New-York Historical Society Accepting Applications For 2020–2021 Fellowships

New Fellows Welcomed for the 2019–2020 Academic Year

The New-York Historical Society is now accepting applications for its prestigious fellowship program for the 2020–2021 academic year. Leveraging its rich collections that detail American history through the lens of New York City, New-York Historical’s fellowships are open to scholars at various times during their academic careers and provides them with the resources and community to develop new research and publications that illuminate complex issues of the past. The available fellowships include:

The New-York Historical Society Museum and Library

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Predoctoral Awards in Women’s History
The two recipients of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Predoctoral Awards in Women’s History should have a strong interest in women’s and public history and the applications of these fields outside the academy. Functioning as research associates and providing programmatic support for New-York Historical’s Center for Women’s History, pre-doctoral awardees will assist in the development of content for the Women’s History exhibitions, associated educational curriculum, and on-site experiences for students, scholars, and visitors. They must be currently enrolled students in good standing in a relevant Ph.D. program in the humanities. The Predoctoral Awardees, whose work at New-York Historical may not directly correspond with their dissertation research, will be in residence part time at New-York Historical for one academic year, between September 9, 2020, and August 28, 2021, and will receive a stipend of $20,000 per year. This position is not full time and will not receive full benefits.

Helen and Robert Appel Fellowship in History and Technology
This fellowship will be awarded to a candidate who has earned a Ph.D. no later than 2019. Research projects should be based on New-York Historical’s collections and explore the impact of technology on history. The fellowship will carry a stipend of $60,000, plus benefits. It begins September 9, 2020, and lasts through June 30, 2021.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship
One fellowship for the length of an academic year is supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities for the sake of research at New-York Historical. The fellowship is available to individuals who have completed their formal professional training and have received their final degree or certificate by 2019. They should have a strong record of accomplishment within their field. There is no restriction relating to age or academic status of applicants. Foreign nationals are eligible to apply if they meet visa requirements for working in the U.S. The 10-month residency will carry a stipend of $42,000, plus benefits. This fellowship will begin September 9, 2020 and will end June 30, 2021.

Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation—Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship
This fellowship will be awarded to a candidate who has earned a Ph.D. no later than 2019. Research projects should expand public understanding of New York State and City history and include research based on the collections and resources of New-York Historical. This 10-month residency will carry a stipend of $60,000, plus benefits. It begins September 9, 2020, and lasts through June 30, 2021.

Short Term Fellowships
Several short term fellowships will be awarded to scholars at any academic level working in the Library collections of New-York Historical. Research is to be conducted for two to four weeks for a stipend of between $2,000. The fellowship period will begin July 1, 2020 and end June 29, 2021.

Fellowships at the New-York Historical Society are made possible through the generous endowments of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, and Helen and Robert Appel. Major support for fellowships is provided by Bernard L. Schwartz and the Lehrman Institute. All fellows receive research stipends while in residency. Short term fellowships are made possible by support from Helen Appel, Richard Brown and Mary Jo Otsea, Causeries du Lundi, Patricia Klingenstein, Sid Lapidus, Peck Stacpoole Foundation, Pine Tree Foundation of New York, Pam and Scott Schafler, Society of Colonial Wars, and Society of Daughters of Holland Dames.

Visit nyhistory.org/library/fellowships for instructions and application checklists for each fellowship. The application deadline for all fellowships is January 3, 2020.

2019–2020 Fellows at the New-York Historical Society

New-York Historical is also pleased to announce fellows now in residence during the 2019–2020 academic year. This year’s fellows are:

Schwartz Fellows

Tejasvi Nagaraja comes to New-York Historical from the Charles Warren Center for American History at Harvard University. He is working on a major book project, Soldiers of the American Dream: War Work, Jim Crow and Freedom Movements in the Shadow of U. S. Power. With a Ph.D. from NYU, Nagaraja will continue to work on his project during his tenure at New-York Historical. Based on deep archival research, oral histories, and interviews, Nagaraja’s project documents the racism and discrimination that veterans and others in the war industry faced after WW II. This is Nagaraja’s “greatest generation,” disillusioned and angry black veterans who turned their mounting discontent into the beginnings of the Civil Rights movement of the 1950s. New York is the central node in Nagaraja’s story, a hub of activists and activism, and while he is here he will be using Library materials from the era to finish up his manuscript.

Alexander Manevitz holds a Ph.D. from NYU, where he began work on the project that brings him to New-York Historical: The Rise and Fall of Seneca Village: Remaking Race and Space in 19th-Century New York City. In the centuries old story of the manifold ways in which New York City builds, demolishes, and rebuilds, Seneca Village occupies a unique place. The compelling strength of Manevitz’s project derives from its ability to recast the rise and fall of Seneca Village in terms of gentrification projects today, projects which have the effect of erasing neighborhoods and memories of those neighborhoods. According to Manevitz, Seneca Village was a unique experiment in which African Americans sought to build an experimental community in the face of racism and class tensions. Looking at that community provides a window onto African American attempts to create their own brand of capitalism and urban planning.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow

With a Ph.D. from CUNY, Dr. Lauren Santangelo is an accomplished scholar in the field of women’s studies. Her first book, Suffrage and the City: New York Women Battle for the Ballot (Oxford), has been recently published, and some of the research for that book was done at New-York Historical, where Dr. Santangelo was a Schwartz Fellow in 2013-14. Her current project, which will draw on several recently acquired collections, focuses on Ladies Mile and the gendered consumer culture it spawned. Ladies Mile flourished during the Gilded Age, a time of retail innovation, electrification, the introduction of elevators, etc.—all of which inflected the experience of women as an important, new consumer class.

Helen and Robert Appel Fellow in History and Technology Fellow

Devin Kennedy comes out of the Harvard History of Science program, where he worked with Professor Peter Galison. Kennedy’s area of particular interest is the impact of technology on the operations of Wall Street in the 1960s and ’70s. He sees Wall Street as a site of continuous technological innovation and proposes to tell the story of the machines, computer programs, cables, and satellites that rewired Wall Street during that period. In particular, he will be examining the partnership of the NYSE with the American Stock Exchange to rewire lower Manhattan and the development by the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) of an automated quotation and dealer communication system called NASDAQ. He will be making extensive use of New-York Historical’s important oral history project, Remembering Wall Street, 1950-1980.

Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation—Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellow

With her Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, Sarah Miller-Davenport is a Permanent Lecturer in 20th century U. S. history at the University of Sheffield in the UK. Her project seeks to address a crucial conundrum in the history of New York City: with city teetering on the brink of financial and social collapse in the 1970s how and why did New York embark on an ambitious globalist agenda symbolized by the building of the Twin Towers in 1973. Moreover, why was it so successful in this most unlikely of undertakings? Professor Miller-Davenport does not see globalization as an inevitable force with its own dynamic. Rather, the pursuit of global capital by the city was the result of conscious decisions made by politicians, business men, bureaucrats, and analysts. Her work will focus on the actors, their motives, their successes, and failures. Finally she will look at the impact of globalization on the fabric of the city, its diverse peoples, and its neighborhoods.

Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Women’s History and Public History

Anna K. Danziger Halperin completed her doctorate in history at Columbia University in 2018, focusing on comparative social policy, gender, and childhood. She has previously taught at Columbia University and St. Joseph’s College, Brooklyn. Her dissertation, “Education or Welfare? American and British Child Care Policy, 1965-2004,” analyzed child care policies in the turn to neoliberalism in both the U.S. and Britain. As the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, she will be in residence full-time at New-York Historical through 2021, assisting in the programs of the Center for Women’s History.

Andrew W. Mellon Predoctoral Fellows in Women’s History and Public History

Pamela Walker is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Rutgers University. She specializes in African American History and Women and Gender History. She received a B.A. in History and Journalism from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville and an M.A. in History from the University of New Orleans. Pamela’s dissertation, “‘Everyone Must Think We Really Need Freedom’: Black and White Mothers, The Mississippi Box Project, and the Civil Rights Movement,” examines the relationship between motherhood, the black freedom struggle, white benevolence, and political consciousness during the long 1960s.

Caitlin Wiesner is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History at Rutgers University, specializing in the history of women, gender, and sexuality in the 20th century United States. She earned her Bachelor of the Arts with Distinguished Honors in History and Women’s & Gender Studies from the College of New Jersey in 2015. Her forthcoming dissertation, “Controlling Rape: Black Women, the Feminist Movement Against Sexual Violence, and the State, 1974-1994,” explores how black women’s anti-rape activity in Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and Chicago evolved in response to the state’s growing interest in punishing rape during the War on Crime. In addition to the Mellon Fellowship at New-York Historical, her research has been supported by the Graduate School of New Brunswick, the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, Rutgers Oral History Archives, Smith College Libraries, and the P.E.O. International.

The New-York Historical Society, one of America’s preeminent cultural institutions, is dedicated to fostering research and presenting history and art exhibitions and public programs that reveal the dynamism of history and its influence on the world of today. Founded in 1804, New-York Historical has a mission to explore the richly layered history of New York City and State and the country, and to serve as a national forum for the discussion of issues surrounding the making and meaning of history. Among the more than 1.6 million works that comprise the museum’s art collections are all 435 preparatory watercolors for John James Audubon’s Birds of America; a preeminent collection of Hudson River School landscapes; and an exceptional collection of decorative and fine arts spanning four centuries.

The Patricia D. Klingenstein Library at the New-York Historical Society is home to over 350,000 books, nearly 20,000 linear feet of manuscripts and archives, and distinctive collections of maps, photographs, and prints, as well as ephemera and family papers documenting the history of the United States from a distinctly New York perspective. The Library’s collections are particularly rich in material pertaining to the American Revolution and the early Republic, the Civil War, and the Gilded Age. Significant holdings relate to Robert Livingston and the Livingston family, Rufus King, Horatio Gates, Albert Gallatin, Cadwallader Colden, Robert Fulton, Richard Varick, and many other notable individuals. Also well documented within the Library’s collections are major social movements in American history, especially abolitionism, temperance, and social welfare. The Library’s visual archives include some of the earliest photographs of New York; a significant collection of Civil War images; and the archives of major architectural firms of the later 19th century.

New-York Historical Society Accepting Applications For 2019-2020 Fellowships

New Fellows Welcomed for the 2018-2019 Academic Year

The New-York Historical Society is now accepting applications for its prestigious fellowship program for the 2019–2020 academic year. Leveraging its rich collections of documents, artifacts, and works of art detailing American history from the perspective of New York City, New-York Historical’s fellowships—open to scholars at various times during their academic careers—provide scholars with material resources and an intellectual community to develop new research and publications that illuminate complex issues of the past.

New-York Historical Society logo

New-York Historical Society logo

The available fellowships include:

Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Predoctoral Fellowships in Women’s History
The two recipients of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship in Women’s History should have a strong interest in the fields of women’s and public history. This unusual part-time fellowship introduces young scholars to work outside the academy in public history and may not directly correspond with their dissertation research. They must be currently enrolled students in good standing in a relevant Ph.D. program in the humanities. The Predoctoral Fellows will be in residence part-time at the New-York Historical Society for one academic year, between September 5, 2019, and June 29, 2020, with a stipend of $15,000 per year. This position is not full time and will not receive full benefits.

National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship
One fellowship for the length of a single academic year is supported by the
National Endowment for the Humanities. The fellowship is available to individuals who have completed their formal professional training and have a strong record of accomplishment within their field. There is no restriction relating to age or academic status of applicants. Foreign nationals are eligible to apply if they have lived in the United States for at least three years immediately preceding the application deadline. The ten-month residency will carry a stipend of $42,000, plus benefits. This fellowship will begin September 5, 2019, and will end June 29, 2020.

Bernard and Irene Schwartz Fellowships
Offered jointly with the
Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at the New School, two Bernard and Irene Schwartz Fellowships are open to scholars who will have completed their Ph.D. in History or American Studies before the end of the 2017-2018 academic year. Fellows will teach one course per semester at Eugene Lang College in addition to conducting focused research in residence at the New-York Historical Society. These fellows carry a stipend of $60,000, plus benefits. The fellowship will begin September 5, 2019, and will end June 29, 2020.

Helen and Robert Appel Fellowship in History and Technology
The fellowship will be awarded to a candidate who has earned their Ph.D. within the last three to five years. Research projects should be based on the collections of
New-York Historical and explore the impact of technology on history. The fellowship will carry a stipend of $60,000, plus benefits; it begins September 5, 2019, and lasts through June 29, 2020.

Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation / Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellowship
This fellowship will be awarded to a candidate who has earned their Ph.D. within the last three to five years. Research projects should expand public understanding of New York State history and should include research based on the collections and resources of New-York Historical. This ten-month residency will carry a stipend of $60,000, plus benefits; it begins
September 5, 2019, and lasts through June 29, 2020.

Short-Term Fellowships
A variety of Short-Term Fellowships will be awarded to scholars at any academic level. Fellows will conduct research in the library collections of the
New-York Historical Society for two to four weeks at a time and will receive a stipend of $2,000. These fellowships will begin and end between July 1, 2019, and June 29, 2020.

Fellowship positions at the New-York Historical Society are made possible by an endowment established by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Generous support for fellowships is provided by Bernard Schwartz, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Helen and Robert Appel, the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation, Sid Lapidus, Michael Weisberg, the Lehrman Institute, and Patricia and John Klingenstein. All fellows receive research stipends while in residency, and the Bernard & Irene Schwartz Fellows each teach two courses at Eugene Lang College at the New School for Liberal Arts during their year as resident scholars. Visit nyhistory.org/library/fellowships for instructions and application checklists for each fellowship. The application deadline for all fellowships is December 31, 2018. Continue reading

New-York Historical Society Announces Ten Fellows For The 2015-16 Academic Year

Now Accepting 2016–17 Applicants at this link

The New-York Historical Society is pleased to announce ten fellows who will be in residence during the 201516 academic year. Leveraging its incomparable collections of documents, artifacts, and works of art detailing American history from the perspective of New York City, New-York Historicals fellowships—open to scholars at various times during their academic careers—provide scholars with material resources and an intellectual community to develop new research and publications that illuminate complex issues of the past.

The ambitious and diverse range of research topics that our incoming fellows will tackle—from the role European and African women in expanding slavery, to how turn of the 20th-century New York elite clubs redefined the city’s architectural and social history—are a testament to the reach and importance of  New-York Historical’s  collections and their relevance to  today’s world,” said Valerie Paley, Vice President, Chief Historian, and Dean of Scholarly Programs at New-York Historical.

New-York Historical offers fellowships to scholars dedicated to understanding and promoting American history. Fellowship positions are made possible by the generous support of Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Sid Lapidus, The Lehrman Institute, and Patricia and John Klingenstein. All fellows receive research stipends while in residency, and Bernard & Irene Schwartz Fellows each teach two courses at Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts during their year as resident scholars. This year’s fellows are:

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES FELLOW 
T. Cole Jones is currently Assistant Professor of History at Purdue University. He received a BA in History from Duke University in 2006, an MA in History from Johns Hopkins University in 2009, and completed his PhD from that same institution in 2014. Jones’s proposed research project, “Captives of Liberty: Prisoners of War and the Radicalization of the American Revolution” is a comprehensive analysis of revolutionary American treatment of enemy prisoners and will illuminate the role of wartime violence in the social and political transformations of the era. With the support of the N-YHS, Jones will spend the 2015–2016 academic year mining the Library’s vast assemblage of regimental orderly books, as well as the papers of several Continental Army figures. Jones will also consult the diary of Thomas Gilpin to contextualize the plight of Philadelphia’s Quaker exiles within the larger history of American prisoner-of-war treatment during the revolution. Jones’s work will challenge common understandings of violence during the revolution. He will uncover the central role brutality played in the war.  Initially the revolutionary leadership  adhered to European rules of war, but their vision of restraint did not endure. Jones will examine how American military practices evolved during the war, analyzing the factors that precipitated the escalation of violence and redefined treatment the revolution’s prisoners of war.

ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION FELLOWS
Matthew Karp is currently Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University. He received a BA in History from Amherst College in 2003 and a PhD in History from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011. During his residency at N-YHS, Karp will undertake a full revision of his book manuscript The Foreign Policy of Slavery. This work will consider pro-slavery internationalism and revise the way we see southern slaveholders in the broader context of modern world history. As presidents, cabinet officers, diplomats, and military leaders, southern elites controlled international policy within the powerful American federal governments. Karp will examine how their unwavering dedication  to slavery shaped the course and destiny of U.S. foreign relations.

Stephen Petrus received a BA in History and Philosophy from Gettysburg College in 1995, an MA in History from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa in 1997, and a PhD in History from the City University of New York in 2010. While at N-YHS, Dr. Petrus will conduct archival research within the Library’s collections, including the Shirley Hayes Papers, the Margot Gayle Papers, and the N-YHS Washington Square Park Redevelopment Collection, to complete a project entitled “The Politics and Culture of Greenwich Village and the Rise of the Tumultuous Sixties.” What made the Village a distinct political and cultural entity in the 1950s and 1960s, and why did many political and artistic movements emerge and flourish there? Petrus’ narrative attributes the political and artistic ferment to community organizations; they were engines of political and cultural change. The concentration of its neighborhood institutions attracted an influx of talent from all over the nation. More than simply a bohemian sanctuary during an age of conformity, Greenwich Village was a hub of resistance to the dominant political and cultural order of the mid-century United States.

BERNARD AND IRENE SCHWARTZ FELLOWS 
Christine Walker is currently Assistant Professor of History at Texas Tech University. She received a BA in American Studies from Yale University in 2000, an MA in History from the University of Connecticut in 2007, and completed her PhD at the University of Michigan in 2014. Walker’s project at N-YHS, entitled “The Jamaica Ladies: Gender, Authority, and Atlantic Slavery,” will adapt her PhD dissertation into a manuscript for publication. Her scholarship argues that free women of European and African descent were crucial investors in the expansion of slavery, and situates the lives of free and enslaved people in a broader colonial context. To complete her research, Dr. Walker will review the John Brown Papers, focusing on the letters of Brown family women, and will mine New-York Historical’s extensive print collection to support research on how local and imperial events influenced women’s lives.

Brendan P. O’Malley he earned a BA in History at Vassar College in 1992 and a PhD in History from the City University of New York in 2015. Dr. O’Malley’s project, “Protecting the Stranger: The Origins of U.S. Immigration Regulation in Nineteenth-Century New York,” will be the first book-length examination of the New York State Board of the Commissioners of Emigration— the first government agency in the United States devoted entirely to immigration. The creation of the Emigration Board in 1847 marked a watershed moment in the relationship between government and immigration, expanding it from a local to a statewide and national concern. The commissioners protected vulnerable immigrants from those who sought to defraud them, facilitated their migration Westand gave immigrants access to numerous amenities to ease their transition into a new life in the United States. The N-YHS’s papers of Gulian C. Verplank, the president of the Emigration Board from 1848 until his death in 1870, are critical to this study.

PATRICIA AND JOHN KLINGENSTEIN SHORT-TERM FELLOWS
H. Horatio Joyce is currently a doctoral candidate in History at Oxford University. He received a BA in the History of Art and Architecture from the University of Chicago in 2010 and an MA in the same subject from Boston University in May 2012. Joyce’s project, “Building and Belonging: McKim, Mead & White and the Making of New York City’s Clubland,” is a social and architectural study of private clubs in New York City in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His focus on both elite identity and urban transformation connects the threads of social and architectural history. The project is organized around the architects and clubmen McKim, Mead, and White, and will utilize the records of the Harmonie Club and the Seventh Regiment. Continue reading