Culture Watch: Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Announces Short List for the 2020 Hugo Boss Prize

Six artists have been short-listed for the Hugo Boss Prize 2020, the biennial award for significant achievement in contemporary art. The short list is selected by a panel of international curators and critics in recognition of artists whose work is transforming the field. Since its inception in 1996, the prize has consistently functioned as a platform for the most relevant and influential art of the present, and has become a cornerstone of the Guggenheim’s contemporary programming.

On the occasion of the thirteenth Hugo Boss Prize, I’m delighted to announce the finalists for the 2020 cycle,” said Nancy Spector, Artistic Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, and jury chair. “After a rigorous examination of today’s artistic landscape, the jury identified a group of artists whose practices are beacons of cultural impact. While diverse in their approaches and themes, they each exemplify the spirit of experimentation and innovation that the prize has always championed.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York logo

The Hugo Boss Prize recognizes the achievements of both emerging and established artists, and sets no restrictions in terms of age, gender, nationality, or medium. The winner, who will receive a $100,000 honorarium, will be announced in the fall of 2020 and will present a solo exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in spring 2021.

Since its inception in 1996, the Hugo Boss Prize has been awarded to twelve influential contemporary artists: American artist Matthew Barney (1996); Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (1998); Slovenian artist Marjetica Potrč (2000); French artist Pierre Huyghe (2002); Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija (2004); English artist Tacita Dean (2006); Palestinian artist Emily Jacir (2008); German artist Hans-Peter Feldmann (2010); Danish artist Danh Vo (2012); American artist Paul Chan (2014); American artist Anicka Yi (2016); and American artist Simone Leigh (2018). The related exhibitions have constituted some of the most compelling presentations in the museum’s history.

Previous finalists include Laurie Anderson, Janine Antoni, Cai Guo-Qiang, Stan Douglas, and Yasumasa Morimura in 1996; Huang Yong Ping, William Kentridge, Lee Bul, Pipilotti Rist, and Lorna Simpson in 1998; Vito Acconci, Maurizio Cattelan, Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset, Tom Friedman, Barry Le Va, and Tunga in 2000; Francis Alÿs, Olafur Eliasson, Hachiya Kazuhiko, Koo Jeong-A, and Anri Sala in 2002; Franz Ackermann, Rivane Neuenschwander, Jeroen de Rijke and Willem de Rooij, Simon Starling, and Yang Fudong in 2004; Allora & Calzadilla, John Bock, Damián Ortega, Aïda Ruilova, and Tino Sehgal in 2006; Christoph Büchel, Patty Chang, Sam Durant, Joachim Koester, and Roman Signer in 2008; Cao Fei, Roman Ondák,Walid Raad, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, and Apichatpong Weerasethakul in 2010; Trisha Donnelly, Rashid Johnson, Qiu Zhijie, Monika Sosnowska, and Tris Vonna-Michell in 2012; Sheela Gowda, Camille Henrot, Hassan Khan, and Charline von Heyl in 2014; Tania Bruguera, Mark Leckey, Ralph Lemon, Laura Owens, and Wael Shawky in 2016; and Bouchra Khalili, Teresa Margolles, Emeka Ogboh, Frances Stark, and Wu Tsang in 2018.

The following artists are finalists for the Hugo Boss Prize 2020:

  • Nairy Baghramian (b. 1971, Isfahan, Iran)
  • Kevin Beasley (b. 1985, Lynchburg, Va.)
  • Deana Lawson (b. 1979, Rochester, N.Y.)
  • Elias Sime (b. 1968, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia)
  • Cecilia Vicuña (b. 1948, Santiago, Chile)
  • Adrián Villar Rojas (b. 1980, Rosario, Argentina)

The Hugo Boss Prize is our most prestigious engagement in the field of arts,” said Mark Langer, CEO and Chairman of HUGO BOSS AG. “We are excited about this diverse and distinguished short list for 2020 and looking forward to the announcement of the winner next fall.

HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2020 SHORT LIST

Nairy Baghramian (b. 1971, Isfahan, Iran) lives and works in Berlin. In an oeuvre that probes the boundaries between the decorative, the utilitarian, and the art object, Baghramian has illuminated new possibilities for sculpture. The artist’s disarming biomorphic forms, made with a range of materials including steel, silicon, resin, and leather, elicit various unexpected art-historical and sociopolitical references, reimagining the workings of the body, gender, and public and private space.

Nairy Baghramian, Stay Downers: Nerd, Fidgety Philip, Dripper, Truant, Backrower and Grubby Urchin, 2017. Various media, dimensions variable
Installation view: Déformation Professionnelle, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 2017–18. Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. Photo: Timo Ohler

Baghramian’s work has been presented in solo exhibitions such as Privileged Points, Mudam Luxembourg—Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean (2019), Breathing Spell (Un respire), Palacio de Cristal del Retiro, Madrid (2018); Déformation Professionnelle, Museum der Moderne Salzburg, and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2017); S.M.A.K. Museum of Contemporary Art, Ghent (2016); Nairy Baghramian: Scruff of the Neck (Supplements), Zurich Art Prize, Museum Haus Konstruktiv, Zurich (2016); Hand Me Down, Museo Tamayo, Mexico City (2015); Fluffing the Pillows, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Mass. (2013), and Kunsthalle Mannheim, Germany (2012); and Class Reunion, Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver (2012).

Kevin Beasley (b. 1985, Lynchburg, Va.) lives and works in New York. Working at the intersection of sculpture, installation, and performance, Beasley constructs revelatory formal and sonic experiences. In works that embed found objects in substances such as resin, foam, and tar, or incorporate unconventionally manipulated audio equipment, he amplifies the cultural resonances of his materials to excavate personal and shared histories of class, race, and institutional power.

Kevin Beasley, Your face is / is not enough, 2016. Performance view: Liverpool Biennial, July 14, 2018. © Kevin Beasley. Photo: Pete Carr, courtesy Casey Kaplan, New York

Beasley has presented and performed in solo exhibitions such as ASSEMBLY, The Kitchen, New York (2019); a view of a landscape, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2018); Kevin Beasley, The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2018); Movement V: Ballroom, CounterCurrent Festival, Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts, Houston (2017); Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley, Hammer Museum at Art + Practice, Los Angeles (2017); Rubbings, Kim? Contemporary Art Center, Riga, Latvia (2017); and inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2016).

Deana Lawson (b. 1979, Rochester, N.Y.) lives and works in New York. Her large-format photographs channel vernacular, art-historical, and documentary traditions within the medium, in compositions that valorize black diasporic culture. Picturing individuals she encounters over the course of her everyday life within carefully staged domestic settings, Lawson choreographs every nuance of scenery, lighting, and pose to create tableaux that powerfully evoke the agency of her subjects.

Deana Lawson, Mama Goma, Gemena, DR Congo, 2014. Pigment print
35 x 44.125 inches (88.9 x 112.1 cm). © Deana Lawson, courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago

Lawson’s work has been presented in solo exhibitions including Deana Lawson, Huis Marseille, Museum voor Fotografie, Amsterdam (2019); Deana Lawson: Planes, The Underground Museum, Los Angeles (2018); Deana Lawson, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2018); Deana Lawson, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (2017); Deana Lawson, The Art Institute of Chicago (2015); and Corporeal, Light Work, Syracuse, N.Y. (2009).

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2019 Holiday Gift Guide: Amazon’s Black Friday Deals Week is Almost Here

More Deals of the Day and Deeper Discounts Than Ever Before on Buzzworthy Holiday Gifts Across Every Department

Kicking off this Friday, November 22, Amazon’s Black Friday deals week will offer new deals all day, every day from fashion to toys, home, electronics, Amazon Devices and more

Save up to 40% on toys from LEGO, Barbie, Hot Wheels and more; up to 50% on Lands’ End clothing and accessories; $40 off the Echo Show 5; deep discounts on brands including Adidas, KitchenAid, L’Oreal Paris and more; plus exclusive deals from Amazon Brands, Amazon Music, Audible and more

Amazon today shared a sneak peek of top deals for its Black Friday Deals Week, which will offer customers new deals all day, every day totaling thousands of amazing deals across every category, plus more Deals of the Day and deeper discounts than ever before. Starting this Friday, November 22 through November 29 (Black Friday), customers can shop thousands of incredible deals on this year’s most popular gifts, new and trending finds, holiday essentials, and more, across toys, electronics, fashion, beauty, kitchen, home, Amazon Devices and more. All of Amazon’s Black Friday deals can be found by visiting amazon.com/blackfriday or on the Amazon App. Customers can also shop on smile.amazon.com/blackfriday to find the same amazing deals and Amazon shopping experience, with the added bonus that AmazonSmile will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to a charity of your choice.

On top of the wide selection of deals and discounts available throughout Amazon’s week of Black Friday deals, customers can also take advantage of select one-time-only, amazing deals from top-tier and most-loved brands across electronics, home, fashion, toys and more, all at jaw-dropping prices. These deals are expected to sell out, with new one-time only deals launching throughout the day on November 28 (Thanksgiving), November 29 (Black Friday) and December 2 (Cyber Monday).

Whether customers are getting a head start on their gift lists, readying their homes for family festivities or grocery shopping for holiday feasts, Amazon makes the holidays easier than ever with top deals and low prices. In fact, according to a recent Profitero study, Amazon prices were found to be 20% cheaper on average than other online retailers.

BLACK FRIDAY DEALS PREVIEW:

The deals included below – and many more – will be available on various dates and times between November 22 and November 29 (Black Friday), while supplies last, at amazon.com/blackfriday, on the Amazon App, or by simply asking “Alexa, what are my deals.”

Amazon Devices

Amazon Brands

  • Save up to 50% on men’s and women’s clothing from Amazon Brands, including Amazon Essentials, Goodthreads, Daily Ritual, and The Drop
  • Save up to 30% on bedding & bath for the family from AmazonBasics, Stone & Beam and Rivet
  • Save up to 30% on furniture from Rivet and Stone & Beam
  • Save up to 30% on office furniture and supplies from AmazonBasics
  • Save up to 30% on phone accessories from AmazonBasics
  • Save up to 30% on kitchen electrics and housewares from AmazonBasics & Stone & Beam
  • Save up to 30% on luggage and travel from AmazonBasics
  • Save up to 25% on food and beverages from Amazon brands, including AmazonFresh, Happy Belly and Wickedly Prime
  • Save 25% on household supplies and personal care from Solimo
  • Save up to 15% on beauty, vitamins, and supplements from Amazon brands including Belei and Revly

Fashion

  • Save up to 35% on Herschel backpacks, wallets, hip packs, and more
  • Save up to 50% on Oakley & Ray-Ban sunglasses
  • Save up to 30% on Calvin Klein underwear
  • Save up to 35% on the newest Fossil smartwatches
  • Save up to 35% on adidas shoes, clothing, and accessories for the family
  • Save up to 40% on Levi’s for the family
  • Save up to 50% on Lands’ End clothing and accessories
  • Save up to 30% on Tommy Hilfiger clothing
  • Save up to 50% on top watch brands including Daniel Wellington, Movado, and more
  • Save up to 40% on Under Armour for the family
  • Save up to 30% on men’s dress shirts
  • Save up to 30% on Izod clothing
  • Save up to 50% on Samsonite and American Tourister luggage
  • Save 35% on 14K gold diamond stud earrings
  • Electronics
  • Save on Samsung, Sony, and LG TVs
  • Save on Samsung Galaxy S10 and Note 10
  • Save up to 45% on streaming devices and accessories
  • Save up to 30% on select Nintendo Switch Software
  • Save up to 33% on select Nintendo Joy-Con
  • Save on Canon and Nikon cameras
  • Save on Headphones from Bose, Sony and other top brands
  • Save on Nintendo Switch Console with Digital Mario Kart 8 Deluxe
  • Save on Xbox One
  • Save on PC gaming laptops, desktops, monitors, components, and accessories
  • Save up to 33% on PlayStation 4 Slim 1TB bundle
  • Save on Oculus Rift S
  • Save on Garmin smart watches
  • Save 30% on select cell phone cases
  • Save on Klipsch speakers
  • Save on Jabra Elite Active 65t Earbuds
  • Save up to 35% on select iOttie Car Mount Phone Holders
  • Save on Garmin Forerunner 235 and DriveSmart
  • Save up to 40% on Corsair gaming products and accessories
  • Save up to 45% on Netgear products
  • Save 40% on Adobe Photoshop Elements 2020
  • Save up to 50% on Brother printers
  • Save up to 60% on HP Deskjet 2622
  • Save $30 on HP Sprocket 2nd Edition
  • Save 30% on MYNT3D Professional Printing 3D Pen
  • Save $50 off Microsoft Office Home and Student 2019
  • Save over 70% on new Norton 360 Premium
  • Save on Kodak and Polaroid photo printers
  • Save on SanDisk and WD
  • Receive a $10 Gift Card with purchase of TurboTax Software

Toys

  • Save 15% on L.O.L. Surprise! Winter Disco Bigger Surprise (Amazon Exclusive)
  • Save 40% on the LEGO Star Wars Ultimate Millennium Falcon
  • Save 40% on tricycles and the 3-in-1 Wagon from Radio Flyer
  • Save 40% on the KidKraft Cinderella Royal Dream House
  • Save 40% on the Little Tikes Bake n’ Grow Kitchen
  • Save up to 30% on select strategy games
  • Save up to 30% on Glitter Girls fashion dolls and accessories
  • Save up to 30% on Barbie, Hot Wheels and more from Mattel
  • Save up to 30% on select party games

Household, Kitchen and Home Furnishings

  • Save up to 30% on SodaStream sparkling water makers
  • Save on Hamilton Beach
  • Save up to 35% on Vitamix
  • Save on Nespresso
  • Save on Dash Appliances
  • Save up to 44% on KitchenAid
  • Save on Instant Pot
  • Save on Conitgo Water bottles, Food Saver and Rubbermaid food containers
  • Save up to 25% on select mattresses
  • Save on Ashley Mattresses
  • Save up to 48% on Degrees of Comfort weighted blankets
  • Save up to 15% on Bissell Lifestyle 220
  • Save up to 19% on Bissell SpotClean Pro
  • Save on Casper Sleep Soft and Supima Cotton Sheet
  • Save up to 37% on Bissell Icon Pet Stick
  • Save up to 41% on Ecovacs N79S
  • Save up to 36% off Ecovacs Deebot 661
  • Save up to 26% Bissell Crosswave
  • Save up to 19% on Bissell SpotClean Pro
  • Save up to 22% on Bissell MyAir
  • Save up to 20% on Oreck Commercial XL Commercial Upright Vacuums
  • Save on AIRMEGA 400S The Smarter App Ena
  • Save on Tempur-Pedic TEMPUR-Protect Waterproof Mattress Protector
  • Save up to 15% on Bissell Lifestyle 220
  • Save on TEMPUR Adapt Plus Cooling Topper
  • Eureka NEN110A Whirlwind Bagless Canister
  • Save on Sunbeam Cordless or Corded Iron
  • Save up to 50% on Simplisafe 12-Piece Security System
  • Save up to 20% on Kidde products
  • Save up to 30% on Hunter ceiling fans
  • Save up to 30% on DeWalt tools
  • Save up to 30% on select SKIL tools
  • Save up to 25% on BLACK+DECKER drill kit
  • Save up to 15% on Opal Countertop Nugget Icemaker
  • Save 15% on NewAir Dual Zone Beverage Cooler

Smart Home

  • Save on Chamberlain MyQ Garage Hub at $17.98
  • Save on iRobot Roomba 960 at $399.00
  • Save on iRobot Roomba 675 at $199.99
  • Save on the new LG 82″ 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV at $1,699.99
  • Save up to $79.90 on Arlo Technologies products
  • Save on Shark IQ Robotic Vacuum at $399.99
  • Save over 30% on Netgear wifi & routers
  • Save $200 on Sony Sound Bar with Dolby Atmos and Wireless Subwoofer
  • Save up to 39% on ecobee SmartThermostat and Switch bundle

Lawn & Garden

  • Save up to 35% on holiday live plants
  • Save on the Sun Joe SPX4000-PRO Pressure Washer
  • Save 35% on Greenworks 80V outdoor power tools
  • Save up to 30% on Keter Cool Bar & more
  • Save up to 35% on fire pits and patio heaters

Audible, Music, Video & Books

  • Audible: Between November 25 and 27, new members receive a bonus $15 Amazon credit and continue to save 53% on the first three months of an Audible membership at $6.95 a month. Additional offers to be announced through the holiday season.
  • For a limited time, new Amazon Music Unlimited customers can get the best holiday deal in Amazon Music’s history – four months of the premium streaming tier for just $0.99, to enjoy unlimited access to more than 50 million songs, ad-free.
  • With purchase of select Echo devices, new Amazon Music Unlimited customers in the US, UK, Germany and Japan will also receive four months of the premium, ad-free streaming tier for free.
  • Prime Video: Between November 29 and December 5, Prime members can enjoy 50% off to rent or buy on new release movies.
  • The Kacey Musgraves Christmas Show, Prime Video’s first foray into the holiday special space, will premiere globally on Friday, November 29. The Kacey Musgraves Christmas Show will also be accompanied by an official soundtrack available on Amazon Music and other DSPs beginning November 29. Learn more at amazon.com/kaceychristmas.
  • Get 3 months of Kindle Unlimited for free – Enjoy unlimited access to over 1 million books, popular magazines and thousands of books with Audible narration. Offer valid for new subscribers only.
  • Get $10 back in eBook credit when you spend $30 on eBooks (activation required).
  • Save up to 80% on select Kindle best-selling books
  • Save up to 50% on Popular Children Books

Pets

  • Save 33% on Furbo Treat Tossing Wifi Pet Camera
  • Save up 35% on Wisdom Panel Dog DNA Kit
  • Save up to 30% on Frontline Oral Defense Daily Dental Chews
  • Save up to 15% on Nutramax products for dogs and cats
  • Save 30% on PetSafe Smart Feed Automatic Dog and Cat Feeder
  • Save 30% on select Greenies dog treats
  • Save 30% on Temptations cat treats
  • Save 30% on Cesar gourmet dog food

Sports & Outdoors

  • Save up to 40% on the adidas Diablo duffel bag
  • Save up to 35% on select Columbia outerwear, apparel, and shoes
  • Save up to 25% on Thule backpacks and luggage
  • Save more than 25% on golf training aids, including Arccos Caddie Smart Sensors
  • Save up to 25% on Osprey packs & accessories
  • Save up to 20% on best sellers from Coleman
  • Save up to 30% on fishing gear from Abu Garcia, Berkley, Penn, Ugly Stik, and more
  • Save up to 15% on stand up paddle boards from Serenelife
  • Save up to 30% on hunting essentials from Plano Synergy
  • Save up to 15% on Marcy exercise equipment
  • Save on the Bowflex Max Trainer M7
  • Save on Bushnell golf products, including rangefinders, GPS, and watches
  • Save 20% or more on Segway electric scooters and personal transporters
  • Save 20% on Huffy adult and kids bikes
  • Save on Callaway golf balls, headwear, and golf bags
  • Save on JOOLA table tennis tables and more
  • Save more than 15% on select GoSports favorites, including wood premium cornhole set, giant wooden toppling tower, and more

Beauty

  • Save up to 45% on Philips Sonicare appliances and brush heads
  • Save up to 40% on Aquaphor, NIVEA, and Eucerin
  • Save 30% on Panasonic electric razor for men
  • Save 20% on L’Oreal Paris brow stylist definers
  • Save up to 40% on professional and luxury beauty skin care, cosmetics, fragrance, hair and more
  • Save up to 33% on select luxury beauty devices and accessories

Health and Personal Care

  • Save up to 50% on 23andMe DNA tests
  • Save up to $60 on select Fitbit items
  • Save up to 30% on select nutrition and wellness items
  • Save 15% on Body Fortress whey protein powder
  • Save 30% or more on Duracell batteries
  • Save $70 on AncestryHealth Core™ Health + Genetic Ethnicity Test

Automotive

  • Save on Hella Sharptone Twin Horn Kits
  • Save on Camco Yellow Fasten Leveling Blocks

Amazon Payments and Gift Cards

Amazon Prime Rewards Visa Signature Cardmembers and Amazon Prime Store Cardmembers with an eligible Prime membership will receive 15% Back on Electronics bestsellers on Amazon.com from now through December 22. They’ll also receive 10% Back on select Amazon devices valid November 28 to December 2 only.

Small Businesses on Amazon Handmade and Amazon Launchpad

  • Save 20% or more on Amazon Handmade products from around the world – shop deal and the gift guide at www.amazon.com/handmadegiftguide.
  • Save up to 35% on top selling iOttie Wireless accessories
  • Save on Dash appliances
  • Save up to 35% on select party games for grown-ups including Exploding Kittens
  • Save up to 44% on Geekee True Wireless Bluetooth Earbuds
  • Save 15% or more on select LuminAID Solar phone chargers and lanterns

Grocery

  • Save 25% or more on select Jack Link’s beef jerky
  • Save up to 30% on select Victor Allen’s coffee packs
  • Save 15% on select TAZO K-Cup pods
  • Save 20% on select Soylent meal replacement shakes and protein bars
  • Save 35% on Tea Forte tea gifts for the holiday season

Whole Foods Market

  • Amazon and Whole Foods Market are offering special savings on organic and classic turkeys in celebration of Thanksgiving. All customers can choose from select organic ($3.49/lb) and classic turkeys ($2.49/lb), and Prime members will save even more on turkeys ($2.99/lb for organic and $1.99/lb for classic). The offer is valid until November 28, while supplies last. Prime members can also receive exclusive deals on organic jewel sweet potatoes ($1.29/lb), organic cranberries ($2.69/12-oz bag), and Bonafide frozen broths and soups (35% off).

DISCOVER THE SEASON’S HOTTEST GIFTS

Customers can also shop Amazon’s biggest-ever selection of curated gift guides and exclusive storefronts this year, which offer gifting inspiration and more:

MORE WAYS TO SHOP

In addition to amazon.com/blackfriday, customers can shop Amazon’s week of Black Friday deals in the following ways:

Amazon.com in Spanish: Customers can visit Amazon.com/espanol or use the Amazon App to shop, browse and search for millions of products, view their carts, and place orders in Spanish.

  • Amazon App: The Amazon App allows customers to conveniently shop for their holiday needs – anytime and anywhere – and never miss a great deal. Customers can use the Watch a Deal feature to “Watch a Lightning Deal” and receive a notification on their mobile phone when the deal is about to start. Additionally, first time app users have an opportunity to save big this holiday. New customers will receive $10 the first time they sign-in to the Amazon App and an additional $15 when they make their first purchase on the app.
  • Alexa Shopping: Customers can add to their Amazon wish list with Alexa by saying, “Alexa, add headphones to my wish list” and track packages and confirm your delivery date with Alexa by saying, “Alexa, where’s my stuff?”
  • Amazon Business: Save big when shopping for work with deals on everything you need for your business. Find deals on supplies for the office holiday party, employee and client gifts, and items for community donation drives. Stock up for the new year with savings on the business essentials you need. Visit amazon.com/holidayforbusiness, For more information and to sign up for a free business account, visit amazon.com/business.
  • Amazon Books: Whether customers want to discover a new book for the holidays, test-drive a device, or purchase Amazon Gift Cards, Amazon Books offers gifts for everyone. To find the store nearest you visit: www.amazon.com/stores.
  • Amazon 4-star: Designed around Amazon.com customers, Amazon 4-star stores feature products that are 4 stars and above, top sellers, new and trending, and most popular from top categories including devices, consumer electronics, toys, games, books, kitchen, and home. To find the store nearest you visit: www.amazon.com/stores.
  • Amazon Live: Watch Amazon Live’s shoppable Black Friday livestream throughout the day on November 29 for demonstrations on top deal products and cameo appearances from celebrities you love. Tune in starting at 4am PST by visiting www.amazon.com/live.
  • Treasure Truck: Discover great gifts you never thought of on Treasure Truck. Opt-in by texting ‘TRUCK’ to 24193 and receive notifications for same-day offers – order the item and pick up at the truck the same day. This Black Friday, gift givers who act fast will find an incredible deal on a holiday-must-have tech item on the truck in select cities, while supplies last.
  • Whole Foods Market: Prime members who shop at Whole Foods Market have access to a number of benefits year-round, like deep discounts on dozens of select popular products each week and an additional 10 percent off hundreds of in-store items. Additionally, Prime members in thousands of cities and towns can shop their local Whole Foods Market store using Amazon.com or the Amazon App.
  • Woot! offers daily deals on customers’ favorite brands and free shipping for Prime members. Visit woot.com from November 24 through November 29 or download the Woot! App for great deals.

GIVE BACK THIS HOLIDAY SEASON, AND BEYOND

Amazon is committed to making holiday giving and giving back easier than ever.

  • AmazonSmile: To jump right into holiday shopping and support your favorite charitable organization at the same time, simply visit smile.amazon.com/blackfriday. By starting with smile.amazon.com, you’ll find the same Amazon experience, with the added bonus that Amazon will donate a portion of the purchase price of eligible products to a charity of your choice.
  • Charity Lists: Charity Lists give charitable organizations an easy way to create wish lists of products needed, while providing a convenient way for customers to donate these essential items directly to the causes. Customers are able to contribute items that are truly critical, to charities they care about, no matter how big or small. Customers can shop thousands of Charity Lists by visiting smile.amazon.com/charitylists, with new charities joining all the time.
  • ( RED) Shopathon: For the third year, Amazon is teaming up with (RED), the charitable organization founded by Bono and Bobby Shriver in 2006, to fight AIDS. Amazon is providing customers a single destination to shop more than 150 (RED) products, including the exclusive (RED) edition of the all-new Echo, which will be available for a limited time. For every all-new Echo (RED) edition sold, Amazon will donate $10 to the Global Fund. Plus, customers interested in donating to support (RED)’s fight can do so on any Echo device by simply asking, “Alexa, donate to (RED).” (RED) products will be available starting today at amazon.com/red.

HOLIDAY DELIVERY MADE EASY

In addition to free delivery on more than 100 million items for all Amazon customers, Amazon has expanded its fast, free, and convenient delivery options for Prime members and customers this holiday season:

  • Fast and Reliable One-Day and Same-Day Delivery. Throughout the season, Prime members in the U.S. can shop a selection of over 10 million items for Prime Free One-Day Delivery and millions of items available for Same-Day Delivery in 46 major metropolitan areas. Not a Prime member yet? Join Prime or start a 30-day free trial at www.amazon.com/prime.
  • Ultrafast and FREE grocery delivery: Now Prime members get free and fast grocery delivery from Amazon Fresh and Whole Foods Market. Selection includes a variety of products for all your holiday needs, from meat to seafood, produce, snacks, and household essentials, with options for fast one- and two-hour delivery windows. Prime members who live in one of the more than 2,000 cities and towns where grocery delivery is available can request an invitation to shop Amazon Fresh or Whole Foods Market delivery. Learn more at amazon.com/grocery.
  • Pickup and delivery on your terms: This holiday season, customers can pick up their packages at a number of Amazon Hub locations including thousands of in-store staffed Counter pickup points across the U.S. within Rite Aid, GNC and Stage stores, as well as at Health Mart independent pharmacies. Additionally, tens of millions of products can be easily and conveniently delivered to 900 cities and towns across the country via Locker or Locker+. To find an Amazon Hub location, visit amazon.com/Hub. In addition, Prime members in 50 U.S. cities and surrounding areas can also enjoy secure, convenient package delivery with Key by Amazon (amazon.com/key).

Profitero Study Methodology

Each day, Profitero monitors prices and other data on more than 450 million product pages at more than 8,000 online retailers. For this study, Profitero analyzed daily prices collected from July 8, 2019 to September 30, 2019 across 19 leading online retailers. Categories analyzed included Appliances, Baby, Beauty, Electronics, Grocery, Home Furniture, Household Supplies, Music & CDs, Office Supplies, Pet Supplies, Sports & Outdoors, Tools & Home Improvement, Toys & Games, and Video Games. The study only compares prices collected on the same day, with both retailers in-stock. Amazon prices reflect 1P only on Amazon.com, exclusive of Fresh and Prime Now. The other retailer online prices studied could reflect promoted prices, but exclude coupons, other discounts that require additional shopper action, or special prices available through retailer-specific programs such as Target REDcard.

Upcoming Exhibition Brings Together 200 Works By 60 American And Mexican Artists At The Whitney Museum In February 2020

The cultural renaissance that emerged in Mexico in 1920 at the end of that country’s revolution dramatically changed art not just in Mexico but also in the United States. Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945 will explore the profound influence Mexican artists had on the direction American art would take. With approximately 200 works by sixty American and Mexican artists, Vida Americana reorients art history, acknowledging the wide-ranging and profound influence of Mexico’s three leading muralists—José Clemente Orozco, Diego Rivera, and David Alfaro Siqueiros—on the style, subject matter, and ideology of art in the United States made between 1925 and 1945.

The Whitney Museum’s own connection to the Mexican muralists dates back to 1924 when the Museum’s founder Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney presented an exhibition of the work of three Mexican artists—José Clemente Orozco, Luis Hidalgo, and Miguel Covarrubias—at the Whitney Studio Club, organized by artist Alexander Brook. It was Orozco’s first exhibition in the United States. A few years later, in 1926, Orozco also showed watercolors from his House of Tears series at the Studio Club; and the following year Juliana Force, Mrs. Whitney’s executive assistant and future director of the Whitney Museum, provided critical support for Orozco at a time when he desperately needed it by acquiring ten of his drawings. The Mexican muralists had a profound influence on many artists who were mainstays of the Studio Club, and eventually the Whitney Museum, including several American artists featured in Vida Americana, such as Thomas Hart Benton, William Gropper, Isamu Noguchi, and Ben Shahn.

Diego Rivera. The Uprising, 1931. Fresco on reinforced cement in a galvanized-steel framework, 74 × 94 1/8 in. (188 × 239 cm). Collection of Marcos and Vicky Micha Levy © 2019 Banco de México–Rivera–Kahlo/ARS. Reproduction authorized by El Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura, 2019.

Curated by Barbara Haskell, with Marcela Guerrero, assistant curator; Sarah Humphreville, senior curatorial assistant; and Alana Hernandez, former curatorial project assistant, Vida Americana: Mexican Muralists Remake American Art, 1925–1945 will be on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art from February 17 through May 17, 2020 and will travel to the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas, where it will be on display from June 25 through October 4, 2020. At the McNay Art Museum, the installation will be overseen by René Paul Barrilleaux.

Jacob Lawrence. Panel 3 from The Migration Series, From every Southern town migrants left by the hundreds to travel north.,1940–41. Casein tempera on hardboard 12 × 18 in. (30.5 × 45.7 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC; acquired 1942. © 2019 The Jacob and Gwendolyn Knight Lawrence Foundation, Seattle / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Vida Americana is an enormously important undertaking for the Whitney and could not be more timely given its entwined aesthetic and political concerns,” said Scott Rothkopf, Senior Deputy Director and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator. “It not only represents the culmination of nearly a decade of scholarly research and generous international collaboration but also demonstrates our commitment to presenting a more comprehensive and inclusive view of twentieth-century and contemporary art in the United States.”

María Izquierdo. My Nieces, 1940. Oil on composition board, 55 1/8 × 39 3/8 in. (140 × 100 cm). Museo Nacional de Arte, INBAL, Mexico City; constitutive collection, 1982 © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / SOMAAP, Mexico City. Reproduction authorized by El Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura, 2019.

Comprised of paintings, portable frescoes, films, sculptures, prints, photographs, and drawings, as well as reproductions of in-situ murals, Vida Americana will be divided into nine thematic sections and will occupy the entirety of the Whitney’s fifth-floor Neil Bluhm Family Galleries. This unprecedented installation, and the catalogue that accompanies it, will provide the first opportunity to reconsider this cultural history, revealing the immense influence of Mexican artists on their American counterparts between 1925 and 1945.

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On View Now: “Private Lives Public Spaces” at The Museum of Modern Art

“Professional pictures must appeal to mass interest and mass interest does not always embrace the things that ought to be known. On the other hand, the amateur has no necessity for appealing to mass interest. He is free to reproduce and record any action his fancy or fancy of a friend may dictate.”

— Hiram Percy Maxim, editor Amateur Cinema League, December 1926i

Home movies. Pierce family. USA. 1958-63. Digital preservation of 16mm film. Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art

Home movies are a form of personal filmmaking made to entertain intimate audiences of family and friends at private screenings. Since the introduction of small-gauge, portable cameras in 1922 heralded the unofficial birth of amateur moviemaking, the many thousands of reels of non-theatrical film shot by individuals around the world amounts to perhaps the largest body of work on film produced in the twentieth century. Commonly orphaned by those who made them, sold for stock footage and used as documentation, less attention has been given to what home movies represent as an alternative to theatrical film and what they share with the work of avant-garde filmmakers.

Home movies. Jarret family. USA. 1958-67. Digital preservation of Standard 8mm film. Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art.

The Yoshiko and Akio Morita Galleries host Private Lives Public Spaces (October 21, 2019 – July 01, 2020), the Museum’s first large-scale exhibition of home movies and amateur films drawn exclusively from its collection. This gallery presentation of largely unseen, privately produced works will explore the connection between artist’s cinema, amateur movies, and family filmmaking since the 1923 introduction of small-gauge film stock heralded the unofficial birth of affordable home moviemaking. The Museum’s archival holdings of the genre represent a remarkable range of creativity by artists, celebrities, world travelers, and the public at large. This presentation of moving image work offers a renewed perspective on the creative strategies that amateur filmmaking shares with experimental and avant-garde cinema of the 20th century. In conjunction with the gallery installation, MoMA’s Department of Education will stage a Home Movie Day comprising three Library of Congress National Film Registry programs.

“Like the amateur still photographer, the amateur film-maker can devote himself to capturing the poetry and beauty of places and events and, since he is using a movie camera, he can explore the vast world of the beauty of movement.” — Maya Deren, “Amateur Versus Professional” Film Culture 1965iii

Home movies. Jarret family. USA. 1958-67. Digital preservation of Standard 8mm film. Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art.

Organized by Ron Magliozzi, Curator, Brittany Shaw, Curatorial Assistant, Katie Trainor, Collections Manager, Peter Williamson, Preservation Officer, and Ashley Swinnerton, Collection Specialist, Department of Film

Featuring works dating from 1907 to 1996, Private Lives Public Spaces is the Museum’s first major exhibition of home movies and amateur films drawn exclusively from its collection. Democratic, personal, and unregulated, this “people’s cinema” is viewed as a precursor to social media, and MoMA’s installation is predicated on the expanded opportunities for display provided by digital media and the fresh appreciation that viewers bring to self-expression in present-day moving image culture.

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Leica Camera USA Grants Awards to Three Women to Support Diversity in Photography

Each recipient will receive $10,000 and a Leica Q2 to pursue a personal project relevant to today’s social and political climate, as expressed through the female perspective

Following the launch of the Leica Women Foto Project earlier this year – a platform dedicated to the expansion of diversity and inclusion in photography – Leica Camera USA is proud to announce the three recipients of the inaugural Leica Women Foto Project Award. Leica recognizes that the shape of a story is reactive to the storyteller’s perspective, often leaving out those whose point of views are underrepresented. By amplifying the female perspective in photography, Leica aims to help provide a more dynamic and diverse view of the world around us.

This importance of diversity in visual storytelling strengthens the integrity of our collective story,” says Kiran Karnani, Director of Marketing for Leica Camera North America. “Visual expressions through myriad lenses challenge and embrace ideas that drive important conversations. We enable growth through an expansion of thought when we actively support inclusivity through the photographic medium. With the Leica Women Foto Project, we aim to embolden photographers to think outside one’s own point of view, support underrepresented voices to speak their visual languages, and celebrate new ways of seeing.

From over 600 submissions across the United States, photographers Debi Cornwall, Yana Paskova and Eva Woolridge were selected by a prestigious panel of judges in the photography, art and entertainment industries to each receive $10,000 and a Leica Q2 to pursue a personal project that tells a story through the female viewpoint.

“Insurgent” by Debi Cornwall

Debi Cornwall was chosen for her series Necessary Fictions, which explores the staging and performance of American power in immersive, realistic military wargames. In this project, Cornwall photographs the mysterious country of “Atropia.” Though fictional, Atropia actually exists: mock Afghan and Iraqi villages have been constructed on military bases across the United States to host immersive, realistic military training exercises for troops preparing to deploy. On ten such sites around the country, Cornwall documents these mock villages, battle scenarios, and “cultural role-players,” with the goal of examining how fictions are deployed and embraced, and to invite critical inquiry among military and civilian viewers alike about a society in which war has become the rule rather than the exception. Cornwall will use the funding from the Leica Women Foto Project Award to continue the story of Necessary Fictions and to explore how fiction and reality blur within the post-9/11 “fantasy-industrial complex.”

Widows of Varanasi by Yana Paskova

Yana Paskova is a Bulgaria-born, Chicago-bred, Brooklyn-based photojournalist and writer who uses her experience as a political asylum immigrant to find a way to bridge humans’ understanding of each other. Paskova will utilize the award funds to continue developing her photographic series, Where Women Rule. She describes the project as “a visual and sociological look at what happens when cultural norms of gender are amended or removed — via the all-female societies across the world, where women gather for shelter or in matriarchy — leaving us with new notions of femininity and masculinity, human bonds, family, and the fluid boundaries of identity.”

“Empty” by Eva Woolridge

As told through her lens as a self-proclaimed African-American and Chinese-American queer woman, Eva Woolridge will round out the inaugural LWFP recipient class by bringing her personal experiences to life in her project The Size of a Grapefruit. The series is an artistic interpretation of Woolridge’s medically traumatic experiences following her diagnosis of a dermoid cyst – the size of a grapefruit – and consequential removal of her right ovary, which she believes could have been saved had medical professionals taken swifter action following their early conversations. With the assistance of the Leica Women Foto Project, Woolridge aims to bring to light more stories of black women worldwide who experience racial bias through a visual representation of their perseverance, grit and subsequent empowerment cultivated from their specific challenges.

The Leica Women Foto Project is a keystone program for Leica Camera USA as we expand opportunities to amplify visual stories told through the lenses of underrepresented perspectives. The overwhelming response of hundreds of USA-based submissions in just our first year alone –+is indicative of the ongoing need for platforms that invite conversations that provoke new ways of seeing.” says Karnani.. “We welcome Debi, Yana, and Eva to the Leica family of storytellers and we look forward to the continued evolution of their impactful stories.

The projects submitted by Cornwall, Paskova, and Woolridge were carefully selected by five influential women in the photography, art and entertainment industries, which included:

  • Karin Kaufmann, Art Director & Chief Representative, Leica Galleries International
  • Maggie Steber, VII Agency photographer and Guggenheim fellow
  • Elizabeth Avedon, photography book and exhibition designer, independent curator and writer
  • Laura Roumanos, executive producer and co-founder, United Photo Industries
  • Deborah Willis, university professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and author of Envisioning Emancipation: Black Americans and the End of Slavery

The Q2s Cornwall, Paskova and Woolridge will each receive will initially be provided as one-year loans to kickstart a legacy program helping to foster community among recipients. At the end of the term, the cameras will be passed on to the next three winners of the 2020 award. A replacement Leica camera will be offered to the initial set of recipients to continue documenting their journey through the lens of a Leica.

All three women will showcase photographs from their respective projects in a joint exhibit at Leica Gallery Boston beginning March 5, 2020 through April 26, 2020 where visitors can view the journey of their personal projects. To learn more about the Leica Women Foto Project Award and the 2019 recipients, visit http://bit.ly/Leica_Women.

Leica represents a union of craftsmanship, design and experience. It is a beautiful collision of art and engineering, and the future of form and functionality. Leica Camera, headquartered in Wetzlar, Germany, is an internationally operating, premium-segment manufacturer of cameras and sport optics products. The legendary status of the Leica brand is founded on a long tradition of excellence in the supreme quality and performance of cameras and lenses, and the iconic images that artists and photojournalists everywhere captured with them. For more information about Leica visit www.leicacamerausa.com,

Major Exhibition, Exploring How Designers Today Are Shaping The Future, To Premiere At The Philadelphia Museum Of Art, October 22, 2019–March 8, 2020

Designs for Different Futures is organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, and the Art Institute of Chicago.

The role of designers in shaping how we think about the future is the subject of a major exhibition that will premiere at the Philadelphia Museum of Art this fall. Designs for Different Futures (October 22, 2019–March 8, 2020) brings together some 80 works that address the challenges and opportunities that humans may encounter in the years, decades, and centuries ahead. Organized by the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and the Art Institute of Chicago, Designs for Different Futures will be presented at the Walker (September 12, 2020–January 3, 2021) and the Art Institute of Chicago (February 6–May 16, 2021) following its presentation in Philadelphia.

Among the questions today’s designers seek to answer are: What role can technology play in augmenting or replacing a broad range of human activities? Can intimacy be maintained at a distance? How can we negotiate privacy in a world in which the sharing and use of personal information has blurred traditional boundaries? How might we use design to help heal or transform ourselves, bodily and psychologically? How will we feed an ever-growing population?

“Another Generosity,” designed 2018 by Eero Lundén, Ron Aasholm, and Carmen Lee of Lundén Architecture Company in collaboration with Bergent, BuroHappold Engineering, and Aalto University (Courtesy of the designers). Photograph © Andrea Ferro. Image courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

While no one can precisely predict the shape of things to come, the works in the exhibition are firmly fixed on the future, providing design solutions for a number of speculative scenarios. In some instances, these proposals are borne of a sense of anxiety, and in others of a sense of excitement over the possibilities that can be created through the use of innovative materials, new technologies, and, most importantly, fresh ideas.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, stated: “We often think of art museums as places that foster a dialogue between the past and the present, but they also can and should be places that inspire us to think about the future and to ask how artists and designers can help us think creatively about it. We are delighted to be able to collaborate with the Walker Art Center and the Art Institute of Chicago on this engaging project, which will offer our visitors an opportunity to understand not only how designers are imagining—and responding to—different visions of the futures, but also to understand just how profoundly forward-looking design contributes in our own time to shaping the world that we occupy and will bequeath as a legacy to future generations.

“PhoeniX Exoskeleton,” designed around 2013 by Dr. Homayoon Kazerooni for suitX (Courtesy of the manufacturer). Photograph ©suitX. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.
Lia: The Flushable and Biodegradable Pregnancy Test,” designed 2018 by Bethany Edwards and Anna Couturier Simpson (Courtesy of the designer). Photograph courtesy of LIA Diagnostics. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

Thinking about the future has always been part of the human condition. It has also been a perennial field of inquiry for designers and architects whose speculations on this subject—ranging from the concrete to the whimsical—can profoundly affect how we imagine what is to come. Among the many forward-looking projects on view, visitors to Designs for Different Futures will encounter lab-grown food, robotic companions, family leave policy proposals, and textiles made of seaweed.

Some of these possibilities will come to fruition, while others will remain dreams or even threats,” said Kathryn Hiesinger, the J. Mahlon Buck, Jr. Family Senior Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700, who coordinated the exhibition in Philadelphia with former assistant curator Michelle Millar Fisher. “We’d like visitors to join us as we present designs that consider the possible, debate the inevitable, and weigh the alternatives. This exhibition explores how design—understood expansively—can help us all grapple with what might be on the horizon and allows our imaginations to take flight.”

Alien Nation: Parade 0,” designed 2017 by Lisa Hartje Moura for HEAD-Genève (Private Collection) Photograph © Head-Genève, Michel Giesbrecht, 2017. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

The exhibition is divided into 11 thematic sections. In Resources, visitors will encounter an inflatable pod measuring 15 feet in diameter, part of the work Another Generosity first created in 2018 by Finnish architect Eero Lundén and designed in this incarnation in collaboration with Ron Aasholm and Carmen Lee. The pod slowly expands and contracts in the space, responding to changing levels of carbon dioxide as visitors exhale around it, and provoking questions about the ongoing effect of the human footprint on the environment.

“Svalbard Global Seed Vault,” designed 2008 by Peter W. Søderman, Barlindhaug Consulting (Exhibition display courtesy of USDA Agricultural Research Service, National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation). Photograph courtesy of Global Crop Diversity Trust. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.
Recyclable and Rehealable Electronic Skin,” designed 2018 by Jianliang Xiao and Wei Zhang (Courtesy of the designer). Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019

The section titled Generations will explore ways in which the choices we make today may contribute to the well-being or suffering of those who come after us. Here, visitors will find a model of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, a repository that stores the world’s largest collection of crop seeds. Located within a mountain on a remote island near the Arctic Circle, the facility is designed to withstand natural or human-made disasters. The Earths section of the exhibition speculates on the challenges of extra-terrestrial communication in Lisa Moura’s Alien Nations installation and showcases typeface from the 2016 science-fiction film Arrival.

“Future Library,” 2014–2114, designed by Katie Paterson (Exhibition display gift of the Future Library Trust, 2018 and purchased with the European Decorative Arts Revolving Fund, 2018). Photograph © Bjørvika Utvikling by Kristin von Hirsch, 2017. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

In Bodies, designers grapple with choices about how our physical and psychological selves might look, feel, and function in different future scenarios. Featured here is one of the world’s lightest and most advanced exoskeletons, designed to help people with mobility challenges remain upright and active. Also notable is the CRISPR Kit, an affordable and accessible gene-editing toolbox, which has the potential to revolutionize biomedical research and open opportunities for gene therapy and genetic engineering.

“ZXX Typeface,” designed 2012, by Sang Mun (Courtesy of the designer). Photograph © Sang Mun. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

Intimacies is a section that explores how technologies and online interfaces may affect love, family, and community. Here, urban experiences of sex and love are the focus of Andrés Jaque’s Intimate Strangers, an audio-visual installation focusing on the gay dating app. Through internet-enabled devices, designers explore the possibility of digitally mediated love and sex, suggesting what advanced digital networks hold for human sexuality.

Cricket Shelter: Modular Edible Insect Farm,” designed 2016 by Mitchell Joachim (Courtesy of the designer). Photograph © Mitchell Joachim, Terreform ONE. Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

Foods contains projects that explore the future of the human diet. Among them is a modular edible-insect farm, Cricket Shelter, by Terreform ONE, which offers a ready source of protein for impending food crises. A kitchen installation suggests how technology and design may contribute to new modes of food production, including an Ouroboros Steak made from human cells.

“Circumventive Organs, Electrostabilis Cardium (film still),” designed 2013 by Agi Haines (Courtesy of the designer). Image courtesy Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

Additional sections of the exhibition will focus on the future of Jobs and how Cities will function and look 100 years from now—with robotic baby feeders, driverless cars, and other developments—affording a glimpse at how we might navigate living beyond this planet. Shoes grown from sweat are among the innovations visitors will find in a section devoted to Materials, while Power will look at how design may affect our citizenship and help us retain agency over such essentials as our DNA, our voices, and our electronic communications in a future where the lines between record-keeping, communication, and surveillance blur. Data acknowledges and questions the different ways that information might be collected and used, with all its inherent biases and asymmetries, to shape different futures.

Raising Robotic Natives,” designed 2016 by Stephen Bogner, Philipp Schmitt, and Jonas Voigt (Courtesy of the designers) Photograph © Stephan Bogner, Philipp Schmitt, and Jonas Voigt. Image courtesy of Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2019.

The curatorial team is comprised of: at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Kathryn B. Hiesinger, The J. Mahlon Buck, Jr. Family Senior Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700, and Michelle Millar Fisher, formerly The Louis C. Madeira IV Assistant Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700; At the Walker Art Center, Emmet Byrne, Design Director and Associate Curator of Design; and at the Art Institute of Chicago, Maite Borjabad López-Pastor, Neville Bryan Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design, and Zoë Ryan, the John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design. Consulting curators are Andrew Blauvelt, Director, Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, and Curator-at-Large, Museum of Arts and Design, New York; Colin Fanning, Independent Scholar, Bard Graduate Center, New York; and Orkan Telhan, Associate Professor of Fine Arts (Emerging Design Practices), University of Pennsylvania School of Design, Philadelphia.

Kathryn B. Hiesinger is the J. Mahlon Buck, Jr. Family Senior Curator of European Decorative Arts after 1700 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Her work focuses on decorative arts and design from the mid-nineteenth century to the present and includes the exhibitions and publications Zaha Hadid: Form in Motion (2011), Out of the Ordinary: The Architecture and Design of Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown and Associates (2001), Japanese Design: A Survey since 1950 (1994) and Design since 1945 (1983).

Michelle Millar Fisher is the Ronald C. and Anita L Wornick Curator of Contemporary Decorative Arts at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. She is a graduate of the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and is currently completing her doctorate in architectural history at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She is the co-author, with Paola Antonelli, of Items: Is Fashion Modern? (2017).

Emmet Byrne is the Design Director and Associate Curator of Design at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. He provides creative leadership and strategic direction for the Walker in all areas of visual communication, branding, publishing, while overseeing the award-winning in-house design studio. He was one of the founders of the Task Newsletter in 2009 and is the creator of the Walker’s Intangibles platform.

Maite Borjabad López-Pastor is the Neville Bryan Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design at the Art Institute of Chicago. She is an architect and curator educated at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid and Columbia University, New York. She is the author and curator of Scenographies of Power: From the State of Exception to the Spaces of Exception (2017). Her work revolves around diverse forms of critical spatial practices, operating across architecture, art, and performance.

Zoë Ryan is the John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design at the Art Institute of Chicago. She is the editor of As Seen: Exhibitions That Made Architecture and Design History (2017) and curator of In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury (2019) and the 2014 Istanbul Design Biennial, The Future is Not What it Used to Be. Her projects explore the impact of architecture and design on society.

Centered on the innovative contemporary design objects, projects, and speculations of the exhibition’s checklist, the accompanying volume proposes design as a means through which to understand, question, and negotiate individual and collective futures, giving provocative voice to the most urgent issues of today. It asks readers to contemplate the design context within broader historical, social, political, and aesthetic spectrums. Designs for Different Futures addresses futures near and far, exploring such issues as human-digital interaction, climate change, political and social inequality, resource scarcity, transportation, and infrastructure.

The primary authors are Kathryn B. Hiesinger, Michelle Millar Fisher, Emmet Byrne, Maite Borjabad López-Pastor, and Zoë Ryan, with Andrew Blauvelt, Colin Fanning, Orkan Telhan, Juliana Rowen Barton, and Maude de Schauensee. Additional contributions include texts by V. Michael Bove Jr. and Nora Jackson, Christina Cogdell, Marina Gorbis, Srećko Horvat, Bruno Latour, Marisol LeBrón, Ezio Manzini, Chris Rapley, Danielle Wood, LinYee Yuan, and Emma Yann Zhang; and interviews with Gabriella Coleman, Formafantasma (Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin), Aimi Hamraie and Jillian Mercado, Francis Kéré, David Kirby, Helen Kirkum, Alexandra Midal, Neri Oxman, and Eyal Weizman.

Designs for Different Futures will be distributed by Yale University Press. The book was overseen by Philadelphia Museum of Art publishing director Katie Reilly and editors Katie Brennan and Kathleen Krattenmaker. It is designed by Ryan Gerald Nelson, Senior Graphic Designer at the Walker Art Center, under the direction of Walker design director Emmet Byrne.

Futures Therapy Lab

As part of the exhibition, visitors to the Philadelphia Museum of Art galleries will also encounter a space for community meetups, public programs, school visits, and self-directed activities. The Futures Therapy Lab will weave personal connections between visitors and the exhibition as part of a collaboration between the museum’s Education Department and the curatorial team. Weekly programs, many of which will occur on Pay-What-You-Wish Wednesday Nights, will connect visitors with designers, artists, and locally based creatives. The Futures Therapy Lab will contain a crowdsourced Futures Library that includes everything from science-fiction books to the exhibition catalogue. “Thinking about possible futures is both exhilarating and anxiety-provoking,” said Emily Schreiner, the Zoë and Dean Pappas Curator of Education, Public Programs. “The Futures Therapy Lab is a place for conversation, critique, and creativity in which visitors can imagine their own hopes, fears and solutions for the future through reflection, discussion, and art making.”

View Full Schedule of Related Public Programs

In Philadelphia, this exhibition is generously supported by the Annenberg Foundation Fund for Major Exhibitions, the Robert Montgomery Scott Endowment for Exhibitions, the Kathleen C. and John J.F. Sherrerd Fund for Exhibitions, Lisa Roberts and David Seltzer in Honor of Collab’s 50th Anniversary, the Women’s Committee of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Laura and William C. Buck Endowment for Exhibitions, the Harriet and Ronald Lassin Fund for Special Exhibitions, the Jill and Sheldon Bonovitz Exhibition Fund, and an anonymous donor.

Related Programs

The Futures Therapy Lab will host a series of weekly happenings:

Artists in the Lab

Artists and designers share their work through talks, demonstrations, and workshops. Wednesday Nights, 5:00–8:45 p.m.

The Designer is In

Talk it out. One-on-one sessions with local designers offer new perspectives on your everyday life. Thursdays & Saturdays, 2:00–4:00 p.m.

Sci-Fi Sundays

Drop-in readings that explore narratives of the future. Select Sundays, 2:00–3:00pm

Philadelphia Museum of Art Presents Major Exhibition Highlighting The Art to Wear Movement

This fall, the Philadelphia Museum of Art presents Off the Wall: American Art to Wear, (November 10, 2019 – May 17, 2020) a major exhibition that highlights a distinctive American art movement that emerged in the late 1960s and flourished during the following decades. It examines a generation of pioneering artists who used body-related forms to express a personal vision and frames their work in relation to the cultural, historical and social concerns of their time. Focusing on iconic works made during the three decades between 1967 and 1997, the exhibition features over 130 one-of-a-kind works by more than sixty artists. Comprised primarily of selections from a promised gift of Julie Schafler Dale, it will also include works from the museum’s collection and loans from private collections. Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same title, co-published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press.

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and CEO, said: “This exhibition will introduce to our visitors an exceptionally creative and adventurous aspect of American art which took the body as a vehicle for its expression. We are not only deeply grateful to Julie Dale for her extraordinary gifts and support of the museum but also see this as an opportunity to acknowledge the dynamic role she played in nurturing the growth and development of this movement.”

Susanna Lewis, Moth Cape, 1979. Machine knitted, appliquéd wool; beads. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

The champions of Art to Wear during the early years were a few forward-thinking museums, among them New York’s Museum of Contemporary Crafts (Museum of Art and Design), collectors, and galleries such as Sandra Sakata’s Obiko, founded in 1972 in San Francisco, and Julie Schafler Dale’s Julie: Artisans Gallery, which opened the following year on Madison Avenue in New York. For over 40 years, Dale’s gallery was a premier destination for presenting one-of-a-kind wearable works by American artists. Through her gallery installations and rotating window displays, she gave visibility to the Art to Wear movement. In 1986, she brought further recognition to the art form by publishing the seminal book Art to Wear—from which the title of this exhibition is taken—which provided in-depth profiles of artists alongside photographs by Brazilian fashion photographer Otta Stupakoff. Dale’s gallery closed in 2013.

Bill Cunningham, Griffin Mask, 1963. Molded, stitched, and glued feathers, sparterie, wire, jersey, and velour. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

Off the Wall is arranged in nine sections; the titles of some are derived from popular music of the ‘60s and ‘70s to suggest the wide-ranging concerns of the artists. The introductory section, The Times They Are A Changin’ (Bob Dylan, 1964), contains works by Lenore Tawney, Dorian Zachai, Claire Zeisler, Ed Rossbach, and Debra Rapoport to illustrate how textile artists in the late ‘50s and ‘60s liberated tapestry weaving from the wall, adapting it to three-dimensional sculptural forms inspired by pre-Columbian weaving.

Dina Knapp, See It Like a Native: History Kimono #1, 1982. Painted, appliquéd, and Xerox-transferred cotton, polyester, plastic, and paper. Promised gift of Julie Schafler Dale Collection.
Ana Lisa Hedstrom, Pieced Silk Faille Kimono, circa 1992. Pieced shibori dyed silk pique weave. The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.
Tim Harding, Garden: Field of Flowers, 1991. Quilted, layered, slashed and rayed cotton. 56 x 67 x 3 inches. Museum of Arts and Design, New York.

In 1969, a group of five students at Pratt Institute studying painting, sculpture, industrial design, multimedia, and graphic design taught each other how to crochet, leading to remarkable outcomes. Janet Lipkin, Jean Cacicedo, Marika Contompasis, Sharron Hedges, and Dina Knapp all created clothing-related forms that they would describe as wearable sculpture, thus establishing a cornerstone of the Art to Wear movement. A highlight in this section is a wool crochet and knit Samurai Top, 1972, by Sharron Hedges, modeled by the young Julie Dale for the book Creative Crochet, authored by two of the artist’s friends, Nicki Hitz Edson and Arlene Stimmel.

Sharron Hedges, Midnight Sky (Julie’s Coat), 1977. Wool, crocheted. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

The next section, Good Vibrations (Beach Boys, 1966), traces the migration of many of these young artists from the East Coast to the West Coast where they joined California’s vibrant artistic community and connected with Sandra Sakata’s Obiko. A pair of colorful denim hand-embroidered mini shorts by Anna VA Polesny embroidered while traveling conveys this new youthful spirit. Pacific Rim influences are evident in the Japanese kimono form as a blank canvas offering infinite possibilities for pattern and design. Katherine Westpahl’s indigo blue resist-dyed cotton work, A Fantasy Meeting of Santa Claus with Big Julie and Tyrone at McDonald’s, 1978, and Janet Lipkin’s Mexico at Midday, a coat made in 1988 are exceptional examples. A range of counter-culture influences, evoking ceremony and spirituality, pervade this section.

Ben Compton, Ivory Gypsy, 1974. Cotton Kota-weave, batiste, crochet lace, and ball fringe; nylon braid; hand-block printed, partially bleached and over-dyed, tie-dyed, appliquéd, and hand-and machine sewn. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Gift of Anne Byrne Kronenfeld. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

Come Together (The Beatles, 1969) responds to the popular use of assemblage in art-making, especially the use of nontraditional materials. It also looks at the art of performance, reflected in Ben Compton and Marian Clayden’s Nocturnal Moth, 1974, inspired by Federico Fellini’s film La Dolce Vita (1960). “Mother Earth,” a nod to the publication Mother Earth News Magazine, looks to nature and environmental concerns while This Land is Your Land (Woodie Guthrie, 1940) explores iconic American imagery including reference to the American West and Native American cultures. Examples in this section include Joan Ann Jablow’s Big Bird cape, 1977, made entirely of recycled bird feathers, and Joan Steiner’s Manhattan Collar, 1979, which reimagines New York’s skyline in miniature.

Joan Ann Jablow, Big Bird, 1977. Feathers, wool knit, silk/polyester. Courtesy Harrie George Schloss. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.
Susanna Lewis, Off We Go into the Wild Blue Yonder, 1977. Knitted and appliquéd wool, rayon, angora, satin, and lamé. Private Collection.
Nina Vivian Huryn, Tree Outfit, 1976. Tooled, painted, laced, and stitched leather, suede, antique shoe buttons, and satin. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

Other Worlds explores fantasy and science fiction, two genres that offered young people an escape from the period’s cultural and political upheavals. Noteworthy here are works by Jean Cacicedo and Nina Huryn, both of whom riff on one of the most widely read English language books at the time, J.R.R. Tolkien’s trilogy Lord of the Rings (1965). Cacicedo responded with a portrait of Treebeard, 1973, a Tolkien character, while Huryn created her own fantasy world in Tree Outfit, with its flowing pants, loose shirt and leather sleeveless jacket containing forest and folklore imagery, a work made especially for Julie: Artisans Gallery in 1976. Other artists turned to dreams, such as Susanna Lewis, who created Moth Cape, 1979, in response to a nightmare that she had of a giant moth enveloping her body.

Debra Rapoport, Epaulets and Hood, 2017. Cardboard, used tea bags, egg cartons, paper, cork, feather. Courtesy of the artist.
Janet Lipkin, Flamingo Jacket, 1982. Hand-dyed, machine-knitted, and stuffed wool and angora. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.
Sheila Perez Ghidini, Combat Vest, circa 1985. Molded plastic figures on quilted plain weave supplemental warp and weft patterning. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

A section called I Am Woman (Helen Reddy, 1971) underscores the ways in which artists invoked feminism directly and indirectly in Art to Wear. Janet Lipkin, for example, invested her works with symbols of freedom while searching for new directions in her life, as seen in Bird Coat, 1972, Flamingo, 1982, and Transforming Woman, 1992. Other works like Combat Vest, 1985, by Sheila Perez, feature plastic toy soldiers as protective armor for the chest area, while Nicki Hitz Edson’s Medusa Mask, 1975, is a wild expression of fraught emotions surrounding the breakup of her marriage.

Nicki Hitz Edson, Medusa Mask, 1975. Crocheted wool. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.
Jo-Ellen Trilling, Preposition Jacket, 1989. Tinted and ink drawings on cotton canvas, pieced silk plain weave, rayon binding appliqué, plastic and metal skeletons appliqué and pendants. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection.

Colour My World (Chicago, 1970) reflects the buoyant rainbow color spectrum that was ubiquitous during this era. Recently published works on color theory by Johannes Itten and Josef Albers provided a cornerstone of the new art education. For Linda Mendelson, color, typography, and text became inseparable. She adapted Albers’s ideas relating to after-images in Big Red, and linked color progression with lines from a poem titled Coat by William Butler Yeats from which she drew inspiration. Other artists such as Tim Harding created an effect similar to impressionist brush strokes by slashing and fraying dyed fabrics, as seen in his colorful coat Garden: Field of Flowers, 1991.

Linda J. Mendelson, In Kyo-Kawara, 2015, Wool machine knitted, plastic buttons. Promised gift of The Julie Schaffler Dale Collection.

The final section Everybody’s Talkin’ (Harry Nilsson, 1969) explores the use of text in Art to Wear. JoEllen Trilling engages in visual word play using common prepositions on a jacket, while Jean Cacicedo channels her grief over her father’s death using words taken from the bible that celebrated his life in My Father’s House, 1994.

Anna VA Polesny, International Levi’s, 1973. Denim hand embroidered with cotton thread. Promised gift of The Julie Schafler Dale Collection. Photography by Otto Stupakoff ©Julie Schafler Dale.

Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles, who organized the exhibition, said: “We are looking back at this period with a fresh lens through which to consider a uniquely American art form that continues to have a worldwide influence. With roots and connections in fine arts, fiber art, craft, performance and fashion, there are so many important artists to appreciate. For this reason I am delighted by the opportunity to cast a light on such extraordinary talents, including so many adventurous women who deserve much greater recognition.”

Off the Wall: American Art to Wear is accompanied by a new publication of the same name co-published the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Yale University Press, co-authored by exhibition curators Dilys E. Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costumes and Textiles at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and independent textile scholar and curator Mary Schoeser, with a contribution written by Julie Schafler Dale. The volume provides the social, political, and artistic context for Art to Wear. ISBN 9780876332917.

Curators: Dilys Blum, The Jack M. and Annette Y. Friedland Senior Curator of Costume and Textiles and Mary Schoeser, Independent Textile Historian and Curator

This exhibition has been made possible by Julie Schafler Dale, PNC, The Coby Foundation, the Arlin and Neysa Adams Endowment Fund, Catherine and Laurence Altman, the Center for American Art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other generous donors.