Sundance Institute to Present New “Sundance Kids” Section in Collaboration with Utah Film Center at 2014 Sundance Film Festival

NEW YOUTH-ORIENTED CATEGORY WILL FEATURE ONE WORLD PREMIERE AND ONE U.S. PREMIERE

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The Sundance Institute (www.sundance.org) has announced today a new section for younger audiences called “Sundance Kids” for the 2014 Sundance Film Festival (www.sundance.org/festival). Celebrating its 30th anniversary in 2014, the Festival has introduced global audiences to some of the most groundbreaking films of the past three decades, including Beasts of the Southern Wild, Fruitvale Station, Little Miss Sunshine, An Education, sex, lies, and videotape, Reservoir Dogs, The Cove, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, An Inconvenient Truth, Precious, and Napoleon Dynamite, and through its New Frontier Initiative, has showcased the cinematic works of media artists including Isaac Julien, Doug Aitken, Pierre Huyghe, Jennifer Steinkamp, and Matthew Barney. The Festival is a program of the non-profit Sundance Institute®.

Programmed in partnership with the Utah Film Center’s Tumbleweeds Program, the inaugural “Sundance Kids” section features the World Premiere of the English-language version of the acclaimed Ernest and Celestine (Directors: Benjamin Renner, Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar) and the U.S. Premiere of Zip & Zap and the Marble Gang (Director: Oskar Santos), and will be part of the 2014 Festival, running from January 16-26 in Park City, Salt Lake City, Ogden and Sundance, Utah.

Ernest and Celestine / France, Belgium, Luxembourg (Directors: Benjamin Renner, Stéphane Aubier, Vincent Patar, Screenwriter: Daniel Pennac) – Unlike her fellow mice, Celestine is an artist and a dreamer. When she nearly ends up as breakfast for a bear named Ernest, the two form an unlikely bond that is quickly challenged by their respective communities.  Cast: Forest Whitaker, Mackenzie Foy, Lauren Bacall, Paul Giamatti, William H. Macy, Megan Mullally. Recommended for ages 5+.

Zip and Zap and the Marble Gang director Oskar Santos (photo credit - Jose Haro)

Zip and Zap and the Marble Gang director Oskar Santos (photo credit – Jose Haro)

Zip & Zap and the Marble Gang / Spain (Director: Oskar Santos, Screenwriters: Francisco Roncal, Jorge Lara, Oskar Santos) – Zip and Zap are punished by being sent to a re-education center. Guided by intelligence, they uncover a mysterious secret hidden deep within the school and end up having the most exciting adventure of their lives. Cast: Javier Gutiérrez, Daniel Cerezo, Raúl Rivas, Claudia Vega, Marcos Ruiz, Fran García. Recommended for ages 9+.

The Utah Film Center brings the world of film to local audiences through free community screenings and discussions, outreach programs, and visiting artists and professionals. Emphasizing social content and artistic excellence, they present the best documentary, independent, and dramatic cinema year-round and collaborate with various educational and community organizations to promote a diversity of ideas, to provide forums for underrepresented groups, and to develop new audiences for film. Movie screenings take place in Salt Lake City, Kamas, Lehi (coming soon), Logan, Moab, Ogden, Orem, Park City, and more coming soon.

The 2014 Tumbleweeds Film Festival for Children and Youth runs March, 14-16 at the Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center and the City Library in Salt Lake City.  The Utah Film Center’s Tumbleweeds program is generously sponsored by the Sorenson Legacy Foundation, George S. and Delores Doré Eccles Foundation, Art Works for Kids and Zions Bank.  The annual Tumbleweeds Film Festival is the only film festival in the Intermountain West that presents films specifically for children and youth.

The addition of Sundance Kids allows us to engage younger audiences around the power of independent film,” said Trevor Groth, Director of Programming. “We are excited to collaborate with Tumbleweeds and The Utah Film Center in presenting Sundance Kids.”

This unique collaboration between the Utah Film Center and Sundance Institute is a great opportunity to elevate the profile of international and independent films for kids,” said Patrick Hubley, Artistic Director of the Utah Film Center and Founder of Tumbleweeds. “We launched our Tumbleweeds programming four years ago with the goal of fostering the next generation of filmmakers and film fans, and we hope this programming will inspire the creativity and imaginations of young film-goers not only in Utah but across the country.”

Visit www.sundance.org/festival for more information about screening dates, times and locations.

Isaac Julien: Ten Thousand Waves at The Museum of Modern Art

November 25, 2013–February 17, 2014

The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, second floor

Ten Thousand Waves (2010) is an immersive film installation projected onto nine double-sided screens arranged in a dynamic structure. Especially conceived for The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, the installation choreographs visitors’ movement through the space. The original inspiration for the recently acquired, 50-minute moving image installation was the Morecambe Bay tragedy of 2004, in which more than 20 Chinese cockle pickers drowned on a flooded sandbank off the coast in northwest England.

Isaac Julien. Maiden of Silence (Ten Thousand Waves). 2010. Endura Ultra photograph I, 180 x 240 cm. Courtesy of the artist, Metro Pictures, New York and Victoria Miro Gallery, London.

Isaac Julien. Maiden of Silence (Ten Thousand Waves). 2010. Endura Ultra photograph I, 180 x 240 cm. Courtesy of the artist, Metro Pictures, New York and Victoria Miro Gallery, London.

Julien poetically interweaves contemporary Chinese culture with its ancient myths—including the fable of the goddess Mazu (played here by Maggie Cheung), which comes from the Fujian Province, from where the Morecambe Bay workers originated. In one section, the Tale of Yishan Island, Julien recounts the story of 16th-century fishermen lost and imperiled at sea. Central to the legend is the sea goddess figure who leads the fishermen to safety. In a preceding section, shot at the Shanghai Film Studios, actress Zhao Tao takes part in a re-enactment of the classic 1930s Chinese film The Goddess. Additional collaborators include calligrapher Gong Fagen, the film and video artist Yang Fudong, cinematographer Zhao Xiaoshi and poet Wang Ping from whom Julien commissioned “Small Boats”, a poem that is recited in Ten Thousand Waves.

Isaac Julien. Ten Thousand Waves. 2010. Installation view, Bass Museum of Art, Miami. Nine-screen installation, 35mm film transferred to High Definition 9.2 surround sound, 49’ 41”.  Courtesy of the artist, Metro Pictures, New York and Victoria Miro Gallery, London. Photograph: Peter Haroldt

Isaac Julien. Ten Thousand Waves. 2010. Installation view, Bass Museum of Art, Miami. Nine-screen installation, 35mm film transferred to High Definition 9.2 surround sound, 49’ 41”. Courtesy of the artist, Metro Pictures, New York and Victoria Miro Gallery, London. Photograph: Peter Haroldt

The installation is staged on the streets of both modern and old Shanghai, and includes music and sounds that fuse Eastern and Western traditions. The installation’s sound structure is as immersive as its sequenced images, with contributions from, among others, London-based musician Jah Wobble and the Chinese Dub Orchestra, and an original score by Spanish contemporary classical composer Maria de Alvear.

London-based Julien is an internationally acclaimed artist and filmmaker. After graduating from St. Martin’s School of Art in London in 1984, he came to prominence with his 1989 drama-documentary Looking for Langston, a poetic exploration of Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance. Informed by his film background, Julien’s gallery installations form fractured narratives that reflect a critical thinking about race, globalization, and representation. In 2008 MoMA MoMA_Logocoproduced Julien’s film Derek (2008), a filmic biography of the late British filmmaker Derek Jarman.

Ten Thousand Waves was conceived and created over four years. In a reflection of the movement of people across continents, audiences move freely around the Marron Atrium with the ability to watch from whatever vantage points they choose.

It was organized by Sabine Breitwieser, former Chief Curator (until January 31, 2013), with Martin Hartung, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art, major support for the exhibition is provided by Leila and Mickey Straus. Additional funding is provided by The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art, and the MoMA Annual Exhibition Fund.

The Museum of Modern Art’s 2013 Film Benefit Honors Tilda Swinton on November 5

The Museum of Modern Art’s 2013 Film Benefit, to be held on November 5, will honor actress Tilda Swinton, an Academy Award winner for Best Supporting Actress for Michael Clayton (2007). Swinton has starred in a wide range of films including Orlando (1992), The Deep End (2001), The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2007), Julia (2008), Burn After Reading (2008), I am Love (2009), We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011), and Only Lovers Left Alive (2013). Throughout her career, Swinton has worked with notable artists/filmmakers including Doug Aitken, Lynn Hershman-Leeson, Derek Jarman, Olivier Saillard, and Isaac Julien as well as conceiving her performance art piece The Maybe which she first performed at the Serpentine gallery in London in 1995 and most recently—in 2013—at MoMA.moma-logo

The honorary co-chairs for the 2013 Film Benefit are Marie-Josée Kravis, President, and Jerry I. Speyer, Chairman, of the Museum’s Board of Trustees. The event’s co-chairs include Wes Anderson, David Bowie, Ralph Fiennes, Karl Lagerfeld, and Anna Wintour.

The Film Benefit will be highlighted by a tribute recognizing Swinton’s acclaimed work and a gala dinner. The event is generously sponsored by Chanel.

Rajendra Roy, The Celeste Bartos Chief Curator of Film at MoMA, states: ”As traditional boundaries between artistic practices have faded, and the influence of the avant-garde and art world-based moving image makers has infiltrated every area of film production, Tilda Swinton has been a standard-bearer for innovation and risk. Her multihyphenate talents—actor, performer, activist, muse—have made her a leading light across a spectrum of cinematic endeavors.”

MoMA’s vast film collection includes a number of films featuring Swinton: Aria (1987), Friendship’s Death (1987), Blue (1993), Das Offene Universum (1993), Conceiving Ada (1997), Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon (1998), Adaptation (2002), Teknolust (2002), Strange Culture (2007), Derek (2008), and We Need to Talk About Kevin (2011).

The Film Benefit raises funds for the acquisition and preservation of great film works, as well as providing support for upcoming film exhibitions at MoMA. Previous honorees include Quentin Tarantino, Pedro Almodóvar, Kathryn Bigelow, Tim Burton, and Baz Luhrmann. Tables to the Film Benefit are available for $75,000, $50,000, and $25,000 and may be reserved by calling (212) 708-9680.