 cm). Mfr.: Apple, Inc. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the manufacturer

Jonathan Ive, Apple Industrial Design Group. iPod. 2001. Polycarbonate plastic and stainless steel, 4 x 2 1/2 x 7/8″ (10.2 x 6.4 x 2.2 cm). Mfr.: Apple, Inc. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of the manufacturer

Music and design­—art forms that share aesthetics of rhythm, tonality, harmony, interaction, and improvisation—have long had a close affinity, perhaps never more so than during the 20th century. Radical design and technological innovations, from the LP to the iPod and from the transistor radio to the Stratocaster, have profoundly altered our sense of how music can be performed, heard, distributed, and visualized. Avant-garde designers—among them Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Lilly Reich, Saul Bass, Jørn Utzon, and Daniel Libeskind—have endeavored to push the boundaries of their design work in tandem with the music of their time. Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, Making Music Modern gathers designs for auditoriums, instruments, and equipment for listening to music, along with posters, record sleeves, sheet music, and animation.

Panasonic. Toot-A-Loop Radio (model R-72). c. 1972. ABS plastic, h. 2 3/4″ (7 cm), diam. 6″ (15.2 cm). Mfr.: Panasonic Company, Secaucus, NJ. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Anne Dixon

Panasonic. Toot-A-Loop Radio (model R-72). c. 1972. ABS plastic, h. 2 3/4″ (7 cm), diam. 6″ (15.2 cm). Mfr.: Panasonic Company, Secaucus, NJ. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Anne Dixon

 

The exhibition examines alternative music cultures of the early 20th century, the rise of radio during the interwar period, how design shaped the “cool” aesthetic of midcentury jazz and hi-fidelity culture, and its role in countercultural music scenes from pop to punk, and later 20th-century design explorations at the intersection of art, technology, and perception. Continue reading

Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor at The Museum of Modern Art, New York

October 04, 2014–January 18, 2015

Contemporary Galleries, second floor; The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, second floor; The Yoshiko and Akio Morita Media Gallery, second floor; Projects Gallery, second floor

Robert Gober (American, born 1954) Untitled. 1991 Wood, beeswax, leather, fabric, and human hair. 13 1/4 x 16 1/2 x 46 1/8″ (33.6 x 41.9 x 117.2 cm)  The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Werner and Elaine Dannheisser Background: Forest, 1991 Hand-painted silkscreen on paper Image Credit: K. Ignatiadis, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery © 2014 Robert Gober

Robert Gober (American, born 1954)
Untitled. 1991
Wood, beeswax, leather, fabric, and human hair. 13 1/4 x 16 1/2 x 46 1/8″ (33.6 x 41.9 x 117.2 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Werner and Elaine Dannheisser
Background: Forest, 1991
Hand-painted silkscreen on paper
Image Credit: K. Ignatiadis, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery
© 2014 Robert Gober

Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a Metaphor, made possible by Hyundai Card, is the first large-scale survey of Robert Gober’s career to take place in the United States. Robert Gober (American, b. 1954) rose to prominence in the mid-1980s and was quickly acknowledged as one of the most significant artists of his generation. Early in his career he made deceptively simple sculptures of everyday objects—beginning with sinks before moving on to domestic furniture such as playpens, beds, and doors. In the 1990s, his practice evolved from single works to theatrical room-sized environments. Featuring loans from institutions and private collections in North America and Europe as well as selections from the artist’s collection, the exhibition includes around 130 works across several mediums, including individual sculptures and immersive sculptural environments and a distinctive body of drawings, prints, and photographs. The loosely chronological presentation traces the development of this remarkable body of work, highlighting themes and motifs that emerged in the early 1980s and continue to inform Gober’s work today.

Robert Gober (American, born 1954) Untitled. 1994 – 1995 Wood, beeswax, brick, plaster, plastic, leather, iron, charcoal, cotton socks, electric light and motor. 47 3/8 × 47 × 34″ (120.3 × 119.4 × 86.4 cm) Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel Image Credit: D. James Dee, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery © 2014 Robert Gober

Robert Gober (American, born 1954)
Untitled. 1994 – 1995
Wood, beeswax, brick, plaster, plastic, leather, iron, charcoal, cotton socks, electric light and motor. 47 3/8 × 47 × 34″ (120.3 × 119.4 × 86.4 cm)
Emanuel Hoffmann Foundation, on permanent loan to the Öffentliche Kunstsammlung Basel
Image Credit: D. James Dee, courtesy the artist and Matthew Marks Gallery
© 2014 Robert Gober

Continue reading