Hourglass Cosmetics Launches Empowering Lipstick Campaign, GIRL, With 90s Supermodel Jenny Shimizu

We live in a world of unprecedented reach; it’s a time when anyone can use their influence for good,” – Jenny Shimizu

Hourglass Cosmetics is proud to announce the launch of GIRL, a lipstick collection intended to help recognize the good in others and yourself. At the center of the campaign are 20 shades, from Protector to Activist, Innovator to Visionary, brought to life by model-turned-role-model Jenny Shimizu and the #GIRLFORGOOD social media campaign.

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Jenny Shimizu

Hourglass Cosmetics was founded in 2004 when beauty industry veteran Carisa Janes saw a void in the beauty market. Founded with a commitment to reinventing luxury cosmetics, Hourglass has carved a niche for itself as an innovative beauty brand.

Hourglass exists at the revolutionary intersection of science, beauty and luxury. The brand is acclaimed for its breakthrough formulations, technological innovations and unwavering commitment to reinvention. Complexion products are infused with the most groundbreaking active ingredients available to create unbelievably surreal skin. Distinguished by sensorial textures, modern color collections, and sleek custom packaging—Hourglass puts the art in state-of-the-art.Hourglass-Logo-New

Having launched at Barneys New York in 2004, Hourglass is now available at retailers worldwide including Bergdorf Goodman, Nordstrom, John Lewis, Lane Crawford, Blue Mercury, Harvey Nichols, Mecca, Net-A-Porter, Liberty, Space NK, Urban Retreat at Harrod’s, as well as Sephora stores in the US, Mexico, Brazil, Italy, Canada, Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand. For a list of authorized Hourglass retailers, please visit our online store locator.

Hourglass opened its flagship retail store in 2014, located on Abbot Kinney Blvd, in Venice, California. The 1400-square-foot space features sleek, modern design and sophisticated visuals. The store carries the full Hourglass line, features exclusive merchandise and offers full makeup services.

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The Hourglass Girl Lip Stylo Collection

90s supermodel Jenny Shimizu makes a return to modeling for the launch of GIRL. An iconic image transcends convention and resonates with meaning beyond its surface. No truer words describe the work of Jenny Shimizu. More than a decade after stepping in front of the camera lens, the supermodel, actress and media personality has shined whether dominating the catwalk, working in independent cinema or serving as a judge on the hit Bravo reality show, Make Me A Supermodel.

Born in San Jose, California in June 1967, Jenny grew up in Santa Maria, California and attended California State University, Northridge on a basketball scholarship. She later moved to Los Angeles to open a car garage. Soon after, Jenny was approached by a casting director while saddling her motorcycle outside an L.A. nightclub and introduced to Calvin and Kelly Klein. The designers were looking for a singular, androgynous face to represent their new fragrance, CK One. She landed her first fashion show for Calvin Klein at the Hollywood Bowl, followed by the pioneering black and white ad campaign. After came Banana Republic’s “American Beauty” campaign by Bruce Weber, which cast Jenny front and center on a Times Square billboard. From there, Jenny worked for such designers as Versace, Prada, Jean Paul Gaultier, Yohji Yamamoto, Donna Karan, Anna Sui, Thierry Mugler, Levi’s, J. Crew, The Gap, L.A. Eyeworks and the United Colors of Benetton. In addition, she also modeled in the world renowned Pirelli calendar and was featured in beauty campaigns for Clinique and Shiseido. Throughout the 90’s Jenny appeared in magazine editorials for Italian Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Glamour, Allure, Elle, Marie Clare, Italian Glamour, French Glamour and the cover of Australian Vogue. Jenny has shot with fashion’s most celebrated photographers including Richard Avedon, Bruce Weber, Irving Penn, Steven Meisel, Michael Thompson, Mario Sorrenti, Michel Comte, Mario Testino, Ellen Von Unwerth, Paolo Roversi, David LaChapelle, Sean Mortensen, Dusan Reljin and David Sims to name a few.

Likewise, her image is exhibited in museums and books all over the world. Exhibits include The Model as Muse (Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2009) and Catherine Opie: American Photographer, Retrospective (Guggenheim Museum, 2008); as well as a permanent exhibit at the Pirelli Museum. Books include Any Objections? by Mario Testino; Couples by Ellen Von Unwerth; The Art of Makeup by Kevyn Aucoin; Fifty Years of Fashion: New Look to Now by Valerie Steele; and The House of Klein: Fashion, Controversy and Business Obsession by Lisa Marsh.

In 1993 Jenny became personally involved with Madonna, after making a cameo in the music video “Rain” (1993). Then came Foxfire (1996), Jenny’s first feature film and leading role, cast opposite of former love, Angelina Jolie. Despite the flood of gossip she received, Jenny has never been shy or apologetic of her high profile relationships. While in her early 20’s Todd Hughes cast Jenny in the madcap, John Waters-esque murder mystery Ding Dong (1995) and in the early 2000’s the two reunited in The New Women (2001). Jenny’s recent works includes the award-winning feature film, Itty Bitty Titty Committee (2007) directed by Jamie Babbitt; two short films, Four Steps (2009) and Tools 4 Fools (2009); and the feature film, Bob’s New Suit (2009). Continue reading

The Whitney Museum of American Art To Present Two-Floor Exhibition In Celebration Of The Portrait

Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection Complete The Reinstallation Of The Whitney’s Collection In Its New Building

The Selfie, often seen as the height of narcissism in what is essentially an increasingly narcissistic world, is the modern version of what has long been a celebrated art form throughout history: The Portrait. Portraits are one of the richest veins of the Whitney’s collection, thanks to the Museum’s longstanding commitment to the figurative tradition, championed by its founder Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney.

The mysterious power and fascination of the portrait—and the ingenious ways in which artists have been expanding the definition of portraiture over the past 100 years—are celebrated in Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection, to be presented at the Whitney Museum of American Art this spring. The works included in this exhibition propose diverse and often unconventional ways of representing an individual. Many artists reconsider the pursuit of external likeness—portraiture’s usual objective—within formal or conceptual explorations or reject it altogether. Some revel in the genre’s glamour and allure, while others critique its elitist associations and instead call attention to the banal or even the grotesque.

Drawn entirely from the Museum’s collection, the exhibition features more than 300 works made from 1900 to 2016 by an extraordinary range of more than 200 artists, roughly half of whom are living. The show will be organized in twelve thematic sections on two floors of the Museum, with works in all media installed side by side. Floor Six, predominantly focused on art since 1960, opens first, on April 6; Floor Seven, which includes works from the first half of the twentieth century alongside more contemporary offerings, will open on April 27. The exhibition will remain on view through February 12, 2017.

Once a rarified luxury good, portraits are now ubiquitous. Readily reproducible and ever-more accessible, photography has played a particularly vital role in the democratization of portraiture, and will be strongly represented in the exhibition. Most recently, the proliferation of smartphones and the rise of social media have unleashed an unprecedented stream of portraits in the form of selfies and other online posts. Many contemporary artists confront this situation, stressing the fluidity of identity in a world where technology and the mass-media are omnipresent. Through their varied takes on the portrait, the artists in Human Interest: Portraits from the Whitney’s Collection demonstrate the vitality of this enduring genre, which serves as a compelling lens through which to view some of the most important social and artistic developments of the past century.

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Barkley L. Hendricks (b. 1945). Steve, (1976). Oil, acrylic, and Magna on linen canvas, 72 × 48in. (182.9 × 121.9 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase and gift with funds from the Arthur M. Bullowa Bequest by exchange, the Jack E. Chachkes Endowed Purchase Fund, and the Wilfred P. and Rose J. Cohen Purchase Fund 2015.101. Image Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, NY.

Many iconic works from the collection will be included by such artists as Alexander Calder, Marsden Hartley, Edward Hopper, Jasper Johns, Alice Neel, Georgia O’Keeffe, Cindy Sherman, and Andy Warhol. In addition, a number of major new acquisitions will be exhibited at the Whitney for the first time, including Barkley L. Hendricks’s full-length 1976 portrait, Steve; Urs Fischer’s 2015 towering candle sculpture of Julian Schnabel (making its debut); Joan Semmel’s painting of two nude lovers, Touch (1977); Henry Taylor’s depiction of Black Panther leader Huey Newton (2007); Deana Lawson’s striking color photograph The Garden (2015); and Rosalyn Drexler’s Pop masterwork Marilyn Pursued by Death (1963). The exhibition will extend to the Museum’s outdoor galleries on Floors Seven and Six, the latter of which will feature Paul McCarthy’s monumental bronze sculpture White Snow #3 (2012), also a new acquisition.

Following is a selection of several of the sections in which the exhibition will be divided:

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST

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Edward Hopper (1882‑1967). (Self‑Portrait), (1925‑1930). Oil on canvas, Overall: 25 3/8 × 20 3/8in. (64.5 × 51.8 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Josephine N. Hopper Bequest 70.1165. © Heirs of Josephine N. Hopper, licensed by Whitney Museum of American Art

On the seventh floor, the section “Portrait of the Artist” brings together self-portraits with portraits of artists and other members of the creative community, a moving window into the way artists see themselves and their relationships with one another. On view will be Edward Hopper’s iconic self-portrait in oil in a brown hat, as well as a pair of drawings by Hopper and Guy Pène du Bois, each depicting the other and made during a single sitting. Other works depict artists with the tools of their trade—Ilse Bing is seen in a photograph holding the shutter release of her camera; Mabel Dwight uses a mirror as an aid in drawing herself; Andreas Feininger photographs himself regarding a strip of film through a magnifying glass. Other works in this section include Cy Twombly photographed by Robert Rauschenberg; Jasper Johns by Richard Avedon; Georgia O’Keeffe drawn by Peggy Bacon; Edgard Varèse sculpted in wire by Alexander Calder; Langston Hughes photographed by Roy DeCarava; Berenice Abbott by Walker Evans; Yasuo Kuniyoshi by Arnold Newman; and a double portrait of Joseph Stella and Marcel Duchamp taken by Man Ray.

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Rachel Harrison (b. 1966). Untitled, (2011). Colored pencil on paper, Sheet: 19 × 24in. (48.3 × 61 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Drawing Committee 2012.81. © Rachel Harrison

EARLY TWENTIETH CENTURY CELEBRITY AND SPECTACLE

In the early decades of the twentieth century, a spectrum of new, popular leisure pursuits—vaudeville, theater, cabaret, sporting events, and above all, motion pictures—thrust performers and entertainers into the public eye as never before. For the crowds that flocked to see them, the stars of these entertainments became larger-than-life figures, and an array of media outlets, from tabloid newspapers to glossy magazines to radio, sprang up to broadcast their exploits to captivated audiences across the nation. Artists eagerly delved into these new phenomena, creating portraits that stoked the public’s growing fascination with celebrities. At the turn of the century, painters such as Howard Cushing and Everett Shinn investigated the changing terms of fame and glamour as flashy public spectacles eclipsed Gilded Age refinement. Following World War I many artists joined in the commercial opportunities offered by the booming entertainment industry—particularly photographers, whose easily reproducible images carried a special air of authenticity. Foremost among them, Edward Steichen pioneered the aesthetic of the “closeup” in his stylish magazine portraits of movie stars and other luminaries, such as Marlene Dietrich, Dolores Del Rio, and Paul Robeson. Other photographers such as James Van Der Zee, Toyo Miyatake, and Carl Van Vechten called attention to vanguard performers whose race or ethnicity placed them outside the mainstream, challenging the sanitized imperatives of popular culture.

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Toyo Miyatake (1895‑1979). Michio Ito, (1929). Gelatin silver print, Sheet: 14 × 10 7/8in. (35.6 × 27.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Photography Committee 2014.241. © Toyo Miyatake Studio

STREET LIFE

Under the rubric of “Street Life” the exhibition presents artists who took to the pavement with their cameras, photographing subjects as they encountered them, sometimes surreptitiously. These images, which often capture fleeting, serendipitous moments, present a counterpoint to the premeditated, sedentary sitter of historical portraits. At the turn of the last century it became clear that the camera could become an apparatus for the indictment of a society’s ills and a group of socially aware photographers became activists in addition to observers of the urban environment. An early work in the exhibition, Lewis Hine’s Newsies at Skeeters Branch, St. Louis, Missouri (c. 1910), exemplifies this type of politically motivated street photography. Other works documenting the spectacle of urban life include Walker Evans’s subway photographs; Helen Levitt’s images taken on the streets of Yorktown and Spanish Harlem; and examples from Garry Winogrand’s Women Are Beautiful portfolio. Artists featured in this section also include Diane Arbus, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, and Nan Goldin. The tradition of street photography is carried through to more recent works by Dawoud Bey and Philip-Lorca di Corcia.

PORTRAITS WITHOUT PEOPLE

Is likeness essential to portraiture? The works in this section, spanning the past one hundred years, ask this question as they pursue alternate means for capturing an individual’s personality, values, and experiences. Often, the presence of the individual or his or her character is implied through objects and symbols that resonate with hidden meaning. Gerald Murphy’s Cocktail (1927), a bold, Jazz Age still life suggests a uniquely autobiographical approach: the accoutrements of a typical 1920s bar tray were based on Murphy’s memory of his father’s bar accessories and the cigar box cover shows a robed woman surrounded by items that allude to Murphy himself, including a boat (he was an avid sailor) and an artist’s palette. Marsden Hartley’s Painting, Number 5 (1914–15), a portrait of Karl von Freyburg, uses German imperial military regalia to stand in for the presence of the officer with whom the artist had fallen in love. In Summer Days (1936), Georgia O’Keeffe adopted the animal skull and vibrant desert wildflowers as surrogates for herself, symbols of the cycles of life and death that shape the desert world she made her home. Jasper Johns’s portrait of a Savarin coffee can full of brushes stands for Johns himself; and James Welling’s portrait of Philip Johnson’s Glass House in New Canaan, CT, may be viewed as a sort of portrait of the famous architect. In a number of works in this section, body parts or personal possessions may allude to the subject, such as Jay DeFeo’s teeth; Alfred Stieglitz’s hat; and Ed Ruscha’s shoes. Forgoing likeness in favor of allusion and enigma, these artists expand the possibilities of the portrait, while also acknowledging that the quest to depict others—and even ourselves—is elusive. Continue reading

Thirteen’s American Masters Celebrates 30 Years of Excellence in Documentary Filmmaking in 2016

Thirteen‘s American Masters has announced the preliminary lineup for its 30th anniversary season on PBS featuring Mike Nichols, B.B. King, Carole King, Fats Domino, Loretta Lynn, Janis Joplin, The Highwaymen, Norman Lear and Maya Angelou. American Masters, THIRTEEN’s award-winning biography series, celebrates our arts and culture. Awards include 70 Emmy nominations and 28 awards — 10 for Outstanding Non-Fiction Series since 1999 and five for Outstanding Non-Fiction Special — 12 Peabody Awards; three Grammys; an Oscar; two Producers Guild Awards for Outstanding Producer of Non-Fiction Television; and the 2012 IDA Award for Best Continuing Series.

"American Masters," THIRTEEN's award-winning biography series, explores the lives and creative journeys of America's most enduring artistic and cultural giants. With insight and originality, the series illuminates the extraordinary mosaic of our nation's landscape, heritage and traditions. Watch full episodes and more at http://pbs.org/americanmasters. (PRNewsFoto/WNET)

“American Masters,” THIRTEEN’s award-winning biography series, explores the lives and creative journeys of America’s most enduring artistic and cultural giants. With insight and originality, the series illuminates the extraordinary mosaic of our nation’s landscape, heritage and traditions. Watch full episodes and more at http://pbs.org/americanmasters. (PRNewsFoto/WNET)

Launched in 1986, the series is the gold standard for documentary film profiles, accruing widespread critical acclaim. This prolific series has produced an exceptional library*, bringing unique originality and perspective to illuminate the creative journeys of our most enduring writers, musicians, visual and performing artists, dramatists, filmmakers and those who have left an indelible impression on our cultural landscape. Balancing a broad and diverse cast of characters and artistic approaches, while preserving historical authenticity and intellectual integrity, these portraits reveal the style and substance of each subject.AboutSeries

The series’ individually crafted films reflect the specific attention deserved by American Masters subjects, including such great talents as Arthur Miller (the series’ first subject), Georgia O’Keeffe, James Baldwin, Diego Rivera, Martha Graham, F. Scott Fitzgerald, I.M. Pei, Leonard Bernstein, Sidney Poitier, Judy Garland, John James Audubon, Bob Dylan, Andy Warhol, Johnny Carson, Zora Neale Hurston, Albert Einstein, Rod Serling, Bill T. Jones, Lucille Ball, Paul Simon, Richard Avedon, John Cassavetes, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Gehry, Woody Guthrie, Jimi Hendrix, Edward Curtis, Julia Child, Walter Cronkite, Woody Allen, and Billie Jean King, as well as influential cultural institutions and eras such as the Actor’s Studio, the Algonquin Round Table, the Negro Ensemble Company, the Juilliard School, 60 Minutes, the Joffrey Ballet, and a century of Chinese American cinematic history in Hollywood Chinese.

Fascinating in their individuality as well as in the whole, American Masters has become a cultural legacy in its own right, producing and presenting the extraordinary mosaic of our creative heritage and broadening viewer appreciation of our nation’s traditions and character. An artist’s work can capture, reflect and even shape a society’s experience. Without art, we would lack an identity, a soul and a voice. American Masters exists to give life to that voice.

For this celebratory 30th anniversary season, the offerings are no less fascinating. The season opens with Mike Nichols and concludes with Maya Angelou. How can it get any better than that?

Mike Nichols: American MastersMike-Nichols_end-frame_KEY-ART-FINAL

Season 30 premiere: Friday, January 29 at 9 p.m. Meet one of America’s late, great directors Mike Nichols (The Graduate, Angels in America), who discusses his life and 50-year artistic career, from the comedy duo Nichols and May to his final film, Charlie Wilson’s War. Winner of an Oscar, a Grammy, four Emmys, nine Tonys, three BAFTAs and many other awards, director, actor, writer, producer and comedian Mike Nichols (November 6, 1931 – November 19, 2014) was an artistic trailblazer. As the legendary comedy duo Nichols and May, Nichols and his partner Elaine May revolutionized comedy in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Now, May has directed the first documentary about her former partner, Mike Nichols: American Masters, premiering Friday, January 29, 2016, at 9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings) to launch the 30th anniversary season of THIRTEEN’s American Masters series.

With charm and wit, Nichols discusses his life and 50-year career as a performer and director. Mike Nichols: American Masters features new interviews with his friends and colleagues, including Meryl Streep, Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks, Dustin Hoffman, Alec Baldwin, Paul Simon, Matthew Broderick, Nathan Lane, Bob Balaban, Tony Kushner, Neil Simon, Frank Langella, James L. Brooks and many others, conducted by film, TV and theater producer Julian Schlossberg (Bullets Over Broadway, American Masters — Nichols & May: Take Two, American Masters: The Lives of Lillian Hellman). Schlossberg also conducted an exclusive interview with Nichols for the film. The documentary features insights and highlights from Nichols’ acclaimed films, including The Graduate, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Catch 22, Silkwood, Biloxi Blues, Working Girl, Angels In America and Charlie Wilson’s War, as well as his theatrical productions Barefoot in the Park, Luv and The Odd Couple. Directed by Elaine May. Produced by Julian Schlossberg.

American Masters: B.B. King: The Life of Riley

Photo Credit: B.B. King performs on stage at the Royal Albert Hall. Photo: Kevin Nixon

Photo Credit: B.B. King performs on stage at the Royal Albert Hall. Photo: Kevin Nixon

Friday, February 12 at 9 p.m. in honor of Black History Month. Explore B.B. King’s challenging life and career through candid interviews with the “King of the Blues” filmed shortly before his death and fellow music stars, including Bono, Bonnie Raitt, Carlos Santana, Eric Clapton, John Mayer, and Ringo Starr, and more.

American Masters — Carole King: Natural Woman

Carole King. Photo: Joseph Sinnott / ©2015 THIRTEEN PRODUCTIONS LLC. All rights reserved.

Carole King. Photo: Joseph Sinnott / ©2015 THIRTEEN PRODUCTIONS LLC. All rights reserved.

Friday, February 19 at 9 p.m. Delve into the hit singer-songwriter’s life and career from 1960s New York to the music mecca of 70s LA to the present. Carole King joins collaborators and family in new interviews, while rare home movies, performances and photos complete the tapestry. The year 2016 marks the 45th anniversary of King’s landmark, four-time Grammy-winning album Tapestry, which was released February 10, 1971.

American Masters: Fats Domino and the Birth of Rock ‘n’ Roll

Singer-songwriter Fats Domino (b. Feb. 26, 1928), 1970. Photo: Getty Images.

Singer-songwriter Fats Domino (b. Feb. 26, 1928), 1970. Photo: Getty Images.

Friday, February 26 at 10 p.m. in honor of Black History Month and Fats Domino’s birthday. Discover how Fats Domino’s brand of New Orleans rhythm and blues became rock ‘n’ roll. As popular in the 1950s as Elvis Presley, Domino suffered degradations in the pre-Civil Rights South and aided integration through his influential music.

American Masters — Loretta Lynn: Still a Mountain Girl

Loretta Lynn. Photo: David McClister

Loretta Lynn. Photo: David McClister

Friday, March 4 at 9 p.m. in honor of Women’s History Month. Explore the country legend’s hard-fought road to stardom. From her Appalachian roots to the Oscar-winning biopic of her life, Coal Miner’s Daughter, Loretta Lynn struggled to balance family and her music career and is still going strong after more than 50 years. The documentary premieres the same day Lynn’s first new studio album in over 10 years, Full Circle (Legacy Recordings), is released. Continue reading

Jacqueline de Ribes: The Essence of True Glamour and Style at The Met’s Costume Institute

Style is what makes you different; it’s your own stamp, a message about yourself.” – Countess Jacqueline de Ribes.

The Costume Institute’s Fall 2015 exhibition, Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style, focuses on the internationally renowned style icon Countess Jacqueline de Ribes, whose originality and elegance established her as one of the most celebrated fashion personas of the 20th century.

Jacqueline de Ribes in Christian Dior, 1959 Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Roloff Beny, Roloff Beny Estate

Jacqueline de Ribes in Christian Dior, 1959. Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Roloff Beny, Roloff Beny Estate

A close study of de Ribes’s life of creative expression yields illuminating insights into her strategies of style,” said Harold Koda, Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, who organized the exhibition. “Her approach to dress as a statement of individuality can be seen as a kind of performance art. When she established her own fashion house, her friend Yves Saint Laurent gave his blessing to the venture as a welcome projection of her elegance.”

The press preview for Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style, was a somber affair. The guest of honor and the exhibition’s subject, Countess Jacqueline de Ribes, was not in attendance for obvious reasons. The Costume Institute released the following statement:

Following the tragic events in Paris, Jacqueline de Ribes has canceled her trip to New York for the opening of Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her thoughts and prayers are with the victims and their families. She would like to express her gratitude to all her friends at the Met with whom she has collaborated for so many months, and hopes that they will understand her decision.

Comtesse de Ribes also knows how much Americans share the deep sadness felt in France, which confirms the enduring bond between the two countries. She hopes the exhibition will represent the joy associated with the freedom of creation.

Jacqueline de Ribes in her own design, 1983 Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Victor Skrebneski, Skrebneski Photograph © 1983

Jacqueline de Ribes in her own design, 1983
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Victor Skrebneski, Skrebneski
Photograph © 1983

As reported by Vanessa Friedman of The New York Times, the planned dinner on Wednesday, hosted by the House of Dior, in honor of the exhibition was downgraded to a cocktail reception in business dress.

While I was looking forward to seeing the Countess in person (having read so much about her in magazines and newspapers since the early 1980’s), I must also say that, even without her there, the exhibition fully represented her far-reaching talents, self-assuredness and strong belief in her own sense of what works for her and how her public life (and charitable works) changed the world around her. In a time when “style icons” are anointed based on the work of their Svengali-like stylists who tell them what to wear (usually obscenely expensive designer dresses borrowed for the night, including the jewelery AND the shoes), where to wear them (most often than not to red-carpet events) and how to wear them, the Countess is the REAL DEAL. Most everyone else is a pale imitation.

Jacqueline de Ribes, 1955 Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Richard Avedon, ©The Richard Avedon Foundation

Jacqueline de Ribes, 1955, Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Richard Avedon,
©The Richard Avedon Foundation

Elegance. It’s an attitude. A frame of mind. An intuition, a refusal, a rigor, a research, a knowledge. The attitude of elegance is also a way of behaving.

Countess Jacqueline de Ribes (born 1929 in Paris to aristocratic parents) is seen by many as the ultimate personification of Parisian elegance. She was, with the American and Italian beauties Gloria Vanderbilt and Marella Agnelli, among the small flock of “Swans” photographed by Richard Avedon and written about by Truman Capote in 1959.

Married at age 19 to the late Édouard, Vicomte de Ribes (he became the Count de Ribes upon the death of his father in 1981), the traditions of her in-laws precluded her from becoming a career woman. However, as an independent spirit, she channeled her creativity into a series of ventures linked by fashion, theater, and style. In 1956, de Ribes was nominated for Eleanor Lambert’s Best-Dressed List. At the time, she had only a handful of couture dresses, as most of her wardrobe was comprised of her own designs, which she made herself or with a dressmaker. Four more nominations followed, and resulted in her induction into the International Best-Dressed List Hall of Fame in 1962.

Jacqueline de Ribes in her own design, 1986 Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Francesco Scavullo, The Francesco Scavullo Foundation and The Estate of Francesco Scavullo

Jacqueline de Ribes in her own design, 1986
Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photograph by Francesco
Scavullo, The Francesco Scavullo Foundation and The Estate of Francesco
Scavullo

When I was a small child, there were two women I admired. One was a friend of my mother’s who was an ambassadress. The other was Coco Chanel. It seems I always wanted to be a designer.”

Photographed by the world’s leading talents including Slim Aarons, Richard Avedon, David Bailey, Cecil Beaton, Robert Doisneau, Horst, Jean Baptiste Mondino, Irving Penn, Francesco Scavullo, Victor Skrebneski, and Juergen Teller, her image came to define an effortless elegance and a sophisticated glamour, something you cannot say about so many of the women today that defines the term, “modern style icons.” As Carolina Herrera recently remarked in a newspaper interview (and I am paraphrasing here), “How can someone be a style icon when they are not wearing any clothes?” in reference to the trio of music and Hollywood stars who attended the recent Met Ball in “dresses” that left almost nothing to the imagination. And Mrs. Herrera is right. If you want to see what a TRUE style icon is, run, don’t walk, to The Met to see Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style.

You must remember that you’re never going to be sexy for everyone. You are sexy for someone and for someone else you are not. Being totally nude is not sexy. The art of being sexy is to suggest. To let people have fantasy.”

Gallery View, Evening Wear © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Gallery View, Evening Wear
© The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The thematic exhibition features approximately 60 ensembles of haute couture and ready-to-wear primarily from de Ribes’s personal archive, dating from 1962 to the present. Also included are her creations for fancy dress balls, which she often made by cutting up and cannibalizing her haute couture gowns to create unexpected, thematic, and conceptually nuanced expressions of her aesthetic. These, along with photographs, video, and ephemera, tell the story of how her interest in fashion developed over decades, from childhood “dress-up” to the epitome of international style.

A muse to haute couture designers, they placed at her disposal their drapers, cutters, and fitters in acknowledgment of their esteem for her taste and originality. Ultimately, she used this talent and experience to create her own successful design business, which she directed from 1982 to 1995.

Gallery View, Evening Wear © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Gallery View, Evening Wear
© The Metropolitan Museum of Art

My mirror, my only truthful advisor.”

While the exhibition explores her taste and style methodology, extensive documentation from her personal archives illustrates the range and depth of her professional life, including her roles as theatrical impresario, television producer, interior designer, and director and organizer of international charity events. Continue reading

Iconic Stylist John Barrett Opens New Salon In New York City At 54 Bond Street

New Downtown Location Is The First Of John Barrett’s Manhattan Expansion

New Salon Opening Coincides with Announcement of Notable Collaborations with Esteemed Beauty Professionals

The opening of our Bond Street salon defines the moment our uptown heritage fuses with the cultural vibrancy of downtown. It perfectly captures our vision for the future of John Barrett.”John Barrett, Founder and Creative Director, John Barrett Holdings, LLC.

John Barrett has officially opened the doors to his new downtown Manhattan destination at 54 Bond Street in the historic NoHo (North of Houston Street) district. The debut of John Barrett Bond Street marks the beginning of a new era for the brand that will ultimately define the future of the modern luxury salon experience.

John Barrett (Photo: www.palmbeachdailynews.com)

John Barrett (Photo: http://www.palmbeachdailynews.com)

John Barrett is widely well-regarded within the industry for providing the ultimate luxury salon experience, with the highest standards for excellence in artistry and service. The debut of the new salon expands upon this foundation, with the infusion of fresh, inspired artistic talent, innovation in hair, spa, and nail services, as well as a tightly edited selection of the most coveted and inventive beauty products. The salon will also feature exclusive collaborations and a curated selection of luxury merchandise suited to the Bond Street clientele.

The Bond Street salon is an architectural masterpiece, with a rich, storied history set in Manhattan’s cultural epicenter of art, fashion and design,” says Jim Hedges, CEO of John Barrett Holdings LLC. “It so appropriately captures the emerging vision for our brand, leading us into the next chapter of growth that will elevate the standard in the luxury salon category.”

Bond Street Salon Design

The former site of the Bouwerie Lane Theater, the landmark building was once home to world-renowned painters, composers, screen sirens, musicians, and artists such as Lauren Hutton, Jane Russell, Pearl Bailey, Brice Marden and Helen Hays.

Designed by notable architect Daniel Romualdez, the new 2,200 square feet salon is modern, plush, and luxuriously appointed. The stylish space retains its original architectural splendor with a nod to its historical significance, modernized with a blend of opulent materials found throughout the two-story space. Here you’ll find brushed pewter, custom-chrome finishes flanked with sleek mirrors, glossy black wood trim, and a punch of color from the brand’s signature terrazzo lavender floors. Hand-oiled, smoke stained oak floors with a smooth, satiny finish are mixed into the flooring design as well, in both the color and treatment rooms.

Exterior shot of John Barrett Bond Street

Exterior shot of John Barrett Bond Street (Photo: http://www.johnbarrett.com

The sunbathed salon features a main floor with ten stations for cut and style and a ground level punctuated with eleven color stations and three manicure and pedicure stations. Dual wash areas are accented with silver-stroked ceilings and a glowing light cove for balanced illumination. Changing and rest areas feel posh and intimate.

The atelier-like environment is part salon, part boutique and part exhibition space, offering clients a spectacular array of exclusive merchandise and art, housed within custom glass and polished chrome vitrines scattered throughout the space. Tom Ford Beauty is the featured color cosmetic brand and is used exclusively by the resident makeup artists for makeup applications and lessons. A full styling station is tucked away on the main floor for brow and lash services.Tom-Ford-Beauty

We are creating a 360-degree experience to deliver new and innovative services, spa treatment protocols, and technologies that haven’t been available before,” says Hedges. “The salon will be a place of discovery and engagement, enabling us to expand into different luxury categories, and reinvent the salon experience beyond anything that currently exists.”

The new salon is one of many John Barrett locations planned to open across the country in the coming year. “Demand for our services continues to increase each successive year, so this comes at the perfect time,” says Barrett. “Nothing excites me more than spreading the magic we have created at the flagship over the years and embracing the downtown style and vitality of Bond Street. It is this energy that will fuel the next phase of our expansion in New York and across the country.

John Barrett Bond Street Notable Collaborations

John Barrett Launches First Tammy Fender Spa in New York City

John Barrett has formed a partnership with renowned Palm Beach-based holistic skincare authority Tammy Fender, bringing her legendary spa treatments to the Bond Street salon in New York City – the only location outside Palm Beach where her coveted spa treatments can be found. The treatments will be administered by aestheticians selected and trained by Fender in the custom-designed spa treatment rooms located on the mezzanine level.

I am absolutely delighted to be working with the legendary John Barrett for the official national launch of our custom treatment services,” says Tammy. “This partnership will bring our years of expertise to an even greater audience with a brand that so perfectly mirrors our own passion for quality and unparalleled client experience.”

The Gallery at John Barrett, 54 Bond

John Barrett has collaborated with art collector’s initiative, Circa 1881, to curate a custom gallery for the Bond Street location, featuring fashion photography from Bruce Weber, Helmut Newton, Steven Meisel, Steven Klein, Richard Avedon, Chuck Close and Andy Warhol. The sweeping floor-to-ceiling gallery wall features rare images of Madonna, Cindy Crawford, Kate Moss and Johnny Depp, among others. All works are available for sale.

John Barrett Partners with Assouline to Curate Bond Street Library

For the first time in its history, luxury book publisher Assouline joined forces with a salon to curate a library of selected titles in fashion, art, photography, travel, design and culture, to be featured on the salon’s main floor.

John Barrett Introduces “The Nail Room” at Bond Street in Collaboration with Nail Industry Visionary, Tracylee Percival

John Barrett sought out Tracylee Percival, the new Director of Manicure Services and Education, to design and develop an unprecedented nail program. “The Nail Room” is a new and transformative concept in the nail realm, one that is in line with John Barrett’s reputation for innovation and creativity. Continue reading

Jessica Stam Embodies Modern Hollywood Glam In Blackglama’s 2015 Campaign

Blackglama Fall 2015 (PRNewsFoto/Blackglama 2015)

Blackglama Fall 2015 featuring model Jessica Stam. (PRNewsFoto/Blackglama 2015)

Blackglama has unveiled its newest advertising campaign, which continues to evolve the brand’s focus into fashion from celebrities. For over 40 years, Blackglama has been world-renowned for providing the finest, most luxurious and exclusive ranch-raised natural black mink. Blackglama mink is distributed exclusively through American Legend Cooperative, based in Seattle, Washington, and sought after by manufacturers, retailers, and consumers globally. All Blackglama mink comes from Origin Assured™ farms.

Blackglama Logo.  (PRNewsFoto/Blackglama)

Blackglama Logo. (PRNewsFoto/Blackglama)

Each Blackglama pelt is hand selected and inspected by American Legend Cooperative’s experienced graders. To qualify as Blackglama, the pelt must be free of any imperfections on both the fur and leather. With such high criteria, less than 2% of the world’s mink population earns the exclusive Blackglama name and can bear the coveted Blackglama label. Blackglama garments also carry a label displaying a unique serial number, providing permanent identification, as well as other security features that ensure that the label is genuine—not an imitation.

1968 represented a turning point in world events and a shift in American culture. To the members of the Great Lakes Mink Association (GLMA), these turbulent times seemed a world away. Working long hours on farms throughout the upper Midwestern United States, they were busy improving and producing the world’s finest dark mink. Little did they know that their work would form the basis of a revolutionary new marketing campaign.

The GLMA ranchers hired a small New York ad agency to create awareness for the high-quality fur being produced by the farmers. Popular copywriter Jane Trahey suggested creating the brand name BLACKGLAMA. How does one advertise something as special as the dark Blackglama mink? The luster and quality of the fur doesn’t show up in a photograph, so Jane thought up a “gimmick.”

The “gimmick” was to associate Blackglama with the glamour of universally recognized and admired people. The result was brilliantly simple: a black-and-white photograph of a well-known woman wearing a Blackglama mink coat shot against a seamless grey backdrop.

The world took notice. Famous names like Judy Garland, Bette Davis, Barbra Streisand and Lauren Bacall were featured in the first year of the campaign alone, photographed by the renowned Richard Avedon. What brought it all together was the straightforward and now unforgettable tagline, “What Becomes A Legend Most?” The effect was powerful and immediate. Within two years, Blackglama was considered the most prestigious ranch black mink in the world. The campaign continued through 1994.

Blackgama 1986 - Cher

Blackgama 1986 – Cher

Since the campaign’s inception four decades ago, Blackglama has featured some of the world’s most acclaimed entertainers, including Sophia Loren, Diana Ross, Audrey Hepburn, Lauren Bacall, Marlene Dietrich, Elizabeth Taylor, Lena Horne, Liza Minnelli and Janet Jackson. Beginning with the 2013 Carolyn Murphy campaign, Blackglama shifted away from entertainers toward models to highlight Blackglama’s fashion aesthetic.

Since 2001, the campaign has featured such supermodels as Linda Evangelista, Gisele Bündchen, Cindy Crawford, Elle Macpherson, Naomi Campbell and Elizabeth Hurley. Beginning with the 2013 Carolyn Murphy campaign, Blackglama shifted away from entertainers toward models to highlight Blackglama’s fashion aesthetic. Into the new millennium, the brand is expanding beyond dark mink to include other products that reflect the “Legendary” qualities of Blackglama.

This year, model Jessica Stam is featured in a campaign conceived by New York-based advertising and branding agency Laspata DeCaro. “In these stunning shots, Jessica represents a reinvention of Hollywood glamour that feels both timeless and relevant,” says Joe Morelli, CEO of Blackglama.

In the new campaign, the platinum blonde and crimson-lipped model is captured in a series of cinematic vignettes photographed by Rocco Laspata on location in Los Angeles. Settings include a majestic palm-lined street in Beverly Hills, a dramatic villa in Malibu overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and an alluring 1930’s supper club that references Hollywood’s golden age. Swathed in Blackglama’s 2015 collection – co-designed by Laspata DeCaro‘s Creative Director, Charles DeCaro, to align with the campaign’s visual narrative – Jessica embodies a modern-day screen goddess. The results are the very epitome of glamour.

Blackgama Fall 2014 - Hilary Rhoda  (http://www.blackglama.com/inside-blackglama/the-campaigns/)

Blackgama Fall 2014 – Hilary Rhoda (http://www.blackglama.com/inside-blackglama/the-campaigns/)

Continue reading

Costume Institute’s Fall Exhibition to Focus on Fashion Icon Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style

The Costume Institute’s Fall 2015 exhibition, Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style, will focus on the internationally renowned style icon Countess Jacqueline de Ribes, whose originality and elegance established her as one of the most celebrated fashion personas of the 20th century. The exhibition will be on view in The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Anna Wintour Costume Center from November 19, 2015 through February 21, 2016.  

A close study of de Ribes’s life of creative expression yields illuminating insights into her strategies of style,” said Harold Koda, Curator in Charge of The Costume Institute, who is organizing the exhibition. “Her approach to dress as a statement of individuality can be seen as a kind of performance art. When she established her own fashion house, her friend Yves Saint Laurent gave his blessing to the venture as a welcome projection of her elegance.”

Countess Jacqueline de Ribes (born 1929 in Paris to aristocratic parents) is seen by many as the ultimate personification of Parisian elegance. She was, with the American and Italian beauties Gloria Vanderbilt and Marella Agnelli, among the small flock of “Swans” photographed by Richard Avedon and written about by Truman Capote in 1959. 

Married at age 19 to Édouard, Vicomte de Ribes (he became the Count de Ribes upon the death of his father in 1981), the traditions of her in-laws precluded her from becoming a career woman. An independent spirit, she channeled her creativity into a series of ventures linked by fashion, theater, and style. In 1956, de Ribes was nominated for Eleanor Lambert’s Best-Dressed List. At the time, she had only a handful of couture dresses, as most of her wardrobe was comprised of her own designs, which she made herself or with a dressmaker.  Four more nominations followed, and resulted in her induction into the International Best-Dressed List Hall of Fame in 1962.  

Photographed by the world’s leading talents including Slim Aarons, Richard Avedon, David Bailey, Cecil Beaton, Robert Doisneau, Horst, Jean Baptiste Mondino, Irving Penn, Francesco Scavullo, Victor Skrebneski, and Juergen Teller, her image came to define an effortless elegance and a sophisticated glamour.

In 1999, Jean Paul Gaultier dedicated his haute couture collection to her with the title “Divine Jacqueline,” and in 2010, she received the Légion d’Honneur from then French President Nicolas Sarkozy for her philanthropic and cultural contributions to France.

The thematic exhibition will feature approximately 60 ensembles of haute couture and ready-to-wear primarily from de Ribes’s personal archive, dating from 1959 to the present. Also included will be her creations for fancy dress balls, which she often made by cutting up and cannibalizing her haute couture gowns to create unexpected, thematic, and conceptually nuanced expressions of her aesthetic. These, along with photographs and ephemera, will tell the story of how her interest in fashion developed over decades, from childhood “dress-up” to the epitome of international style.  

A muse to haute couture designers, they placed at her disposal their drapers, cutters, and fitters in acknowledgment of their esteem for her taste and originality. Ultimately, she used this talent and experience to create her own successful design business, which she directed from 1982 to 1995.  

While the exhibition will focus on her taste and style methodology, extensive documentation from her personal archives will illustrate the range and depth of her professional life, including her roles as theatrical impresario, television producer, interior designer, architect, and director and organizer of international charity events.

Designers in the exhibition will include Giorgio Armani, Pierre Balmain, Bill Blass, Marc Bohan for House of Dior, Roberto Cavalli, Jacqueline de Ribes, John Galliano, Madame Grès (Alix Barton), Valentino Garavani, Jean-Paul Gaultier, Norma Kamali, Guy Laroche, Ralph Lauren, Ralph Rucci, Yves Saint Laurent, Fernando Sanchez for Révillon Frères, and Emanuel Ungaro.

Jacqueline de Ribes: The Art of Style will run November 19, 2015–February 21, 2016 at the Anna Wintour Costume Center at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.