Opening Soon: Guggenheim Examines New Developments in Contemporary Photography in Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York

Location: Tower Levels 2, 4, and 5

Dates: November 20, 2015–March 23, 2016

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Photo-Poetics: An Anthology, an exhibition documenting recent developments in contemporary photography and consisting of photographs, videos, and slide installations by ten international artists. With more than 70 works by Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek, the exhibition runs from November 20, 2015–March 23, 2016, and presents a focused study into the nature, traditions, and magic of photography in the context of the rapid digital transformation of the medium.

Lisa Oppenheim, The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else, 2006 Slide projection of 15 35 mm slides, continuous loop, dimensions variable Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2009 2009.60

Lisa Oppenheim, The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else, 2006, Slide projection of 15 35 mm slides, continuous loop, dimensions variable, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2009. 2009.60

Moyra Davey, Les Goddesses, 2011, HD color video, with sound, 61 min., Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy, New York. © Moyra Davey

Moyra Davey, Les Goddesses, 2011, HD color video, with sound, 61 min., Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy, New York. © Moyra Davey

Organized by Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography, with Susan Thompson, Assistant Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Photo-Poetics: An Anthology offers an opportunity to define the concerns of a new generation of photographic artists and contextualize their work within the history of art and visual culture. These artists mainly pursue a studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is often an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings.

Anne Collier, Crying, 2005, Chromogenic print, 99.1 x 134 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Tighe 2005.47 © Anne Collier

Anne Collier, Crying, 2005, Chromogenic print, 99.1 x 134 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Tighe 2005.47 © Anne Collier

Erin Shirreff, UN 2010, 2010, HD color video, silent 17 min., Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Erica Gervais, 2010.29 © 2010 Erin Shirreff

Erin Shirreff, UN 2010, 2010, HD color video, silent 17 min., Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Erica Gervais, 2010.29 © 2010 Erin Shirreff

The artists in the exhibition attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies. Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism and invested in exploring the processes and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object. The works in the exhibition, rich with detail, reward close and prolonged regard; they ask for a mode of looking that is closer to reading than the cursory scanning fostered by the clicking and swiping functionalities of smartphones and social media. Both the exhibition and its accompanying catalogue are conceived as anthologies, as independent vehicles to introduce each artist’s important and unique practice.

Erica Baum, Jaws, 2008 (from the series Naked Eye), Inkjet print, 47 x 41.6 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Tighe, 2011 2011.48 © Erica Baum

Erica Baum, Jaws, 2008 (from the series Naked Eye), Inkjet print, 47 x 41.6 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Tighe, 2011
2011.48 © Erica Baum

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue featuring an introduction, afterword, and ten monographic essays by Jennifer Blessing that provide focused, contemplative readings of each artist’s work. The catalogue’s design, in which each artist’s practice is presented individually, reflects the exhibition’s structure as a series of solo presentations. The catalogue will be available for $50 at the Guggenheim Store and online at guggenheimstore.org.

Leslie Hewitt, Riffs on Real Time (3 of 10), 2006–09, Chromogenic print, 76.2 x 61 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2010. 2010.55

Leslie Hewitt, Riffs on Real Time (3 of 10), 2006–09, Chromogenic print, 76.2 x 61 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2010. 2010.55

Elad Lassry, Untitled (Woman, Blond), 2013, Chromogenic print in walnut frame with four-ply silk, 36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2013.72 © Elad Lassry

Elad Lassry, Untitled (Woman, Blond), 2013, Chromogenic print in walnut frame with four-ply silk, 36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2013.72 © Elad Lassry

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Georg Baselitz: Drinkers and Orange Eaters at Skarstedt Upper East Side

Skarstedt UES will present a comprehensive exhibition of work by renowned German artist Georg Baselitz at their 79th Street gallery, which will feature 12 paintings from both his Drinkers and Orange Eaters series’, dating from 1981-82. The exhibition brings together paintings from public and private collections to demonstrate the breadth of Baselitz’s creativity during this two-year period. The Drinkers and Orange Eaters remain some of Baselitz’s most expressive and vividly colorful works.

Georg Baselitz Orangenesser, 1982 oil on canvas 57 1/2 x 44 4/5 inches (146 x 114 cm.)

Georg Baselitz, Orangenesser, 1982, oil on canvas
57 1/2 x 44 4/5 inches (146 x 114 cm.)

Georg Baselitz was born in Deutschbaselitz, Germany, in 1938. He attended the Hochschule für bildende und angewandte Kunste in East Berlin in 1956 and the West Berlin school from 1957 – 1963. In 1965, he was awarded a scholarship for a year’s residential study at the Villa Romana in Florence. Very early in his career, Baselitz emerged as a pioneer of German Neo-Expressionism, rebelling against the dominance of abstract painting, proposing in its place a very personal, expressive figurative art rooted in the art brut movement. In his early works, he concentrated on several figure types, including heroes, rebels, and shepherds. From 1969 on, Baselitz painted his subjects upside-down. He adopted this method to stress the artifice of painting. The artist is also well known for his sculpture and printmaking. Drawing upon a varied collection of influences outside of mainstream Modernism, including art of the Mannerist period, African sculptures, imagery rooted in the Art Brut, as well as the Existentialist art and literature of Dada and Surrealism, Baselitz developed a distinct artistic language.

 

At the time these works were painted, Baselitz found himself surrounded by the new images of a younger artistic generation taking up German Expressionism as a spontaneous experience, practiced using clowns and checked patterns. Baselitz’s use of vibrant reds and yellows—even a harlequin motif—lends a theatrical quality to his work, while the depiction of glassware and fruit adds a playful element of celebration and bacchanalia.

Georg Baselitz Ohne Titel (B. fur Larry-Remix) (26.VII.06), Untitled (B. for Larry-Remix), 2006 feather pen and watercolor on paper 22 3/8 x 15 1/4 inches (56.8 x 38.7 cm.)

Georg Baselitz, Ohne Titel (B. fur Larry-Remix) (26.VII.06), Untitled (B. for Larry-Remix), 2006
feather pen and watercolor on paper
22 3/8 x 15 1/4 inches (56.8 x 38.7 cm.)

In these two figurative series’, Baselitz reacts to the work of his German Expressionist predecessors — Ernst Ludwig Kirchner and Emil Nolde, among others—paying homage to his artistic forefathers while simultaneously establishing distance from them. Championed as a leading exponent of German Neo-Expressionist painting, Baselitz displays a newfound freedom from ideological pressures with his Drinkers and Orange Eaters. Baselitz explains, “The ’80s helped me to rearrange everything; I was able to set up a whole range of ideas and experiences anew, which meant I was able to break everything down so I could make something out of it again.”(1)

Furthermore, Baselitz’s impulsive, tactile method of working creates a dynamic and almost animated surface, composed of fractured imagery. Thickly applied paint forms the rudimentary features of his figures, while his forceful handling of the medium emphasizes individual brushstrokes. Baselitz described his painting style for the Orange Eaters as “boxing with both hands, so to speak.”(2) He uses form, style, and color to shatter traditional assumptions—turning his subjects on their heads in order to impart meaning. Baselitz deliberately rendered his figures upside-down on the canvas, defying conventional visual interpretation. This inverted orientation frees his work from connotation without entering the realm of pure abstraction. Beyond the human form, Baselitz’s Drinkers and Orange

Georg Baselitz 6 Schöne, 4 hässliche Porträts: Schönes Porträt 2  (6 Beautiful, 4 Ugly Portraits: Beautiful Portrait 2), 1987-1988 oil on board

Georg Baselitz
6 Schöne, 4 hässliche Porträts: Schönes Porträt 2
(6 Beautiful, 4 Ugly Portraits: Beautiful Portrait 2), 1987-1988
oil on board

Eaters represent a critical time in history and an evolving ideology of liberation.

Baselitz’s work has been widely exhibited throughout the United States and Europe. Major retrospectives of his work have been held at the Whitechapel Art Gallery, London (1983; which later traveled to Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and Kunsthalle Basel); Centre Pompidou, Paris (1993); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (1995; traveled to Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC, and Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin); Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (1996 and 2011); and Royal Academy of Arts, London (2007). Baselitz has represented Germany at the Venice Biennale (1980) and participated in Documenta 5 and 7 in Kassel, Germany (1972 and 1982). Georg Baselitz lives and works in Basel (Switzerland), at the Ammersee (Bavaria, Germany) and in Imperia (Italian Riviera).

Skarstedt is working closely with the artist on this seminal presentation, as well as a detailed catalogue published on the occasion of the exhibition. Georg Baselitz: Drinkers and Orange Eaters will be on view at Skarstedt (20 East 79th Street) from May 11 through June 26, 2015.

On View Now: Guggenheim Museum Presents Unprecedented Survey of Italian Futurism

First Comprehensive Overview of the Influential Movement to Be Shown in the U.S.

Featuring Over 360 Works, Including Several Never Before Seen Outside of Italy

Exhibition:                 Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe
Venue:                         Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York
Location:                   Full rotunda and ramps, High Gallery, Annex Levels 5 and 7
Dates:                           February 21–September 1, 2014

From now through September 1, 2014, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, the first comprehensive overview in the United States of one of Europe’s most important 20th-century avant-garde movements. Featuring over 360 works by more than 80 artists, architects, designers, photographers, and writers, this multidisciplinary exhibition examines the full historical breadth of Futurism, from its 1909 inception with the publication of Filippo Tommaso Marinetti’s first Futurist manifesto through its demise at the end of World War II. The exhibition includes many rarely seen works, some of which have never traveled outside of Italy. It encompasses not only painting and sculpture, but also the advertising, architecture, ceramics, design, fashion, film, free-form poetry, photography, performance, publications, music, and theater of this dynamic and often contentious movement that championed modernity and insurgency.

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Futurism was launched in 1909 against a background of growing economic and social upheaval. In Marinetti’s “The Founding and Manifesto of Futurism,” published in Le Figaro, he outlined the movement’s key aims, among them: to abolish the past, to champion modernization, and to extol aggression. Although it began as a literary movement, Futurism soon embraced the visual arts as well as advertising, fashion, music and theater, and it spread throughout Italy and beyond. The Futurists rejected stasis and tradition and drew inspiration from the emerging industry, machinery, and speed of the modern metropolis. The first generation of artists created works characterized by dynamic movement and fractured forms, aspiring to break with existing notions of space and time to place the viewer at the center of the artwork. Extending into many mediums, Futurism was intended to be not just an artistic idiom but an entirely new way of life. Central to the movement was the concept of the opera d’arte totale or “total work of art,” in which the viewer is surrounded by a completely Futurist environment.

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

More than two thousand individuals were associated with the movement over its duration. In addition to Marinetti, central figures include: artists Giacomo Balla, Benedetta (Benedetta Cappa Marinetti), Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Fortunato Depero, and Enrico Prampolini; poets and writers Francesco Cangiullo and Rosa Rosà; architect Antonio Sant’Elia; composer Luigi Russolo; photographers Anton Giulio Bragaglia and Tato (Guglielmo Sansoni); dancer Giannina Censi; and ceramicist Tullio d’Albisola. These figures and other lesser-known ones are represented in the exhibition.

Futurism is commonly understood to have had two phases: “heroic” Futurism, which lasted until around 1916, and a later incarnation that arose after World War I and remained active until the early 1940s. Investigations of “heroic” Futurism have predominated and comparatively few exhibitions have explored the subsequent life of the movement; until now, a comprehensive overview of Italian Futurism had yet to be presented in the U.S. Italian art of the 1920s and ’30s is little known outside of its home country, due in part to a taint from Futurism’s sometime association with Fascism. This association complicates the narrative of this avant-garde and makes it all the more necessary to delve into and clarify its full history.

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Italian Futurism unfolds chronologically, juxtaposing works in different mediums as it traces the myriad artistic languages the Futurists employed as their practice evolved over a 35-year period. The exhibition begins with an exploration of the manifesto as an art form, and proceeds to the Futurists’ catalytic encounter with Cubism in 1911, their exploration of near-abstract compositions, and their early efforts in photography. Ascending the rotunda levels of the museum, visitors follow the movement’s progression as it expanded to include architecture, clothing, design, dinnerware, experimental poetry, and toys. Along the way, it gained new practitioners and underwent several stylistic evolutions—shifting from the fractured spaces of the 1910s to the machine aesthetics (or arte meccanica) of the ’20s, and then to the softer, lyrical forms of the ’30s. Aviation’s popularity and nationalist significance in 1930s Italy led to the swirling, often abstracted, aerial imagery of Futurism’s final incarnation, aeropittura. This novel painting approach united the Futurist interest in nationalism, speed, technology, and war with new and dizzying visual perspectives. The fascination with the aerial spread to other mediums, including ceramics, dance, and experimental aerial photography.

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Installation view: Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, February 21–September 1, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

The exhibition is enlivened by three films commissioned from documentary filmmaker Jen Sachs, which use archival film footage, documentary photographs, printed matter, writings, recorded declamations, and musical compositions to represent the Futurists’ more ephemeral work and to bring to life their words-in-freedom poems. One film addresses the Futurists’ evening performances and events, called serate, which merged “high” and “low” culture in radical ways and broke down barriers between spectator and performer. Mise-en-scène installations evoke the Futurists’ opera d’arte totaleinterior ensembles, from those executed for the private sphere to those realized under Fascism. Continue reading

Annual Exhibition of Artwork by New York City Public School Students on View at the Guggenheim Museum

Exhibition:    A Year with Children 2014
Venue:         Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York 
Location:      Annex Level 3
Dates:          May 9–June 18, 2014 

A YEAR WITH CHILDREN 2014 Student artwork 3rd grade, PS 144, Queens, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © 2014 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

A YEAR WITH CHILDREN 2014
Student artwork
3rd grade, PS 144, Queens, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © 2014 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

Now in its 43rd year, Learning Through Art (LTA), the pioneering arts education program of the Guggenheim Museum, presents A Year with Children 2014, an exhibition organized by the Sackler Center for Arts Education at the Guggenheim Museum, May 9–June 18, 2014. The annual exhibition showcases select artworks by students in grades two through six from 11 public schools who participated in LTA during the 2013–14 school year, representing each of New York City’s five boroughs. Approximately one hundred creative and imaginative works, including collages, drawings, found objects, prints, paintings, sculptures, and photographs will be on display during the six-week installation.

A YEAR WITH CHILDREN 2014 Student artwork 3rd grade, PS 48, Staten Island, 2014 Photo: Kris McKay © 2014 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

A YEAR WITH CHILDREN 2014
Student artwork
3rd grade, PS 48, Staten Island, 2014
Photo: Kris McKay © 2014 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation

A Year with Children is an annual exhibition that presents art by students participating in the Learning Through Art program which places professional teaching artists in New York City public elementary schools. The teaching artists collaborate with classroom teachers to develop art projects that teach students art skills and techniques while exploring ideas and themes related to the school curriculum. The program encourages curiosity, critical thinking, and ongoing collaborative investigation. Additionally, LTA immerses students in the artistic process, encouraging them to view themselves as artists. Each student is given a sketchbook and an artist’s apron. Throughout the program, teaching artists model practices and explorations similar to those that they use to spark their own creativity. Students’ investigations are also inspired by the exhibitions they visit at the Guggenheim during the school year. When viewing art, students participate in inquiry-based discussions that encourage careful observation and interpretation.

LTA STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM 4th grade, PS 86, Bronx, 2014 © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

LTA STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM. 4th grade, PS 86, Bronx, 2014
© The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

In the LTA program, students investigated local and world communities, history, nature, change, and identity. While engaged with these themes, students explored a variety of materials, as reflected in the works on view in A Year with Children 2014. For example, Lotería Character Cards created by the students at PS 88 in Ridgewood will be grouped onto boards so visitors may interact with the Mexican Lotería game of chance. Invented board games and characters created by the fourth graders at PS 9 in Prospect Heights will also be on display, as will mixed-media sculptures inspired by the characters in books read by fourth graders at Chinatown’s PS 42.

LTA STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM 3rd grade, PS 8, Brooklyn, 2014 © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

LTA STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM. 3rd grade, PS 8, Brooklyn, 2014
© The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

LTA was founded in 1970 by Natalie Kovner Lieberman in response to the elimination of art and music programs in New York City public schools. Since its inception, LTA has served nearly 150,000 children and their families, primarily in New York City public schools.

2013–14 School Year
Nearly 1,500 students in grade grades two through six at 11 public schools participated in 20-week projects led by 16 LTA teaching artists, who reached 55 classes during the 2013–14 school year. The participating schools are: in Manhattan, PS 28 (Washington Heights), PS 184 (Lower East Side), and PS 42 (Chinatown); in the Bronx, PS 86 (Kingsbridge); in Staten Island, PS 48 (Grasmere); in Queens, PS 88 (Ridgewood), PS 144 (Forest Hills), and PS 317 (Rockaway Park); and, in Brooklyn, PS 8 (Brooklyn Heights), PS 9 (Prospect Heights), and PS 676 (Red Hook).

LTA STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM 3rd grade, PS 8, Brooklyn, 2014 © The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

LTA STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM. 3rd grade, PS 8, Brooklyn, 2014
© The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York

A Year with Children 2014 is organized by the Education Department at the Guggenheim Museum: Greer Kudon, Senior Education Manager; Lindsay Smilow, Associate Manager; and Emmy Goldin, Education Associate. Continue reading