Saks Fifth Avenue Unveils New Beauty Floor In New York Flagship

The ‘future of beauty’ opens on second floor as part of Grand Renovation

Saks Fifth Avenue FaceGym

Saks Fifth Avenue FaceGym – SAKS FIFTH AVENUE UNVEILS NEW BEAUTY FLOOR IN NEW YORK FLAGSHIP (Courtesy of Justin Bridges for Saks Fifth Avenue) 

Saks Fifth Avenue today opens the new, 32,000-square-foot beauty space on the second floor of the New York City Flagship Store with more than 120 color cosmetics, skincare, fragrance, and wellness brands —58 of which are new to the floor. (See the full list below.) With a significant focus on experiences, the floor is approximately 40-percent larger and now includes 15 new spa rooms along with services such as medi-spa treatments, facials, massages, manicures, brow services, a flower shop and more. By moving the Beauty department to the second floor, Saks is evolving the way customers shop and experience beauty. (Saks New York is located at 611 Fifth Avenue at 50th Street, and is open Monday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.)

Saks Fifth Avenue Apothecary

Saks Fifth Avenue Apothecary – SAKS FIFTH AVENUE UNVEILS NEW BEAUTY FLOOR IN NEW YORK FLAGSHIP (Courtesy of Justin Bridges for Saks Fifth Avenue)

The brands represented on the new beauty space include (in alphabetic order) Acqua Di Parma, AERIN Beauty, Aesop, Alexander McQueen, Amouage, Angela Caglia, Annick Goutal, Art Meets Art, Artis, Balenciaga, Blink Brow Bar London, Bobbi Brown, Bond No. 9, Bottega Veneta, Bulgari, Burberry, By Terry, Care/of, Cartier, Cellcosmet, Chanel, Chantecaille, Chloé, Christian Dior, Christian Louboutin, Christophe Robin, Chuda, Cire Trudon, Clarins, Clé de Peau Beauté, Clinique, Clive Christian, Creed, Decorté, Diana Vreeland, Dior, Diptyque, Dolce & Gabbana, D.S. & Durga, Dyson, EB Florals, Estée Lauder, Ex Nihilo, FaceGym, Floraïku, Foreo, Frédéric Malle, GHD, Giorgio Armani, Givenchy, Glow Recipe, Gucci, Guerlain, Hermès, Histoires De Parfums, Hotel Couture, House of Sillage, Jason Wu, Jo Malone London, Kiehl’s Since 1851, Kilian, L’Artisan Parfumeur, La Mer, La Prairie, Lancer Skincare, Lancôme, Laura Mercier, Le Labo, Leonor Greyl, MAC, Maison Francis Kurkdjian, Mancera, Marc Jacobs, Mario Badescu, Martine de Richeville, Marvis, Mason Pearson, Molton Brown, Montale, Moroccanoil, Mugler, Narciso Rodriguez, Nars, Natura Bissé, NEST Fragrances, Omorovicza, Ormonde Jayne, Orveda, Patchology, Penhaligon’s, Philip Kingsley, Prada, Proenza Schouler, R+Co, Raincry, ReFa, RéVive, Rodial, RODIN olio lusso, Roja Dove, Rossano Ferretti, Sakara Life, Salvatore Ferragamo, Serge Lutens, Shiseido, simplehuman, Sisley Paris, SK-II, SKINNEY MedSpa, Slip, sundays, Supergoop!, Tammy Fender, Tata Harper, The Perfumer’s Story, Tiffany & Co., Tom Ford, Trish McEvoy, Valentino, Valmont, Viktor & Rolf, Vilhelm Parfumerie and YSL.

“As part of Saks’ overall growth strategy, we continue to look for ways to innovate, create and disrupt. The bold decision to move Beauty to the second floor, from the traditional main floor model, allowed us to build a one-of-a-kind destination enabling Saks to create the epitome of an experiential beauty floor,” said Marc Metrick, president, Saks Fifth Avenue. “We continue to apply the principles of what we call The New Luxury to everything we do. What we’ve done with Beauty gives the customer a warmer environment, differentiated from what they can get anywhere else and creates a reason to come to Saks and experience our brand.

Saks Fifth Avenue EB Florals

Saks Fifth Avenue EB Florals — SAKS FIFTH AVENUE UNVEILS NEW BEAUTY FLOOR IN NEW YORK FLAGSHIP (Courtesy of Justin Bridges for Saks Fifth Avenue)

The new beauty floor is the latest step in the New York flagship’s Grand Renovation. Saks redefined the department store concept with the revolutionary migration of Beauty from the main floor to the second floor. The Saks Store Planning and Design team, in collaboration with Gensler, spearheaded the design focusing on opening up the space, creating broad sightlines across the floor and modernizing traditional finishes that complement the brand’s heritage. The team used custom agglomerate white stone flooring from Italy throughout and restored original windows facing Fifth Avenue, 49th Street, and 50th Street, allowing natural light to the floor and north and south facing views of the city. Continue reading

Nordstrom Men’s Store NYC Opens

Retailer Debuts First Manhattan Flagship

Nordstrom, Inc. opened the doors Thursday, April 12, to its very first flagship, full-line New York City location and first ever stand-alone men’s store at 235 West 57th Street. The three-level 47,000 square foot store offers a differentiated merchandise assortment across all categories, including popular and designer brands, along with a range of convenient services to serve customers on their terms.

NORDSTROM LOGO

Nordstrom Incorporated logo. (PRNewsFoto)

The Nordstrom Men’s Store NYC features the company’s newest store design concepts, including an all-glass façade to bring in more natural light, unboxing the display windows, and connecting the shopping experience to the city. An open, flexible floor plan allows for an evolving curation of how products are displayed over time, depending on what New York customers respond to. The store environment will create a sense of discovery, allowing customers to navigate easily and find new brands they haven’t experienced before.

Calvin-Klein-boutique-at-Nordstrom-Men-s-Store-NYC---Naho-Kubota--1

Calvin Klein Boutique at Nordstrom Men’s Store NYC

Nordstrom has been a longtime believer in investing in artwork for its stores. New Yorkers will experience an extensive collection, featuring 39 works by both international and American artists, with a quarter being local. Suspended in the center of a three-story staircase, a floating, diaphanous tree sculpture entitled “Arctic Tree” by the Seattle-based artist John Grade is a nod to the retailer’s Seattle roots.

EXCLUSIVE MERCHANDISE CONCEPTS
Olivia Kim, Nordstrom vice president of creative projects has curated a special Comme des Garçons(CDG) shop that will feature one of the largest local selections of the fashion house’s coveted brands. Olivia commissioned artist Marc Hundley to design a space that invokes both the ethos of CDG and the streets of New York City. In a first for Nordstrom, the men’s flagship will also feature designer shops by Calvin Klein, Balenciaga, Valentino, and Dior. Each space is united by a chainmail motif, but are distinguished by personalized fixtures adhering to each brand. The shoe department houses a Christian Louboutin shop displaying a wide range of the shoemaker’s sporty and formal offerings. The Nike Men’s Project, a sportswear and shoe destination for style and fitness-obsessed customers, will offer the brand’s latest sneakers and apparel collections.

Comme-des-Garcons-shop-at-Nordstrom-Men-s-Store-NYC---Naho-Kubota--3

Comme des Garcons shop at Nordstrom Men’s Store NYC

The store also features an array of customization and personalization experiences, including the Levi’s Tailor Shop, where customers can shop Levi’s Authorized Vintage, one of the largest vintage denim collections in existence, and also design custom embroidery on any item, heat press a shirt or get an express hem while they wait; Shinola will offer watch customization in addition to a selection of tech products; exclusive to the flagship, Samuelson Custom Suit Visualizer is an interactive digital made-to-measure suiting experience at an accessible price point; Eton Endless Aisle is a digital touchscreen offering an expanded assortment of dress shirts and ties; and cult-favorite Le Labo will create personalized fragrance labels in the grooming department. Continue reading

The Metropolitan Museum of Art Announces Schedule of Spring and Summer 2018 Exhibitions

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has announced the schedule of its upcoming spring and summer seasons. Highlights of the upcoming 2018 exhibition season are:

Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism

Exhibition Dates: January 17–July 15, 2018

Exhibition Location: Gallery 851

William Wegman, Before-After

William Wegman, Before/On/After (detail), 1972. Gelatin silver prints. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Vital Projects Fund Inc. Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, 2016. © William Wegman, Courtesy the artist

Opening at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on January 17, the exhibition Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism will survey Conceptual Art as it developed in Southern California in the 1970s. The show is occasioned by the artist William Wegman’s extraordinary recent gift to the Museum of 174 short videos that he made between 1970 and 1999—his entire career in the medium. A 90-minute selection of videos from this gift will be shown along with photographs and drawings by Wegman as well as drawings, prints, and photographs by his contemporaries in Southern California—John Baldessari, Vija Celmins, Douglas Huebler, Ed Ruscha, and others.

Wegman took up video while teaching painting at the University of Illinois in the mid-1960s. Like many artists using the then-new medium, Wegman appreciated video—like photography—for its lo-fi reproducibility and anti-artistic qualities. Also, unlike film, where the negative must be developed and processed before viewing, video was like a sketchbook that allowed revision in real time.

It wasn’t until Wegman moved to Southern California in 1970 that his video production took off. Although he lived in Los Angeles for only three years, the artist found his method: short, staged vignettes using everyday items in which expectations are reversed and puns and homonyms pursued to absurd conclusions.

The artist’s key early collaborator for most of these short videos was his dog, a Weimaraner called Man Ray, who enthusiastically participates in the goings-on. In contrast to other early adopters of video, Wegman eschewed an aesthetic of boredom to focus on humorous, improvised scenarios in which he deflated the pretensions of painting and sculpture while also lampooning the pieties and self-seriousness of Conceptual Art—at a time when it was being codified and institutionalized. Beneath the slacker humor, however, are poignant points about failure and the reversal of expectations that resonate with work by other West Coast Conceptualists—the friends and fellow travelers also featured in the exhibition.

Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism is organized by Doug Eklund, Curator in the Department of Photographs at The Met.

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris

Exhibition Dates: January 23–April 15, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue, Gallery 918, Lila Acheson Wallace Wing

Joseph Cornell (American, 1903–1972). Homage to Juan Gris, 1953–54.

Joseph Cornell (American, 1903-1972). Homage to Juan Gris, 1953-54. Box construction. Philadelphia Museum of Art, Purchased: John D. McIlhenny Fund. Art © The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

On October 22, 1953, Joseph Cornell wrote in his diary: “Juan Gris/Janis Yesterday.” He was referring to the previous day’s outing, when, on one of his frequent trips to the gallery district in midtown Manhattan, Cornell visited the Sidney Janis Gallery on East 57th Street. Among a presentation of approximately 30 works by modern artists, one alone captivated Cornell—Juan Gris’s celebrated collage The Man at the Café (1914), which is now a promised gift to the Museum as part of the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection.

This shadowy profile of a fedora-topped man immediately inspired Cornell to begin a new series: some 18 boxes, two collages and one sandtray created in homage to Juan Gris, whom he called a “warm fraternal spirit.”

When he began the Gris series in 1953, Cornell was an established artist, two decades into his career. His shadow box assemblages —a genre he is credited with pioneering—were exhibited regularly in major galleries and museums, and acquired by collectors and museums for their permanent collections. Cornell gathered his banal yet evocative materials during his forays in New York City or Long Island. His sources were many and varied; he made his assemblages from old journals and French history textbooks, postage stamps, fishing tackle, cordial glasses, clay pipes, and “flotsam and jetsam” to use his words. From these disparate fragments, Cornell wove together concepts, subjects, and lives that fascinated him. The complex network of references contained in each box often obscures, if not conceals, the artist’s intended theme or subject. For instance, in his Gris series, Cornell incorporated reproductions of Gris’s works into only one box, as well as in two collages and the one sandtray. Without these reproductions and the inscriptions Cornell made on some of the constructions, most of the works in his Gris series would be indistinguishable from those in his Aviary and Hotel series from around the same time – although for his homages to Gris he used the great white-crested cockatoo exclusively. Few viewers would have known about Cornell’s extensive notes found in his diaries and his Gris dossier, a working source file in which he stored materials for inspiration or later use. Cornell’s research on Gris included the acquisition of biographical publications and reviews on the Spanish-born artist, and he bolstered his knowledge of Gris and his art through conversations with artist friends such as Marcel Duchamp and Robert Motherwell.

In The Man at the Café, Gris worked in oil paint and pasted newsprint to present a mysterious male figure reading a newspaper, which obscures his face. The shapes of the man’s stylized fedora and its prominent black shadow cast against the café wall held a particular fascination for Cornell. For the central figure of his Gris series, Cornell selected a white cockatoo to contrast with the dramatic blacks, but he also embedded a reference to Gris’s shadow play and the fedora’s silhouette. Indeed, the bird, or its distinctive silhouette, appears in all but two of the boxes, with Cornell mimicking the relationship between positive and negative space by pasting the bird print to a wood cutout, outlining it, or echoing its contours with black paper.

Although Gris remained the initial catalyst for the series, Cornell also incorporated allusions to his own passions and pastimes as revealed in the foreign language texts, hotel advertisements, and maps. An aficionado of ballet and opera, Cornell attended performances in New York City and contributed illustrations to the Dance Index, a periodical edited by New York City Ballet co-founder Lincoln Kirstein in the 1940s. The white, feathered and tulle costumes of the principals dancing Swan Lake and La Sylphide reminded him of birds. Cornell was also enamored with the nineteenth century, the era of the romantic ballet and bel canto singing, and wove these birds of song and stage into the Gris series as well.

Completed over a period of 13 years, Cornell’s series of Gris shadow boxes is more extensive in number than any other that the artist openly dedicated to one of his admired luminaries of stage, screen, literature, or the visual arts. The main protagonist of Cornell’s Juan Gris series is a bird—the great white-crested cockatoo—specifically, an image taken from a 19th-century print of the species that Cornell repeatedly used along with Photostats or silhouettes of the bird’s form to explore the fascinating shadows that Gris produced in his own practice. At The Met, the exhibition Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris will reunite for the first time nearly a dozen boxes from Cornell’s Gris series together with the Cubist masterpiece, The Man at the Café.

The exhibition is made possible by the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust.

Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris inaugurates a series of dossier exhibitions under the auspices of the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

As part of its mission to ensure the ongoing study of modern art with a particular focus on Cubism, the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center offers fellowships, lectures, and other programs to support new scholarship on the Leonard A. Lauder Cubist Collection and other 20th-century art. Each dossier exhibition will be related to a work or group of works from the Collection. Birds of a Feather: Joseph Cornell’s Homage to Juan Gris and future projects in the series are intended to provide a deeper context for understanding Cubism, its protagonists, and greater influences, to contribute exceptional scholarship, and to offer a fresh approach to the subject of looking and thinking about modern art.

The exhibition is curated by Mary Clare McKinley, an independent art historian based in London and former Assistant Curator in the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A catalog, made possible by the Leonard A. Lauder Research Center for Modern Art, accompanies the exhibition and contains a major essay, written by McKinley, and the first-ever documentary catalog of Cornell’s Gris series.

Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings

Exhibition Dates: January 30–May 13, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue, Floor 1, Gallery 746, The Erving and Joyce Wolf Gallery

Thomas Cole (American, 1801–1848). View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts,

Thomas Cole (American, 1801-1848). View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm-The Oxbow (detail), 1836. Oil on canvas, 51 1/2 x 76 in. (130.8 x 193 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1908

Met Museum to Explore Transatlantic Career of Renowned Painter Thomas Cole

Exhibition Marks 200th Anniversary of the Artist’s Arrival in America

Celebrated as one of America’s preeminent landscape painters, Thomas Cole (1801–1848) was born in northern England at the start of the Industrial Revolution, emigrated to the United States in his youth, and traveled extensively throughout England and Italy as a young artist. He returned to America to create some of his most ambitious works and inspire a new generation of American artists, launching a national school of landscape art. Opening January 30, the exhibition Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings will examine, for the first time, the artist’s transatlantic career and engagement with European art. With Cole’s masterwork The Oxbow (1836) as its centerpiece, the exhibition will feature more than three dozen examples of his large-scale landscape paintings, oil studies, and works on paper. Consummate paintings by Cole will be juxtaposed with works by European masters including J. M. W. Turner and John Constable, among others, highlighting the dialogue between American and European artists and establishing Cole as a major figure in 19th-century landscape art within a global context. The exhibition marks the 200th anniversary of Cole’s arrival in America.

The exhibition was organized by Elizabeth Kornhauser, the Alice Pratt Brown Curator of American Painting and Sculpture at The Met, and Tim Barringer, Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University, with Chris Riopelle, Curator of Post-1800 Paintings at the National Gallery, London.

The exhibition follows the chronology of Cole’s life, beginning with his origins in recently industrialized northern England, his arrival in the United States in 1818, and his embrace of the American wilderness as a novel subject for landscape art of the New World. Early works by Cole will reveal his prodigious talent. After establishing himself as the premier landscape painter of the young United States, he traveled back to Europe.

The next section will explore in depth Cole’s return to England in 1829–31 and his travels in Italy in 1831–32, revealing the development of his artistic processes. He embraced the on-site landscape oil study and adopted elements of the European landscape tradition reaching back to Claude Lorrain. He learned from contemporary painters in England, including Turner, Constable, and John Martin, and furthered his studies in landscape and figure painting in Italy. By exploring this formative period in Cole’s life, the exhibition will offer a significant revision of existing accounts of his work, which have, until now, emphasized the American aspects of his formation and identity. The exhibition will also provide new interpretations of Cole’s work within the expanded contexts of the history of the British Empire, the rise of the United States, the Industrial Revolution, and the American wilderness, and Romantic theories of history.

Upon his return to America, Cole applied the lessons he had learned abroad to create the five-part series The Course of Empire (1834–36). These works reveal a definition of the new American Sublime that comes to its fullest expression in The Oxbow (1836). Finally, the exhibition concludes with an examination of Cole’s legacy in the works of the next generation of American landscape painters whom Cole personally mentored, notably Asher B. Durand and Frederic E. Church.

Exhibition design is by Brian Butterfield, Senior Exhibition Designer; graphics are by Ria Roberts, Graphic Designer; and lighting is by Clint Ross Coller and Richard Lichte, Lighting Design Managers, all of The Met Design Department. After the presentation at The Met, the exhibition will be shown at The National Gallery, London (June 11–October 7, 2018).

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalog suitable for both scholars and the general public. With new information on Cole’s life and revisionist interpretations of his major work, the publication will also feature research by The Met’s conservation team into Cole’s methods as a painter, illuminating this previously neglected area. The catalog will be available for purchase in The Met Store (hardcover, $65). The catalog is made possible by the William Cullen Bryant Fellows of The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

A series of Education programs will complement the exhibition. MetLiveArts will feature a 40-minute acoustic performance by Sting in the Museum’s Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium on April 24, 25, and 26 (7:30 p.m.). Prior to each concert, ticket holders will enjoy a special viewing of the exhibition with curators Elizabeth Kornhauser and Tim Barringer. The April 24 performance of “Sting: Atlantic Crossings” is for Members only. Tickets will be available for purchase in early 2018.

On April 8 (2 p.m.), as part of MetSpeaks, American artist Ed Ruscha will discuss his seminal five-part Course of Empire series (1992 and 2003–5) with his friend, the author, and artist Tom McCarthy, who resides in London. Tickets for this event will be available for purchase.

Met curator Elizabeth Kornhauser and paintings conservator Dorothy Mahon will explore Cole’s work methods and techniques with artist Stephen Hannock on February 7 (6:00 p.m.), revealing the layers of meaning in Cole’s iconic painting, The Oxbow. This program is part of the Conversations With… series.

Elizabeth Kornhauser will moderate a Sunday at The Met discussion on April 15 (2 p.m.) on Cole’s role as a proto-environmental artist with scholars Alan Braddock and Rebecca Bedell and artist Michel Auder. (Auder’s 2017 work The Course of Empire was shown at the Documenta exhibition in Kassel, Germany.) These programs are free with Museum admission.

In a Gallery Performance on April 27 (6:00 p.m.), exhibition co-curator Tim Barringer will explore the musical and literary references that inspired Cole. This program is free with Museum admission, advance registration is required.

Education programs are made possible in part by the Clara Lloyd-Smith Weber Fund and The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts.

The exhibition, organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and The National Gallery, London, is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation, White & Case LLP, the Enterprise Holdings Endowment, and the Terra Foundation for American Art. It is also supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve

Exhibition Dates: February 6–May 27, 2018

Exhibition Location: The Met Breuer, Floor 2

Leon Golub (American, 1922–2004). Gigantomachy II (detail), 1966

Leon Golub (American, 1922-2004). Gigantomachy II (detail), 1966. Acrylic on linen, 9 ft. 11 1/2 in. x 24 ft. 10 1/2 in. (303.5 x 758.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts and Stephen, Philip, and Paul Golub, 2016 (2016.696). © The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Opening February 6, 2018 at The Met Breuer, Leon Golub: Raw Nerve will present a selective survey of this groundbreaking artist’s work. Timed to celebrate the 2016 gift to The Met of the monumental painting Gigantomachy II (1966) from The Nancy Spero and Leon Golub Foundation for the Arts and Stephen, Philip, and Paul Golub, the exhibition will present highlights from Golub’s long, eminent career, drawn from distinguished private collections as well as the artist’s estate. Golub’s unflinching portrayals of power and brutality have profound relevance today, as does his belief in the ethical responsibility of the artist.

Born in Chicago, Golub (1922-2004) occupies a singular position in the history of mid to late 20th-century art. His devotion to the figure, his embrace of expressionism, his amalgamation of modern and classical sources, and his commitment to social justice distinguish his practice as an artist. The centerpiece of Leon Golub: Raw Nerve is Gigantomachy II, a commanding, epic work measuring nearly 10 by 25 feet. Created in 1966, two years after Golub joined the Artists and Writers Protest Group and began to lobby actively against the Vietnam War, this political allegory recounts the story of a mythic battle between the Olympian gods and a race of giants. In Golub’s contemporary retelling, there are no heroes, only anonymous men in various states of distress, their bodies riven by scars and wounds. Alongside this powerful and terrifying work, Leon Golub: Raw Nerve will feature paintings from all of the artist’s most important series, including Pylon, White Squad, Riot, and Horsing Around. These will be accompanied by a 1970 painting of a victim of the Vietnam War, as well as a suite of early paintings that reflect Golub’s study of antiquity, and a group of unsettling portraits of the Brazilian dictator Ernesto Geisel. Also on view will be works on paper that represent subjects of longstanding interest to the artist, from mercenaries, interrogators, and the victims of violence to political figures, nudes, and animals, all of them rendered in the raw, visceral style for which he is justly celebrated. Taken together, the works in Leon Golub: Raw Nerve, which spans the entire arc of Golub’s career, attest to his incisive perspective on the catastrophes that afflict human civilization as well as his critique of violence and belligerent masculinity.

Leon Golub: Raw Nerve is organized by Kelly Baum, Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon Polsky Curator of Contemporary Art in The Met’s Department of Modern and Contemporary Art. Continue reading

The Business of Fashion: LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton Announces Record 2016 Results

LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, the world’s leading luxury products group, recorded revenue of €37.6 billion in 2016, an increase of 5% over the previous year. Organic revenue growth was 6%.lvmh-moet-hennessy-louis-vuitton

In the fourth quarter, revenue increased by 9% compared to the same period of 2015. Organic growth was 8%. The American market remains on a good track as does Europe. Asia, excluding Japan, continued its good momentum.

Profit from recurring operations reached €7 billion in 2016, an increase of 6%, to which all business groups, apart from selective distribution, contributed. This result compares to 2015 which was itself a year of growth. Operating margin reached 18.7%. Group share of net profit was €3 981 million, representing growth of 11%.

Bernard Arnault, Chairman and CEO of LVMH, said: “LVMH achieved an excellent performance in 2016 within a context of geopolitical and economic instability. Continued innovation, entrepreneurial spirit and the quest for excellence: all Maisons continue to assert these core values while maintaining rigorous execution of their strategies on the ground. In an environment which remains uncertain, we can count on the appeal of our brands and the agility of our teams to strengthen, once again in 2017, our leadership in the universe of high quality products.

Key highlights from 2016 include:

  • Record revenue and profit from recurring operations
  • Growth in the United States, Europe and Asia
  • Good performance of Wines & Spirits in all regions
  • The success of both iconic and new products at Louis Vuitton, where profitability remains at an exceptional level
  • Progress at Fendi
  • The sale of Donna Karan and the acquisition of Rimowa, a leader in luggage of excellence
  • Good momentum at Parfums Christian Dior driven by successful product innovations
  • Market share gains at Bvlgari and TAG Heuer
  • Growth at Sephora which strengthened its position in all its markets and in digital
  • Free cash flow of €3 974 million, an increase of 8%
  • Gearing of 12% at end of December 2016

WINES & SPIRITS: GOOD YEAR WITH PROGRESS IN THE UNITED STATES AND REBOUND IN SHIPMENTS TO CHINA

The Wines & Spirits Business Group recorded an increase in organic revenue of 7 %. On a reported basis, revenue growth was 5 %. Profit from recurring operations increased by 10 %. With volumes up 3%, solid growth continues for champagne and prestige cuvees performed particularly well. Hennessy cognac enjoyed an excellent year with 10% volume growth. The American market is growing well and China saw better momentum after a tough 2015 due to destocking by distributors. Other spirits, Glenmorangie and Belvedere, continued their growth.

LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton is represented in Wines and Spirits by a portfolio of brands that includes Moët & Chandon, Dom Pérignon, Veuve Clicquot Ponsardin, Krug, Ruinart, Mercier, Château d’Yquem, Domaine du Clos des Lambrays, Château Cheval Blanc, Hennessy, Glenmorangie, Ardbeg, Belvedere, Chandon, Cloudy Bay, Terrazas de los Andes, Cheval des Andes, Cape Mentelle, Newton, Bodega Numanthia and Ao Yun.

FASHION & LEATHER GOODS: GOOD PERFORMANCE OF LOUIS VUITTON, OTHER BRANDS STRENGTHENED THEIR POSITIONS

The Fashion & Leather Goods Business Group recorded organic revenue growth of 4% in 2016. On a reported basis, revenue growth was 3 %. Profit from recurring operations increased by 10%. Louis Vuitton had a good year driven by the level of creativity across all its businesses. The continued success of its iconic product range and the strong demand for recent creations such as the new luggage designed by Marc Newson and the Louis Vuitton fragrances, all contributed to this growth. Fendi recorded robust growth crossing the symbolic revenue threshold of 1 billion euros during the year. Loro Piana continued to expand its distribution network and opened a flagship store in Paris. Céline, Loewe and Kenzo all continued to grow. Marc Jacobs continued to work on changes to its collection. Donna Karan was sold in December to the American G-III group. Rimowa, world leader in luggage of excellence, joined the LVMH group.

Its Fashion and Leather Goods division includes Louis Vuitton, Céline, Loewe, Kenzo, Givenchy, Thomas Pink, Fendi, Emilio Pucci, Marc Jacobs, Berluti, Nicholas Kirkwood, Loro Piana and Rimowa.

PERFUMES & COSMETICS: CONTINUED SUCCESS OF INNOVATIONS; EXCELLENT PERFORMANCE IN MAKEUP

The Perfumes & Cosmetics Business Group recorded organic revenue growth of 8%. On a reported basis, revenue growth was 6%. Profit from recurring operations increased by 5%. The inauguration of the new atelier for the creation of fragrances, Les Fontaines Parfumées, at Grasse was a highlight of the year. Parfums Christian Dior grew market share in all regions, driven by the worldwide success of Sauvage and the vitality of its iconic perfumes J’adore and Miss Dior. The progress of makeup also contributed to the Maison’s excellent performance. Guerlain benefitted from the successful launch of its new makeup collection inspired by its fragrance La Petite Robe Noire. Benefit experienced strong growth driven by the success of its new collection for eyebrows. Make Up For Ever, Fresh and Kat Von D performed well.

LVMH is present in the Perfumes and Cosmetics sector with Parfums Christian Dior, Guerlain, Parfums Givenchy, Kenzo Parfums, Perfumes Loewe as well as other promising cosmetic companies (BeneFit Cosmetics, Make Up For Ever, Acqua di Parma and Fresh).

WATCHES & JEWELRY: MARKET SHARE GAINS FOR BVLGARI AND TAG HEUER

The Watches & Jewelry Business Group recorded organic revenue growth of 5%. On a reported basis, revenue growth was 5%. Profit from recurring operations increased by 6%. Bvlgari continued to gain market share with enhancements to its Serpenti, Diva and B.zero1 lines. Growth continued in China, Korea and in the Middle East. TAG Heuer grew despite a difficult market for watches, gained market share and benefitted from the success of its new collections and its connected watch. Hublot accelerated its development in Asia and recorded the best year in its history. Chaumet continued to move its product lines upmarket and inaugurated a new boutique concept in Hong Kong.

LVMH‘s Watches and Jewelry division comprises Bulgari, TAG Heuer, Chaumet, Dior Watches, Zenith, Fred, Hublot and De Beers Diamond Jewellers Ltd, a joint venture created with the world’s leading diamond group.

SELECTIVE RETAILING: GOOD PERFORMANCE AT SEPHORA, DFS IMPACTED BY A DIFFICULT TOURISM CONTEXT IN ASIA

The Selective Retailing Business Group recorded organic revenue growth of 8%. On a reported basis, revenue growth was 7%. Profit from recurring operations declined by 2%. Sephora gained market share across all regions and once again recorded double-digit growth in both revenue and profits. More than a hundred stores were opened in 2016 including notably a flagship store in the World Trade Center in New York and major renovations in Boston and Singapore. Its online offer accelerated with the launch in six new countries. DFS continued to face a difficult environment, notably in Hong Kong. The expansion into new destinations continued. The opening of the T Galleria in Angkor in Cambodia and one in Venice, Italy were the highlights of the year.

LVMH is also active in selective retailing as well as in other activities through DFS, Sephora, Le Bon Marché, La Samaritaine, Royal Van Lent and Cheval Blanc hotels.

Key figures:

             
Euro millions    

2015

 

2016

 

% change

Revenue    

35 664

 

37 600

 

+ 5 %

Profit from recurring operations    

6 605

 

7 026

 

+ 6 %

Group share of net profit    

3 573

 

3 981

 

+ 11 %

Free cash flow*    

3 679

 

3 974

 

+ 8 %

Net financial debt    

4 235

 

3 265

 

– 23 %

Total equity    

25 799

 

27 903

 

+ 8 %

* Before available for sale financial assets and investments, transactions relating to equity and financing activities Continue reading

amfAR’s CINEMA AGAINST AIDS GALA RAISES A RECORD BREAKING $35 MILLION FOR RESEARCH TO FIGHT HIV/AIDS AND TO HELP FIND A CURE

EVENT SPONSORED BY WORLDVIEW ENTERTAINMENT, BOLD FILMS, BVLGARI, MERCEDES-BENZ and THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

The 21st annual Cinema Against AIDS raised a record $35 million last night, helping amfAR in its continued fight against HIV/AIDS. The star-studded black-tie event was held at the Hotel du Cap Eden Roc and was presented by Worldview Entertainment, Bold Films, and BVLGARI.
CAP D'ANTIBES, FRANCE - MAY 22:  Harvey Weinstein and Heidi Klum speak onstage during amfAR's 21st Cinema Against AIDS Gala Presented By WORLDVIEW, BOLD FILMS, And BVLGARI at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc on May 22, 2014 in Cap d'Antibes, France.  (Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images for amfAR)

CAP D’ANTIBES, FRANCE – MAY 22: Harvey Weinstein and Heidi Klum speak onstage during amfAR’s 21st Cinema Against AIDS Gala Presented By WORLDVIEW, BOLD FILMS, And BVLGARI at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc on May 22, 2014 in Cap d’Antibes, France. (Photo by Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images for amfAR)

CAP D'ANTIBES, FRANCE - MAY 22:  Dean Caten, Sharon Stone and Dan Caten attend amfAR's 21st Cinema Against AIDS Gala Presented By WORLDVIEW, BOLD FILMS, And BVLGARI at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc on May 22, 2014 in Cap d'Antibes, France.  (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/amfAR14/WireImage)

CAP D’ANTIBES, FRANCE – MAY 22: Dean Caten, Sharon Stone and Dan Caten attend amfAR’s 21st Cinema Against AIDS Gala Presented By WORLDVIEW, BOLD FILMS, And BVLGARI at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc on May 22, 2014 in Cap d’Antibes, France. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/amfAR14/WireImage)

Since amfAR’s late Founding International Chairman Dame Elizabeth Taylor hosted the first Cinema Against AIDS in 1993, the event has become the most coveted ticket in Cannes. Past events have been chaired by amfAR Global Fundraising Chairman Sharon Stone, President Bill Clinton, Demi Moore, Sir Elton John, and Madonna, among many others.
Like the epidemic itself, AIDS research knows no borders. amfAR’s programs have had a global reach since 1986, when the Foundation began awarding international grants. Today, amfAR continues to fund HIV/AIDS researchers worldwide and works to translate their research into effective policy, prevention, and treatment programs around the globe.
CAP D'ANTIBES, FRANCE - MAY 22:  (L-R) Eva Herzigova and Sharon Stone speak onstage during amfAR's 21st Cinema Against AIDS Gala Presented By WORLDVIEW, BOLD FILMS, And BVLGARI at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc on May 22, 2014 in Cap d'Antibes, France.  (Photo by Dominique Charriau/WireImage)

CAP D’ANTIBES, FRANCE – MAY 22: (L-R) Eva Herzigova and Sharon Stone speak onstage during amfAR’s 21st Cinema Against AIDS Gala Presented By WORLDVIEW, BOLD FILMS, And BVLGARI at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc on May 22, 2014 in Cap d’Antibes, France. (Photo by Dominique Charriau/WireImage)

CAP D'ANTIBES, FRANCE - MAY 22:  Kellan Lutz attends amfAR's 21st Cinema Against AIDS Gala Presented By WORLDVIEW, BOLD FILMS, And BVLGARI at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc on May 22, 2014 in Cap d'Antibes, France.  (Photo by Andreas Rentz/amfAR14/WireImage)

CAP D’ANTIBES, FRANCE – MAY 22: Kellan Lutz attends amfAR’s 21st Cinema Against AIDS Gala Presented By WORLDVIEW, BOLD FILMS, And BVLGARI at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc on May 22, 2014 in Cap d’Antibes, France. (Photo by Andreas Rentz/amfAR14/WireImage)

Sharon Stone was once again a Chair of the event, along with Harvey Weinstein, amfAR ambassador Milla Jovovich, Heidi Klum, BVLGARI Ambassador Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, John Travolta, Kelly Preston, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan and Abhishek Bachchan, Carine Roitfeld, amfAR Chairman Kenneth Cole, Bulgari Group Chief Executive Officer Jean-Christophe Babin, amfAR Global Fundraising Ambassador Milutin Gatsby, Michel Litvak, Vincent Roberti, Remo Ruffini, Worldview Entertainment chairman and CEO Christopher Woodrow, and Worldview Entertainment COO Molly Conners.

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Neiman Marcus Unveils Fall 2013 The Art Of Fashion Campaign Photographed by Artist Sarah Moon

Alexander McQueen NM AOF Fall 2013.  (PRNewsFoto/Neiman Marcus, Sarah Moon)

Alexander McQueen NM AOF Fall 2013. (PRNewsFoto/Neiman Marcus, Sarah Moon)

Soon to be seen in the big September fashion issues and the September edition of the Neiman Marcus’s in-house publication, the book , Neiman Marcus announced The Fall 2013 Art of Fashion Campaign. Debuting nearly 20 years ago, The Art of Fashion was a revolutionary step for the luxury retailer to feature cutting-edge fashion and provocative photography, as well as highlighting some of their top picks of the season. Designer merchandise featured in the Fall 2013 campaign includes Alexander McQueen, Stephen Webster, Dior, Burberry Prorsum, Lanvin Paris, Manolo Blahnik, The Row, Jil Sander, Chanel, Gucci, Valentino, Dolce & Gabbana, Akris, Charlotte Olympia, Carolina Herrera, Oscar de La Renta, Givenchy, Christian Louboutin, Giorgio Armani, Proenza Schuler, Azzedine Alaia and Tom Ford.

Gucci Neiman Marcus Art Of Fashion Fall 2013.  (PRNewsFoto/Neiman Marcus, Sarah Moon)

Gucci Neiman Marcus Art Of Fashion Fall 2013. (PRNewsFoto/Neiman Marcus, Sarah Moon)

Shot by veteran artist/photographer Sarah Moon, Creative Director Georgia Christensen is especially pleased with this year’s edition of the campaiagn: “There’s soul to her work. She loves clothes. And there’s a wonderful combination of modern and conventional. She’s shooting digital but then they’re physically moving the background.”

Tom Ford Neiman Marcus Art Of Fashion Fall 2013.  (PRNewsFoto/Neiman Marcus, Sarah Moon)

Tom Ford Neiman Marcus Art Of Fashion Fall 2013. (PRNewsFoto/Neiman Marcus, Sarah Moon)