Audrey Hepburn’s Personal Collection Part III Online At Christie’s In May

#AudreyAtChristies

Christie’s online sale Audrey Hepburn: The Personal Collection Part III will open for bidding on May 2, closing on May 9, 2018. Comprising 212 lots, the sale is now available to view online www.christies.com/audreyhepburn. Following the success of Part I and II in Autumn 2017, Part III continues Christie’s celebration of this globally renowned and adored film and stage actress, fashion legend and humanitarian, in what would have been her 90th year.christies_logo_black-hr_mdtv71b

Not to be missed, the sale will provide a further opportunity for fans, collectors and admirers to delve in to Audrey Hepburn’s personal world, both on and off screen, through the objects she collected, used and loved; from jewellery, fashion and accessories, to correspondence, film memorabilia and professional photography by leading photographers of the day.audrey-hepburn-identity-centered[1]

Audrey Hepburn is rightly regarded not only as one of the greatest screen actresses of all time but as a style icon. 25 years after her death she maintains a resonance and popularity as strong today as it was during her lifetime. With estimates starting at just £200 and ranging up to £15,000 this auction will provide collectors and devoted fans from around the world with a further opportunity to acquire personal items treasured by one of the most famous and well-loved women of the 20th Century.

Christie’s auctions, Part I and Part II, of the personal collection of Hepburn captivated the imagination of a global audience, realizing an overall total of £6,053,875/ $8,100,085/ €6,883,255. Comprising 473 lots, the flagship live auction at Christie’s headquarters in London (September 27, 2017) and the online sale (September 19 to October 4, 2017) attracted registered bidders from a total of 50 countries across 6 continents. Both sales sparked competitive bidding from new and existing clients; in the saleroom, on the telephones, via absentee bids and Christie’s LIVETM in Part I; and via Christie’s easily accessible online sale format in Part II.

The overall top lot from the collection was sold in Part I: Audrey Hepburn’s working script for the 1961 Paramount production Breakfast at Tiffany’s which sold to Tiffany & Co. for £632,750 / $846,619 / €719,437, realizing a world auction record for a script (estimate: £60,000-90,000). The top lot of Part II was A Matador’s Traje De Luces (Suit of Lights) which realized £52,500/ $70,245/ €59,693 (estimate £3,000 – 5,000).

Luca Dotti and Sean Hepburn Ferrer commented: “Having taken 25 years to be ready to share our mother’s personal world, we were truly touched by the global response to Part I and II of her collection. It is with pleasure that we now present Part III; a further group of her belongings that we feel will be of interest to her ever-growing base of admirers.

Adrian Hume-Sayer, Head of Sale and Director of Private Collections commented: “We are indebted to Audrey Hepburn’s two sons for entrusting Christie’s with this very special collection. Audrey Hepburn is widely acknowledged as one of the greatest icons in the history of both film and fashion. The incredible enthusiasm with which her collection was received bears testament to the enduring strength of her appeal – from Hong Kong to Hollywood the pre-sale exhibitions drew crowds wherever they went, with the London pre-sale events alone drawing in excess of 12,000 visitors. The fervor continued with vigor through both the live and online auctions, with the marathon 10 hour live sale running until midnight. The success of the sales – which saw thousands of her personal possessions across almost 500 lots all find homes – show the immense continued affection for perhaps the greatest British actress the world has seen. Part III of the collection will be offered online in 2018, details will follow in due course.”

Highlights include:

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An ivory wool gabardine coat by Rose Bertin, Lausanne, 1968, is offered together with a pair of shoes.

Lot 2 – An ivory wool gabardine coat by Rose Bertin, Lausanne, 1968, is offered together with a pair of shoes. Audrey is wearing this coat on the cover of ‘Audrey in Rome’ by Luca Dotti, and Ludovicia Damiani, Harper Collins, 2011 (page 1) Estimate £3,000-5,000

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The simple and elegant pearl has become synonymous with Audrey Hepburn, evoking her classic and understated style.

Lot 8 – A pair of cultured pearl earrings. The simple and elegant pearl has become synonymous with Audrey Hepburn, evoking her classic and understated style. According to son Luca Dotti, Audrey ‘hated the idea of spending a fortune on diamonds and gold… What she really loved were pearls because of their purity, the fact that they were made by nature.’ Estimate £8,000-12,000 Continue reading

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Christie’s Announces Details of Exhibitions, Sales, Tickets and Catalogues for the Collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller

May 1-11 Online Sale | May 8, 9 & 10 Saleroom Auctions

First look at complete collection of more than 1,000 items of decorative art and 550 works of fine art:

  • Two evening sales of European, American and Latin American masterpieces
  • Online sales of Fine and Decorative Arts across eight collecting themes
  • All estate proceeds to benefit philanthropy

Public highlights exhibitions continue around the globe

  • Los Angeles April 6 –12
  • Beijing April 6 – 7
  • Shanghai April 10 –11
  • New York April 28 – May 8

Christie’s announces final details of the most anticipated art world event of the spring season: the sale of the magnificent Collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller. All of the estate proceeds will be directed to a dozen philanthropies Peggy and David Rockefeller supported during their lifetimes, for the benefit of continuing scientific research, higher education, support for the arts, sustainable economic development, and land conservation initiatives, among others.christies_logo_black-hr_mdtv71b

New confirmed details include the complete schedule of live and online sales, illustrated catalogs available online, remaining US and Asia highlights tours and locations, and ticket information to attend the special extended public exhibition of the Collection at Rockefeller Center in New York from April 28 – May 8. The global tour and exhibitions are presented in partnership with VistaJet. In total, the Collection is expected to realize in excess of $500 million. Before now, the most valuable collection ever previously offered at auction was the Collection of Yves Saint Laurent et Pierre Bergé in 2009 at Christie’s Paris, which achieved more than US$400 million.

The Collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller comprises approximately 1,550 auction lots, including one of the largest and most important collections of decorative arts to come to market in decades. Christie’s will offer 900 lots via live saleroom auctions at its Rockefeller Center site on May 8, 9 and 10. A companion online sale – which opens for bidding worldwide on May 1– will feature an additional 650 lots organized across eight collecting themes, with estimates ranging from $100 to $10,000. Through this unique integration of sale channels, Christie’s brings traditional decorative arts to the forefront, leveraging a sophisticated digital marketing approach and ‘guest-stylist’ partnerships with top tastemakers, interior designers, and social media influencers.

Marc Porter, Christie’s Chairman, Americas stated: “This rich and diverse collection of fine and decorative art is unified by Peggy and David Rockefeller’s love of beauty and their unerring eye for exceptional quality and craftsmanship in design. The size and scope of this great collection has inspired us to innovate new approaches to our traditional sale model and leverage our world-class online sale platform as only Christie’s can. The result is a dynamic week of saleroom auctions, including not one but two Evening Sales of masterworks from European, American and Latin American artists and a stellar offering of Decorative Arts across a range of categories. Our online sale, which is organized along the themes and motifs that resonated most with Peggy and David Rockefeller, brings this Collection to life in a fresh and exciting way, and is designed to make it both easy and enjoyable for collectors from all around the world to participate in this singular philanthropic event.

Following the main auction week, Christie’s will offer a selection of 19 lots of jewelry from the family collection as a highlight of its Magnificent Jewels sale in New York on June 12. The jewelry will be exhibited as part of the extended exhibition in New York and the highlights tour to Los Angeles.

In keeping with Peggy and David Rockefeller’s wishes, Estate proceeds from the Collection sales at Christie’s will be directed to the following philanthropies, which the Rockefellers supported throughout their lifetimes: American Farmland Trust, Americas Society/Council of the Americas, Council on Foreign Relations, the David Rockefeller Fund, Harvard University, Maine Coast Heritage Trust, Mount Desert Land and Garden Preserve, the Museum of Modern Art, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Rockefeller University, and The Stone Barns Restoration Corporation – Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture, among others.

LOS ANGELES TOUR

West Coast collectors and jewelry enthusiasts will get a first look at the Collection highlights between April 6 and 12 when Christie’s brings a selection of masterpieces and Rockefeller family jewels to its flagship West Coast gallery in Beverly Hills. The touring exhibition was curated with the tastes and interests of Christie’s clients in mind, with rare works by American artists Georgia O’Keeffe, Edward Hopper, and Willem de Kooning exhibited alongside masterpieces by Pablo Picasso, Claude Monet, and Paul Gauguin. In addition, Christie’s LA will unveil Diego Rivera’s rarely-exhibited large-scale masterwork, The Rivals, painted in 1931 aboard the ship carrying Rivera and Frida Kahlo to New York. A collection of jewelry owned by Peggy Rockefeller will be included in the Los Angeles previews, featuring signed pieces by Van Cleef & Arpels, Jean Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co., and Raymond Yard, among others.

Porter further added: “This rich and diverse collection of fine and decorative art is unified by Peggy and David Rockefeller’s love of beauty and their unerring eye for exceptional quality and craftsmanship in design. The size and scope of this great collection have inspired us to innovate new approaches to our traditional sale model and leverage our world-class online sale platform as only Christie’s can. The result is a dynamic week of saleroom auctions, including not one but two Evening Sales of masterworks from European, American and Latin American artists and a stellar offering of Decorative Arts across a range of categories. Our online sale, which is organized along the themes and motifs that resonated most with Peggy and David Rockefeller, brings this Collection to life in a fresh and exciting way, and is designed to make it both easy and enjoyable for collectors from all around the world to participate in this singular philanthropic event. Continue reading

“The Newest Americans” Exploring Citizenship & Immigration In The Trump Era Opened April 3 At The California Museum

New Exhibit Capturing Experiences Of Immigrants Prompts Discussion On The American Dream Through July 8th Before Embarking On A 5-Year National Tour

Following the 2016 election, America’s political climate was polarized by the Trump Administration’s efforts to build a border wall, enact a Muslim ban and enforce mass deportations. Against this backdrop, photographer Sam Comen with interviews by Michael Estrin set out to capture the experiences of new Americans in the moments following their naturalization after two Los Angeles, CA ceremonies held in February and March of 2017. Their resulting portraits and interviews led to the development of “The Newest Americans” as a traveling exhibit created in partnership with the California Museum.logo

The California Museum’s  The Newest Americans,” exploring U.S. citizenship and immigration in the era of President Donald J. Trump, is now open. The new exhibit prompts discussion on America’s legacy as a nation of immigrants and the future of the American dream through July 8, 2018, before embarking on a 5-year national tour managed by Exhibit Envoy.

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Maria Teresa Cervantes (right), country of origin Mexico, pictured with daughter Lorraine (left) and grandson Jonathan Anda (center). CREDIT: By Sam Comen, courtesy of photographer.

I commend the California Museum for presenting an exhibit examining the immigrant experience at this critical time in California and U.S. history,” said Secretary of State and Museum Board of Trustee Alex Padilla. “The display prompts much-needed discussion on civic engagement, citizenship, and civil rights, as the Trump administration enacts restrictive immigration policies that not only impacts families, but all California communities.”

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Breznil Ashton, country of origin St. Vincent & the Grenadines. CREDIT: By Sam Comen, courtesy of photographer.

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Maria Villagordoa, country of origin Mexico. CREDIT: By Sam Comen, courtesy of photographer

Illustrating a range of ages and walks of life, the 28 exhibit participants represent 23 countries of origin, including Mexico, Rwanda, China, Russia, and Syria. The exhibit includes photographs accompanied by text panels presented in English and Spanish sharing the subjects’ views on why they chose to become American citizens and what the American dream means to them.

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Caixia Yang Phillipe, country of origin China. CREDIT: By Sam Comen, courtesy of photographer

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Michael Jordan, country of origin Canada. CREDIT: By Sam Comen, courtesy of photographer.

Highlights include: Continue reading

The Whitney To Present The First Museum Survey Of The Work Of Mary Corse

This June, the Whitney Museum of American Art will debut Mary Corse: A Survey in Light, the first museum survey devoted to the work of Mary Corse (born 1945, Berkeley, CA; lives and works in Topanga, CA). One of the few women associated with the West Coast Light and Space movement of the 1960s, Corse shared with her contemporaries a deep fascination with perception and with the possibility that light itself could serve as both a subject and material of art. Yet while others largely migrated away from painting into sculptural and environmental projects, Corse approached the question of light through painting.

Mary Corse (b. 1945), Untitled (Space + Electric Light), 1968

Mary Corse (b. 1945), Untitled (Space + Electric Light), 1968. Argon light, plexiglass, and high-frequency generator, 45 1/4 x 45 1/4 x 4 3/4 in. (114.9 x 114.9 x 12.1 cm). Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego; museum purchase with funds from the Annenberg Foundation. Photograph by Philipp Scholz Rittermann

This long-overdue examination—which will run at the Whitney from June 8 through November 25 in the eighth-floor Hurst Family Galleries—focuses on key moments of experimentation in Corse’s career, highlighting the ways in which her unique formal and material investigations helped forge a new language of painting.

The Whitney exhibition begins in 1964, when, following an unusually intense education in abstract painting as a teen in Berkeley, Corse enrolled at Chouinard Art Institute and moved to downtown Los Angeles. There, she dove headlong into a sustained dialogue with painting, questioning its most essential elements and forms—the brushstroke, the edge, the monochrome, the grid—while charting her own course through studies in quantum physics and unconventional “painting” materials, from fluorescent light and plexiglass to metallic flakes, glass microspheres, and clay. The survey will bring together for the first time Corse’s key bodies of work—including her early shaped canvases, freestanding sculptures, and the light encasements that she engineered between 1966 and 1968, in her early twenties, as well as her breakthrough White Light paintings, begun in 1968, and the Black Earth series that she initiated after moving in 1970 from her downtown studio to the rugged hills of Topanga Canyon.

As a focused survey that will introduce Corse’s work to many visitors, this exhibition endeavors to historicize this understudied artist’s career while placing significant attention on the viewing experience in the galleries. Corse’s exquisite works capture the physical and metaphysical qualities of light on a two-dimensional surface and have the power to activate the viewer in the creation of the perceptual experience: the kinetic effect of the work is contingent upon the movement of the body through space. This experiential component of Corse’s work will be of paramount importance to the installation.

The exhibition is organized in association with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where it will be on view from July 28 through November 10, 2019. Organized by Kim Conaty, Steven and Ann Ames Curator of Drawings and Prints, with Melinda Lang, curatorial assistant, in close collaboration with the artist, the exhibition unfolds both chronologically and thematically, presenting approximately 25 works dating from the mid-1960s to the present.

Conaty noted: “It’s an exciting moment to recognize Corse’s pioneering achievements, now more than five decades after she began. The experience of her work, which can be both material and immaterial, minimal and maximal, makes us slow down and look, then look again. There is a real magic to the work that is felt, not just seen, and we’re thrilled to offer our visitors the opportunity to discover it.”

In addition, in May 2018, Dia Art Foundation will unveil a new gallery dedicated to Corse at Dia:Beacon. On view for three years, this long-term installation examines the artist’s use of light and geometric form in painting. It celebrates recent acquisitions within a broader group of works that highlights the period from the late 1960s through the 1970s. On October 12, the Whitney is partnering with Dia to present a symposium at the Whitney reflecting on Corse’s career and offering new perspectives on her work. Further details will be forthcoming.

Scott Rothkopf, Deputy Director for Programs and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, commented: “Corse’s exhibition at the Whitney and installation at Dia will finally position her as the true innovator she has been for more than half a century. Not only did she play a key role in the emergence of the West Coast Light and Space movement, but since then she has persistently developed a body of painting remarkable for its technical experimentation and otherworldly beauty.”

Born in Berkeley, California, in 1945, Corse moved to Los Angeles in 1964 and earned her BFA at the Chouinard Art Institute (now California Institute of the Arts) in 1968. Her work was included at the time in several important group exhibitions, such as the 1970 Annual Exhibition at the Whitney (1970); Permutations: Light and Color, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (1970); and Twenty–Four Young Los Angeles Artists, LACMA (1971). Recently, her work has been featured in group exhibitions including Phenomenal: California Light, Space, Surface, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego (2011); Pacific Standard Time: Crosscurrents in L.A. Painting and Sculpture, 1950–1970, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2011); Surface, Support, Process: The 1960s Monochrome in the Guggenheim Collection, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (2011); Reductive Minimalism: Women Artists in Dialogue, 1960–2012, University of Michigan Museum of Art, Ann Arbor (2014); and Light and Space, Seattle Art Museum, WA (2015).

Corse is the recipient of the New Talent Purchase Award, Los Angeles County Museum of Art (1967); the Theodoron Award, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum (1971); a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship (1972); and the Cartier Foundation Award (1993).

A richly illustrated monograph, published in cooperation with Yale University Press, will accompany the presentation. The publication features an essay by Conaty, along with additional texts by Robin Clark (Director of the Artist Initiative, SFMoMA), Michael Govan (CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director, Los Angeles County Museum of Art), Alexis Lowry (Associate Curator, Dia Art Foundation), and artist David Reed, as well as an illustrated chronology and exhibition history. It will serve as the first sustained study of Corse’s work and is intended to advance significantly the scholarship and interpretation around the artist’s practice.

Mary Corse: A Survey in Light is organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, in association with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Significant support for Mary Corse: A Survey in Light is provided by The Barnett and Annalee Newman Foundation, Sueyun and Gene Locks, and Donna Perret Rosen and Benjamin M. Rosen.

Philadelphia Museum of Art To Exhibit Agnes Martin Works From The Daniel W. Dietrich II Collection

This spring, the Philadelphia Museum of Art will present, “Agnes Martin: The Untroubled Mind” (Gallery 174) on view May 19-October 14, 2018, an intimately scaled installation featuring four paintings by Agnes Martin from the bequest of the late philanthropist, Daniel W. Dietrich II, a crucial supporter of the artist’s career. Three of these paintings date to the mid-1960s, and the fourth to 1985. They will be exhibited with additional works on paper and sculpture that Dietrich collected. This installation will explore the ideas that inform Martin’s minimalist art and reflect upon the enduring friendship that existed between a major artist and her patron.

Hill, 1967, by Agnes Martin

Hill, 1967, by Agnes Martin, American (born Canada), 1912 – 2004. Acrylic and graphite on canvas, 6 feet × 6 feet (182.9 × 182.9 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Daniel W. Dietrich II, 2016-3-20. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Timothy Rub, The George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer, said: “Dan was a generous philanthropist and an admirer and avid collector of Martin’s work. He supported her first major mid-career retrospective in 1973 at the Institute of Contemporary Art here in Philadelphia. From that seminal moment onward, he continued to champion her work and added superb examples to his private collection. This installation provides a unique opportunity to understand the nature of Martin’s contribution to contemporary art and to understand how aspects of Dietrich’s transformative gift fit so well into our collection.”

Leaf, 1965, Agnes Martin

Leaf, 1965, Agnes Martin, American (born Canada), 1912 – 2004. Acrylic and graphite on canvas, 6 feet × 6 feet (182.9 × 182.9 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Daniel W. Dietrich II, 2016-3-21. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Play II, 1966, by Agnes Martin

Play II, 1966, by Agnes Martin, American (born Canada), 1912 – 2004. Acrylic and graphite on canvas, 6 feet × 6 feet (182.9 × 182.9 cm). Philadelphia Museum of Art: Bequest of Daniel W. Dietrich II, 2016-3-22. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Martin created each of the paintings that will be on view—Leaf (1965), Play II (1966), Hill (1967) and Untitled #6 (1985)— using acrylic paint and graphite. These works, each six-feet square, will be complemented in the installation by another painting in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Rose (1965), a centennial gift of the Woodward Foundation in 1975, of the same medium and size. Continue reading

National Museum of African American History and Culture Offers Walk-Up Wednesdays in April

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture has announced Walk-Up Wednesdays for the entire month of April 2018. Individuals who walk up without timed-entry passes may enter the museum on a first-come, first-served basis Wednesdays, April 11, 18 and 25. Walk-up entry is subject to building capacity. The museum already has issued advance timed passes for the entire month of April. Individuals who already have advance timed passes will receive priority entry. The museum is launching Walk-Up Wednesdays in April as a pilot to test no-pass entry.

National Museum of African American History and Culture logo

National Museum of African American History and Culture logo

The National Museum of African American History and Culture opened Sept. 24, 2016, on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Occupying a prominent location next to the Washington Monument, the nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural destination devoted exclusively to exploring, documenting and showcasing the African American story and its impact on American and world history.

Walk-Up Wednesdays in April will help us to determine how to manage visitor demand,” said Lonnie G. Bunch III, the museum’s founding director. “We are honored and humbled to have struck such a chord with our visitors. They stay an average of four-and-a-half hours on weekdays. We don’t want to disappoint our visitors by reaching capacity and having them wait in long lines for space to become available inside the galleries. The goal of this pilot program is to provide greater access for the public while maintaining the safety and security of our visitors.”

Pass Holders

· Individuals with advance timed-entry passes for Wednesdays in April may enter according to the time stated on their passes.

Group Visits

· The museum will continue to require advance timed passes for groups of 10 or more.

· All groups are required to present passes to gain entry to the museum.

Same-Day Online

· Same-day online passes will not be issued on Wednesdays in April.

For more information on timed passes and Walk-Up Wednesdays, visit https://nmaahc.si.edu/walk-wednesdays-april. For more information about the museum, visit nmaahc.si.edu, follow @NMAAHC on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat—or call Smithsonian information at (202) 633-1000.

Tickets For Harry Potter: A History Of Magic At New-York Historical Society To Go On Sale April 26

Ground-Breaking British Library Exhibition Comes to New York Showcasing the History of Magic as Featured in Harry Potter

Exhibition Marks the 20th Anniversary of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone Publication in the U.S. by Scholastic

The New-York Historical Society announced that tickets for Harry Potter: A History of Magic, a British Library exhibition, will go on sale to the general public on April 26. The exhibition—the most successful showcase of all time at the British Library in London—will be on view at New-York Historical October 5, 2018–January 27, 2019. Tickets can be purchased at www.harrypotter.nyhistory.org beginning at 12 pm EDT on April 26.

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Harry Potter: A History of Magic graphic Illustration by Jim Kay © Bloomsbury Publishing Plc 2016

Capturing the traditions of folklore and magic at the heart of the Harry Potter stories, Harry Potter: A History of Magic combines century-old treasures including rare books, manuscripts, and magical objects from the collections of the British Library and New-York Historical Society, with original material from Harry Potter publisher Scholastic and J.K. Rowling’s own archives. From medieval descriptions of dragons and griffins, to the origins of the sorcerer’s stone, visitors can explore the subjects studied at Hogwarts and see original drafts and drawings by J.K. Rowling as well as Harry Potter illustrator Jim Kay.

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Close-up of the first recorded mention of ‘abracadabra’, as a cure for malaria, in Quintus Serenus, Liber medicinalis © British Library Board

September 2018 marks the 20th anniversary of the U.S. publication of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, and Scholastic kicked off its year-long celebration in January 2018. The Wizarding World will have one of its busiest years ever in the U.S., with the opening of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child on Broadway in April; the British Library’s exhibition Harry Potter: A History of Magic, opening at the New York Historical Society in October; and the second Fantastic Beasts movie, The Crimes of Grindelwald, opening in cinemas in November. The Harry Potter books have sold more than 160 million copies in the U.S. alone and more than 500 million copies worldwide. The books are published in more than 200 territories in 80 languages.

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A broomstick belonging to Olga Hunt © Museum of Witchcraft, Boscastle

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Tombstone of Nicholas Flamel © Paris, Musée de Cluny – Musée national du Moyen Âge

In celebration, New-York Historical will display illustrator Brian Selznick’s artwork that will appear on the covers of the Harry Potter series to be published by Scholastic later this year. Also on view to the public for the first time will be Mary GrandPré’s illustrations created for Scholastic’s original editions of the novels. Costumes and set models from Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, which opens on Broadway in April, will be showcased in the exhibition.

New York Historical Society. PBDW architect renovations

New-York Historical Society exterior, 170 Central Park West. Photo credit: Jon Wallen.

Complementing the exhibition throughout its run will be a host of engaging and interactive activities sure to delight Harry Potter fans of all ages. Tickets for monthly fun trivia nights, which will put fans’ knowledge of the Wizarding World to the test, will be on sale on April 26 as well. Additional family and adult programs will be unveiled in the coming months. Continue reading