Walker Art Center Announces Extensive 2020–2021 Exhibition Schedule Highlights

The Walker Arts Center continues to flesh out what is considerably a very dynamic exhibition schedule for the next two years. Additions to the Walker Art Center’s 2020–2021 exhibition schedule include two new solo exhibitions by female artists, Faye Driscoll: Thank You for Coming (February 27–June 14, 2020) and Candice Lin (April 17–August 29, 2021) as well as a Walker collection show of women artists, Don’t let this be easy (July 16–March 14, 2021). For her first solo museum exhibition, Faye Driscoll incorporates a guided audio soundtrack, moving image works, and props to look back across the entirety of her trilogy of performances Thank You For ComingAttendance (2014), Play (2016), and Space (2019)—works that were presented and co-commissioned by the Walker and subsequently toured around the world over the past six years. Another newly added exhibition, Candice Lin, is the first US museum solo show by the artist, co-organized by the Walker Art Center and the Carpenter Center for Visual Arts (CCVA). Lin is creating a site-specific installation that responds to the space of the gallery at each institution, allowing the shape of the work to evolve over the course of its presentation.

The Walker-organized exhibition Don’t let this be easy highlights the diverse and experimental practices of women artists spanning some 50 years through a selection of paintings, sculptures, moving image works, artists’ books, and materials from the archives.

The initiative is presented in conjunction with the Feminist Art Coalition (FAC), a nationwide effort involving more than 60 museums committed to social justice and structural change.

Other upcoming exhibitions include An Art Of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018 (February 16–September 20, 2020), a survey of six decades of Johns’ work in printmaking drawn from the Walker’s complete collection of the artists’ prints including intaglio, lithography, woodcut, linoleum cut, screenprinting, lead relief, and blind embossing; The Paradox of Stillness: Art, Object, and Performance (formerly titiled Still and Yet) (April 18–July 26, 2020), is an exhibition that rethinks the history of performance featuring artists whose works include performative elements but also embrace acts, objects, and gestures that refer more to the inert qualities of traditional painting or sculpture than to true staged action.

Additional exhibitions include Michaela Eichwald’s (June 13–November 8, 2020) first US solo museum presentation, bringing together painting, sculpture, and collage from across the past 10 years of her practice; Designs for Different Futures (September 12, 2020 – January 3, 2021)—a collaborative group show co-organized by the Walker Art Center, Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago—brings together about 80 dynamic works that address the challenges and opportunities that humans may encounter in the years, decades, and centuries to come; Rayyane Tabet (December 10, 2020– April 18, 2021), a solo show by the Beirut-based multidisciplinary artist featuring a new installation for the Walker that begins with a time capsule discovered on the site of what was once an IBM manufacturing facility in Rochester, Minnesota.

OPENING EXHIBITIONS

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS



Photo Credit: Flags I, 1973. Screenprint on paper, 27 3/8 x 35 ½ in. ed. 3/65. Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988. © Jasper Johns/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

An Art Of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960–2018, February 16–September 20, 2020. Gallery B/Target

When Jasper Johns’s paintings of flags and targets debuted in 1958, they brought him instant acclaim and established him as a critical link between Abstract Expressionism and Pop Art. In the ensuing 60 years, Johns (US, b. 1930) has continued to astonish viewers with the beauty and complexity of his paintings, drawings, sculpture, and prints. Today, he is considered one of the 20th century’s greatest American artists.

Artist: Jasper Johns Title: Figure 7 from the Color Numeral Series Date: 1969 Medium: lithograph on paper Accession number: 1985.319 Credit Line: Gift of Kenneth Tyler, 1985. Repro Rights: VAGA; Art copyright Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.
Artist: Jasper Johns Title: Target Date: 1960 Medium: lithograph on paper Accession number: 1988.181 Credit Line: Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988. Repro Rights: VAGA; Art copyright Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

In celebration of the artist’s 90th birthday, An Art of Changes surveys six decades of Johns’s work in printmaking, highlighting his experiments with familiar, abstract, and personal imagery that play with memory and visual perception in endlessly original ways. The exhibition features some 90 works in intaglio, lithography, woodcut, linoleum cut, screenprinting, and lead relief—all drawn from the Walker’s comprehensive collection of the artist’s prints.

Target, 1974
Screenprint on paper
35 1/8 x 27 3/8 inches
Collection Walker Art Center, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988
© Jasper Johns/VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY
Artist: Jasper Johns Title: Untitled Date: 2000 Medium: linocut on paper Accession number: 2001.197 Credit Line: Gift of the artist, 2001. Repro Rights: VAGA; Art copyright Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.
Artist: Jasper Johns Title: Untitled Date: 2016 Medium: Linoleum-cut on paper Accession number: 2017.6 Credit Line: Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of the artist, 2017. Photo by Gene Pittman for Walker Art Center.
Artist: Jasper Johns Title: Fragment of a Letter Date: 2010 Medium: intaglio on paper Accession number: 2011.59.1-.2 Credit Line: Gift of the artist, 2011. Repro Rights: VAGA; Art copyright Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.
Artist: Jasper Johns Title: Between the Clock and the Bed Date: 1989 Medium: Lithograph on paper Accession number: 1991.155 Credit Line: Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Stacy Roback, 1991. Repro Rights: VAGA, Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photo by Gene Pittman for Walker Art Center.

Organized in four thematic sections, the show follows Johns through the years as he revises and recycles key motifs over time, including the American flag, numerals, and the English alphabet, which he describes as “things the mind already knows.” Some works explore artists’ tools, materials, and techniques. Others explore signature aspects of the artist’s distinctive mark-making, including flagstones and hatch marks, while later pieces teem with autobiographical imagery. To underscore Johns’s fascination with the changes that occur when an image is reworked in another medium, the prints will be augmented by a small selection of paintings and sculptures.

Artist Jasper Johns at work in his studio
Artist: Jasper Johns Title: Savarin Date: 1977 Medium: Lithograph on paper Accession number: 1988.276 Credit Line: Collection Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Gift of Judy and Kenneth Dayton, 1988. Repro Rights: VAGA, Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY.

Curator: Joan Rothfuss, guest curator, Visual Arts.

  • Exhibition Tour
    Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh: October 12, 2019–January 20, 2020
    Walker Art Center, Minneapolis: February 16–September 20, 2020
    Grand Rapids Art Museum, Michigan: October 24, 2020–January 24, 20
    21
    Tampa Art Museum, Florida: April 28–September 6, 2021
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“¡Pleibol!” Slides Into Smithsonian Fall 2020

Exhibition Will Explore Latina/o Impact Through Baseball Artifacts, Stories and Photos

Before he was a World Series champion, Anthony Rendon, the former Washington Nationals third baseman and current Los Angeles Angel, was an ordinary kid; signed up for youth baseball at the YMCA in Houston. His childhood jersey and “first” baseball card will be on view in the upcoming Smithsonian exhibition, “¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues/En los barrios y las grandes ligas” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History beginning Oct. 9, 2020.

Anthony Rendon’s YMCA baseball card. Major League Baseball Player Anthony Rendon pictured at age 5 on a Houston YMCA Giants T-ball league card. The front is emblazoned with “Superstars” and the back includes his height of 3 ft., 10 in. Gift of Rene and Bridget Rendon to the National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution.

Rendon’s story, like that of many baseball-loving families in Latino communities, shows passion and dedication to the game. The bilingual exhibition will capture the excitement of the sport and will highlight how Latinas/os have transformed American culture and society through the lens of baseball, the national pastime.

The Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service (SITES) will be traveling a version of “¡Pleibol!” to 15 cities through 2025. In Washington, D.C., the exhibition opens in the museum’s Albert M. Small Documents Gallery and will feature more than 60 artifacts and objects such as baseball cards, programs and scrapbooks.

Throughout the 20th century in the United States and Latin America, baseball provided Latino communities a path for a better future. Workers in agriculture and industry in the United States used baseball as a means to make ends meet and as a socially acceptable space to find community and organize for rights and justice.

“‘¡Pleibol!’ presents major league stories, but it is first and foremost rooted in communities and the reality of who was allowed to play ball and where,” said Margaret Salazar-Porzio, curator in the museum’s Division of Cultural and Community Life. “The story we tell shows how Latino communities played, celebrated and changed the game.

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PHOTO | BRUT: Collection Bruno Decharme & Compagnie Opens at The American Folk Art Museum, New York City, June 16, 2020–October 18, 2020

PHOTO | BRUT: Collection Bruno Decharme & Compagnie, at the American Folk Art Museum in New York City. presents the first international survey of self-taught photography. Gathering works dating from 1870 to the present by artists from various countries, the exhibition reveals the critical potential of this still relatively unexplored segment of the research on art brut. It includes four hundred works by more than forty artists (notably, Morton Bartlett, Lee Godie, Norma Oliver, Miroslav Tichý, and Marcel Bascoulard) with projections of never-before-printed images by Eugene Von Bruenchenhein and the Instagram transformations of Ichio Sugino. It also gathers assemblages made of photographs by Felipe Jesus Consalvos, Kasuo Handa, and Steve Ashby, and works relying heavily on the photographic process by Henry Darger and Leopold Strobl. This exhibition shines light on the innovative practices in the field of photography, offering fresh insight into the medium. The works have been selected from the exceptional collection of Bruno Decharme, as well as from the American Folk Art Museum, public institutions, and private collections.

Steve Ashby (1904–1980, Delaplane, VA); untitled; n.d.; wood, magazine clipping, fabric, paint, plastic, and metal; 10 1/2 x 11 1/2 x 5 in.; Collection of Robert A. Roth. Photo by John Faier.
Henry Darger (1892–1973, Chicago, IL); untitled (“These Little Children. . .”); mid-twentieth century; hand-tinted photograph and ink on cardboard; 7 x 9 in.; © Kiyoko Lerner; Collection American Folk Art Museum, New York, gift of Kiyoko Lerner, 2003.7.60. Photo by Gavin Ashworth.

This exhibition is co-produced by the American Folk Art Museum, abcd, and Les Rencontres d’Arles. It is curated by Valérie Rousseau, PhD, senior curator & curator of self-taught art and art brut, and Bruno Decharme, in collaboration with Paula Aisemberg, Barbara Safarova, and Sam Stourdzé.

Morton Bartlett (1909, Chicago, IL–1992, Boston, MA); untitled (Girl Reading); c. 1955; 35mm transparency; © The Bartlett Project, LLC; Barry Sloane Collection, Los Angeles. Photo courtesy of the Bartlett Project, LLC.

A 320-page catalog (printed in English and French, 2019), published by Flammarion in collaboration with the American Folk Art Museum and abcd, is available at the Museum Shop. It includes contributions by the exhibition curators Bruno Decharme, Valérie Rousseau, Barbara Safarova, and Sam Stourdzé, and renowned specialists Michel Thévoz and Brian Wallis, among others.

Lee Godie (1908, Chicago, IL–1994, Plato Center, IL), untitled (“Lee at 6 am Chicago”), around 1980, silver print (photo booth), 5 x 3 3/4 in., Collection John and Teenuh Foster. Photo courtesy of John and Teenuh Foster.

This exhibition is supported in part by the David Davies and Jack Weeden Fund for Exhibitions, the Stacy C. Hollander Fund for Exhibitions, William Talbott Hillman Foundation, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, and the Council for Self-Taught Art.

Art News: Christie’s Global Auction Channel Sales Total £3.9 Billion (US$5.0 Billion) In 2019

This past week, Christie’s announced auction channel sales of £3.9 billion (US$5 billion) for 2019.

Key highlights for the year included:

  • A new top price for any living artist at auction, achieved with Jeff Koon’s Rabbit, which realized US$91,075,000 at Christie’s New York in May 2019.
  • Numerous record prices in 2019, including top prices for artworks and objects sold in London (David Hockney, Henry Geldzahler and Christopher Scott, for £37,661,248/US$49,521,696), Hong Kong (Sanyu, Five Nudes, for HK$303,984,992/US$38,848,420) and Geneva (Patek Philippe Grandmaster Chime ref. 6300A for ONLY WATCH for CHF31,000,000/US$31,244,094). In Paris Nicolas de Staël’s Parc des Princes realized €20,000,000/US$22,254,368, and set a record for the artist and was the top price for any lot sold at Christie’s Paris this year.
  • Christie’s remained the auction house of choice for major private and estate collections, achieving the top three results for named collections in 2019 with Masterpieces from the Collection of S.I. Newhouse, The Robert B. and Beatrice C. Mayer Family Collection, and Maharajas and Mughal Magnificence.
  • Strong results were also achieved for the collections of notable collectors David Gilmour, Drue Heinz, the Irving Collection, James and Marilynn Alsdorf, Terry Allen Kramer, Eileen and I.M. Pei, Richard L. Weisman, George Michael, the Clarke Collection, Ron and Diane Disney Miller, the Matthys-Colle Collection, works from the UniCredit Group, Jeremy Lancaster, and masterpieces from a Rothschild Collection.

A Celebration of George Michael

The year opened with news that The George Michael Collection was to be sold in London. Highlights were exhibited in New York, Los Angeles, Hong Kong and Shanghai before a special multi-media exhibition at King Street drew thousands of fans to celebrate the singer’s life, his music and the art he lived with.

The collection spoke volumes about a man who touched millions, due to the autobiographical nature of many of the works and because it revealed the extent to which George Michael had supported YBA artists such as Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin.

Numerous artists’ auction records were set across the live auction and the online sale, but perhaps the most poignant came with Commissioned Portrait Untitled (George) by Michael Craig-Martin, the man who taught many of the YBAs at Goldsmiths in London. The wall-mounted LCD sold for £175,000 in the online sale, contributing to a collection total of £11,328,125.

The money raised from the sale will extend the philanthropic legacy built by George Michael during his lifetime.

The Golden Light of The Setting Sun

Paul Signac (1863-1935), Le Port au soleil couchant, Opus 236 (Saint-Tropez), 1892. Sold for £19,501,250 on 27 February 2019 in London

On a chilly night in London, Paul Signac’s pointillist masterpiece of a summer sunset over the port of Saint-Tropez struck a chord with collectors. Painted in May 1892, the work eclipsed Signac’s record price at auction, which had been set at Christie’s in 2007.

Christie’s Global President Jussi Pylkkänen described the painting as ‘one of the last great Signacs in private hands’, a billing that befitted the price it achieved: £19.5 million (including premium).

Fit for Royal Feet

An important Safavid ‘polonaise’ carpet. Sold for £3,724,750 on 2 May 2019 in London

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to walk on gold? In May Christie’s offered a Safavid rug woven with silver- and gold-wrapped thread, which sold for £3,724,750 — almost seven times its low estimate.

It was one of two polonaise carpets being auctioned that day, both of which were handmade in the royal ateliers of 17th-century Isfahan in Iran and presented to the future King of Poland. He in turn gifted them both to the Arch-Chancellor of the Holy Roman Empire, and they spent the following 300 years in the Weissenstein Palace in Germany

The exceptional price they achieved was largely due to their brilliant condition, which, said specialist Louise Broadhurst, was the result of being hung rather than walked on. The other carpet, which realised £3,895,000, is soon to be exhibited at the Houston Museum of Fine Art.

The Fruit of Cézanne’s Labours

Paul Cézanne’s Bouilloire et fruits, 1888-90. Sold for $59,295,000 on 13 May 2019 at Christie’s in New York

Paul Cézanne’s Bouilloire et fruits, 1888-90. Sold for $59,295,000 on 13 May 2019 in New York

According to Alex Rotter, Chairman of the Post-War & Contemporary Art department in New York, the 11 masterpieces from the collection of S.I. Newhouse, the late American publishing magnate and one of the great art collectors of his age, represented ‘one of the most sought-after groupings of art in private hands’.

Works were spread across two auctions: the Impressionist & Modern Art Evening Sale and the Post-War & Contemporary Art Evening Sale. The star lot of the former proved to be Cézanne’s still life, Bouilloire et fruits, a mature work painted in Aix-en-Provence.

Bidding opened at $30 million and rose swiftly before it was eventually captured by a telephone bidder. The £59,295,000 paid came close to passing the record figure for a work by Cézanne at auction.

Just 48 hours later, in the Post-War and Contemporary Art Evening Sale, another work from Newhouse’s collection would break a very significant record indeed.

An African Spirit Mask

A Songye Kifwebe mask. Sold for $4,215,000 on 14 May 2019 at Christie’s in New York

The Walschot-Schoffel Kifwebe mask. Sold for $4,215,000 on 14 May 2019 in New York

But first came the auction of this mesmerising Kifwebe masterpiece. Worn over the face and accessorised with raffia-palm beards, Kifwebe masks have been used for hundred of years by the Songye people of what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Before the auction, Christie’s specialist Susan Kloman explained that the mask’s patina, built up over years of handling, suggests it was once of great importance. On the day of the sale the mask, which would have been used to summon spirits, achieved $4,215,000, setting a new world record for any Songye artwork.

The Ultimate Modern Icon

Jeff Koons, Rabbit, executed in 1986. Sold for $91,075,000 on 15 May 2019 in New York

Jeff Koons, Rabbit, executed in 1986. Sold for $91,075,000 on 15 May 2019 in New York

Dumbstruck,’ was the word used by the Museum of Modern Art’s late curator Kirk Varnedoe to describe his first encounter with Rabbit by Jeff Koons in 1986.

Standing at just over three feet high, and made from polished stainless steel, the sculpture seems to be a mass of contradictions — solid, weightless, sensual, inert. It was instantly embraced by artists and critics, drawing comparisons with Brancusi’s perfect forms.

I couldn’t get my head around its simple beauty at first,’ recalled Damien Hirst. ‘I was stunned. The bunny knocked my socks off.

Rabbit was offered in New York, the ultimate prize in the sale of masterpieces from the collection of S.I. Newhouse. Bidding started at $40 million and quickly rose to $60 million, with the work finally selling for $91,075,000. It was the top price achieved at Christie’s in 2019, and set a new world auction record for a work by a living artist.

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Seattle Museum Month Offers Big Savings in February

New Museum Openings Enhance Month Of Significant Discounts At More Than 40 Museums

Every February, savvy travelers look to Seattle, also known as the Emerald City, where big savings can stack up for arts and culture lovers of all ages with Seattle Museum Month. From Feb. 1-29, 2020, travelers who stay at any one of nearly 60 participating downtown Seattle hotels receive 50 percent off admission prices to more than 40 museums and cultural institutions. February also historically offers lower rates for airfare to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and special hotel packages to entice winter travelers. To see the full list of participating museums and hotels, visit the Seattle Museum Month website at www.seattlemuseummonth.com.

Seattle Museum Month is produced by Visit Seattle and funded by the Seattle Tourism Improvement Area (STIA), a dedicated marketing fund assessed from guests at 73 downtown Seattle hotels. The program was created to encourage travelers to visit Seattle in February and celebrate the remarkable collection of unique museums in the region.

(PRNewsfoto/Visit Seattle)

Seattle has a richly diverse and world-renowned collection of museums that draw people to our city year-round, but Seattle Museum Month offers unparalleled discounts for our visitors,” Visit Seattle Senior Director of Cultural Tourism Tracey Wickersham said. “Engaging hands-on experiences with history-making computers, vintage pinball machines, and experiential music galleries where you can look, listen and re-create some of rock ‘n’ roll’s greatest moments mean our museums entertain as well as educate. You’ll find mind-blowing gardens made of glass and ancient artifacts that explore all facets of life on earth, and art from around the globe. A trip to Seattle for Museum Month will make memories that last a lifetime.”

Seattle Museum Month celebrates with a host of museum openings that give travelers the opportunity to explore Seattle’s cultural legacy.

Photo by: Dennis Miller. Caption: Savvy travelers look to the Emerald City for deep discounts on arts and cultural attractions all February with Seattle Museum Month. Travelers who stay at any one of nearly 60 participating downtown Seattle hotels receive 50 percent off admission prices to more than 40 museums and cultural institutions. The newly reopened Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture is among those participating this year.

The Seattle Art Museum hosts the grand re-opening of the Seattle Asian Art Museum February 8 and 9. After a two-year renovation and expansion, the museum reopens with a reimagined collection installation that breaks boundaries with a thematic, rather than geographic or chronological, exploration of art from the world’s largest continent. Set in Seattle’s picturesque Volunteer Park, the historic Art Deco-era museum underwent a $56 million renovation and expansion to more fully display one of the largest collections of Asian art in the nation. Visitors wishing to attend the historic re-opening weekend on February 8 and 9 can reserve free timed tickets online. Beginning Feb. 12, Museum Month passes will be accepted.

Photo courtesy of Visit Seattle. Caption: Every February, savvy travelers look to the Emerald City where big savings can stack up for arts and culture lovers of all ages with Seattle Museum Month. February also historically offers lower rates for airfare to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and special hotel packages to entice winter travelers. To see the full list of participating museums and hotels, visit the Seattle Museum Month website at www.seattlemuseummonth.com. (PRNewsfoto/Visit Seattle)

With 16 million objects in its collections and infinite stories to tell, the recently re-opened Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture – the oldest museum in Washington state – welcomes visitors to an entirely new experience. Locally known as The Burke, the museum is located at the north end of The University of Washington Seattle campus and re-opened in October 2019. The new building designed by Olson Kundig creates unprecedented opportunities for visitors to see university faculty, researchers and students uncovering dinosaur skeletons, analyzing insects and collaborating with Native communities every day.

Enjoy renowned favorites as well like Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI), The Museum of Flight, Museum of Pop Culture (MoPOP) and explore other regional museums, like LeMay – America’s Car Museum in Tacoma, USS Turner Joy Museum Ship in Bremerton or the Bellevue Arts Museum in downtown Bellevue.

Seattle Museum Month discounts are only valid for guests staying at one of the participating hotels, up to four people, during hotel stay dates. Visitors must present an official Seattle Museum Month guest pass at participating museums to redeem the discounts.

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High Museum Of Art To Present First Magnum Live Lab Photography Residency And Exhibition In The United States

Magnum is a community of thought, a shared human quality, a curiosity about what is going on in the world, a respect for what is going on and a desire to transcribe it visually.” – Henri Cartier-Bresson

This spring, the High Museum of Art will be the first-ever U.S. venue for Live Lab, a photography residency and related exhibition organized in collaboration with the international photographic cooperative Magnum Photos. Live Lab is designed to involve the community in the realization of a new body of photographs, which will be created over a two-week period in a “lab” at the Museum. The Atlanta project will feature American photographer Carolyn Drake and South African artists Lindokuhle Sobekwa and Mikhael Subotzky, whose projects all will explore themes relevant to the city.

High Museum logo

The process begins with a two-week–long “photographic jam session” (March 16–27, 2020) during which the photographers will use the High as their base of operations. They will travel into the city and metro area to shoot photographs, which they will then edit, make and sequence on site at the Museum. To render their creative process transparent, the photographers will open their workspace (located in the lobby of the High’s Anne Cox Chambers Wing) to the public at select times. The residency will culminate in a pop-up exhibition of the photographers’ work, on view in the Chambers lobby from March 28 through April 19, 2020.

Magnum Photos has hosted Live Labs in cities around the world, including London; Paris; Shenzhen, China; Kyoto, Japan; and most recently, Moscow.

We are honored that Magnum chose the High, and Atlanta, as its first U.S. host for Live Lab, and we are delighted to bring this project to the city,” said Rand Suffolk, Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr., director of the High. “This collaboration is a testament to the strength of our photography department and our commitment to supporting the creation of new work and offering innovative ways for our audience to connect with their museum and the greater community. We can’t wait to see what the photographers create.

High Museum Of Art To Present First Magnum Live Lab Photography Residency And Exhibition In The United States

To help the artists learn more about Atlanta, the High provided them with a brief on the city, which touched on topics including its history, economy and position as the crossroads of the new South. The photographers are now in the process of developing their projects’ focus and scope.

We look forward to welcoming these incredible photographers to Atlanta and to lifting the veil on their creative process for our visitors,” said Gregory Harris, the High’s assistant curator of photography. “Ours is a vibrant yet complicated and ever-changing city. It will be thrilling to see Atlanta through the lenses of these artists.”

Carolyn Drake (born 1971) is a California native now based in the Bay Area. She studied media/culture and history in the 1990s at Brown University, where she became interested in approaches to documentary and the ways that history and reality are purposefully shaped and revised over time. She worked for multimedia companies in New York for many years but eventually left her office job to engage with the physical world through photography. Between 2007 and 2013, Drake traveled frequently to Central Asia from her base in Istanbul to work on two projects that became acclaimed photo books. “Two Rivers” explores the connections between ecology, culture and political power along the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers. “Wild Pigeon” is an amalgam of photographs, drawings and embroideries she made in collaboration with Uyghur people in western China. Her latest book, “Knit Club,” will be published by TBW Books in the spring of 2020. Drake is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize, a World Press Photo award, a Magnum Emergency Fund grant and a Fulbright fellowship, among other awards. She became a Magnum nominee in 2015.

Lindokuhle Sobekwa (born 1995 in Katlehong, Johannesburg) came to photography in 2012 through his participation in the Of Soul and Joy Project, an educational program run in Thokoza, a township in southeastern Johannesburg. He went on to study with Bieke Depoorter, Cyprien Clément-Delmas, Thabiso Sekgala, Tjorven Bruyneel and Kutlwano Moagi. His early projects explore poverty and unemployment in the townships of South Africa as well as the growing nyaope drug crisis within them. His ongoing projects also address his own life—for example, his project “I Carry Her Photo with Me” examines his relationship with his sister, Ziyanda, who was estranged from her family when she died. In 2017, this project was selected by the Magnum Foundation’s Photography and Social Justice program for further development, and in 2018 Sobekwa received the Magnum Foundation Fund to continue his long–term project “Nyaope,” which has been selected for a residency at La Cité des Arts de la Réunion. Sobekwa became a Magnum nominee in 2018.

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Annenberg Space For Photography's Vanity Fair: Hollywood Calling Exhibition Opens In February 2020

Exhibit Showcases Iconic Images, Cover Shoots, and Behind-the-Scenes Moments from Vanity Fair

Today, the Annenberg Space for Photography, L.A.’s premier destination for photography, announces its next exhibition opening in February 2020Vanity Fair: Hollywood Calling The Stars, the Parties, and the Powerbrokers. The photo exhibit, opening Oscar weekend, runs from February 8 July 26, 2020.

The Annenberg Space for Photography logo (PRNewsfoto/The Annenberg Space for Photography)

Curated by Vanity Fair‘s creative development editor David Friend and the magazine’s former director of photography Susan White, Vanity Fair: Hollywood Calling features photographic portraiture and multimedia installations that capture the magic and glamour of the film and television industry’s major players from the last four decades. The exhibition is a look at the Hollywood stars, the parties, and the powerbrokers, through the distinctive lens of Vanity Fair – the most widely celebrated journalistic arbiter of Hollywood power and personality.

Documentarians, May 1998. Photo: Timothy Greenfield-Sanders
Lady Gaga & Mark Ronson, Vanity Fair Oscar Party, 2019 (Credit: Justin Bishop)
Latino Directors, November 2015, Photo: Jason Bell

With 130 photographs and more than 50 photographers, Hollywood Calling showcases Vanity Fair‘s vaunted portraitists, including the magazine’s principal photographer, Annie Leibovitz, as well as Jonathan Becker, Harry Benson, Cass Bird, Cristina de Middel, Ethan James Green, Erik Madigan Heck, Horst P. Horst, George Hurrell, Helmut Newton, Jackie Nickerson, Herb Ritts, Collier Schorr, Lord Snowdon, Firooz Zahedi, and dozens more.

Oscar-winning director Ang Lee, Hollywood Issue 2019. Photo: Peter Hapak
Barry Jenkins, Hollywood Issue 2019. Photo: Peter Hapak
Alfonso Cuaron, Hollywood Issue 2019. Photo: Peter Hapak

The show features images of iconic celebrities in film/TV, comedy and more, including Demi Moore, Natalie Portman, Nicole Kidman, Meryl Streep, Lena Waithe, Lupita Nyong’o, Philip Seymour Hoffman, George Clooney, Michelle Williams, Tom Hanks, Angelina Jolie, Viola Davis, Brad Pitt, Heath Ledger, Jack Nicholson, Ellen DeGeneres, Robin Williams, Eddie Murphy, Jim Carrey, Steve Martin, Janet Jackson, Barbra Streisand, Jodie Foster, Jennifer Lopez, Halle Berry, Oprah Winfrey, Michael B. Jordan, Gwyneth Paltrow, Blythe Danner, Jennifer Lawrence, and many more.

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