The Museum Of Modern Art Announces Publication On The History Of MoMA PS1

This long-awaited book captures the spirit of a legendary institution through the words of those who made it New York’s most vital venue for contemporary art.

This fall, The Museum of Modern Art will release the first publication on the history of MoMA PS1, which traces the institution’s evolution from the 1970s to today through interviews, ephemera, never-before-seen images, and an extensive exhibition history. Since 1976, MoMA PS1 in Long Island City, Queens, has been a crucible for radical experimentation, engaging artists from a range of disciplines. Structured around interviews with Alanna Heiss, PS1’s founder and director of more than three decades, MoMA PS1: A History (published October 22, 2019) offers a vivid chronicle of the extraordinary history of New York’s premier venue for contemporary art. The publication also features contributions by artists and curators who have been closely associated with PS1—including James Turrell, R. H. Quaytman, Kevin Beasley, Carolyn Christov-Bakargiev, and Martha Wilson—supplemented by excerpts from previously unpublished interviews from the 1970s and statements from numerous figures who helped shape the institution.

Batya Zamir, Airlines, Batya Zamir: Dance Performance, May 20–21, 1977. Courtesy Batya Zamir. Photo: Richard Van Buren.
P.S.1 1977 A Painting Show Lee Krasner: Lee Krasner, poster for A Painting Show, May 1–29, 1977. © 2019 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

This publication was edited by Klaus Biesenbach, director of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, and former director of MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large, The Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Bettina Funke, art historian, editor, former head of publications for Documenta 13, and co-founder of The Leopard Press.

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Dennis Freedman Named Consulting Creative Director Of Surface Media

Diane Solway, Editor-in-Chief of Surface Media, announced the appointment of Dennis Freedman as Surface Media’s Consulting Creative Director, effective immediately. In his new role, Freedman will work closely with Solway as Surface Media re-imagines and expands its dynamic engagement with design, art, architecture, fashion, and travel. Freedman’s deep and far-ranging experience and creative vision will help shape the evolution of Surface Media’s magazine, digital platforms, live experiences, and strategic partnerships.

Dennis Freedman

Freedman was the founding Creative Director of W Magazine, where he and Solway collaborated for many years, and where Solway most-recently served as Features and Culture Director until the magazine was acquired by Future Media Group earlier this year. After leaving W, Freedman served as Creative Director of Barneys New York where he pioneered new ways to connect with customers, including the shopable video and collaborations with Lady Gaga, Jay Z, Baz Luhrmann, Miuccia Prada and John Galliano. Freedman also brought a new level of interactivity to its windows, working with artists and photographers, among them the Louise Bourgeois estate, Alex Katz, Juergen Teller, and Mario Sorrenti.

Dennis’ groundbreaking creativity and influence in the visual world is legendary and I am excited to be collaborating with him again in bringing Surface’s brand and platforms to a new level of performance,” said Solway. “Design is his passion and he will be instrumental as we expand our communities and dynamically connect our audiences with the innovators featured across our platforms.”

Over the years, I’ve had the opportunity to work with Diane and, together, we have curated some of the most dynamic stories and programming that I’ve done in my career,” said Freedman. “I am looking forward to collaborating with her on the realization of her vision for Surface Media and its unparalleled ability to engage its audiences with the leading creatives of our time.”

At W, Freedman spearheaded W’s transformation from a fledging newsprint tabloid to a leading creative showcase for some of the foremost fashion photographers of the day, among them Philip Lorca di Corcia, Steven Klein, and David Sims. He is also one of the world’s foremost collectors of modern and contemporary design. In February, a show of nearly 70 pieces from Freedman’s collection of Italian radical design will open at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Titled “Radical: Italian Design 1965-1985, the Dennis Freedman Collection,” the show will subsequently travel to the Yale School of Architecture Gallery.

Future Media Group Logo

Surface Media is owned by Future Media Group (FMG), the company that recently acquired W Magazine from Condé Nast. Diane Solway was named Editor-in-Chief of Surface in September 2019.

Future Media Group, formed as the holding company during the acquisition of W from Condé Nast, also encompasses Surface and Watch Journal. It is committed to developing legacy media brands and delivering them into the future.

Since 1972, W has been an escape from the ordinary. Unbound by convention, W sees the world through the lenses of fashion, art and film. Across platforms, W celebrates the unexpected and sparks cultural conversations with provocative stories, addictive videos and distinctively curated social feeds featuring iconic celebrities such as Bradley Cooper, Cate Blanchett and Rihanna.

Since 1993, Surface has been the barometer for what’s new and what’s next in the worlds of contemporary global design, architecture, art, fashion, and culture. With special access to tastemakers including Thom Browne, Delphine Arnault, David Adjaye, Nobu Matsuhisa, Kanye West and more, Surface is a compass for today’s creative leaders that boasts a circulation of 100,000 with in-room distribution at top hotels including The Edition, The Nomad, and The Gramercy Park Hotel.

Since 1997, Watch Journal is the category leader in fine watches and living well, pairing a love of fine timepieces with fashion, art, travel, sports and architecture. Readers of the publication have an average net worth of $4.4 million. The magazine is distributed as the exclusive trade media outlet at over 250 private air terminals across the United States and as the only in-room American publication at Les Trois Rois in Basel, Switzerland.

“In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury” at The Art institute of Chicago

The Art Institute of Chicago presents an examination of midcentury art and design with In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury, on view now through January 12, 2020. The exhibition, which opened on September 6, 2019, brings together the work of Clara Porset (b.1895), Lola Álvarez Bravo (b.1903), Anni Albers (b.1899), Ruth Asawa (b.1926), Cynthia Sargent (b.1922), and Sheila Hicks (b.1934), reflecting the unique experiences of these designers and artists in Mexico between the 1940s and 1970s. Despite their singularities, they created work that reflected on artistic traditions, while at the same time opened up new readings of daily life at a time of great social and political change.

The work of Clara Porset, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Anni Albers, Ruth Asawa, Cynthia Sargent, and Sheila Hicks has never been shown together before. While some of these artists and designers knew one another and collaborated together, they are from different generations, and their individual work encompasses a range of media varying from furniture and interior design to sculpture, textiles, photography, and prints. They all, however, share one defining aspect: Mexico, a country in which they all lived or worked between the 1940s and 1970s. During this period they all realized projects that breached disciplinary boundaries and national divides.

This exhibition takes its title from a quote by Clara Porset who, encouraging makers to seek inspiration widely, wrote: “There is design in everything…in a cloud…in a wall…in a chair…in the sea…in the sand…in a pot. Natural or man-made.” A political exile from Cuba, Porset became one of Mexico’s most prominent modern furniture and interior designers. Influenced by Bauhaus ideas, she believed that design and art could reshape cities, elevate the quality of life, and solve large-scale social problems. She shared these values with the other artists and designers in this exhibition, who were also committed to forging relationships across cultures; bringing different voices into dialogue; and responding productively to a moment of profound cultural and economic transformation. While some knew one another and worked together, this constellation of practitioners was from different generations, and their individual work encompasses a range of media varying from furniture and interior design to sculpture, textiles, photography, and printmaking.

Clara Porset. Butaque, about 1955–56. Gálvez Guzzy Family/Casa Gálvez Collection. Photo by Rodrigo Chapa, courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Clara Porset conceived designs informed by modernism with clean lines and forms, while also inspired by Mexican lifestyles. Mexican photographer Lola Álvarez Bravo created dynamic photomontages by cutting and pasting together parts of different photographs to produce images that emphasized the intense urban development. She also photographed Porset’s work. Following Porset’s invitation to visit Mexico, German émigré Anni Albers saw the country’s landscape and architecture as a vital source of inspiration, informing the abstract visual language of her designs. Japanese American Ruth Asawa, who took a class on craft and housing with Porset in Mexico City, was drawn to the artistry in utilitarian looped-wire baskets that she encountered in Toluca and her sculptures made with this wire technique became her primary practice. Cynthia Sargent and her husband Wendell Riggs moved to Mexico City from New York in 1951, where they produced several popular lines of textiles and rugs in their weaving workshop, collaborated with Porset for her exhibition Art in Daily Life (1952), and encouraged an appreciation of crafts by founding the weekly market Bazaar Sábado. Sheila Hicks, who moved in the same artistic circles as Porset, set up a workshop in Taxco el Viejo where she collaborated with and learned from local weavers, while producing pieces that were resolutely her own.

In the decades following the Mexican Revolution, which ended around 1920, Mexico was rapidly modernizing, and the art scene of its capital was as cosmopolitan and vibrant as it is today. Government projects promoted the country’s artisanal traditions in an attempt to build a cohesive national identity. This open climate attracted intellectuals and artists, such as the six celebrated here. They were transformed by what they learned, drawing inspiration from Mexican lifestyles and artistic practices, including the patterns of ancient indigenous sculptures, the geometries of archaeological sites, and the complex technical qualities found in thousands of years of textile traditions.

Anarquía arquitectónica en la ciudad de México (Architectural Anarchy in Mexico City), about 1953
Lola Álvarez Bravo. Familia González Rendón. © Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

Mexican artist Lola Álvarez Bravo, a close friend and collaborator of Porset, was one of few women photographers working in the country during this period. Her photographs are essential to understanding Porset’s no longer extant projects, and her dynamic photomontages, created by cutting and pasting together parts of different photographs to create new images, provide insights into Mexico’s richly layered social, political, and geographical landscape during the 1940s and 1950s.

Study for Camino Real, 1967
Anni Albers. The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 1994. © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2019. Photo by Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art

Porset was also friends with German émigré Anni Albers. Encouraged to visit Mexico by Porset, she first traveled to the country in 1935 and made 13 subsequent trips. Mexico’s landscape and architecture became a vital source of inspiration and remained so throughout her career, providing an abstract visual language for her designs. The triangle motif, for instance, that she used repeatedly in textiles and screenprints was drawn from archaeological Zapotec sites such as Monte Albán.

Untitled (S.535, Hanging Five-Lobed Continuous Form within a Form with Two Interior Spheres and One Teardrop Form), 1951
Ruth Asawa. Courtesy of Charles and Kathy Harper Collection. © Estate of Ruth Asawa, Courtesy David Zwirner. Photo by Dan Bradica

Mexico also left a deep impression on Japanese American Ruth Asawa. In 1947, two years after taking a class with Porset at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, she returned to the country and was drawn to the artistry in utilitarian looped-wire baskets that she encountered in Toluca. From then on, sculptures made with this wire technique became her primary practice.

Scarlatti, designed in 1958, produced about 1968–1969
Cynthia Sargent. Riggs-Platas Family Collection. Photo by Wendy McEahern

American Cynthia Sargent moved to Mexico City from New York with her husband Wendell Riggs in 1951 and produced several popular lines of rugs in their weaving workshop. Porset championed Sargent’s work and included her fabric designs in her pivotal exhibition Art in Daily Life. Sargent and Riggs went on to co-found the Bazaar Sábado, an influential market for Mexican and expatriate art and craft that continues to this day.

Learning to Weave in Taxco, Mexico, about 1960
Sheila Hicks. Gift of Martha Bennett King in memory of her brother, Dr. Wendell Clark Bennett. © Sheila Hicks

While American artist Sheila Hicks never met Porset, she was aware of Porset’s designs through her close friendship with architect Luis Barragán, who worked with both artists. After studying Latin American weaving traditions and traveling to South America, Hicks relocated to Mexico in the late 1950s and set up a workshop in Taxco el Viejo, where she collaborated with and learned from local weavers, while producing pieces that are resolutely her own.

As a story, In a Cloud… reminds us that, for many, transnational migration is both a fact of life and a provocation of creativity; it also challenges easy assumptions about the directions that migration can take. Current political discourse in the United States often frames Mexico as a place that people either leave or move through and not as a country that attracts immigrants of its own. As this exhibition makes clear, it was this country’s openness to artistic practice that drew a host of ambitious modern artists and designers from around the world.

The work of these independent-minded designers and artists provides six distinct yet aligned models of creative practices that followed alternative routes and opened up new possibilities. Displayed together, their work makes the case for a continued evaluation of Mexico’s creative landscape and contributes to burgeoning discussions aimed at a more inclusive history of modern art and design,” said Zoë Ryan, John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design, Department of Architecture and Design, the Art Institute of Chicago.

The pieces in this exhibition resulted from a complex dynamic of cultural learning and exchange. Each artist went beyond replication and applied their newfound knowledge and practices to create their own unique output while crediting the sources of their inspiration. These works highlight the importance of these still-influential contributions to art and design.

Major funding for In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury is provided by the Gordon and Carole Segal Exhibition Fund; the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation; Margot Levin Schiff and the Harold Schiff Foundation; and Barbara Bluhm-Kaul and Don Kaul.

Additional support is provided by Maria and William D. Smithburg; Kimberly M. Snyder; the George Lill Foundation Endowment; Nada Andric and James Goettsch; the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts; Thomas E. Keim and Noelle C. Brock; the Butler-VanderLinden Family Fund; the Terra Foundation for American Art; The Danielson Foundation; The Robey Chicago; and CNA.

Publishing Giant Condé Nast Announces New Global Leadership Structure

U.S./New York-based Condé Nast and London-based Condé Nast International Are Integrated as One Global Team. New Consumer Marketing Function to Bring Focus on Direct-to-Consumer Efforts With Unified Commercial Team to Better Serve Global Clients’ Holistic Needs

New Leadership Structure is Expected to Help Further Turn the Financial Ship Around As Company Moves Beyond Closing and Selling Off Magazine Titles, Layoffs and Consolidation of Workforce Across All Titles

Long expected, Condé Nast yesterday appointed a new global leadership team designed to accelerate the company’s evolution into a 21st-century media company. The new organizational structure, which combines Condé Nast and Condé Nast International into a unified global team, was created with several guiding principles in mind, including the preservation of local editorial voice and authority, an enhanced focus on the consumer, unification of the company’s ad and commercial sales functions to reflect clients’ local and global needs and the development of new ways to share capabilities and best practices across the company.

Condé Nast is a global media company, home to iconic brands including Vogue, The New Yorker, GQ, Glamour, AD, Vanity Fair, and Wired, among many others. The company’s award-winning content reaches 84 million consumers in print, 367 million in digital and 379 million across social platforms, and generates more than 1 billion video views each month. The company is headquartered in London and New York and operates in 32 markets worldwide including China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico & Latin America, Russia, Spain, Taiwan, the U.K., and the U.S., with local license partners across the globe. Launched in 2011, Condé Nast Entertainment is an award-winning production and distribution studio that creates programming across film, television, social and digital video and virtual reality.

One of my top priorities has been to define our organizational structure so that we can take full advantage of our unique growth opportunities and exceptional content around the world,” said the recently-appointed CEO of Condé Nast, RogerLynchI’m confident that our new global structure will better enable us to collaborate across teams and markets and, ultimately, deliver unparalleled experiences for our consumers and clients.

The new structure is as follows:

Global Content Functions:: Anna Wintour, U.S. Artistic Director, Editor-in-Chief of Vogue U.S. and (newly-appointed) Global Content Advisor, will continue in her role as U.S. Artistic Director and Editor-in-Chief of Vogue U.S., and will add Global Content Advisor and oversight of Vogue International to her responsibilities. In her expanded role, Wintour will advise the executive leadership team on global content opportunities and act as a resource to editors-in-chief and editorial talent worldwide.

Oren Katzeff, President of Condé Nast Entertainment (CNE), will expand the company’s digital video, film and television operations to create best-in-class video content experiences for audiences worldwide. The company has been increasing its focus on video content and currently generates 1.1 billion video views per month. Under Oren’s leadership, CNE will now be the core of our global network of video teams, supporting the growth of our video businesses in all markets.

David Remnick, Editor-in-Chief of The New Yorker, will also continue to report directly to Lynch.

Global Operations Organization: Wolfgang Blau, President, International & Chief Operating Officer will oversee all non-U.S. markets, as well as selected global strategic functions, including Product & Technology, Data, Licensing, Global Editorial Operations, Business Development, and Delivery & Business Transformation. This organization will ensure day-to-day operational excellence and capability sharing across the business.

Global Commercial Organization: Pamela Drucker Mann, Global Chief Revenue Officer & President, U.S. Revenue, will lead a new global revenue organization that brings together the company’s U.S. and international ad sales, creative and agency, B2B marketing and client service capabilities. Jamie Jouning, promoted to Chief Client Officer, will report to Drucker Mann and oversee key global accounts, multi-market deals, and central digital ad operations. Drucker Mann will define ad sales and ad product strategies globally, and work closely with Jamie and the central team and commercial leads in the company’s worldwide markets to drive overall ad, agency, and B2B revenue and share best practices.

Consumer Marketing Organization: Condé Nast is creating a new consumer marketing organization that will be led by a Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) and will bring added focus to the company’s direct-to-consumer efforts. As the company expands its consumer offerings, this team will be charged with developing best-in-class capabilities and consistency across consumer experiences on every platform. The team will also be responsible for consumer revenue, with a core focus on subscriptions and memberships. In addition, the team will have responsibility for global brand management, consumer research, and insights and global audience development, ensuring a data-driven approach to the company’s efforts. The search for a CMO to lead this new organization will begin immediately.

Corporate Functions: The company is also globalizing its three corporate functions to leverage skills, expertise and standardize processes and best practices: People, Finance and Communications. The company will begin an immediate search and selection process for these and other open roles. Until new leaders are identified, teams will maintain their existing reporting lines and responsibilities.

We’re bringing added focus to our direct-to-consumer efforts and will build a new consumer marketing function that will be charged with developing best-in-class subscription and membership capabilities, and maintaining the authenticity of our iconic global brands,” Lynch continued. “And by transforming our sales organization into a unified global team, Condé Nast will be better positioned to serve the holistic needs of our clients around the world and make it easier for them to do business with us.

The new structure and appointments take effect immediately.

John A. Farrell To Be Awarded New-York Historical Society’s 2018 Barbara And David Zalaznick Book Prize In American History For Richard Nixon: The Life

$50,000 Prize and Title of American Historian Laureate to Be Presented at Weekend with History Friday, April 13, 2018

Pam Schafler, chair of New-York Historical Society’s Board of Trustees, and Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of New-York Historical, announced that author John A. Farrell will be honored with New-York Historical’s annual Barbara and David Zalaznick Book Prize in American History for Richard Nixon: The Life (Penguin Random House, 2017).

The award recognizes the best book of the year in the field of American history or biography. Mr. Farrell will receive a $50,000 cash award, an engraved medal, and the title of American Historian Laureate, which will be presented on April 13, 2018. The ceremony is part of New-York Historical’s 13th annual Chairman’s Council Weekend with History, a two-day event featuring an array of speakers discussing important historical events that have made an impact on New York City and the nation.

N-YHS_logo_2

New-York Historical Society logo

Selected by a prize committee comprising historians and New-York Historical leadership from a field of more than 136 submissions, Richard Nixon: The Life is a defining portrait of a man who led America in a time of turmoil and left the nation divided. We live today, Farrell shows, in a world Richard Nixon made. Within four years of his first political victory, Nixon was a U.S. senator; in six, the vice president of the United States of America. Nixon’s sins as a candidate were legion; and in one unlawful secret plot, as Farrell reveals, Nixon acted to prolong the Vietnam War for his own political purposes. Finally elected president in 1969, Nixon packed his staff with bright young men who devised forward-thinking reforms addressing health care, welfare, civil rights, and protection of the environment. It was a fine legacy, but Nixon cared little for it. He aspired to make his mark on the world stage instead, and his 1972 opening to China was the first great crack in the Cold War. Continue reading

Danielle Herrington “Owns It” as the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Cover Model

2018 Issue Celebrates 36 Strong + Sexy Women, Including Aly Raisman, Ashley Graham, Kate Upton, Paulina Porizkova, Hailey Clauson, Sloane Stephens, Genie Bouchard, Brenna Huckaby, Sailor Brinkley Cook, Alexis Ren, Olivia Culpo, Plus New Powerful Section “In Her Own Words”

Three New Original SI Swimsuit Television Specials Air Exclusively on Sports Illustrated TV (SI TV) – “Making of SI Swimsuit,” “#SISwimSearch – The journey to find the next SI Swimsuit star,” and “In Her Own Words,” Which Was Shot by Model Robyn Lawley

Special AR and VR Features Makes This the Most Immersive Issue of SI Swimsuit Ever

Watch Former SI Swimsuit Cover Model Tyra Banks Reveal the Cover to Herrington on www.SI.com/Swimsuit

Newcomer Danielle Herrington claims the coveted cover of the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue. The cover was revealed first on SI.com and the brand’s social platforms via a video featuring former SI Swimsuit cover model Tyra Banks sharing the news with a surprised and emotional Herrington. Herrington, a Rookie in 2017’s SI Swimsuit issue, shot her 2018 photos in the Bahamas with photographer Ben Watts. SI Swimsuit Editor MJ Day, who marks her sixth year as editor and 21st year working at the brand, considers all photos from all the models for the cover. SI Swimsuit 2018 hits newsstands on Wednesday, February 14.

SI Swimsuit 2018 cover featuring Danielle Herrington. CREDIT Ben Watts-SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

Danielle Herrington “Owns It” as the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Cover Model. SI Swimsuit 2018 cover featuring Danielle Herrington. The issue is on newsstand now. CREDIT: Ben Watts/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED

The annual SPORTS ILLUSTRATED Swimsuit Issue (www.si.com/swimsuit) reaches more than 70 million US adults annually and more men ages 18 to 34 than the Super Bowl. The iconic brand spans 16 product extensions, along with a vibrant experiential marketing business. Since debuting in 1964, Swimsuit has become a pop culture phenomenon and a revered launching pad for successful careers in TV, fashion, business, and film. The fashion industry describes SI Swimsuit as the “Oscars of Swimwear,” as an appearance in the issue is a crowning achievement for swimsuit and accessory manufacturers.

The 55th installment of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue features a diverse cast of 36 models including 4 returning cover models, 5 world-famous athletes, 5 mothers, 4 published authors, 12 rookies, 6 model search contestants and 10 women who are featured in the new section, “In Her Own Words.” The full list of SI Swimsuit 2018 models is below.

Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2018 features a diverse array of 36 models, including Compton, CA native and cover model Danielle Herrington and 2018 Rookie of the Year Alexis Ren. The full SI Swimsuit 2018 cast is: Alexis Ren, Allie Ayers, Aly Raisman, Anne de Paula, Ashley Graham, Barbara Palvin, Bianca Balti, Brenna Huckaby, Camille Kostek, Chase Carter, Danielle Herrington, Ebonee Davis, Genie Bouchard, Georgia Gibbs, Hailey Clauson, Haley Kalil, Hunter McGrady, Iyonna Fairbanks, Jasmyn Wilkins, Kate Bock, Kate Upton, Kate Wasley, Lais Ribeiro, Myla Dalbesio, Olivia Culpo, Olivia Jordan, Paige Spiranac, Paulina Porizkova, Raven Lyn, Robin Holzken, Robyn Lawley, Sailor Brinkley Cook, Samantha Hoopes, Sloane Stephens, Tabria Majors and Vita Sidorkina.

Every on-location shoot of the 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit issue took place in the Caribbean, the brand’s most frequent destination and the backdrop for more than 40 photo shoots and 20 cover images, including the 2018 cover. The Caribbean locations shot in 2018 were the Bahamas, Aruba, Belize, and Nevis. In honor of that history, SI Swimsuit will continue to support hurricane relief efforts in the region and has already committed to visiting Puerto Rico for the 2019 issue.

SI Swimsuit 2018 spotlights beauty in its many different forms while providing a platform for the voices and messages of the bold, diverse, inspiring and stunning women featured throughout the issue. This comes to life in different ways and across mediums, from first-person essays written by a collection of models, to emotional short-form videos, to full-length documentary-style features.

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Sports Illustrated Swimsuit 2018 logo

MJ Day, the editor of Sports Illustrated Swimsuit, said, “As a 20 year veteran of this iconic brand – the past six as editor – I am constantly inspired by the incredible women I get to work with annually. Their brilliance, their drive, their successes, their strength are something to celebrate and emulate. We feature models who are scientists, CEOs, Olympians, activists, moms, influencers, show hosts and more—and not one of them failed to achieve her goals because she chose to look sexy and wear a bikini. It is time to move past the incorrect assumption that ‘sexy and empowered’ do not go together.

Day continued, “This year we are so proud to elevate Danielle Herrington’s profile. She is a fresh face, beautiful inside and out, and a hard-working, grounded woman who will be a beacon to many younger girls who can see themselves in her.”

Two of my role models are Tyra Banks and Beyoncé, so the fact that I get to join this incredible group of women as I become the third black model on the cover of SI Swimsuit is a dream come true,” said Danielle Herrington, 2018 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit cover model. “I am so excited to be part of this iconic brand that has long given identity and voice to women of all shapes, colors, and beliefs. I hope that young girls who look at this cover are inspired to dream as big as I did and work hard to attain all their goals.”

This year’s issue marks several “firsts” for SI Swimsuit:

  • In Her Own Words” – The “In Her Own Words” project, which debuts in 2018, was conceived to deliver a message of empowerment, beauty, confidence, and self-acceptance. Featuring models painted in words they chose, this platform allowed the voice, the strength and the passion of these women to be expressed in the rawest form: on the naked body. With a stripped-down studio and an all-female crew, SI gave full creative control to the women as they became their own canvas. Models and activists such as Aly Raisman and Paulina Porizkova participated in the project. Sailor Brinkley Cook, a photography student at Parsons School of Design, and Robyn Lawley, an aspiring videographer, joined the crew, taking behind-the-scenes photos and capturing video of the intimate shoot.

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The British Library Exhibition, Harry Potter: A History of Magic, to open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018

The British Library Is Bringing A Major Exhibition To The U.S. For The First Time

Harry Potter: A History Of Magic Will Be On View At The British Library In London, October 20, 2017 – February 28, 2018

The British Library and the New-York Historical Society are delighted to announce that Harry Potter: A History of Magic will open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018, following its run at the British Library in London from October 20, 2017 – February 28, 2018.

Harry Potter: A History of Magic

The British Library Exhibition, Harry Potter: A History of Magic, to open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018

The exhibition’s New York opening marks the 20th anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in the U.S. by Scholastic, following the 20th-anniversary celebrations of the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in the U.K. in 2017.

Ahead of the U.K. opening in London, Harry Potter: A History of Magic has already sold over 25,000 tickets—the highest amount of advance tickets ever sold for a British Library exhibition. Tickets are available to buy from the British Library website.

The first book in the series of Harry Potter novels, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, was originally published by Bloomsbury in 1997. Since then Bloomsbury has published all seven of the Harry Potter novels in children’s and adult editions, three charity books―Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, Quidditch Through the Ages and The Tales of Beedle the Bard, and the ILLUSTRATED EDITION of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. Bloomsbury is also the publishers for the physical audiobooks of the entire series.

The exhibition unveils rare books, manuscripts, and magical objects from the British Library’s collection, capturing the traditions of folklore and magic at the heart of the Harry Potter stories. Exploring the subjects studied at Hogwarts, the exhibition includes original drafts and drawings by J.K. Rowling and Harry Potter illustrator Jim Kay, going on display for the first time.

As it travels from London to New York, the exhibition will evolve to include U.S.-specific artifacts from New-York Historical’s collection and items from U.S. Harry Potter publisher Scholastic’s collection.

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world’s greatest research libraries. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research, and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive research collection. The Library’s collection has developed over 250 years and exceeds 150 million separate items representing every age of written civilization and includes books, journals, manuscripts, maps, stamps, music, patents, photographs, newspapers and sound recordings in all written and spoken languages. Up to 10 million people visit the British Library website―www.bl.UK ―every year where they can view up to 4 million digitized collection items and over 40 million pages. (See more at: www.bl.uk.) Continue reading