Pope.L Comes to MoMA in An Exhibition Of Foregrounding Landmark Performances, Videos, Objects, And Installations

The Museum of Modern Art announces member: Pope.L, 1978–2001, an exhibition of landmark performances and related videos, objects, and installations by the multidisciplinary artist Pope.L, on view from October 21, 2019, through January 2020. Pope.L (b. 1955) is a consummate thinker and provocateur whose practice across multiple mediums—including painting, drawing, installation, sculpture, theater, and video—utilizes abjection, humor, endurance, language, and absurdity to confront and undermine rigid systems of belief. Spanning works made primarily from 1978 to 2001, the exhibition features videos, photographs, sculptural elements, ephemera, and live actions. member: Pope.L, 1978–2001 is organized by Stuart Comer, Chief Curator, Department of Media and Performance, with Danielle A. Jackson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance.

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Works in the exhibition include those rooted in experimental theater, such as Egg Eating Contest (1990), Aunt Jenny Chronicles (1991), and Eracism (2000), as well as street interventions such as Thunderbird Immolation a.k.a. Meditation Square Piece (1978), Times Square Crawl a.k.a. Meditation Square Piece (1978), Tompkins Square Crawl a.k.a. How Much Is That Nigger in the Window (1991), ATM Piece (1996), and The Great White Way: 22 miles, 9 years, 1 street (2001–09), among others. Together, these works highlight the role performance has played within an emphatically interdisciplinary career that has established Pope.L as a critical and influential force in contemporary art. Additionally, these early works form a snapshot of the profound social, cultural, and economic shifts in New York City throughout the 1980s and ’90s.

Pope.L. The Great White Way, 22 miles, 9 years, 1 street. 2000-09. Performance. © Pope. L. Courtesy of the artists and Mitchell – Innes & Nash, New York.

MoMA will publish a comprehensive, fully illustrated catalogue to accompany the exhibition. Presenting a detailed study of these investigations, as well as overarching topics Pope.L has explored throughout his career, the publication will establish key details for each work and articulate how the artist continues to think about the legacy of these ephemeral projects unfolding in time.

Pope. L. Thunderbird Immolation a.k.a Meditation Square Pieces New York, NY 1978. Digital c-print on gold fiber silk paper. 9 by 6 in. 22.86 by 15.24 cm. © Pope. L. Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell – Innes & Nash, New York.

MoMA’s presentation is part of Pope.L: Instigation, Aspiration, Perspiration, a trio of complementary exhibitions organized by MoMA, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and Public Art Fund. Utilizing both public and private spaces, the expansive presentation will address many elements of the artist’s oeuvre, from seminal early works to a monumental new installation and a new performative work inspired by the artist’s iconic crawl series.

Pope. L. Eating the Wall Street Journal (3rd Version). Sculpture Center, New York, NY. 2000, Digital c-print on gold fiber silk paper. 6 by 9 in. 15.24 by 22.86 cm. © Pope. L. Courtesy of the artist and Mitchell – Innes & Nash, New York.

The exhibition is presented as part of The Hyundai Card Performance Series. Major support is provided by The Jill and Peter Kraus Endowed Fund for Contemporary Exhibitions and The Jon Stryker Endowment. Additional support is provided by The Friends of Education of The Museum of Modern Art, Nancy and David Frej, Barbara Karp Shuster, and Ann and Mel Schaffer.

Pope. L. How Much is that Nigger in the Window a.k.a Tompkins Square Crawl. New York, NY 1991. Digital c-print on gold fiber silk paper. 10 by 15 in. 25.4 by 38.1 cm. © Pope. L. Courtesy of the artists and Mitchell – Innes & Nash, New York.

Leadership contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund, in support of the Museum’s collection and collection exhibitions, are generously provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley, Eva and Glenn Dubin, The Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund, Alice and Tom Tisch, The David Rockefeller Council, Anne Dias, Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., Kenneth C. Griffin, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro, The Keith Haring Foundation, and The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art.

Major contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund are provided by the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, Clarissa Alcock and Edgar Bronfman, Jr., Agnes Gund, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

Art Watch: “Photo-Poetics: An Anthology” at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum

November 20, 2015–March 23, 2016

This group exhibition, Photo-Poetics: An Anthology,features more than 70 works by ten artists: Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek.

Lisa Oppenheim The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else, 2006 Slide projection of 15 35 mm slides, continuous loop, dimensions variable Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2009 2009.60

Lisa Oppenheim, The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else, 2006.  Slide projection of 15 35 mm slides, continuous loop, dimensions variable. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2009. 2009.60

Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism, these artists pursue a largely studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance—a sort of displaced self-portraiture—that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings. Driven by a profound engagement with the medium of photography, these artists investigate the nature, traditions, and magic of photography at a moment characterized by rapid digital transformation. They attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies, and creating artist’s books, installations, and photo-sculptures.

Leslie Hewitt Riffs on Real Time (3 of 10), 2006–09 Chromogenic print, 76.2 x 61 cm Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2010 2010.55

Leslie Hewitt, Riffs on Real Time (3 of 10), 2006–09. Chromogenic print, 76.2 x 61 cm. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2010. 2010.55

While they are invested in exploring the processes, supports, and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object.

Sara VanDerBeek From the Means of Reproduction, 2007 Chromogenic print, 101.6 x 76.2 cm Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee 2007.138 © Sara VanDerBeek

Sara VanDerBeek, From the Means of Reproduction, 2007. Chromogenic print, 101.6 x 76.2 cm
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee 2007.138 © Sara VanDerBeek

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Opening Soon: Guggenheim Examines New Developments in Contemporary Photography in Photo-Poetics: An Anthology

Venue: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, New York

Location: Tower Levels 2, 4, and 5

Dates: November 20, 2015–March 23, 2016

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum presents Photo-Poetics: An Anthology, an exhibition documenting recent developments in contemporary photography and consisting of photographs, videos, and slide installations by ten international artists. With more than 70 works by Claudia Angelmaier, Erica Baum, Anne Collier, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, Elad Lassry, Lisa Oppenheim, Erin Shirreff, Kathrin Sonntag, and Sara VanDerBeek, the exhibition runs from November 20, 2015–March 23, 2016, and presents a focused study into the nature, traditions, and magic of photography in the context of the rapid digital transformation of the medium.

Lisa Oppenheim, The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else, 2006 Slide projection of 15 35 mm slides, continuous loop, dimensions variable Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2009 2009.60

Lisa Oppenheim, The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else, 2006, Slide projection of 15 35 mm slides, continuous loop, dimensions variable, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2009. 2009.60

Moyra Davey, Les Goddesses, 2011, HD color video, with sound, 61 min., Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy, New York. © Moyra Davey

Moyra Davey, Les Goddesses, 2011, HD color video, with sound, 61 min., Courtesy the artist and Murray Guy, New York. © Moyra Davey

Organized by Jennifer Blessing, Senior Curator, Photography, with Susan Thompson, Assistant Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Photo-Poetics: An Anthology offers an opportunity to define the concerns of a new generation of photographic artists and contextualize their work within the history of art and visual culture. These artists mainly pursue a studio-based approach to still-life photography that centers on the representation of objects, often printed matter such as books, magazines, and record covers. The result is often an image imbued with poetic and evocative personal significance that resonates with larger cultural and historical meanings.

Anne Collier, Crying, 2005, Chromogenic print, 99.1 x 134 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Tighe 2005.47 © Anne Collier

Anne Collier, Crying, 2005, Chromogenic print, 99.1 x 134 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Tighe 2005.47 © Anne Collier

Erin Shirreff, UN 2010, 2010, HD color video, silent 17 min., Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Erica Gervais, 2010.29 © 2010 Erin Shirreff

Erin Shirreff, UN 2010, 2010, HD color video, silent 17 min., Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Erica Gervais, 2010.29 © 2010 Erin Shirreff

The artists in the exhibition attempt to rematerialize the photograph through meticulous printing, using film and other disappearing photo technologies. Drawing on the legacies of Conceptualism and invested in exploring the processes and techniques of photography, they are also deeply interested in how photographic images circulate. Theirs is a sort of “photo poetics,” an art that self-consciously investigates the laws of photography and the nature of photographic representation, reproduction, and the photographic object. The works in the exhibition, rich with detail, reward close and prolonged regard; they ask for a mode of looking that is closer to reading than the cursory scanning fostered by the clicking and swiping functionalities of smartphones and social media. Both the exhibition and its accompanying catalogue are conceived as anthologies, as independent vehicles to introduce each artist’s important and unique practice.

Erica Baum, Jaws, 2008 (from the series Naked Eye), Inkjet print, 47 x 41.6 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Tighe, 2011 2011.48 © Erica Baum

Erica Baum, Jaws, 2008 (from the series Naked Eye), Inkjet print, 47 x 41.6 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by Mr. and Mrs. Aaron M. Tighe, 2011
2011.48 © Erica Baum

Photo-Poetics: An Anthology is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue featuring an introduction, afterword, and ten monographic essays by Jennifer Blessing that provide focused, contemplative readings of each artist’s work. The catalogue’s design, in which each artist’s practice is presented individually, reflects the exhibition’s structure as a series of solo presentations. The catalogue will be available for $50 at the Guggenheim Store and online at guggenheimstore.org.

Leslie Hewitt, Riffs on Real Time (3 of 10), 2006–09, Chromogenic print, 76.2 x 61 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2010. 2010.55

Leslie Hewitt, Riffs on Real Time (3 of 10), 2006–09, Chromogenic print, 76.2 x 61 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2010. 2010.55

Elad Lassry, Untitled (Woman, Blond), 2013, Chromogenic print in walnut frame with four-ply silk, 36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2013.72 © Elad Lassry

Elad Lassry, Untitled (Woman, Blond), 2013, Chromogenic print in walnut frame with four-ply silk, 36.8 x 29.2 x 3.8 cm, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Purchased with funds contributed by the Photography Committee, 2013.72 © Elad Lassry

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