Culture Watch: Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Announces Short List for the 2020 Hugo Boss Prize

Six artists have been short-listed for the Hugo Boss Prize 2020, the biennial award for significant achievement in contemporary art. The short list is selected by a panel of international curators and critics in recognition of artists whose work is transforming the field. Since its inception in 1996, the prize has consistently functioned as a platform for the most relevant and influential art of the present, and has become a cornerstone of the Guggenheim’s contemporary programming.

On the occasion of the thirteenth Hugo Boss Prize, I’m delighted to announce the finalists for the 2020 cycle,” said Nancy Spector, Artistic Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Foundation, and jury chair. “After a rigorous examination of today’s artistic landscape, the jury identified a group of artists whose practices are beacons of cultural impact. While diverse in their approaches and themes, they each exemplify the spirit of experimentation and innovation that the prize has always championed.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York logo

The Hugo Boss Prize recognizes the achievements of both emerging and established artists, and sets no restrictions in terms of age, gender, nationality, or medium. The winner, who will receive a $100,000 honorarium, will be announced in the fall of 2020 and will present a solo exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in spring 2021.

Since its inception in 1996, the Hugo Boss Prize has been awarded to twelve influential contemporary artists: American artist Matthew Barney (1996); Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (1998); Slovenian artist Marjetica Potrč (2000); French artist Pierre Huyghe (2002); Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija (2004); English artist Tacita Dean (2006); Palestinian artist Emily Jacir (2008); German artist Hans-Peter Feldmann (2010); Danish artist Danh Vo (2012); American artist Paul Chan (2014); American artist Anicka Yi (2016); and American artist Simone Leigh (2018). The related exhibitions have constituted some of the most compelling presentations in the museum’s history.

Previous finalists include Laurie Anderson, Janine Antoni, Cai Guo-Qiang, Stan Douglas, and Yasumasa Morimura in 1996; Huang Yong Ping, William Kentridge, Lee Bul, Pipilotti Rist, and Lorna Simpson in 1998; Vito Acconci, Maurizio Cattelan, Michael Elmgreen and Ingar Dragset, Tom Friedman, Barry Le Va, and Tunga in 2000; Francis Alÿs, Olafur Eliasson, Hachiya Kazuhiko, Koo Jeong-A, and Anri Sala in 2002; Franz Ackermann, Rivane Neuenschwander, Jeroen de Rijke and Willem de Rooij, Simon Starling, and Yang Fudong in 2004; Allora & Calzadilla, John Bock, Damián Ortega, Aïda Ruilova, and Tino Sehgal in 2006; Christoph Büchel, Patty Chang, Sam Durant, Joachim Koester, and Roman Signer in 2008; Cao Fei, Roman Ondák,Walid Raad, Natascha Sadr Haghighian, and Apichatpong Weerasethakul in 2010; Trisha Donnelly, Rashid Johnson, Qiu Zhijie, Monika Sosnowska, and Tris Vonna-Michell in 2012; Sheela Gowda, Camille Henrot, Hassan Khan, and Charline von Heyl in 2014; Tania Bruguera, Mark Leckey, Ralph Lemon, Laura Owens, and Wael Shawky in 2016; and Bouchra Khalili, Teresa Margolles, Emeka Ogboh, Frances Stark, and Wu Tsang in 2018.

The following artists are finalists for the Hugo Boss Prize 2020:

  • Nairy Baghramian (b. 1971, Isfahan, Iran)
  • Kevin Beasley (b. 1985, Lynchburg, Va.)
  • Deana Lawson (b. 1979, Rochester, N.Y.)
  • Elias Sime (b. 1968, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia)
  • Cecilia Vicuña (b. 1948, Santiago, Chile)
  • Adrián Villar Rojas (b. 1980, Rosario, Argentina)

The Hugo Boss Prize is our most prestigious engagement in the field of arts,” said Mark Langer, CEO and Chairman of HUGO BOSS AG. “We are excited about this diverse and distinguished short list for 2020 and looking forward to the announcement of the winner next fall.

HUGO BOSS PRIZE 2020 SHORT LIST

Nairy Baghramian (b. 1971, Isfahan, Iran) lives and works in Berlin. In an oeuvre that probes the boundaries between the decorative, the utilitarian, and the art object, Baghramian has illuminated new possibilities for sculpture. The artist’s disarming biomorphic forms, made with a range of materials including steel, silicon, resin, and leather, elicit various unexpected art-historical and sociopolitical references, reimagining the workings of the body, gender, and public and private space.

Nairy Baghramian, Stay Downers: Nerd, Fidgety Philip, Dripper, Truant, Backrower and Grubby Urchin, 2017. Various media, dimensions variable
Installation view: Déformation Professionnelle, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, 2017–18. Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. Photo: Timo Ohler

Baghramian’s work has been presented in solo exhibitions such as Privileged Points, Mudam Luxembourg—Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean (2019), Breathing Spell (Un respire), Palacio de Cristal del Retiro, Madrid (2018); Déformation Professionnelle, Museum der Moderne Salzburg, and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2017); S.M.A.K. Museum of Contemporary Art, Ghent (2016); Nairy Baghramian: Scruff of the Neck (Supplements), Zurich Art Prize, Museum Haus Konstruktiv, Zurich (2016); Hand Me Down, Museo Tamayo, Mexico City (2015); Fluffing the Pillows, MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge, Mass. (2013), and Kunsthalle Mannheim, Germany (2012); and Class Reunion, Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver (2012).

Kevin Beasley (b. 1985, Lynchburg, Va.) lives and works in New York. Working at the intersection of sculpture, installation, and performance, Beasley constructs revelatory formal and sonic experiences. In works that embed found objects in substances such as resin, foam, and tar, or incorporate unconventionally manipulated audio equipment, he amplifies the cultural resonances of his materials to excavate personal and shared histories of class, race, and institutional power.

Kevin Beasley, Your face is / is not enough, 2016. Performance view: Liverpool Biennial, July 14, 2018. © Kevin Beasley. Photo: Pete Carr, courtesy Casey Kaplan, New York

Beasley has presented and performed in solo exhibitions such as ASSEMBLY, The Kitchen, New York (2019); a view of a landscape, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2018); Kevin Beasley, The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2018); Movement V: Ballroom, CounterCurrent Festival, Cynthia Woods Mitchell Center for the Arts, Houston (2017); Hammer Projects: Kevin Beasley, Hammer Museum at Art + Practice, Los Angeles (2017); Rubbings, Kim? Contemporary Art Center, Riga, Latvia (2017); and inHarlem: Kevin Beasley, The Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2016).

Deana Lawson (b. 1979, Rochester, N.Y.) lives and works in New York. Her large-format photographs channel vernacular, art-historical, and documentary traditions within the medium, in compositions that valorize black diasporic culture. Picturing individuals she encounters over the course of her everyday life within carefully staged domestic settings, Lawson choreographs every nuance of scenery, lighting, and pose to create tableaux that powerfully evoke the agency of her subjects.

Deana Lawson, Mama Goma, Gemena, DR Congo, 2014. Pigment print
35 x 44.125 inches (88.9 x 112.1 cm). © Deana Lawson, courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago

Lawson’s work has been presented in solo exhibitions including Deana Lawson, Huis Marseille, Museum voor Fotografie, Amsterdam (2019); Deana Lawson: Planes, The Underground Museum, Los Angeles (2018); Deana Lawson, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2018); Deana Lawson, Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis (2017); Deana Lawson, The Art Institute of Chicago (2015); and Corporeal, Light Work, Syracuse, N.Y. (2009).

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“What Is Love?” Burberry Reveals Festive Holiday Campaign

Burberry‘s festive 2019 holiday campaign is out. To mark his first holiday campaign for the fashion house, Burberry Chief Creative Officer, Riccardo Tisci has assembled a cast of global talent to celebrate the notion of togetherness, union, hope and love.

Burberry Festive 2019 Holiday Collection. Courtesy of Burberry

The entire cast includes Alexis Chaparro, Arah Clarke, Ava Valentine, Blanket, Bodhi Horton, Boychild, Carla Bruni, Casper Chatfield, Cassius Varghese, Cecilia Chancellor, Christian Guzman, Dahely Nunez, Daisy Middleton, Elis Moaven, Fran Summers, Hector Polio, Howard Griffiths, Ikram Abdi Omar, Jacob Guerra, Jaeda Sherman, Jose Polio, Keith Summers, Kristians Jakovlevs, Lea T, Leissy De La Cruz, Louis Chatfield, Mahmood, Marina Morena, Noah Carlos, Noah Landes, Regina Limon Vega, Reia Zhing Cheong, Ruben Loftus-Cheek, Sasha Pivovarova, Shay, Valentin Bedford, Wu Tsang, Yoo Ah-in, Zhou Dongyu

Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott
Burberry Festive 2019 Holiday Collection. Courtesy of Burberry
Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

‘I am connected to the idea of unity, togetherness and challenging the perception of what love is today. This for me is the real spirit of the season. It’s one of my favorite times of the year – when I can stop, reflect and reconnect with those who make me feel happy and at home, no matter where I am in the world. I loved the idea of bringing together a group of people that have been so supportive of me since I joined Burberry to celebrate my first holiday campaign for the house,” states Riccardo Tisci, Burberry Chief Creative Officer.

Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott
Ikram Abdi Omar in Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

The campaign centres around a film of the cast dancing to the soundtrack of ‘What Is Love?‘ by Deee-Lite and is shot by renowned photography duo Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott.

Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

It was a real pleasure working on this project for Burberry. Working with Riccardo is about connection, it’s about the back and forth of discussing creative ideas and it’s this that makes our jobs even more interesting and exciting. We have been friends for many years so I guess we know each other’s sensibilities – there are always a lot of laughs!” says Mert and Alas. “My favourite Christmas memory is when we were preparing a Christmas dinner and the oven literally blew up! I burnt my lashes and of course we had no turkey. Disappointing, but it was a funny night!

And the cast itself seems to have had a fun and memorable time as well.

Carla Bruni (above) in Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry. Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

CARLA BRUNI: “I love the concept of the campaign – this big group of different people coming together. I had a fabulous time with Riccardo and was thrilled to find myself behind the lens of Mert & Marcus again. On set, Riccardo gave me this feeling of freedom and modernity – his talent is beyond words. You can see that he has this profound and precious knowledge of fashion, and has this simplistic way of using the past to invent the future. My most precious festive memory is a Christmas Eve in a castle completely buried in snow in Touraine.

Burberry Festive 2019 Holiday Collection. Courtesy of Burberry
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This Just In!: David Breslin And Adrienne Edwards Will Curate The 2021 Whitney Biennial

The Whitney Museum of American Art announced today that its 2021 Biennial, the 80th edition, will be co-organized by two brilliant members of the Museum’s curatorial department, David Breslin and Adrienne Edwards. The 2021 Whitney Biennial exhibition will open in the spring of 2021 and is presented by Tiffany & Co., which has been the lead sponsor of the Biennial since the Museum’s move downtown.

Image credit: Adrienne Edwards and David Breslin. Photograph by Bryan Derballa

Alice Pratt Brown Director Adam D. Weinberg noted: “The central aim of the Biennial is to be a barometer of contemporary American art. Each Biennial is a reflection of the cultural and social moment as it intersects with the passions, perspectives, and tastes of the curators. David and Adrienne will be a great team. They are inquisitive, curious, and are acutely attuned to the art of the current moment. No doubt they will bring fresh outlooks to this historic exhibition and reinvent it for these complex and challenging times.”

With a long history of exhibiting the most promising and influential artists and provoking debate, the Whitney Biennial is the Museum’s signature survey of the state of contemporary art in the United States. The Biennial, an invitational show of work produced in the preceding two years, was introduced by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney in 1932, and it is the longest continuous series of exhibitions in the country to survey recent developments in American art.

Initiated by founder Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney in 1932, the Whitney Biennial is the longest-running survey of American art. More than 3,600 artists have participated, including Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jacob Lawrence, Alexander Calder, Louise Bourgeois, Joan Mitchell, Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Roy Lichtenstein, Agnes Martin, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Serra, Lynda Benglis, Frank Bowling, Joan Jonas, Barbara Kruger, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Jenny Holzer, David Wojnarowicz, Glenn Ligon, Yvonne Rainer, Zoe Leonard, Kara Walker, Cindy Sherman, Nan Goldin, Mike Kelley, Lorna Simpson, Renée Green, Wade Guyton, Julie Mehretu, Cecilia Vicuña, Mark Bradford, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Ellen Gallagher, Rachel Harrison, Wu Tsang, Nick Mauss, Sarah Michelson, Laura Owens, Postcommodity, Pope.L, Jeffrey Gibson, and Tiona Nekkia McClodden.

The biennials were originally organized by medium, with painting alternating with sculpture and works on paper. Starting in 1937, the Museum shifted to yearly exhibitions called Annuals. The current format—a survey show of work in all media occurring every two years—has been in place since 1973. The 2019 Biennial (still on partial view on the Museum’s sixth floor until October 27) was organized by two Whitney curators, Jane Panetta and Rujeko Hockley. It featured seventy-five artists and collectives working in painting, sculpture, installation, film and video, photography, performance, and sound.

David Breslin was recently named the DeMartini Family Curator and Director of Curatorial Initiatives, a role he will assume this month. Since joining the Museum in 2016 as DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, Breslin has spearheaded the Museum’s collection-related activities, curating a series of major collection exhibitions and overseeing acquisitions. Working closely with his curatorial colleagues, he has organized or co-organized four timely and thematized collection displays, including Where We Are: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1900–1960, An Incomplete History of Protest: Selections from the Whitney’s Collection, 1940–2017, Spilling Over: Painting Color in the 1960s, and The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965, which is currently on view on the Museum’s seventh floor. In 2018, he co-curated (with David Kiehl) the landmark retrospective David Wojnarowicz: History Keeps Me Awake at Night.

Breslin came to the Whitney from the Menil Drawing Institute, where he created an ambitious program of exhibitions and public and scholarly events and helped to shape the design of the Institute’s new facility. He also oversaw work on the catalogue raisonné of the drawings of Jasper Johns and grew the collection. Prior to the Menil, Breslin served as the associate director of the research and academic program and associate curator of contemporary projects at the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, MA; he also oversaw the Clark’s residential fellowship program and taught in the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art. Breslin co-edited Art History and Emergency: Crises in the Visual Arts and Humanities (Yale University Press, 2016), a volume that grew from a Clark Conference he organized with art historian Darby English.

In 2018, Adrienne Edwards was named Engell Speyer Family Curator and Curator of Performance at the Whitney. Previously, she served as curator of Performa since 2010 and as Curator at Large for the Walker Art Center since 2016.

At the Whitney, Edwards curated Jason Moran, the artist’s first museum show, now on view on the Museum’s eighth floor. She originated the exhibition at the Walker in 2018; it previously traveled to the ICA Boston and the Wexner Center for the Arts. The exhibition features a series of performances, Jazz on a High Floor in the Afternoon, curated by Edwards and Moran. She organized the event commencing the construction of David Hammons’s Day’s End, featuring a commission by composer Henry Threadgill and a “water” tango on the Hudson River by the Fire Department of the City of New York’s Marine Company 9. Earlier this year, Edwards organized Moved by the Motion: Sudden Rise, a series of performances based on a text co-written by Wu Tsang, boychild, and Fred Moten, which presented a collage of words, film, movements, and sounds.

For Performa, Edwards realized new boundary-defying commissions, as well as pathfinding conferences and film programs with a wide range of over forty international artists. While at the Walker, she co-led the institution-wide Mellon Foundation Interdisciplinary Initiative, an effort to expand ways of commissioning, studying, collecting, documenting, and conserving cross-disciplinary works. Edwards’s curatorial projects have included the critically acclaimed exhibition and catalogue Blackness in Abstraction, hosted by Pace Gallery in 2016. She also organized Frieze’s Artist Award and Live program in New York in 2018. Edwards taught art history and visual studies at New York University and The New School, and she is a contributor to the National Gallery of Art’s Center for the Advanced Study in Visual Art’s forthcoming publication Black Modernisms.

Scott Rothkopf, the Whitney’s Senior Deputy Director and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, said, “David and Adrienne truly represent the best spirit and ideals of the Whitney. Not only are they devoted to—and beloved by—living artists, but they bring to the art of our time a deep historical and scholarly awareness. The most recent editions of the Biennial have reaffirmed its vitality and relevance, and I look forward to discovering how another pair of Whitney curators will lend their voices to our signature exhibition.”

Premier Selection Of Galleries To Participate In Art Basel’s 2016 Edition In Hong Kong

Preview (by Invitation Only)

Tuesday, March 22, 2016, 3pm to 8pm

Wednesday, March 23, 2016, 1pm to 5pm

Vernissage (by Invitation Only)

Wednesday, March 23, 2016, 5pm to 9pm

Public Days

Thursday, March 24, 2016, 1pm to 9pm

Friday, March 25, 2016, 1pm to 8pm

Saturday, March 26, 2016, 11am to 6pm

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 - General Impression © Art Basel Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 – General Impression © Art Basel
Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel has announced the details of its fourth edition in Hong Kong, taking place for the second time in March. The Hong Kong show of Art Basel, whose Lead Partner is UBS, will feature 239 premier galleries from 35 countries and territories, presenting works of the highest quality that range from the Modern period of the early 20th century to the most contemporary artists of today. Once again, Art Basel will be a showcase for art from the region of Asia and Asia-Pacific, where half of its galleries have exhibition spaces. Art Basel Hong Kong will open to the public from Thursday, March 24 to Saturday, March 26, 2016, and will take place at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC).

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 - General Impression © Art Basel Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 – General Impression © Art Basel
Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 - General Impression © Art Basel Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 – General Impression © Art Basel
Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel stages the world’s premier art shows for Modern and contemporary works, sited in Basel, Miami Beach, and Hong Kong. Defined by its host city and region, each show is unique, which is reflected in its participating galleries, artworks presented, and the content of parallel programming produced in collaboration with local institutions for each edition. In addition to ambitious stands featuring leading galleries from around the globe, each show’s singular exhibition sectors spotlight the latest developments in the visual arts, offering visitors new ideas and new inspiration.

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 - General Impression © Art Basel Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 – General Impression © Art Basel
Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 - General Impression © Art Basel Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 – General Impression © Art Basel
Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 - General Impression © Art Basel Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Art Basel in Hong Kong 2015 – General Impression © Art Basel
Photo by Jessica Hromas/Art Basel 2015

Alongside a strong presence of returning galleries from across the globe, this year’s edition features 28 galleries that will participate in the Hong Kong show of Art Basel for the first time. Nine new galleries join from Asia including Antenna Space (Shanghai), galerie nichido (Tokyo, Nagoya, Fukuoka, Karuizawa, Kasama, Paris), Gallery 100 (Taipei), Ink Studio (Beijing), Lawrie Shabibi (Dubai), Longmen Art Projects (Shanghai), MEM (Tokyo), Vanguard Gallery (Shanghai) and Yeo Workshop (Singapore). Art Basel Hong Kong will also see the addition of 18 leading Western galleries showing for the first time including Cardi Gallery (Milan, London), Carlos/Ishikawa (London), David Kordansky Gallery (Los Angeles), Galerie 1900 – 2000 (Paris), Galerie Isabella Bortolozzi (Berlin), Galerie Jocelyn Wolff (Paris), Galerie Nagel Draxler (Berlin, Cologne), gb agency (Paris), Greene Naftali (New York), In Situ – fabienne leclerc (Paris), Kewenig (Berlin, Palma), Metro Pictures (New York), P.P.O.W (New York), Sabrina Amrani (Madrid), Société (Berlin), team (gallery, inc.) (New York, Los Angeles), Xavier Hufkens (Brussels) and Zeno X Gallery (Antwerp). Selma Feriani Gallery (Sidi Bou Said, London) joins Art Basel as the first African gallery outside of South Africa to ever participate in an Art Basel show.

Tokyo Gallery + BTAP, Ushio Shinohara, Samurai Sword, 1967. Courtesy the artist and the gallery

Galleries 2016: Tokyo Gallery + BTAP, Ushio Shinohara, Samurai Sword, 1967. Courtesy the artist and the gallery

Project Fulfill Art Space, Sung-chih Chen《Untitled-Room 1》mixed media installation, 300x300x240cm,2008 (Museum of Contemporary Art, Taipei) Courtesy the artist and the gallery

Galleries 2016: Project Fulfill Art Space, Sung-chih Chen《Untitled-Room 1》mixed media installation, 300x300x240cm,2008 (Museum of Contemporary Art, Taipei) Courtesy the artist and the gallery

The upcoming edition features a particularly strong representation of galleries with exhibition spaces in Japan, Singapore, South Korea and Taiwan, in addition to those with spaces in Hong Kong and Mainland China. The participating galleries have exhibition spaces in: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Cuba, France, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Mainland China, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, the Philippines, Poland, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States.

de Sarthe Gallery, Zao Wou-Ki, Untitled, 1963. Courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery

Galleries 2016: de Sarthe Gallery, Zao Wou-Ki, Untitled, 1963. Courtesy the artist and de Sarthe Gallery

Gallery Exit, LUI Chun Kwong. Courtesy of the artist and the gallery

Galleries 2016: Gallery Exit, LUI Chun Kwong. Courtesy of the artist and the gallery

Galleries, the main sector of the show, will feature 187 Modern and contemporary art galleries, presenting the highest quality of painting, sculpture, drawing, installation, photography, video and editioned works. Exhibitors returning after a brief hiatus include Marianne Boesky Gallery (New York) and Applicat-Prazan (Paris), while many Asian galleries have moved from other sectors of the show into Galleries, where they will present a wider range of their gallery programs. These galleries are: Athr (Jeddah), Blindspot Gallery (Hong Kong), Chambers Fine Art (Beijing, New York), Galerie Ora-Ora (Hong Kong), Gallery Isabelle van den Eynde (Dubai, Brussels), Nanzuka (Tokyo), Nature Morte (New Delhi), Project Fulfill Art Space (Taipei), Taro Nasu (Tokyo), TKG+ (Taipei, Beijing), Yavuz Gallery (Singapore) and Yumiko Chiba Associates (Tokyo). Francesca Minini (Milan) and Galeria Plan B (Cluj, Berlin) are also showing for the first time in the Galleries sector.

Insights 2016: 1335Mabini, Kiri Dalena, Erased Slogans. Courtesy the artist and the gallery

Insights 2016: 1335Mabini, Kiri Dalena, Erased Slogans. Courtesy the artist and the gallery

Lawrie Shabibi, Farhad Ahrarnia, Intuitive Notion of a Rotation, 2015. Courtesy The artist and Lawrie Shabibi

Lawrie Shabibi, Farhad Ahrarnia, Intuitive Notion of a Rotation, 2015. Courtesy The artist and Lawrie Shabibi

The Insights sector will be dedicated to curatorial projects by 28 galleries with spaces in Asia and the Asia-Pacific region and will feature solo shows, exceptional historical material, and strong thematic group exhibitions. This year’s edition features a particularly strong presentation of Modern work, with around half of the galleries presenting material from this period. This year’s Insights will provide a particularly diverse and in-depth overview of art from across the region with featured artists from Australia, Bangladesh, India, Iran, Japan, Mainland China, South Korea, the Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan and Turkey. Highlights include eight large photographic works by Michael Cook (b. 1968, Australia), forming a panoramic narrative reflecting on colonial histories and drawing on the artist’s Bidjara heritage, presented by This Is No Fantasy + dianne tanzer gallery (Melbourne); Antenna Space (Shanghai) presents sculpture by artists Guan Xiao (b. 1983, Mainland China) and Yu Honglei (b. 1984, Mainland China) each responding to themes of ‘postproduction’ and ‘reproduction’; a new body of work by Stella Zhang (b. 1965, Mainland China), a continuation of her existing series ‘0-Viewpoint’ and comprising sculptural paintings and an installation, brought to Art Basel by Galerie du Monde (Hong Kong); experimental ink work by Li Huasheng (b. 1944, Mainland China), presented by Ink Studio (Beijing); ceramic sculptures by Kimiyo Mishimo (b. 1932, Japan), many of which will not have previously been seen outside of Japan, brought by MEM (Tokyo); performative video work by Tadasu Takamine (b. 1968, Japan), an artist whose work draws attention to the societal effects of the Fukushima nuclear disaster, presented by Arataniurano (Tokyo); and, brought by Pi Artworks (Istanbul, London), new sculptures by Tayeba Begum Lipi (b. 1969, Bangladesh) reflecting on her childhood, accompanied by video and audio work. Continue reading