Sundance Institute to Present New “Sundance Kids” Section in Collaboration with Utah Film Center at 2014 Sundance Film Festival

NEW YOUTH-ORIENTED CATEGORY WILL FEATURE ONE WORLD PREMIERE AND ONE U.S. PREMIERE

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The Sundance Institute (www.sundance.org) has announced today a new section for younger audiences called “Sundance Kids” for the 2014 Sundance Film Festival (www.sundance.org/festival). Celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2014, the Festival has introduced global audiences to some of the most groundbreaking films of the past three decades, including Beasts of the Southern Wild, Fruitvale Station, Little Miss Sunshine, An Education, sex, lies, and videotape, Reservoir Dogs, The Cove, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, An Inconvenient Truth, Precious, and Napoleon Dynamite, and through its New Frontier Initiative, has showcased the cinematic works of media artists including Isaac Julien, Doug Aitken, Pierre Huyghe, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Matthew Barney. The Festival is a program of the non-profit Sundance Institute®.

Programmed in partnership with the Utah Film Center’s Tumbleweeds Program, the inaugural “Sundance Kids” section features the World Premiere of the English-language version of the acclaimed Ernest and Celestine (Directors: Benjamin Renner, Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar) and the U.S. Premiere of Zip & Zap and the Marble Gang (Director: Oskar Santos), and will be part of the 2014 Festival, running from January 16-26 in Park City, Salt Lake City, Ogden and Sundance, Utah.

Ernest and Celestine / France, Belgium, Luxembourg (Directors: Benjamin Renner, Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar, Screenwriter: Daniel Pennac) – Unlike her fellow mice, Celestine is an artist and a dreamer. When she nearly ends up as breakfast for a bear named Ernest, the two form an unlikely bond that is quickly challenged by their respective communities.  Cast: Forest Whitaker, Mackenzie Foy, Lauren Bacall, Paul Giamatti, William H. Macy, Megan Mullally. Recommended for ages 5+.

Zip and Zap and the Marble Gang director Oskar Santos (photo credit - Jose Haro)

Zip and Zap and the Marble Gang director Oskar Santos (photo credit – Jose Haro)

Zip & Zap and the Marble Gang / Spain (Director: Oskar Santos, Screenwriters: Francisco Roncal, Jorge Lara, Oskar Santos) – Zip and Zap are punished by being sent to a re-education center. Guided by intelligence, they uncover a mysterious secret hidden deep within the school and end up having the most exciting adventure of their lives. Cast: Javier Gutiérrez, Daniel Cerezo, Raúl Rivas, Claudia Vega, Marcos Ruiz, Fran García. Recommended for ages 9+.

The Utah Film Center brings the world of film to local audiences through free community screenings and discussions, outreach programs, and visiting artists and professionals. Emphasizing social content and artistic excellence, they present the best documentary, independent, and dramatic cinema year-round and collaborate with various educational and community organizations to promote a diversity of ideas, to provide forums for underrepresented groups, and to develop new audiences for film. Movie screenings take place in Salt Lake City, Kamas, Lehi (coming soon), Logan, Moab, Ogden, Orem, Park City, and more coming soon.

The 2014 Tumbleweeds Film Festival for Children and Youth runs March, 14-16 at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center and the City Library in Salt Lake City.  The Utah Film Center’s Tumbleweeds program is generously sponsored by the Sorenson Legacy Foundation, George S. and Delores Doré Eccles Foundation, Art Works for Kids and Zions Bank.  The annual Tumbleweeds Film Festival is the only film festival in the Intermountain West that presents films specifically for children and youth.

The addition of Sundance Kids allows us to engage younger audiences around the power of independent film,” said Trevor Groth, Director of Programming. “We are excited to collaborate with Tumbleweeds and The Utah Film Center in presenting Sundance Kids.”

This unique collaboration between the Utah Film Center and Sundance Institute is a great opportunity to elevate the profile of international and independent films for kids,” said Patrick Hubley, Artistic Director of the Utah Film Center and Founder of Tumbleweeds. “We launched our Tumbleweeds programming four years ago with the goal of fostering the next generation of filmmakers and film fans, and we hope this programming will inspire the creativity and imaginations of young film-goers not only in Utah but across the country.”

Visit www.sundance.org/festival for more information about screening dates, times and locations.

Major Exhibition To Explore Modern and Contemporary Latino Art Opens at the Smithsonian American Art Museum Oct. 25

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art”, now open at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, presents the rich and varied contributions of Latino artists in the United States since the mid-20th century, when the concept of a collective Latino identity began to emerge. The exhibition is drawn entirely from the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s pioneering collection of Latino art and explores how Latino artists shaped the artistic movements of their day and recalibrated key themes in American art and culture.

Melesio ‘’Mel’’ Casas, "Humanscape 62", 1970, acrylic, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment. © 1970, the Casas Family

Melesio ‘’Mel’’ Casas, “Humanscape 62”, 1970, acrylic, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment. © 1970, the Casas Family

The exhibition presents works in all media by 72 leading modern and contemporary artists. Of the 92 artworks featured in the exhibition, 63 have been acquired by the museum since 2011, representing its deep and continuing commitment to collecting Latino art. “Our America” will be on view from Oct. 25 through March 2, 2014. Following its presentation in Washington, D.C., the exhibition will travel to six cities across the United States. The exhibition is organized by E. Carmen Ramos, curator of Latino Art at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Olga Albizu, "Radiante", 1967, oil, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of JPMorgan Chase

Olga Albizu, “Radiante”, 1967, oil, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of JPMorgan Chase

“The exhibition ‘Our America’ is the culmination of a major collecting initiative, still underway at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, to build a significant collection of Latino art in the nation’s capital,” said Elizabeth Broun, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “It is particularly exciting to debut so many artworks newly acquired for the museum’s permanent collection.”

The exhibition includes works by artists who participated in all the various artistic styles and movements, including abstract expressionism; activist, conceptual and performance art; and classic American genres such as landscape, portraiture and scenes of everyday life. Latino artists across the United States were galvanized by the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s and they created new images of their communities and examined bicultural experiences. Many critically probed American history and popular culture, revealing the possibilities and tensions of expansionism, migration and settlement. Other Latino artists in the exhibition devoted themselves to experimentation, pushing the limits of their chosen medium. “Our America” presents a picture of an evolving national culture that challenges expectations of what is meant by “American” and “Latino.”

María Magdalena Campos-Pons, "Constellation", 2004, instant color prints, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment. © 2004, María Magdale

María Magdalena Campos-Pons, “Constellation”, 2004, instant color prints, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase through the Luisita L. and Franz H. Denghausen Endowment. © 2004, María Magdale

The relationship between Latino art and the larger world of American art in the post-War period is not simple or clear cut,” said Ramos. “Some artists, influenced by the activism of Latino civil rights movements, turned away from pure formalist discourse to tackle the pressing issues of the day. Others artists wholeheartedly embraced abstraction. An even larger group inhabited multiple worlds, infusing avant-garde modes with politically and culturally engaged themes.” Continue reading