The Museum of Advertising Founded In NYC

The first museum dedicated to celebrating the global advertising industry, The Museum of Advertising, has been founded in New York City. Exhibits will feature historical works of all mediums to explore the full spectrum of creativity, culture, and commerce. The 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization is currently in planning stages, working with members of the advertising community and consumer brands on various items including fundraising, sponsorships and building the museum collection.

The Museum of Advertising Logo

The Museum of Advertising logo

The Museum of Advertising is committed to preserving and interpreting the historical collective works of the advertising industry through commercial artifacts, celebrated ad campaigns and their creators; exploring sociological and economical impacts; forges emotional connections between visitors and brands past and present; and enhances appreciation for the profound role advertising has played and continues to play in shaping culture, society, and the economy worldwide.

The foundation of The Museum of Advertising is thousands of artifacts in a growing collection founded by Glenn Pajarito, a Madison Avenue advertising executive who has served as Creative Director of multiple global ad agencies for over 100 of the world’s largest brands. Together with the Board of Directors, their goal is to give back to the vibrant advertising community and engage the public.

The advertising industry is constantly focused on the future and our changing media landscape. What we don’t do as well is preserve the work which is so ephemeral, and recognize the innovations made in communication, design, and media.” Museum Founding Director Glenn Pajarito said. “Advertising also transcends commercial marketing and has influenced product innovations, influenced politics, shaped cultural trends, educated and entertained over generations across the world.

For more information, please visit https://www.themuseumofadvertising.org.

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Art News: The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994

STEPHEN BARKER, “The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994”

Exhibition dates: September 14 – October 28, 2017

Daniel Cooney Fine Art (508-526 West 26th Street, Suite 9C, New York, NY 10001, 212 255 8158. dan@danielcooneyfineart.com. Hours: Wednesday – Saturday 11 – 6) is pleased to announce the first solo exhibition of photographs, “The ACT UP Portraits: Activists & Avatars, 1991-1994“, by renowned photographer Stephen Barker. The exhibit will showcase approximately 15 never before seen black and white photographic portraits of AIDS activists – in the studio and at home – taken by Barker during his time working within the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) 1991-1994, and Barker’s unique artist’s book Funeral March, which chronicles the carrying of Mark Fisher’s body in an open coffin from Judson Church, up Sixth Avenue, to the steps of the Republican National Committee on the eve of the presidential election in 1992.

Rod Sorge (1969-1999) ACT UP Needle Exchange, 1991

Rod Sorge (1969-1999) ACT UP Needle Exchange, 1991

Barker became involved with ACT UP in the late 80s working primarily with the needle exchange program. The photographs were never intended as an encyclopedic project, but rather the portraits evolved organically out of Barker’s working relationships, friendships, and intimacies. The exhibition is especially timely during this 30th anniversary year of ACT UP when once again all underserved communities, including those living with HIV/AIDS, are threatened by our own government. It is a call to arms for activism and a reminder of the distance we have traveled and battles we have won.

Stephen Barker, 'Gay Wachman, ACT UP Needle Exchange,' 1992, Gelatin Silver Print

Stephen Barker, ‘Gay Wachman, ACT UP Needle Exchange,’ 1992, Gelatin Silver Print

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Rodin at The Met

Exhibition Dates: September 16, 2017–January 15, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue, B. Gerald Cantor Sculpture Gallery (Gallery 800) and Gallery 809

On the centenary of the death of Auguste Rodin (1840–1917), The Metropolitan Museum of Art will celebrate its historic collection of the artist’s work in Rodin at The Met, opening September 16, 2017. (The exhibition is made possible by the Iris & B. Gerald Cantor Foundation.)

Rodin_2017_DetailPage_Desktop_3360x1720_051817_v1

Auguste Rodin (French, Paris 1840-1917 Meudon), Orpheus and Eurydice, modeled probably before 1887, carved 1893, marble. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Thomas F. Ryan, 1910

Nearly 50 marbles, bronzes, plasters, and terracottas by Rodin, representing more than a century of acquisitions and gifts to the Museum, will be displayed in the newly installed and refurbished B. Gerald Cantor Sculpture Gallery (Gallery 800). The exhibition will feature iconic sculptures such as The Thinker and The Hand of God, as well as masterpieces such as The Tempest that have not been on view in decades. Paintings from The Met’s collection by some of Rodin’s most admired contemporaries, including his friends Claude Monet (1840–1926) and Pierre Puvis de Chavannes (1824–1898), will be presented in dialogue with the sculptures on display.

The extraordinary range of The Met’s holdings of Rodin’s work will be highlighted in an adjacent gallery (Gallery 809) with a selection of drawings, prints, letters, and illustrated books, as well as photographs of the master sculptor and his art. This focused presentation will introduce visitors to the evolution of Rodin’s draftsmanship and demonstrate the essential role of drawing in his practice. It will also address Rodin’s engagement with photographers, especially Edward Steichen (1879-1973), who served as a key intermediary in bringing Rodin’s drawings to New York.

Rodin at The Met begins a new chapter in the Museum’s long-standing engagement with Rodin. In 1912, The Met opened a gallery dedicated to Rodin’s sculptures and drawings—the first at the Museum devoted exclusively to the work of a living artist. Displayed in that gallery were almost 30 sculptures and, within a year, 14 drawings. During the late 20th century, the historic core of The Met’s Rodin collection was further enhanced by Iris and B. Gerald Cantor and their Foundation’s gifts of more than 30 sculptures, many of them from editions authorized by the artist and cast posthumously. Today, The Met’s holdings of Rodin’s art are among the largest and most distinguished in the United States. The exhibition will give visitors the opportunity to experience anew Rodin’s enduring artistic achievements.

Rodin at The Met is organized by Denise Allen, Curator in The Met’s Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts; Ashley Dunn, Assistant Curator in the Department of Drawings and Prints; and Alison Hokanson and Asher Ethan Miller, both Assistant Curators in the Department of European Paintings.

Education programs will accompany the exhibition including a Sunday at The Met program “Rediscover Rodin” on October 15, a Picture This! Workshop on October 19, and a Met Signs Tour: Rodin at The Met with Emmanuel von Schack on Friday, November 3.

The display in Gallery 809 will close on January 15, 2018. The installation of paintings and sculptures in Gallery 800 will remain on permanent view with periodic rotations of selected works.

New-York Historical Society To Present Unprecedented Exhibition On The History Of The Vietnam War

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975, On View October 4, 2017 – April 22, 2018

One of the major turning points of the 20th century, the Vietnam War will be the subject of an unprecedented exhibition presented by the New-York Historical Society from October 4, 2017April 22, 2018. Bringing the hotly contested history of this struggle into the realm of public display as never before, the exhibition will offer a chronological and thematic narrative of the conflict from 1945 through 1975 as told through more than 300 artifacts, photographs, artworks, documents, and interactive digital media.

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American infantrymen crowd into a mud-filled bomb crater and look up at tall jungle trees seeking out Viet Cong snipers firing at them during a battle in Phuoc Vinh, north-northeast of Saigon in Vietnam’s War Zone D, June 15, 1967. Henri Huet / Associated Press

Objects on display will range from a Jeep used at Tan Son Nhut Air Base to a copy of the Pentagon Papers; from posters and bumper stickers both opposing and supporting the U.S. war effort to personal items left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, DC; from indelible news photographs (such as Eddie Adams’ Execution) to specially commissioned murals by contemporary artist Matt Huynh. While no gallery exhibition can provide a comprehensive, global perspective on this vast subject, the materials brought together in The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 will comprise a sweeping and immersive narrative, exploring, from a primarily American viewpoint, how this pivotal struggle was experienced both on the war front and on the home front. The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 was curated by Marci Reaven, New-York Historical Society vice president for history exhibitions.

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Interior of the USNS General Nelson M. Walker. Courtesy of Art and Lee Beltrone, Vietnam Graffiti Project, Keswick, VA. American servicemen initially traveled to Vietnam aboard WWII-era troop ships like the General Nelson M. Walker. Nearly 5,000 Marines and G.I.s crowded the Walker on each three-week voyage from Oakland, California to Danang or Qui Nhon, South Vietnam.

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 signals a new ambition for the New-York Historical Society, which is to include in our exhibition program histories that are not only difficult but also as yet unresolved,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president, and CEO of New-York Historical. “This monumental exhibit challenges received wisdom about the origins and consequences of the War, relying on sources only recently made available to scholars as well as first person accounts of those who fought. As the exhibition shows, the War continues to provoke debate and discussion today and to dominate much of our thinking about military conduct and policy. The Vietnam War was the longest armed conflict of the 20th century, and today—more than 40 years after it ended―it continues to influence both public policy and personal convictions. We are grateful for the opportunity to offer the public a chance to better understand events and protagonists of the 20th century that reverberate well into the 21st.

Exhibition Overview

The Vietnam War: 1945–1975 sets the scene for the coming conflict through a display in an introductory gallery, where texts and materials about the onset of the Cold War document how the U.S. and its allies began to maneuver against the Communist bloc in regional confrontations after World War II while avoiding head-on engagement between the nuclear powers. Objects on view include a series of oil paintings by Chesley Bonestell imagining the destruction of New York City by Soviet atomic bombs and a newsreel from 1950 making the case for U.S. military action in Korea.

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Men of the 173rd Airborne Brigade on a search and destroy patrol after receiving supplies, 1966. National Archives at College Park, MD. The primary mission of U.S. forces was to destroy the enemy and their logistical network. American ground troops operated throughout South Vietnam, supported by naval and air campaigns. They defended the DMZ, pursued units in the hills along the Central Coast, combed through Viet Cong base areas in the Iron Triangle, and ranged across the upper Mekong Delta as part of an Army-Navy mobile riverine force.

The exhibition then takes up the story of Vietnam by recalling the successful struggle of the Communist-nationalist coalition Viet Minh to force France to abandon its claim to Vietnam, then part of the French colony known as Indochina. Archival footage from a CBS News broadcast illustrates the “domino theory” put forward by the Eisenhower administration in support of its desire to halt the spread of Communism in Asia, a mindset which contributed to the partitioning of Vietnam into North and South. Among the objects representing the experiences of the North Vietnamese and southern insurgents are a 1962 painting by the Hanoi-based artist Tran Huu Chat and a bicycle of the sort used by North Vietnamese forces for transport of arms along the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Also on view is a scale model of the USS Maddox, one of the destroyers involved in the Gulf of Tonkin encounter with North Vietnamese forces in August 1964, which gave the Johnson Administration grounds for seeking Congressional authorization to increase U.S. military operations without a declaration of war.

On July 28, 1965, President Johnson spoke to the nation on TV to explain that it was up to America to protect South Vietnam and fight communism in Asia and that to be driven from the field would imperil U.S. power, security, and credibility. He also announced a dramatic escalation in the military draft.

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Draft card. Courtesy of Joseph Corrigan, C Troop, 2nd Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division, Dak To, Vietnam 1967–68. President Johnson’s order to send more troops to Vietnam affected all men between the ages of 18 and 26. Registration for military service was compulsory. The Selective Service called up only the men needed while excusing the rest through deferments. Twenty-seven million American men were of draft age during the war. Forty percent served in the military, and about 2.5 million went to Vietnam.

Objects on view, like an original draft card, and displays will address various responses to the draft, which affected all men between the ages of 18 and 26. Archival footage of Johnson’s address announcing the doubling of the draft will be shown. Artifacts, such as graffiti created by soldiers on their canvas berths, from the troopship General Walker, which ferried draftees during the three-week voyage to Vietnam, will demonstrate the personal side of soldiers as they headed toward war.

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Detail. Tran Huu Chat, Spring in Tay Nguyen, 1962 and 2016. Lacquer engraving. New-York Historical Society. Hanoi art student Tran Huu Chat received high marks in 1962 for his lacquer engraving that depicted Ho Chi Minh and the Viet Minh organizing among the people to depose the French colonialists. Fellow Vietnamese would have understood that the artist was using the heroism of the Viet Minh to symbolically refer to the National Liberation Front, organized in 1960 to oppose the Diem regime and its U.S. backers. The original artwork hangs in Hanoi’s Vietnam National Museum of Fine Arts. The 84-year-old Tran Huu Chat made an exact reproduction for this exhibition.

With this escalation of U.S. military involvement, the exhibition moves into a section that examines the conduct of the war and its repercussions both in the field and among American civilians. Two large, illustrated murals by noted artist and illustrator Matt Huynh, titled War Front and Home Front, depict key aspects of the years 1966 and 1967. War Front depicts the four combat zones in South Vietnam to show differing types of combat and highlight significant moments and battlegrounds. Home Front illustrates activity in the United States, including the Spring Mobilization, the largest antiwar demonstration to that date in American history, in which hundreds of thousands marched through midtown Manhattan on April 15, 1967.

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71st Evacuation Hospital patch belonging to Barbara Chiminello (left) and 57th Medical Detachment patch belonging to Thomas Chiminello (right). Courtesy of Barbara, Philip, and Eugene Chiminello. Siblings Thomas and Barbara Chiminello served alongside one another in Vietnam—Tommy as a Medevac helicopter pilot and Barbara as a nurse. These are their unit patches. In October 1967, Barbara received devastating news. Tommy and his crew had all been killed while responding to an urgent evacuation request.

The mural also shows a pro-war demonstration from May 1967 and other scenes of the war’s impact on national life. Interactive kiosks placed next to both murals bring them to life, allowing visitors to explore the events depicted through videos and photographs. Notable objects displayed in this section include a poster of a woman fighter in support of the southern insurgents, recreated by Tran Thi Van; helmets worn by U.S. and South Vietnamese government soldiers, dog tags, military patches, and field implements; letters from soldiers to their loved ones back home; a condolence letter on the death of a son; period magazines; posters and buttons both demanding an end to the war and urging support for the military effort; and a recording of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s April 1967 speech against the war. Continue reading

The British Library Exhibition, Harry Potter: A History of Magic, to open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018

The British Library Is Bringing A Major Exhibition To The U.S. For The First Time

Harry Potter: A History Of Magic Will Be On View At The British Library In London, October 20, 2017 – February 28, 2018

The British Library and the New-York Historical Society are delighted to announce that Harry Potter: A History of Magic will open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018, following its run at the British Library in London from October 20, 2017 – February 28, 2018.

Harry Potter: A History of Magic

The British Library Exhibition, Harry Potter: A History of Magic, to open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018

The exhibition’s New York opening marks the 20th anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in the U.S. by Scholastic, following the 20th-anniversary celebrations of the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in the U.K. in 2017.

Ahead of the U.K. opening in London, Harry Potter: A History of Magic has already sold over 25,000 tickets—the highest amount of advance tickets ever sold for a British Library exhibition. Tickets are available to buy from the British Library website.

The first book in the series of Harry Potter novels, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, was originally published by Bloomsbury in 1997. Since then Bloomsbury has published all seven of the Harry Potter novels in children’s and adult editions, three charity books―Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Quidditch Through the Ages and The Tales of Beedle the Bard, and the ILLUSTRATED EDITION of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Bloomsbury is also the publishers for the physical audiobooks of the entire series.

The exhibition unveils rare books, manuscripts, and magical objects from the British Library’s collection, capturing the traditions of folklore and magic at the heart of the Harry Potter stories. Exploring the subjects studied at Hogwarts, the exhibition includes original drafts and drawings by J.K. Rowling and Harry Potter illustrator Jim Kay, going on display for the first time.

As it travels from London to New York, the exhibition will evolve to include U.S.-specific artifacts from New-York Historical’s collection and items from U.S. Harry Potter publisher Scholastic’s collection.

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest research libraries. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research, and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection. The Library’s collection has developed over 250 years and exceeds 150 million separate items representing every age of written civilization and includes books, journals, manuscripts, maps, stamps, music, patents, photographs, newspapers and sound recordings in all written and spoken languages. Up to 10 million people visit the British Library website―www.bl.UK ―every year where they can view up to 4 million digitized collection items and over 40 million pages. (See more at: www.bl.uk.) Continue reading

Gaetano Pesce Art Exhibition at The Peninsula Chicago

Aligning With Expo Chicago, The Peninsula Chicago Announces An Exhibition Celebrating Artist, Architect And Designer Gaetano Pesce Curated by Salon 94 Design

The Peninsula Chicago presents an exclusive art exhibition with works created by impresario artist, architect, and designer Gaetano Pesce. Curated by Salon 94 Design, the exhibition entitled, What it is to be Human,” aligns with the sixth annual EXPO CHICAGO, the International Exposition of Contemporary & Modern Art, taking place at Navy Pier, September 13 to 17, 2017, and the Chicago Architecture Biennial September 16 to January 7, 2018. The collection is open to the public and displayed in the hotel, September 11 to October 9, 2017.

Palladio Cabinet

Gaetano Pesce, Palladio Cabinet, 2007. Photo by Jeff Elstone

With this exhibition, The Peninsula Hotels is continuing its support of innovative public art around the world, by partnering with museums, galleries, and private collectors so guests may enjoy pioneering works by established masters and emerging artists. Each hotel has committed to supporting the arts and art-related Peninsula Academy programs.The Peninsula Chicago Logo

The exhibit title explains how Gaetano’s art connects with humanity, showcasing joy in each piece: featuring 20 objects including: Ritratto dell’ Uomo Centento Cabinet, 2016; Palladio Cabinet, 2007; two versions of Rug Wall Lamp, 2017; Friend Lamp, 2014; What it is to be human chandelier, 2012; Lake Table, 2012; Ricordo della Gamba Sinistra (Skin), 2015; Ritratto di quello che non guarda…o almeno così sembra (Skin), 2015; a selection of Tree Vases, 2015-2017; and ‘Donna’ chair 1969, on loan from Luminaire—an armchair and pouf—a metaphor of the female figure and whimsically comes with a ball and chain. All objects are available for purchase.

Gaetano Pesce's Rug Wall Lamps, 2017

Gaetano Pesce, Rug Wall Lamps, 2017

Maria Razumich-Zec, Regional Vice President and General Manager of The Peninsula Chicago says, “Known for celebrating thoughtful art within the hotel, it is our honor to display Mr. Pesce’s works that provoke thought, emotion and dialogue.”

We are extremely grateful for our partnership with The Peninsula Chicago as both our Official Hotel Sponsor and their ongoing commitment to presenting international artworks to the Chicago community,” said EXPO CHICAGO President | Director Tony Karman. “Gaetano Pesce is an internationally respected artist and this is a not-to-be-missed exhibition.”

Expo Chicago 2017 logo

Expo Chicago 2017 logo

“The work of iconic designer Gaetano Pesce, at The Peninsula Chicago, highlights Salon 94 Design’s focus on radical design. Gaetano’s 50-year career is centered around experimenting with materials and technologies. Featured are his papier-mâche and resin tree vases, recalling the Tuscan landscape of his youth, alongside his explosive sculptural sconces,” said Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, owner of Salon 94 Design. Continue reading

The Whitney To Present Myth Astray: A Project By Arto Lindsay

Contributors include Júlio Bressane, Barbara Browning, Gustavo di Dalva, Christopher Dunn, and Pedro Meira Monteiro

Brazilian-American artist and experimental composer Arto Lindsay will present MYTH ASTRAY, a series of talks, screenings, and musical performances at the Whitney Museum of Modern Art from September 7 to 10.

On the occasion of the current Whitney exhibitions Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium and Calder: Hypermobility, MYTH ASTRAY brings together a multidisciplinary group of artists and scholars to explore the themes of Oiticica’s work and life. Lindsay kicks off the project with the debut of a site-specific installation and a ticketed solo performance on Thursday evening, September 7, in the Museum’s Susan and John Hess Theater. He returns on Saturday, September 9, to perform with the noisemakers and instrument-like objects made by Alexander Calder that were inspired by his travels to Brazil in the late 1940s.

Miguel Rio Branco, Babylonests, 1971. Digital projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy of César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Miguel Rio Branco, Babylonests, 1971. Digital projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy of César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Three seminal films by Júlio Bressane, an influential member of Brazil’s Cinema Marginal movement of the late 1960s/early 1970s, screen throughout the weekend. Matou a Família e Foi ao Cinema (1969), O Anjo Nasceu (1969), and Cuidado Madame (1970) are among the films to be shown.

Speakers include award-winning novelist, dancer, and cultural critic Barbara Browning and scholars of Brazilian studies Christopher Dunn and Pedro Meira Monteiro. Brazilian percussionist Gustavo di Dalva—who has performed and recorded with some of Brazil’s preeminent musicians, including Gilberto Gil, Milton Nascimento, and Caetano Veloso—performs throughout the weekend.

The program will explore Tropicália, Samba, and the Brazilian avant-garde, focusing on the aesthetic and political movements of Brazil that were central to Oiticica’s practice and the period he spent in New York in the 1970s, where he was stimulated by the art, music, poetry, and theater scenes.

A complete schedule of events is noted below. Programs and screenings on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday are free with Museum admission. For more information, visit whitney.org.

SCHEDULE

All events will take place in the Museum’s Susan and John Hess Family Theater, Floor 3.

Thursday, September 7

8 pm: Arto Lindsay in Concert

Tickets are required ($25 adults; $18 members, students and seniors). Capacity is limited, and all tickets are standing room only. Visitors are encouraged to purchase tickets in advance.

Friday, September 8

  • 3 pm: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 4 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s O Anjo Nasceu, 1969 (90 min)
  • 6 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 7:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 8:30 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning

Saturday, September 9

  • 12 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning
  • 2 pm: Performance of Alexander Calder’s noisemakers
  • 3 pm: Performance of Alexander Calder’s noisemakers
  • 4:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 5 pm: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 6 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 6:30 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 8:30 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s Film Cuidado Madame, 1970 (70 min)

Sunday, September 10

  • 11 am: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 12 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning
  • 1 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 1:30 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 2:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 4 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s Film Matou a Família e Foi ao Cinema, 1969 (90 min)

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium is organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; and the Art Institute of Chicago. Support for the national tour of this exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. In New York, major support is provided by The Whitney’s National Committee. Continue reading