Pottery Barn Introduces Mix-And-Match Textiles Collection With Fashion Designers Emily Current And Meritt Elliott

Pottery Barn has launched a new collection of textiles and bedding essentials with revered stylists and fashion designers, Emily Current and Meritt Elliott of Current/Elliott. Inspired by their ready-to-wear collection, THE GREAT, the new Emily & Meritt for Pottery Barn assortment celebrates personal style and embodies the spirit of creative fearlessness that is synonymous with the LA-based designers.

Emily Current and Meritt Elliott, a creative team since 1999, are the celebrated Los Angeles-based duo known for their whimsical and timeless sensibility that recalls classic Americana. Drawn to one another’s innate sense of style, Emily and Meritt first met in college and quickly realized the fresh and fearless aesthetic they share – an affinity for individuality, dressing without rules and mixing high and low with confidence and flair.

In Spring 2012, the twosome joined an elite rank of designers when they became members of the prestigious Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA). In a visual ode to their varied career, encapsulating their love affair with denim and imaginative worldview, Emily and Meritt penned A Denim Story: Inspirations from Bell-bottoms to Boyfriends, a coffee table book published by Rizzoli in Spring 2014. In Spring 2015, Emily and Meritt launched their much anticipated, multi-category women’s collection, aptly named THE GREAT. Whether they’re designing a collection, creating memorable outfits for clients, styling unforgettable editorial spreads and advertising campaigns, appearing as fashion experts, or consulting for companies inspired by their distinct world-view, Emily and Meritt always bring a playful, intelligent spirit to whatever they touch

Emily and Meritt exclusively for Pottery Barn (Photo: Business Wire)

True to Emily and Meritt’s casual and nostalgic Americana aesthetic, the latest chapter in their Pottery Barn partnership features washed garment-dyed fabrics in fall color palettes and chic prints that inspire endless combinations and create an effortless, lived-in collection for both bath and bedroom. From the warm solids in hues of army green, spice and indigo, the pops of bright marigold and soft vintage blush to the playful yet subtle star, stripe and dot patterns, the new Fall collection gives Pottery Barn customers yet another way to embrace and express their unique style within the home.

We’re thrilled to introduce the newest collection in our partnership with Pottery Barn — a range of sheets, duvets, quilts and towels in washed garment-dyed colors and special prints made for layering, mixing, and matching,” said Emily Current and Meritt Elliot. “We wanted to capture the look and feel of a well-loved fabric and designed this collection for the person who treasures effortless personal style.”

Emily and Meritt have a playful yet chic aesthetic that translates beautifully into approachable designs for the home,” said Monica Bhargava, Executive Vice President of Product Development and Design, Pottery Barn. “This collection of garment-dyed textiles evokes a sense of comfort and self-expression and allows the Pottery Barn customer to add cozy layers to their space just in time for fall.

The new Emily & Meritt for Pottery Barn collection is now available online at PotteryBarn.com and in select Pottery Barn stores. To learn more about the line, visit www.potterybarn.com/emilyandmeritt and join the conversation on social media with @potterybarn #EandMxPB.

The Museum Of Modern Art Announces The First Major Dorothea Lange Solo Exhibition At Moma In 50 Years

The Museum of Modern Art announces Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures, the first major solo exhibition at the Museum of the photographer’s incisive work in over 50 years. On view from February 9 through May 2, 2020, in The Paul J. Sachs Galleries in The David and Peggy Rockefeller Building,

Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures includes approximately 100 photographs drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection. The exhibition also uses archival materials such as correspondence, historical publications, and oral histories, as well as contemporary voices, to examine the ways in which words inflect our understanding of Lange’s pictures. These new perspectives and responses from artists, scholars, critics, and writers, including Julie Ault, Wendy Red Star, and Rebecca Solnit, provide fresh insight into Lange’s practice. Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures is organized by Sarah Meister, Curator, with River Bullock, Beaumont & Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, assisted by Madeline Weisburg, Modern Women’s Fund Twelve-Month Intern, Department of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art.

Dorothea Lange. Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California. 1936. Gelatin silver print, 11 1/8 x 8 9/16″ (28.3 x 21.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase

Toward the end of her life, Dorothea Lange (1895–1965) remarked, “All photographs—not only those that are so-called ‘documentary,’ and every photograph really is documentary and belongs in some place, has a place in history—can be fortified by words.”

Dorothea Lange. Tractored Out, Childress County, Texas. 1938. Gelatin silver print. 9 5/16 x 12 13/16″ (23.6 x 32.6 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase

Organized loosely chronologically and spanning her career, the exhibition groups iconic works together with lesser known photographs and traces their varied relationships to words: from early criticism on Lange’s photographs to her photo-essays published in LIFE magazine, and from the landmark photobook An American Exodus to her examination of the US criminal justice system. The exhibition also includes groundbreaking photographs of the 1930s—including Migrant Mother (1936)—that inspired pivotal public awareness of the lives of sharecroppers, displaced families, and migrant workers during the Great Depression. Through her photography and her words, Lange urged photographers to reconnect with the world—a call reflective of her own ethos and working method, which coupled an attention to aesthetics with a central concern for humanity.

Dorothea Lange. The Defendant, Alameda County Courthouse, California. 1957. Gelatin silver print. 12 3/8 x 10 1/8″ (31.4 x 25.8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Purchase

It seems both timely and urgent that we renew our attention to Lange’s extraordinary achievements,” said Meister. “Her concern for less fortunate and often overlooked individuals, and her success in using photography (and words) to address these inequities, encourages each of us to reflect on our own civic responsibilities. It reminds me of the unique role that art—and in particular photography—can play in imagining a more just society.

The exhibition begins in 1933, when Lange, then a portrait photographer, first brought her camera outside into the streets of San Francisco. Lange’s increasing interest in the everyday experience of people she encountered eventually led her to work for government agencies, 2 supporting their objective to raise public awareness and to provide aid to struggling farmers and those devastated by the Great Depression. During this time, Lange photographed her subjects and kept notes that formed the backbone of government reports; these and other archival materials will be represented alongside corresponding photographs throughout the exhibition. Lange’s commitment to social justice and her faith in the power of photography remained constant throughout her life, even when her politics did not align with those who were paying for her work.

A central focus of the exhibition is An American Exodus, a 1939 collaboration between Lange and Paul Schuster Taylor, her husband and an agricultural economist. As an object and as an idea, An American Exodus highlights the voices of her subjects by pairing first-person quotations alongside their pictures. Later, Lange’s photographs continued to be useful in addressing marginalized histories and ongoing social concerns. Throughout her career as a photographer for the US Government and various popular magazines, Lange’s pictures were frequently syndicated and circulated outside of their original context. Lange’s photographs of the 1930s helped illustrate Richard Wright’s 12 Million Black Voices (1941), and her 1950s photographs of a public defender were used to illustrate Minimizing Racism in Jury Trials (1969), a law handbook published after Black Panther Huey P. Newton’s first trial during a time of great racial strife.

This collection-based exhibition would not be possible had it not been for Lange’s deep creative ties to the Museum during her lifetime. MoMA’s collection of Lange photographs was built over many decades and remains one of the definitive collections of her work. Her relationship to MoMA’s Department of Photography dates to her inclusion in its inaugural exhibition, in 1940 which was curated by the department’s director, Edward Steichen. Lange is a rare artist in that both Steichen and his successor, John Szarkowski, held her in equally high esteem. More than a generation after her first retrospective, organized by Szarkowski at MoMA in 1966, Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures uses both historical and contemporary words to encourage a more nuanced understanding of words and pictures in circulation.

The exhibition is accompanied by the catalogue Dorothea Lange: Words & Pictures, capturing this renewed consideration of Lange’s work through the particular lens of its relationship to words. Contributors to the exhibition and the catalogue include artists and curators Julie Ault, Sam Contis (in collaboration with Tess Taylor), Sandy Phillips, Wendy Red Star, and Sally Mann; scholars and writers Kimberly Juanita Brown, Jennifer Greenhill, Christina Sharpe, Robert Slifkin, and Rebecca Solnit.

The exhibition is supported by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

The Museum Of Modern Art Announces Sur Moderno: Journeys Of Abstraction—The Patricia Phelps De Cisneros Gift

Major Exhibition at the Opening of New MoMA Will Display Over 100 Important Works by Latin American Artists

The Museum of Modern Art announces Sur moderno: Journeys of Abstraction―The Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Gift, a major exhibition drawn primarily from the paintings, sculptures, and works on paper donated to the Museum by the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros between 1997 and 2016.

Since its founding in 1929, The Museum of Modern Art has collected, exhibited, and studied the art of Latin America. Today, MoMA’s collection includes more than 5,000 works of modern and contemporary art by artists from Latin America distributed across its six curatorial departments, representing important figures in early modernism, Expressionism, Surrealism, abstraction, architecture, and Conceptual and contemporary art.

Alfredo Hlito (Argentine, 1923–1993). Ritmos cromáticos III (Chromatic Rhythms III), 1949. Oil on canvas, 39 3/8 × 39 3/8″ (100 × 100 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund

On view from October 21, 2019, through March 14, 2020, Sur moderno celebrates the arrival of the most important collection of abstract and concrete art from Latin America by dedicating an entire suite of galleries on the Museum’s third floor to the display of artists from Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina, and Uruguay.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988). Contra relevo no. 1 (Counter Relief no. 1). 1958. Synthetic polymer paint on wood, 55 1/2 × 55 1/2 × 1 5/16″ (141 × 141 × 3.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Promised gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund. Courtesy of “The World of Lygia Clark” Cultural Association

The exhibition highlights the work of Lygia Clark, Gego, Raúl Lozza, Hélio Oiticica, Jesús Rafael Soto, and Rhod Rothfuss, among others, focusing on the concept of transformation: a radical reinvention of the art object and a renewal of the social environment through art and design. The exhibition is also anchored by a selection of archival materials that situate the works within their local contexts. Sur moderno is organized by Inés Katzenstein, Curator of Latin American Art and Director of the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America, The Museum of Modern Art, and consulting curator María Amalia García, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET)–Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Argentina, with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

María Freire (Uruguayan, 1917–2015). Untitled. 1954. Oil on canvas, 36 1/4 × 48 1/16″ (92 × 122 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund in honor of Gabriel Pérez‑Barreiro

The exhibition is divided into two main sections based on the concept of transformation. The first section, “Artworks as Artifacts, Artworks as Manifestos,” presents a group of works that subverted the conventional formats of painting and sculpture. Cuts, folds, articulated objects, cut-out frames, and experiments that question the autonomy of the art object are some examples of these artists’ material explorations. One of the first works visitors encounter in the exhibition, Willys de Castro’s Active Object (1961), fuses the materiality of painting with the principles of free-standing sculpture, inviting the viewer to circle around a painted canvas. Another work in this section, Gyula Kosice’s Articulated Mobile Sculpture (1948), questions the grounds of traditional sculpture by combining strips of brass to create a movable structure that defies classification.

Hélio Oiticica (Brazilian, 1937–1980). Relevo neoconcreto (Neoconcrete Relief) 1960. Oil on wood, 37 7/8 × 51 1/4″ (96 × 130 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Gary Garrels. © Projeto Hélio Oiticica

The exhibition’s inclusion of Spatial Construction no. 12 (c. 1920) by Aleksandr Rodchenko highlights the influence of Russian Constructivism on South American art. Similarly, images of Piet Mondrian’s works were widely circulated and had a great impact on the development of abstraction in the region. His Broadway Boogie Woogie (1942–43), on view in the exhibition, inspired investigations of kineticism among artists such as Jesús Rafael Soto, whose Double Transparency (1956) is an attempt to transform the two-dimensionality of Mondrian’s painting into a three-dimensional experience.

Lygia Pape (Brazilian, 1927–2004). Untitled. 1956. Acrylic on wood, 13 3/4 × 13 3/4 × 3 1/8″ (35 × 35 × 8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund in honor of Sharon Rockefeller. Courtesy of Projeto Lygia Pape

In the second section, “Modern as Abstract,” the language of abstraction is displayed as both a product of and a catalyst for the transformation of the artists’ surroundings. The geometrical principles of abstract painting carried over into the everyday, where artists and architects recognized one another as allies, leading to a shared operation and set of ideals. Here, María Freire’s Untitled (1954), for example, is displayed alongside archival materials and works from MoMA’s Architecture and Design collection, in an exploration of public sculptural projects and furniture design.

The final part of the exhibition is dedicated to the grid, one of modern art’s central motifs of experimentation. Gego’s Square Reticularea 71/6 (1971) and Hélio Oiticica’s Painting 9 (1959) are two examples of works in the exhibition that approached the transformation and expansion of the rational grid in different ways. Oiticica disrupted the strict geometric system with his rhythmically arranged rectangles, while Gego warps and deconstructs the reticular structure.

Over the last 25 years, the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros has donated more than 200 works by Latin American artists to The Museum of Modern Art. In addition to those generous donations, in 2016 the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros established the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America at MoMA. The Institute’s programming includes fellowships for scholars, curators and artists, and an extended research initiative that contributes to a series of public programs hosted by the Museum, as well as symposia in Latin America, and publications in digital and printed format.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, with contributions from such prominent scholars in the field as María Amalia García, Irene V. Small, and Mónica Amor. The volume also includes a conversation between Patricia Phelps de Cisneros and MoMA director Glenn D. Lowry, and a dialogue between Inés Katzenstein, the Museum’s current curator of Latin American art, and Luis Pérez-Oramas, who, in addition to serving as MoMA’s Latin American art curator between 2003 and 2017, was one of the principal curators involved in the development of the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.

SPONSORSHIP:

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by Agnes Gund.

Additional support is provided by Adriana Cisneros de Griffin and Nicholas Griffin.

Leadership contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund, in support of the Museum’s collection and collection exhibitions, are generously provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley, 3 Eva and Glenn Dubin, The Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund, Alice and Tom Tisch, The David Rockefeller Council, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Anne Dias, Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., Kenneth C. Griffin, The Keith Haring Foundation, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, and Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro.

Major contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund are provided by the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, Clarissa Alcock and Edgar Bronfman, Jr., Agnes Gund, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

Sterling Vineyards Celebrates The 71st Emmy Awards As The Official Wine Of The 2019 Emmy Awards Season

For the fourth consecutive year, iconic Napa Valley winery Sterling Vineyards, known for its ‘Always Polished, Never Dull‘ lifestyle, returns to television’s most anticipated night as the Official Wine of the 71st Emmy® Awards Season.

Following the live telecast of the 71st Emmy Awards on Sunday evening, September 22, 2019, Sterling Vineyards will invite Emmy nominees, presenters and members of the Television Academy to toast with their award-winning wines at the Television Academy’s official after-party, the Governors Ball. The evening will feature a taste of the 2015 Sterling Vineyards Platinum Cabernet Sauvignon, launched to retailers across the country last November. The Cabernet, among the finest from Napa Valley, is the winery’s newest expression of the depth, precision and intensity that is unique to the region, a testament to the craftsmanship of winemaker Harry Hansen and the winery’s tradition of producing outstanding, varietally focused wines. Chosen by the Television Academy Governors Ball Committee to showcase with the night’s menu from acclaimed Chef Joachim Splichal and Patina Catering, Sterling Vineyards Platinum Cabernet Sauvignon will be served alongside the 2017 Sterling Vineyards Napa Valley Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay and 2016 Sterling Vineyards Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, paired with dishes including Paella Valenciana, Yellowfin Sashimi, Candy Striped Beet Poke, and Hand-Carved Grass-fed Tenderloin of Beef.

(PRNewsfoto/Sterling Vineyards)

Sterling Vineyards will also gift a special limited-edition, personalized bottle of the 2015 Sterling Vineyards Iridium Cabernet Sauvignon to each Emmy Award winner as they await their Emmy statuette in the Governors Ball Winner’s Circle. 2015 is just the second vintage of the winery’s premier luxury Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, named appropriately for one of the rarest elements on earth. Made in only the very best vintages with the finest and most intense expression of Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, Iridium is the pinnacle of winemaking perfection. Emmy winners who enter the Winner’s Circle will have the exclusive chance to enjoy a glass of this special wine, as they are invited to raise a glass while their Emmy statuettes are personalized.

Sterling Vineyards is honored to share in the recognition of television excellence and outstanding creative talent, and we look forward to toasting this year’s Emmys winners with these exceptional wines,” shares Senior Vice President of Marketing at Treasury Wine Estates, Brett Scallan. “This year in particular, marks the end of some of television’s most esteemed series such as Game of Thrones, Empire, Veep, and The Big Bang Theory, making the evening even more special and giving us all the more reason to raise a glass in their honor.”

The 71st Emmy Awards will telecast live on FOX from the Microsoft Theater in downtown Los Angeles on Sunday, September 22, 8:00 PM ET/5:00 PM PT. The Governors Ball will take place at the adjacent L.A. LIVE Event Deck immediately following the telecast.

UGG Collective Launches For Autumn/Winter 2019

Brand Ushers In Seasonal Marketing Campaign With A Fresh Cast Including Musician H.E.R. And Entrepreneur Luka Sabbat

The iconic lifestyle brand continues to celebrate its uniqueness and elevated position by featuring personalities who highlight the diversity and spirit of UGG®.

Global lifestyle brand UGG® unveiled their sixth UGG® Collective global campaign for Autumn/Winter 2019, featuring a cast of real Californians including GRAMMY® Award-winning musician Gabi Wilson of H.E.R., plus entrepreneur and style influencer Luka Sabbat.

(PRNewsfoto/UGG)

From majestic mountains and wild woodlands to buzzing cities and quiet beach towns, California represents an eclectic paradise that brings together people from all across the world. For the brand’s new campaign, UGG® and the cast traveled across San Francisco finding breathtaking locations in the Presidio and historic Battery Chamberlain.

The UGG Collective consists of Californian musicians, actors, entrepreneurs, filmmakers, photographers and professional athletes. Like UGG®, they are bold, provocative, free-spirited, optimistic and real,” said Andrea O’Donnell, President, Fashion & Lifestyle Brands. “Each season, we select new groups of unique individuals to represent the brand. In telling their stories, we tell ours.”

This season the cast includes:

  • Gabi Wilson/H.E.R. dives into enigma to get listeners to focus on her sound rather than the person behind it. Writing and practicing music since the age of three, the California native’s soulful songs have garnered praise from the likes of Alicia Keys, Bryson Tiller, and Rihanna. Touted as one of R&B’s rising stars, she won her first GRAMMY Award in February 2019 and is part of a growing group of young creatives who are revising identity and art in the digital age.
  • Luka Sabbat does everything his own way. Growing up between New York and Paris with fashion-industry parents, he has an innate sense of style infused into everything he does—most notably, his self-made project “Hot Mess,” a collaborative collection of unapologetically raw photography, film, clothing, and furniture. Boldly unfiltered, he redefines what it means to be a young creative entrepreneur.
  • Crystal Moselle is intent on bringing more female perspectives to film, turning her lens on an all-girl cast in Skate Kitchen, which follows a group of unapologetically young, queer, and feminist skateboarders in NYC. Honest in her storytelling, Moselle’s tender curiosity allows her to create soft yet extraordinary moments on screen—uncovering beauty in pain, and truth in fiction.
  • Daniel Woods never cowers in the face of failure, embracing it as a ladder to greatness. Competitively climbing since age eight, he is currently at the top of his game, winning a gold medal at the IFSC World Cup in 2010 and dominating the American Boulder Series for the last decade. Passionate and daring, he pushes the limits of possibility on a daily basis.
  • Lola McDonnell is a free-spirited model whose wild heart and love for travel lead her to some of the world’s most beautiful places. Often accompanied by fiancé and fellow Collective member Zackery Michael, she leads an unconventional life of adventure.
  • Zackery Michael lives life on his own terms as a self-taught photographer who’s always on the road. From shooting fashion editorials in NYC and celebrities in L.A. to documenting the mountain tribes of Myanmar, his photography focuses on intimate shots of people and places, often featuring his girlfriend Lola McDonnell.

The brand campaign was shot by photographer Frederic Auerbach and produced by 3Star Productions. The cast was assembled by casting director Shay Nielsen, and came to life with the help of wardrobe stylist Kate Ruth, hair stylist Nikki Providence and makeup artist Dana Delaney. The locations were given flair and detail with the assistance of set designer Eli Metcalf.

GOAT and Bergdorf Goodman Partner on Exclusive Shopping Experience

The leading sneaker marketplace and the iconic 5th Avenue retailer link up to offer rare and highly coveted sneakers

GOAT, the global destination for authentic sneakers, has announced its partnership with iconic New York retailer, Bergdorf Goodman. The two brands will enter an exclusive partnership, which includes a curated shopping experience at Goodman’s Men’s Store on 5th Avenue.

Sneakers and athletic-driven sportswear have been a leading component of the designer and luxury menswear world, and we see this influence continuing to be very important,” said Bruce Pask, Men’s Fashion Director at Bergdorf Goodman. “GOAT is an innovator and leader in the resale space with an elevated aesthetic, peerless expertise, and a focus on customer experience and service, aspects that we absolutely share, making this a perfectly suited partnership and an exciting new experience that our customers can only find at BG.

Rare sneakers, like the Kanye West x Louis Vuitton Jasper, will be on display and for sale.

As part of the partnership, rare and highly coveted sneakers such as Chanel’s collaboration with Pharrell on the Adidas NMD Human Race Trail and the auto-lacing Air Mag ‘Back To The Future’ will be on display via a unique visual installation and available for purchase.

Founded in 2015 to bring trust and safety to sneaker reselling, the GOAT Group offers the greatest selection of sneakers ranging from general releases to rare exclusives. Through its managed marketplace model, authentication service and buyer protection, GOAT is the most trusted option in the industry.

Retail and resale are just at the beginning of their convergence, and as the global demand for streetwear increases, we will continue to see its influence in the luxury market,” said Daishin Sugano, co-founder and CPO of GOAT Group. “Collaborating with Bergdorf Goodman, the iconic luxury retailer, exemplifies the endless possibilities in the industry.”

The GOAT installation opens at Bergdorf Goodman’s Men’s Store (745 5th Ave, New York, NY 10151) on Wednesday, August 21, 2019, and will be open through New York Fashion Week Spring/Summer 2020 shows (September 6 – 11, 2019).

Coming Soon: Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe at Palm Springs Art Museum

Organized By Vitra Design Museum, The Exhibition Featuring More Than 700 Objects

Inspired By Folk Art And Pop Art, Girard Created A Bold, Colorful, And Charismatic Universe.

Alexander Girard (Born in May 24, 1907 in New York City, NY and died on December 31, 1993 in Santa Fe, New Mexico) was one of the most important and prolific designers of the 20th century. He created stunning interiors for restaurants, private homes, corporate offices, and even airplanes! He created textiles, typography, and tableware. He designed exhibitions, toys, and a whole city street in Columbus, Indiana. Inspired by folk art and pop art, Girard created a bold, colorful, charismatic universe. He warmed up modernism with his whimsical, optimistic patterns and designs.

The Palm Springs Art Museum (101 Museum Drive, Palm Springs, CA 92262, 760-322-4800) has announced the West Coast debut of Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe. This exhibition, organized by Vitra Design Museum, presents the colorful universe of Alexander Girard through more than 400 objects—textiles, drawings, furniture, graphics, film, and folk art—in a richly layered installation and accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. Exhibition visitors will experience one of his best-known interiors—that of the 1957 Miller House in Columbus, Indiana—through a full-scale replica of its iconic conversation pit, which will be a place for repose and public programs.

The show will be on view from November 23, 2019 through March 1, 2020.

Practicing from the late 1920s until the late 1970s, Girard worked mostly for the American furniture company Herman Miller after becoming director of its textile division in 1951. Girard’s clients also included companies like Braniff International Airways and John Deere for which he created fresh new corporate brand identities, which, in the case of Braniff, extended from the planes themselves to the flight crew uniforms and passenger lounges. In addition to Girard’s own designs, this exhibition presents the creative universe from which Girard took his inspiration: folk art from all over the world, which the designer collected throughout his life. A selection of 300 objects from his folk art collection, gifted by him to the International Folk Art Museum in Santa Fe, is also featured in the exhibition.

The Palm Springs Art Museum was founded in 1938 as the Palm Springs Desert Museum at La Plaza in downtown Palm Springs. Natural science exhibits, Cahuilla Indian artifacts, and hiking excursions dominated the institution’s programming.

The museum moved several times within the downtown Palm Springs area before building its first permanent structure in 1958, located on the southwest corner of Tahquitz-McCallum Way and Indian Ave. Over the years, fine art gained a greater measure of focus.

By the late 60’s it was evident the 10,000 square foot building was quickly becoming too small. In 1974, architect E. Stewart Williams was commissioned to design the current building for the museum. Further growth resulted in the construction of the Doris and Walter N. Marks Administration Building and the 1996 completion of the Steve Chase Wing and the Education Center.

Major renovations, and even bigger donations of art, transformed the institution, which also sharpened its programming with nationally significant exhibitions. In April 2004, the Board of Trustees decided to shift the museum’s focus from a multi-disciplinary museum to a world-class art museum with a vibrant theater program. In evaluating the current strengths and directions of the museum, it became clear that the art collections were growing and that the art audience was expanding – primarily in the areas of architecture, photography, and contemporary glass.

A study of the area’s other institutions also brought a realization that there were other established organizations providing exhibitions in the natural sciences. One year later, in April 2005, the museum officially changed its name from Palm Springs Desert Museum to Palm Springs Art Museum to reflect its emphasis on the visual and performing arts.

The museum remains committed to serving as an innovative community cultural center, and expanding its exhibitions, programs, and services in the visual and performing arts.

In 2012, the museum opened a satellite exhibition and education space in Palm Desert (Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert, 72-567 Highway 111, Palm Desert, CA 92260, 760-346-5600), which features an architecturally distinctive building named The Galen that presents ongoing and temporary exhibitions of internationally important art and is surrounded by the Faye Sarkowsky Sculpture Garden that features significant sculpture works surrounded by beautifully landscaped gardens.

In 2011, the museum purchased the Santa Fe Federal Savings & Loan building designed by E. Stewart Williams in 1960. Located in downtown Palm Springs, it was reopened as the Palm Springs Art Museum Architecture and Design Center, Edwards Harris Pavilion (300 S Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs, CA 92262, 760-423-5260) in 2014.

This hub of the museum’s exploration of architecture and design features related exhibitions and educational programs.

The collection also includes Frey House II, the historically significant residence in Palm Springs that architect Albert Frey designed for himself in 1963 and bequeathed to the museum upon his death in 1998.

Accredited by the American Association of Museums, the Palm Springs Art Museum has 28 galleries, two sculpture gardens, four classrooms, a resource centers, an artists center, five storage vaults, a 85-seat lecture hall, a 433-seat theater, a 1,000 square-foot store, and a popular local bistro.

A variety of educational programs and activities will take place in connection to the Palm Springs iteration; additionally, the museum’s annual gala and biggest fundraiser on January 26, 2020 will be Girard themed in décor and ambience to bring even greater attention to the exhibition.

Alexander Girard: A Designer’s Universe‘s global sponsors are Herman Miller and Maharam. Palm Springs Art Museum’s presentation is organized by Brooke Hodge, Director of Architecture and Design, with generous support from Joan & Gary Gand. Additional support is provided by Ellen Donaldson.