“She Loves Me” from THIRTEEN’s “Great Performances” Kicks Off PBS’s Broadway’s Best Lineup

The critically-acclaimed Roundabout Theatre Company production of She Loves Me comes to THIRTEEN‘s Great Performances, Friday, October 20 at 9 p.m. (check local listings) as the opening presentation of PBS’s fall Broadway’s best lineup. Every Friday night, from October through December, PBS will give theater lovers a front-row seat to some of the best-loved Broadway shows, from glorious, feel-good musicals to captivating dramas. All four titles are productions by the theater streaming service BroadwayHD in association with THIRTEEN PRODUCTIONS LLC for WNET.GP-Logo

She Loves Me joins Present Laughter (November 3), Indecent (November 19), and Holiday Inn (November 24, and also from Roundabout) as part of PBS’s Broadway’s best lineup, directed for television by Emmy Award-winner David Horn, executive producer of both Great Performances and THIRTEEN‘s local Theater Close-Up series.

For over 50 years, PBS has provided audiences locally and across the country with unparalleled access to some of the most exciting and eclectic theater offerings on Broadway and beyond. We’re pleased to continue this great tradition with a diverse mix of recent critically acclaimed productions,” Horn said.

She Loves Me was the first Broadway musical ever to stream live during a performance at Roundabout Theatre Company’s Studio 54. In the musical, Tony Award® winner Laura Benanti and Tony Award® nominee Zachary Levi star as Amalia and Georg, two parfumerie clerks who aren’t quite the best of friends. Constantly bumping heads while on the job, the sparring coworkers can’t seem to find common ground. But little do they know, the anonymous romantic pen pals they have both been falling for happen to be each other. Will love continue to blossom once their identities are finally revealed?

Critics unanimously embraced this latest production. Mark Kennedy of Associated Press, for one, remarked, “An astounding cast, a nifty story and memorable songs turn this revival into a celebration of classic musical construction.

Marilyn Stasio of Variety raved, “The enchanting Broadway revival is so charming, you kind of wish it would follow you home.”

For BroadwayHD this performance of She Loves Me was produced by Stewart F. Lane and Bonnie Comley and captured by BroadwayHD in June 2016, in association with Ellen M. Krass Productions, Inc. and THIRTEEN PRODUCTIONS LLC FOR WNET. It was directed for television by David Horn.

Part of Roundabout’s 50th Anniversary Season, She Loves Me also starred Byron Jennings (Maraczek), Gavin Creel (Kodaly), Tom McGowan (Sipos) and Jane Krakowski (Ilona) with Nicholas Barasch (Arpad) and Peter Bartlett (Head Waiter).

The production was directed by Tony Award® nominee Scott Ellis, choreographed by Warren Carlyle with musical direction by Paul Gemignani. This classic musical comedy features a book by Joe Masteroff, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick and music by Jerry Bock.

This marks the second presentation of She Loves Me on Great Performances which aired a well-remembered British studio version starring Robin (“Poldark”) Ellis and Gemma (“The Slipper and the Rose”) Craven which delighted viewers.

The celebrated score features favorites such as “Vanilla Ice Cream,” “A Romantic Atmosphere,” “Dear Friend,” and “She Loves Me.” The musical is based on a play by Miklos Laszlo, whose well-known romantic story was the basis for the 1940 James Stewart film “The Shop Around the Corner,” the 1949 Judy Garland and Van Johnson musical “In the Good Old Summertime,” and the 1998 Tom Hanks & Meg Ryan film “You’ve Got Mail.

Roundabout’s Associate Artistic Director Scott Ellis previously directed Roundabout’s ten-time Tony-nominated revival of “She Loves Me” in 1993, which marked the first Broadway musical in the company’s history and launched the Musical Theatre Program at Roundabout.

The production started previews on February 19, 2016, and with the official opening on March 17, 2016. The creative team includes David Rockwell (sets), Jeff Mahshie (costumes), Don Holder (Lights), Jon Weston (Sound), Larry Hochman (Orchestrations), David Krane (Dance Arrangements & Incidental Music).

Major support for the Roundabout Theatre Company’s production of She Loves Me is provided by The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation. The stage production of She Loves Me also benefits from Roundabout’s Musical Theatre Fund with lead gifts from The Howard Gilman Foundation, Perry and Marty Granoff, Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, and Michael Kors and Lance Le Pere.

The Full Schedule:

GREAT PERFORMANCES: She Loves Me

Friday, October 20, 9 p.m.

(See Above) Continue reading

THIRTEEN’s American Masters Kicks Off Season 31 with Exclusive U.S. Broadcast Premiere of By Sidney Lumet, Tuesday, January 3 on PBS

Exclusive Interview With Treat Williams, Star Of Lumet’s Prince Of The City, And Emmy-Winning Filmmaker Nancy Buirski Follows The Documentary

Prolific and versatile filmmaker Sidney Lumet (1924-2011) made 44 films in 50 years, earning the Academy Honorary Award for lifetime achievement after four Oscar nominations. Considered a quintessential New York filmmaker, Lumet frequently used New York City’s urban mettle to infuse his films with a realism and intensity that kept audiences in suspense while prodding them to consider their own morality. In American Masters: By Sidney Lumet, he tells his own story in a never-before-seen interview shot in 2008 by late filmmaker Daniel Anker and producer Thane Rosenbaum. With candor, humor and grace, Lumet reveals what matters to him as an artist and as a human being. Launching Season 31, American Masters: By Sidney Lumet premieres nationwide Tuesday, January 3 at 8 p.m. on PBS (check local listings) and features a new, exclusive interview with Golden Globe- and Emmy Award-nominated actor Treat Williams, who starred in Lumet’s Prince of the City, afterward.by-sidney-lumet_poster_goldposter_com_1-jpg0o_0l_800w_80q

Peabody and Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Nancy Buirski (Afternoon of a Faun, The Loving Story, Loving) weaves Lumet’s personal stories and commentary with scenes from his films to create a portrait of one of the most accomplished, influential and socially conscious directors in the history of cinema. Clips spanning his canon, from 12 Angry Men, Serpico, Dog Day Afternoon, Network, Prince of the City, The Verdict, and many more, reveal the spiritual and ethical lessons at the core of his work.

Looking back over his career, Lumet speaks intimately about the experiences that informed his work, which he loved. His Depression-era, working-class Lower East Side beginnings as a child actor with his father in Yiddish theater, on Broadway, and his gradual transition to directing live TV, informed the stories he chose and his ability to translate important stage works into film, such as The Sea Gull, The Fugitive Kind and Long Day’s Journey into Night. In clips from these films, American Masters: By Sidney Lumet underscores Lumet’s own journey: his relationship with his father mirrored in Long Day’s Journey into Night, Daniel, Running on Empty and Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead.

Marching for workers’ rights in the 1930s, standing up to McCarthy-era blacklist interrogation and finding ways to employ his blacklisted friends, Lumet developed an appreciation for people who question authority. His movies often featured characters fighting for justice, standing up to the crowd and questioning personal responsibility. First and foremost a storyteller, Lumet’s strongly moral tales captured the dilemmas and concerns of a society struggling with essentials: how does one behave to others and to oneself? (You can read the full biography here.) Continue reading

Television: Curtain Going Up On the 2015 Award-Winning London Production of Gypsy on PBS

Starring Imelda Staunton on THIRTEEN’s Great Performances Friday, November 11 at 9 p.m. on the PBS Arts Fall Festival

Jonathan Kent‘s award-winning production of the classic musical Gypsy – a record-breaking sellout during its acclaimed London run – comes to THIRTEEN‘s Great Performances, Friday, November 11 at 9 p.m. on PBS on the PBS Arts Fall Festival. (Check local listings.) Gypsy first appeared in 1959 on Broadway under the title Gypsy: A Musical Fable.

Great Performances: Gypsy

Rose (Imelda Staunton) in “Gypsy” Credit: ©2014 Johan Persson

The first London production to be seen for 40 years, the musical opened at England’s Chichester Festival Theatre before moving to the West End‘s Savoy Theatre. A London production had not been seen in the West End since 1973. This critically acclaimed West End production features Imelda Staunton as Rose (The role of Rose is often called the ‘King Lear’ of the musical theatre canon).

Great Performances: Gypsy

Herbie (Peter Davison) and Rose (Imelda Staunton) in “Gypsy” Credit: ©2014 Johan Persson

Following a run at the Chichester Festival Theatre, which won the Critics’ Choice Theatre Award for Best Musical in 2014, a West End revival of Gypsy opened at the Savoy Theatre on April 15, 2015, in a limited run through November 28. Directed by Jonathan Kent with choreography by Stephen Mear and set and costume design by Anthony Ward, the production starred Staunton as Rose, Peter Davison as Herbie, Lara Pulver as Louise, Gemma Sutton as June, Anita Louise Combe as Tessie Tura, Louise Gold as Mazzeppa and Julie Legrand as Electra. The London production was nominated for eight Laurence Olivier Awards at the 2016 ceremony, winning four, including Best Actress in a Musical (Staunton) and Best Musical Revival, the most awards won by a single production in that year

Great Performances: Gypsy

Louise (Lara Pulver) in “Gypsy” Credit: ©2014 Johan Persson

Gypsy is considered by many to be one of Broadway’s all-time triumphs. It tells the story of ambitious showbiz mother Rose, who treks across the country with her daughters Baby June and Louise in search of success with their homespun vaudeville act. As times change, Rose is forced to accept the demise of vaudeville and the rise of burlesque, as well as her daughters’ quest for autonomy.

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Baby June (Isla Huggins-Barr) in “Gypsy” Credit: ©2014 Johan Persson

With a book by Arthur Laurents, music by Jule Styne and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, the show was suggested by the memoirs of Gypsy Rose Lee. The musical was initially a project of producer David Merrick and actress Ethel Merman (who starred as the original Rose). Merrick had read a chapter of Lee’s memoirs in Harper’s Magazine and approached Lee to obtain the rights. Jerome Robbins was interested, and wanted Leland Hayward as co-producer; (Merman also wanted Hayward to produce her next show.) Merrick and Hayward approached Laurents to write the book. As he relates, Laurents initially was not interested until he saw that the story was one of parents living their children’s lives. Composers Irving Berlin and Cole Porter declined the project. Finally, Robbins asked Stephen Sondheim, who agreed to do it. Sondheim had previously worked with Robbins and Laurents on the musical West Side Story. However, Merman did not want an unknown composer, and wanted Jule Styne to write the music. Although Sondheim initially refused to write only the lyrics, he was persuaded by Oscar Hammerstein to accept the job.

Great Performances: Gypsy

Mazeppa (Louise Gold) in “Gypsy” Credit: ©2014 Johan Persson

The score features songs that have since become show standards, and helped launch the career of Sondheim. “Everything’s Coming Up Roses,” “Some People,” “Let Me Entertain You,” “Together, Wherever We Go” and of course “Rose’s Turn” are among the musical highlights. Continue reading

THIRTEEN’s Nature Exposes the Sly Tricks of Natural Born Hustlers

When it comes to the most important goals in the animal kingdom, learning how to survive and raising the next generation are right at the top of the list. This may seem clear cut, but the lengths to which some animals go to achieve these objectives can often be downright devious. To illustrate the point, we see a shady squirrel, double-crossing cuttlefish, a conniving orchid mantis and a deceitful bird called a drongo use mimicry, disguise, and trickery to get what they want. Throughout the episodes, scientists studying animal con artists pull back the curtain on their deceptions, using their latest research to demonstrate how each of them hustles their mark.

Natural Born Hustlers.  Episode 1 - Staying Alive

Picture Shows: Mmamoriri the Bearded Lioness. Scientists believe because Mmamoriri the bearded lioness mimics a male, that other rivals believe there are more lions in the pride, than there actually are. © BBC/Chadden Hunter

This three-part series reveals the modus operandi of some of nature’s greatest animal con artists as they outwit predators, line up their next meal, and get the girl. Natural Born Hustlers airs Wednesday, January 13, 20 & 27, 2016 at 8 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings). After each broadcast, the episode will be available for online streaming at www.pbs.org/nature.

Natural Born Hustlers.  Episode 1 - Staying Alive

Picture Shows: Cuttlefish ingeniously transform their entire bodies to match their surroundings, nature’s answer to an invisibility cloak. © Richard Whitcomb/Shutterstock

The first episode, Staying Alive, offers stories about unusual survival techniques. Cuttlefish, for example, elude their many predators with a kind of invisibility cloak. They completely transform themselves to match the colors and patterns of their surroundings. But what is truly remarkable is that they do this despite being color-blind. The secret to how they do it is hidden in their skin, which can sense and possibly even “see” color using a protein usually found only in eyes. And these great illusionists have another trick that no other animal can do. Their skin can also morph from a flat surface to a three dimensional one in order to complete the camouflage. Other ruses revealed include: why burrowing owls, who live underground, mimic the sounds of rattlesnakes; how imitation may not just be the sincerest form of flattery, it can also save your life; and what deception the regal horned lizard employs as a last resort to keep a menacing coachwhip snake at bay.

Natural Born Hustlers.  Episode 2 - The Hunger Hustle

Picture Shows: Drongo. The Drongo is the ultimate animal hustler, tricking many different animals with confidence tricks to cheat them out of a meal. © BBC/Victoria Buckley

The duplicitous ways in which animals try to secure their next meal is the subject of the second episode, The Hunger Hustle. Singled out is the devious drongo, a South African bird. In winter, he has to rely on grubs and insects that live underground, but other animals are far better equipped to dig them up, so the drongo devises a con. He serves as lookout while vulnerable social weaver birds are on the ground digging up food. If a predator is spotted, he sends out an alarm call and the weavers head for safety until they get an all clear call from him. But the drongo also issues fake alarm calls, allowing him to eat food the weavers have dug up before issuing an all clear to return.

Natural Born Hustlers.  Episode 2 - The Hunger Hustle

Looking just like a flower, orchid mantises use aggressive mimicry to lure in their prey; in fact, they are even more attractive to insects than flowers themselves. © Sebastian Janicki/Shutterstock

Among other segments: the orchid mantis, which attracts insects by mimicking a flower and why it is even more successful than the real thing; how killer whales use sound to manipulate the behavior of herring to their advantage; and how and why gray squirrels practice sleight of hand to protect the nuts they’ve gathered to get them through the winter. Continue reading

THIRTEEN’s Nature, Raising the Dinosaur Giant, Hosted by Sir David Attenborough, Unearths a New Species in Patagonia, Wednesday, February 17, 2016, on PBS

Paleontologists Believe They Have Discovered The Largest Known Dinosaur And Reconstruct Its Skeleton Model

A few years ago in the Argentinean desert, a shepherd was searching for one of his lost sheep when he spotted the tip of a gigantic fossil bone sticking out of a rock. When the news reached paleontologists at the MEF Museum in Trelew, Argentina, they set up camp at the discovery site to examine it and look for more bones. By the end of the dig, they had uncovered more than 200 other huge bones. As the program reveals, these fossils came from seven dinosaurs, all belonging to a new species of giant plant-eating titanosaur whose name will be announced soon.

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Sir David Attenborough with a new giant titanosaur find – a thigh bone (femur) fossil. Paleontology Museum, Trelew, Argentina February 2015. © Robin Cox

When we learned that early signs at the dig site suggested this new species was the largest land animal ever known and experts were discovering such valuable information about the life of such giants millions of years ago, we were keenly interested,” says Fred Kaufman, executive producer of Nature.

Nature pioneered a television genre that is now widely emulated in the broadcast industry. Throughout its history, Nature has brought the natural world to millions of viewers and has been consistently among the most-watched primetime series on public television.

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Dig site of a new giant titanosaur find at La Fletcha Farm. Dig team from the Paleontology Museum in Trelew, Chubut Province, Argentina. Over 200 fossil bones found. April 2015. © William Hicklin

Sir David Attenborough, the film’s host and narrator, takes us through the twists and turns of the forensic investigation to find out more about this new animal. He talks to paleontologists studying the fossils, along with comparative anatomy experts, and with the help of 3D scanning, CGI visuals and animation, looks at what the bones reveal about the lives of these dinosaurs. He’s on location at the dig site and in the MEF Museum labs in Trelew, and present when a life-size skeleton of the dinosaur, built by a Canadian and Argentinean team of model makers, is completed. Raising the Dinosaur Giant airs Wednesday, February 17, 2016, at 8 p.m. (ET) on PBS (check local listings). After the broadcast, the episode will be available for online streaming at pbs.org/nature.

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A new giant titanosaur find – a whole reconstructed skeleton. Paleontology Museum, Trelew, Argentina February 2015. © Robin Cox

As Attenborough explains, dinosaurs roamed what is now the rocky desert of Patagonia during the Cretaceous Period, around 145 to 66 million years ago. The largest of these were plant-eaters known as titanosaurs. Among the fossils unearthed during the two-year excavation were bones from the giant’s front and back legs, which are vital in determining its body mass or weight, and those from its spine, which helped establish its identity. Dr. Diego Pol, chief paleontologist on the project, was pleased that the femur (or thigh bone), found by the shepherd, was well-preserved because it was of great value to the scientific study. At 2.6 yards in length, it also turned out to be the largest dinosaur bone ever discovered. To protect the fossils, weighing more than half a ton or so, on their journey to the museum lab, the team had to apply plaster casts on each limb. A road was even built to transport them.

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Sir David Attenborough with a new giant titanosaur find – a thigh bone (femur) fossil. Paleontology Museum, Trelew, Argentina February 2015. © Robin Cox

According to Attenborough, scientists dated these fossils to precisely 101.6 million years old by examining the ash deposits in the rock layers surrounding them. He shares the team’s discoveries gleaned from meticulous forensic work and makes comparisons to the biology of living creatures. Among some early findings are that the giants are thought to have eaten plants such as fern, cycads and conifers without chewing them; it’s estimated that its heart weighed just over 500 pounds to pump blood around its massive body and is thought to have had four chambers; and this largest titanosaur measured 121 feet from head to tail and weighed just over 77 tons.

The film also follows Attenborough as he visits the largest known dinosaur nesting ground 500 miles north of the Patagonian dig site, where the remains of their eggshells can be seen scattered for miles. He discloses that hundreds of buried titanosaur eggs, originally laid on an old river plain, have also been found intact. The unhatched ones were preserved in mud when the river flooded, providing clues to what a baby titanosaur may have looked like.

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Dr. Jose Luis Carballido (right) and Dr. Diego Pol (left) measure the femur bone of a new giant titanosaur find at the dig site on La Fletcha Farm near Trelew, Chubut Province, Argentina, April 2015. © William Hicklin

Like so many people, young and old, I am fascinated by dinosaurs,” says Attenborough. The subsequent confirmation from Dr. Pol that they believe they had discovered the largest dinosaur ever known was like icing on the cake. But the research continues as the fossils contain many secrets yet to be revealed. Continue reading

GREAT PERFORMANCES AT THE MET: LES CONTES D’HOFFMANN

Great Performances at the Met: "Les Contes d’Hoffmann" - Erin Morley as Olympia in Offenbach's "Les Contes d’Hoffmann." Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: “Les Contes d’Hoffmann” – Erin Morley as Olympia in Offenbach’s “Les Contes d’Hoffmann.”
Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Italian Tenor Vittorio Grigolo stars in the title role as the tortured poet unlucky in love in Offenbach’s Les Contes d’Hoffmann on Great Performances at the Met Sunday, May 10 at 12 p.m. on PBS, in a production by Broadway director Bartlett SherThomas Hampson adds a new role to his extensive repertory as the Four Villains who interfere with Hoffmann’s courtship of four women: the mechanical doll Olympia, sung by American soprano Erin Morley in her role debut; the consumptive artist Antonia and the self-absorbed diva Stella, both portrayed by Russian soprano Hibla Gerzmava; and the Venetian courtesan Giulietta, sung by English mezzo-soprano Christine Rice. American mezzo-soprano Kate Lindsey takes the trouser role of Nicklausse, Hoffmann’s faithful muse, and Canadian conductor Yves Abel leads the cast. Soprano Deborah Voigt hosts the broadcast.

Great Performances at the Met: "Les Contes d’Hoffmann" - Vittorio Grigolo in the title role of Offenbach's "Les Contes d’Hoffmann." Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: “Les Contes d’Hoffmann” – Vittorio Grigolo in the title role of Offenbach’s “Les Contes d’Hoffmann.” Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: "Les Contes d’Hoffmann" - Hibla Gerzmava as Antonia in Offenbach's "Les Contes d’Hoffmann." Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: “Les Contes d’Hoffmann” – Hibla Gerzmava as Antonia in Offenbach’s “Les Contes d’Hoffmann.”
Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

After becoming the toast of Paris with his witty operettas, Jacques Offenbach set out to create a more serious work. He chose as his source a successful play based on the stories of visionary German writer E.T.A. Hoffmann. Three of these tales—at once profound, eerie, and funny—were unified in the play by a narrative frame that made Hoffmann the protagonist of his own tales. Each episode recounts a catastrophic love affair: first with a girl who turns out to be an automated doll, then with a sickly young singer, and finally with a Venetian courtesan. In the prologue and epilogue, the hero is involved with an opera singer who seems like a combination of these three previous loves. Throughout the opera, Hoffmann is dogged by a diabolical nemesis and accompanied by his faithful friend Nicklausse, whose true identity is only revealed after bitter experience. Failure in love eventually fuels his future artistic success. Offenbach died before the premiere, leaving posterity without an authorized version of the score.

Erin Morley as Olympia in Offenbach's "Les Contes d’Hoffmann." Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Erin Morley as Olympia in Offenbach’s “Les Contes d’Hoffmann.”
Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Vittorio Grigolo in the title role of Offenbach's "Les Contes d’Hoffmann." Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Vittorio Grigolo in the title role of Offenbach’s “Les Contes d’Hoffmann.”
Photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

Les Contes d’Hoffmann will be broadcast on THIRTEEN’S Great Performances at the Met Sunday, May 10 at 12 p.m. on PBS.  (Check local listings.) (In New York, THIRTEEN will air the opera at 12:30 p.m.) Les Contes d’Hoffmann was originally seen live in movie theaters on January 31, 2015 as part of the groundbreaking The Met: Live in HD series, which transmits live performances to more than 2,000 movie theaters and performing arts centers in over 70 countries around the world. The Live in HD series has reached a record-breaking 17 million viewers since its inception in 2006. Continue reading

GREAT PERFORMANCES AT THE MET: DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG

Met Opera Music Director James Levine Leads Wagner’s Grand Comedy Die Meistersinger Von Nürnberg On Great Performances at the Met Sunday, April 12 at 11 a.m. on PBS

Soprano Renée Fleming hosts the broadcast

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: A scene from Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: A scene from Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg.
Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Met Music Director James Levine conducts Wagner’s epic human comedy Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg (“The Master-Singer of Nuremberg”) in its first Great Performances at the Met broadcast.

German baritone Michael Volle stars as cobbler-poet Hans Sachs, with South African tenor Johan Botha as Walther, German soprano Annette Dasch as Eva, German baritone Johannes Martin Kränzle in his Met debut as Beckmesser, German bass Hans-Peter König as Pogner, American tenor Paul Appleby as David, and Scottish mezzo-soprano Karen Cargill as Magdalene.  The performance was part of the final revival of Otto Schenk’s acclaimed 1993 Met production.

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Johan Botha as Walther in Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Johan Botha as Walther in Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Johannes Martin Kränzle as Beckmesser in Wagner's "Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg." Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Johannes Martin Kränzle as Beckmesser in Wagner’s “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg.” Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Karen Cargill as Magdalene in Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Karen Cargill as Magdalene in Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Paul Appleby as David in Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Paul Appleby as David in Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Michael Volle as Hans Sachs in Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg – Michael Volle as Hans Sachs in Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg

Great Performances at the Met: Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg: Matthew Rose as Nightwatchman in Wagner’s “Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg.” Photo: Ken Howard/Metropolitan Opera

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg will be broadcast on THIRTEEN’S Great Performances at the Met Sunday, April 12 at 11 a.m. on PBS.  (Check local listings.) (In New York, THIRTEEN will air the opera at 12:30 p.m.) Soprano Renée Fleming hosts the broadcast. Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg was originally seen live in movie theaters on December 13, 2014 as part of the groundbreaking The Met: Live in HD series, which transmits live performances to more than 2,000 movie theaters and performing arts centers in over 70 countries around the world. The Live in HD series has reached a record-breaking 17 million viewers since its inception in 2006. Continue reading