QVC and FFANY Welcome 12 New Footwear Brands for Annual Charitable Shoe Sale

QVC Takes A Stylish Stand Against Breast Cancer

Help make cancer a part of the past with QVC’s annual shoe shopping bash. Leading multiplatform retailer QVC is set to join forces with the Fashion Footwear Association of New York (FFANY) to help conquer cancer with its annual QVC Presents “FFANY Shoes on Sale” broadcast event, scheduled to air Thursday, October 12 from 6 to 9 PM (ET). As part of QVC’s ongoing commitment to support charitable causes that promote the success and wellness of women through the power of relationships, QVC Presents “FFANY Shoes on Sale” has generated more than $53 million, benefitting various breast cancer research and education institutions.

QVC FFANY Shoes on Sale Logo

As part of QVC’s ongoing commitment to support charitable causes that promote the success and wellness of women through the power of relationships, QVC Presents “FFANY Shoes on Sale” has generated more than $53 million, benefitting various breast cancer research and education institutions.

Each October, the entire QVC community looks forward to uniting with the Fashion Footwear Association of New York as we continue our crusade against breast cancer,” said Mike George, President, and CEO of QVC. “This event is truly a shining moment for us as we leverage the power of relationships to address an issue of paramount concern not only to our customers but to our team members and surrounding communities as well. I am incredibly proud of the impact we have made in the field of breast cancer research and education, and I look forward to building upon that momentum and bringing us one step closer to eradicating this deadly disease once and for all.”

During the event, shoe aficionados will be offered a chic selection of approximately 140 donated shoe styles from more than 80 brands, including 12 newcomers like Imagine by Vince Camuto, Marc Fisher LTD, Eric Javits and 1.State, among others. All shoes will be offered at HALF the manufacturer’s suggested retail price* with a minimum of 80 percent of the purchase price** benefitting various breast cancer research and education institutions, including:

  • Penn Medicine’s Abramson Cancer Center
  • Breast Cancer Research Foundation
  • Cedars-Sinai Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute
  • The Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
  • Michigan Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Breast Oncology Program
  • UPMC Hillman Cancer Center
  • University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute
  • Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
  • The Margie and Robert E. Petersen Breast Cancer Research Program at the John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence Saint John’s Health Center.

The success of this event is contingent upon the generous donations of so many brands. This year, four footwear companies have been designated as Special Pink Benefactors for contributing more than $500,000 in shoe donations each. Nine West Holdings, Inc., which boasts such brands as Anne Klein, Bandolino and Nine West; Caleres, offering items from Bzees, Carlos by Carlos Santana, Dr. Scholl’s Footwear, Fergie Footwear, Franco Sarto, Lifestride, Naturalizer, Rykä, Sam Edelman and Via Spiga; Camuto Group, whose donation includes styles from 1. State, ED Ellen DeGeneres, Imagine by Vince Camuto, Jessica Simpson, Lucky Brand and Vince Camuto; and Marc Fisher Footwear, with styles from Guess, Indigo Rd., Kendall and Kylie, Marc Fisher, Marc Fisher LTD, Tommy Hilfiger and Tretorn.

QVC Logo

QVC, Inc. is the world’s leading video and e-commerce retailer, committed to providing its customers with thousands of the most innovative and contemporary beauty, fashion, jewelry and home products.

This year, QVC and the Special Pink Benefactors are encouraging shoppers to share photos explaining why and for whom they are shopping. Select photos will be featured on-air during the QVC Presents “FFANY Shoes on Sale” broadcast. QVC is also collaborating with influencers who will post “shoefies” of their favorite styles from this year’s event using #shoes4acure and encourage their followers to do the same.

In addition to the broadcast event, shoe lovers can shop the Shoe of the Day, a special style unveiled each weekday between 7 and 9 AM (ET) on QVC during the month of October. Additional styles can be found in the online collection offered on QVC.com. Shoes will be available through QVC.com, the QVC apps or by calling 800.345.1515.

The Fashion Footwear Charitable Foundation was created to support ongoing research and education programs in the fight against breast cancer and is supported by members of the Fashion Footwear Association of New York (FFANY). Donated footwear is sold on live television through QVC during the Fashion Footwear Charitable Foundation‘s annual charity benefit, QVC Presents “FFANY Shoes on Sale.” Funds are distributed to leading breast cancer research and education institutions across the United States, including beneficiaries for the 2017 event. The Fashion Footwear Charitable Foundation makes its home at 274 Madison Avenue, Suite 1701, New York, NY 10016, www.FFANY.org.

*The manufacturer’s suggested retail price is based on supplier’s representation of value. No sales may have been made at this price.

**Purchase price excludes shipping, handling and tax.

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Alba Botanica® Brand Partners With The Pink Agenda And FAB-U-WISH During Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Highlighting Giuliana Rancic’s FAB-U-WISH Initiative, Alba Botanica® Brand Will Show Support For A Great Cause

The Alba Botanica® brand is proud to announce its partnership with The Pink Agenda, a non-profit organization committed to raising money for breast cancer research and Giuliana Rancic‘s FAB-U-WISH program, an initiative that grants wishes to those suffering from breast cancer. Since 2014, Giuliana Rancic’s FAB-U-WISH and The Pink Agenda has granted the most fabulous wishes to women undergoing treatment for this devastating disease.alba-botanica.jpg

The Pink Agenda believes that engaging today’s generation can go a long way toward finding tomorrow’s cure for breast cancer. That’s why The Pink Agenda, together with its partner the Breast Cancer Research Foundation, is working with the next generation of leaders to find and fund programs that are improving the lives of those suffering from breast cancer and conducting the groundbreaking research necessary to improve their odds. The Pink Agenda, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization launched in 2007, has contributed $2 million to breast cancer research.

Alba Botanica®, as a brand was started with the mission to Do Beautiful. Last year, they launched the Do Good – Do Beautiful campaign, which highlights women who are doing good and beautiful things in their lives and the world. Supporting The Pink Agenda and Giuliana Rancic, who was already a fan of the brand, is the perfect partnership to continue the brand’s messaging of empowering and inspiring women in the world.

As a brand that promotes creating positive change in the world, the Alba Botanica® brand is thrilled to be working alongside Giuliana and The Pink Agenda to both spread awareness and raise research funds in support of finding a cure for breast cancer,” said Julie Marchant-Houle, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Personal Care products at The Hain Celestial Group, Inc.

Said Rancic, “By partnering with FAB-U-WISH and The Pink Agenda, Alba Botanica® brand is helping women currently facing breast cancer feel special – and feel better – during their most difficult times. We’re proud to be working alongside Alba Botanica® to support our ultimate wish of finding a cure.

The Pink Agenda is honored to have Alba Botanica® join in our fight to make breast cancer history,” said Lucretia Gilbert, Executive Director of The Pink Agenda. “Our partners are critical in helping raise awareness of the disease and funding the groundbreaking research necessary to save lives.”

Alba Botanica® products contain 100% vegetarian ingredients and are made with vitamins, plant emollients and therapeutic botanicals for optimum beauty benefits. The Alba Botanica® brand range includes: Hawaiian skin care, hair care and spa treatments; Even Advanced™ skin care; ACNEdote™ acne skin care treatments; Very Emollient™ body lotions, bath and shower gels, cream shaves and foam shaves; Good & Clean™ facial cleansers; Fast Fix beauty treatments; a full range of suncare products and deodorant sticks.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month: What You Need to Know and How You Can Help

Thanks to earlier detection –through screening and increased awareness— and better treatments, a woman’s risk of dying of breast dropped 38 percent between the late 1980s and 2014, translating into 297,300 fewer breast cancer deaths during that time.

However, there’s much more to be done. Breast cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer death in women. Only lung cancer kills more women each year. And there remains a large racial gap in mortality, with African-American women having 42 percent higher death rates compared to whites. The chance that a woman will die from breast cancer is about 1 in 37 (about 2.7 percent).

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American Cancer Society Logo (PRNewsfoto/American Cancer Society)

The Facts:

The American Cancer Society‘s estimates for breast cancer in the United States for 2017 are:

  • About 252,710 new cases of invasive breast cancer will be diagnosed in women.
  • About 63,410 new cases of carcinoma in situ (CIS) will be diagnosed (CIS is non-invasive and is the earliest form of breast cancer).
  • About 40,610 women will die from breast cancer.
  • While black and white women get breast cancer at roughly the same rate, black women are more likely to die from it.

At this time, there are more than 3.1 million people with a history of breast cancer in the United States. (This includes women still being treated and those who have completed treatment.)

Risk factors:

  • Limited but accumulating research indicates that smoking may slightly increase breast cancer risk, particularly long-term, heavy smoking and among women who start smoking before their first pregnancy.
  • Obesity increases the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Risk is about 1.5 times higher in overweight women and about 2 times higher in obese women than in lean women.
  • Growing evidence suggests that women who get regular physical activity have a 10%-25% lower risk of breast cancer compared to women who are inactive, with stronger evidence for postmenopausal than premenopausal women.
  • Numerous studies have confirmed that alcohol consumption increases the risk of breast cancer in women by about 7%-10% for each one drink of alcohol consumed per day on average. Women who have 2-3 alcoholic drinks per day have a 20 percent higher risk of breast cancer compared to non-drinkers.

What You Can Do to Help

From investing in research, providing free rides to treatment, giving insurance advice and providing a free place to stay during chemotherapy, the American Cancer Society is attacking cancer from every angle. If you or someone you love is concerned about developing breast cancer, have been recently diagnosed, are going through treatment, or are trying to stay well after treatment, the American Cancer Society can help you find the answers you need.

Get Involved and help save lives from breast cancer: Fundraise and participate in one of more than 250 Making Strides events or participate virtually at makingstrideswalk.org.

Take action with The American Cancer Society’s nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy affiliate, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) and help make fighting breast cancer a national priority at acscan.org/makingstrides

Macy’s Thinks Pink to Support the Battle Against Breast Cancer

In Honor Of Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Join In The Fight For A Cure With Powerful Pink Pieces Benefitting The Cause

This October, Macy’s continues to support Breast Cancer Awareness Month, inviting customers to give back through an inspiring campaign that shines light on awareness while using fashion to fundraise for a disease that affects women, men and families everywhere. From Macy’s online Pink Shop featuring fashion, home and pet merchandise from an array of great brands, including a limited-edition necklace created by Macy’s employees, to the Polo Ralph Lauren Foundation’s Pink Pony bracelets, a portion of each purchase price will benefit charities that are working to eliminate the disease.macys logo

Breast cancer awareness has long been an important cause for Macy’s, which we continue to support alongside our generous customers, employees and partners working collaboratively to make a difference,” said Holly Thomas, Macy’s group vice president of cause marketing. “We are inspired by their generosity and are deeply grateful for the funds and awareness raised toward the fight against breast cancer.”

Pink Shop at macys.com

Beginning Sept. 25, Macy’s online “Pink Shop” at www.macys.com/pink offers a curated selection of fashion for men, women, children and pets, in addition to items for the home. The shop will also include special pink merchandise created for Macy’s from Charter Club, Ideology and Thalia Sodi, in support of the Breast Cancer Research Foundation (BCRF).

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Macy’s supports Breast Cancer Awareness Month with powerful pink pieces that benefit the cause; ID Ideology BCRF Family Strong Collection; macys.com/pink (Photo: Business Wire)

Bold graphics and inspirational messages of strength will be featured on ID Ideology’s BCRF Family Strong Collection. The limited-edition items raise awareness for the cause through motivational phrases for men, women, girls and pets, as well as signature items such as leggings and hoodies. In tribute to Breast Cancer Awareness month, Ideology also made a $100,000 donation to BCRF, regardless of sales.

Cozy sleepwear and robes featuring the iconic pink ribbon will be available for a limited time from Charter Club at Macy’s. Ten percent of the purchase price from each soft and inviting piece will benefit BCRF through Dec. 31, 2017.

Courageous messages of hope emblazon two new tees from Thalia Sodi’s Breast Cancer Research Foundation Tee Collection. Macy’s will donate 10 percent of the retail price from these motivational pieces to BCRF through Oct. 31, 2017.

BCRF Necklace

The Macy’s family also includes many associates who have been touched by this disease, and to honor those brave battles, Macy’s will be releasing a limited-edition heart pink ribbon necklace created and inspired by the uplifting story of three employees who have been personally impacted by breast cancer. A portion of sales from this delicate sterling silver and pink sapphire pendant will support BCRF.

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Macy’s supports Breast Cancer Awareness Month with powerful pink pieces that benefit the cause; limited-edition sterling silver and pink sapphire necklace $99; http://www.macys.com/pink  (Photo: Business Wire

I had the piece created for myself to always remember and appreciate those friends and family members who are so generous when you are going through treatment,” said Tracie Manick, vice president store manager at Macy’s Manhattan Village in Manhattan Beach, California. “The design was inspired by two friends who were there for me through the entire ordeal of surgery and treatment. Brandi Galimi, a Macy’s district merchant, was diagnosed with breast cancer eight months before I was. She and her sister, Jill Pan, also a vice president store manager at Macy’s, had tattoos in the shape of the heart with the ribbon to remember. In honor of their kindness, their tattoos became my inspiration for the pendant.”

This moving piece featuring sterling silver and pink sapphires will be available in select stores and on macys.com for $99. In honor of all supporters, Macy’s will donate $10 from the sale of each necklace to BCRF through Dec. 1, 2017. Continue reading

2017 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month: Tanger Outlets Launches Shop PINK On October 1st At All Tanger Locations

Commemorating 24 Years of Uniting in the Fight Against Breast Cancer

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. will once again offer shoppers great savings in return for supporting the ongoing efforts to end breast cancer during the 24th annual Tanger PINK Campaign. Since 1994, Tanger has contributed more than $17 million to breast cancer research through the PINK Campaign, 5K races, on-site events and other breast cancer-related fundraising initiatives across the U.S.

TANGER FACTORY OUTLET CENTERS, INC. LOGO

Tanger Outlets. (PRNewsFoto/Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc.)

The Tanger PINK Campaign launched September 29 at Tanger Outlets across the United States and Canada. At participating retailers, every day during the month of October, shoppers using the Shop Pink Card will receive additional savings on the best brand name and design fashions while helping to unite in the fight against breast cancer.

Tanger Factory Outlet Centers1

Tanger Outlets Launches Shop PINK On October 1st At All Tanger Locations

Tanger’s Shop Pink Cards offer shoppers 25% off any item at participating stores, once per day, per store with unlimited use through October 31, 2017. Shop Pink Cards are available in two formats: a mobile card saved on your phone or a physical card to save in your wallet. Tanger’s Shop Pink Cards can be purchased at any Tanger Outlets nationwide, online at www.tangeroutlet.com/pink or on Tanger’s app.

Individual centers will schedule local Pump Up the PINK events, including 5K Walk/Runs, Pink Party Socials, and other Pink activations to enhance the shopping experience and to shine the light on breast cancer awareness. Tanger Outlets is also giving away gift cards and PINK items on their social media channels for fans throughout the month. Continue reading

The Council of Fashion Designers of America And Fabletics Launch Global Campaign For Fashion Targets Breast Cancer

Actress and Fabletics Co-Founder Kate Hudson returns as Fashion Targets Breast Cancer Ambassador for FTBC 2017

Doing Good is Always in Fashion” is the message behind the 2017 Fashion Targets Breast Cancer Campaign from the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) in partnership with Fabletics, a global active-lifestyle brand co-founded by Kate Hudson in 2013.Fabletics

The collaboration returns for a second year with the actress, fashion tastemaker and mother of two serving as the FTBC ambassador for the month of October. Hudson follows in the footsteps of previous FTBC Ambassadors including Naomi Campbell, Christy Turlington, and Karolina Kurkova among others.

The Fashion Targets Breast Cancer® (FTBC) name and symbol were created by Ralph Lauren and subsequently entrusted to the CFDA Foundation. In 2011, FTBC began working with The New York Community Trust to develop a focused grantmaking program covering the critical areas of breast cancer screening, treatment, and survival. It established the Fashion Targets Breast Cancer Fund, which is guided by an advisory committee of fashion industry representatives, experts in the content area, and Trust staff, to make grants to New York City organizations that assist women with breast cancer. Specifically, grants from the FTBC Fund help low-income, minority, and immigrant women, with screening, treatment, and support services to help them cope with their cancer.

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Image Credit: Actress and Fabletics Co-Founder Kate Hudson return as Fashion Targets Breast Cancer Ambassador for FTBC 2017. | Photo Credit: JUCO

Fabletics is a global active-lifestyle brand designed with every woman in mind. Co-founded by Hudson, the brand combines fitness and fashion to make women feel stylish and confident at, and beyond, the gym. Fabletics brings new monthly collections—in sizing ranging from XXS-3X and customized lengths —to a loyal community of over one million members across eight countries. See (and shop) the full selection of premium quality activewear, accessories, shoes and more at fabletics.com and 22 retail locations across the US.

I’m really honored to have been asked to be an ambassador for Fashion Targets Breast Cancer for a second year. Continuing to support this cause proactively is so important to me — and to so many other people whom have had a personal experience with a friend or family member diagnosed with breast cancer. We’ve made great strides but it’s my hope that with our collective voices, we can continue to spread awareness and produce the ground-breaking research needed to make progress in the mission to end breast cancer forever,” said Hudson.

Our inaugural ‘Fashion Targets Breast Cancer’ campaign in partnership with Fabletics was so successful that we all decided to renew the effort for this important cause,” said Steven Kolb, President and CEO of the CFDA. “We are thrilled that Kate Hudson agreed to return as our ambassador, as our values of health, fitness, and philanthropy are aligned with those of Kate and Fabletics.

The Council of Fashion Designers of America, Inc, (CFDA) is a not-for-profit trade association founded in 1962 with a membership of over 500 of America’s foremost womenswear, menswear, jewelry, and accessory designers. In addition to hosting the annual CFDA Fashion Awards, the organization owns the Fashion Calendar and stages New York Fashion Week: Men’s. It also offers programs which support professional development and scholarships, including the CFDA {Fashion Incubator}, the CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, the Geoffrey Beene Design Scholarship, the Liz Claiborne Design Scholarship Award, the Kenneth Cole Footwear + Accessory Innovation Award, and the CFDA/Teen Vogue Scholarship. Member support is provided through the Strategic Partnerships Group, a group of high-profile companies offering designers strategic opportunities. The CFDA Foundation, Inc. is a separate, not-for-profit organized to mobilize the membership to raise funds for charitable causes. Through the Foundation, the CFDA manages the worldwide Fashion Targets Breast Cancer initiative and raises funds for HIV/AIDS organizations, among other programs.

As part of the partnership, Fabletics is launching a FTBC-branded capsule collection available during Breast Cancer Awareness Month this October. It features three two-piece outfits designed in signature FTBC colors: a sports bra and high-waisted leggings, a sports bra and capri, and a tank with a legging. Proceeds of sales from the three looks will directly benefit FTBC global. The items will be available for purchase across eight countries and available on Fabletics.com as well as in the 22 Fabletics stores nationwide. Fabletics will also host an FTBC event at all retail locations, where a percentage of net proceeds of all sales will be donated to the initiative.

For more information, please visit www.CFDA.com, facebook.com/cfda, instagram.com/cfda, twitter.com/cfda, cfda.tumblr.com, and youtube.com/cfdatv. For general information on Fabletics, please visit the TechStyle website. Visit Fabletics Blog to experience the brand’s editorial content site.

New CDC Study Shows Changes In Breast Cancer Death Rates By Age Group

Corresponding author: Lisa C. Richardson, lrichardson@cdc.gov

Breast cancer death rates among women decreased during 2010-2014, but racial differences persisted, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in this week’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.cdc-logo1

Breast cancer continues to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among U.S. women (1). Compared with white women, black women historically have had lower rates of breast cancer incidence and, beginning in the 1980s, higher death rates (1). This report examines age-specific black-white disparities in breast cancer incidence during 1999–2013 and mortality during 2000–2014 in the United States using data from United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) (2). Overall rates of breast cancer incidence were similar, but death rates remained higher for black women compared with white women. During 1999–2013, breast cancer incidence decreased among white women but increased slightly among black women resulting in a similar average incidence at the end of the period. Breast cancer incidence trends differed by race and age, particularly from 1999 to 2004–2005, when rates decreased only among white women aged ≥50 years. Breast cancer death rates decreased significantly during 2000–2014, regardless of age with patterns varying by race. For women aged ≥50 years, death rates declined significantly faster among white women compared with black women; among women aged <50 years, breast cancer death rates decreased at the same rate among black and white women. Although some of molecular factors that lead to more aggressive breast cancer are known, a fuller understanding of the exact mechanisms might lead to more tailored interventions that could decrease mortality disparities. When combined with population-based approaches to increase knowledge of family history of cancer, increase physical activity, promote a healthy diet to maintain a healthy bodyweight, and increase screening for breast cancer, targeted treatment interventions could reduce racial disparities in breast cancer.

USCS includes incidence data from the CDC’s National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program and mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (2). Data on new cases of invasive (malignant) breast cancer* diagnosed during 1999–2013 were obtained from population-based cancer registries affiliated with NPCR or SEER programs in each state and the District of Columbia (DC). Incidence data in this report met USCS publication criteria, covering 99% of the U.S. population during 2009–2013 and 92% during 1999–2013.† SEER Summary Stage 2000§ was used to characterize cancers as localized, regional, distant, or unknown stage using clinical and pathologic tumor characteristics, such as tumor size, depth of invasion and extension to regional or distant tissues, involvement of regional lymph nodes, and distant metastases. Breast cancer death data during 2000–2014 were based on death certificate information reported to state vital statistics offices and compiled into a national file through the National Vital Statistics System; mortality data in this report cover 100% of the U.S. population. Race and ethnicity were abstracted from medical records for cases and from death certificates for deaths; this report includes all races, white, and black, regardless of ethnicity. Population estimates for the denominators of incidence and death rates were from the U.S. Census, as modified by the National Cancer Institute. Five-year average annual incidence rates for 2009–2013 and death rates for 2010–2014 per 100,000 women were age-adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 U.S. standard population (19 age groups).¶ Average annual percentage change was used to quantify changes in incidence rates during 1999–2013 and death rates during 2000–2014 and was calculated using joinpoint regression, which allowed different slopes for three periods; the year at which slopes changed could vary by race and age.

During 2009–2013, approximately 221,000 breast cancers were diagnosed each year (Table). Overall incidence of breast cancer was similar among black women (121.5 cases per 100,000 population) and white women (123.6 cases per 100,000 population), but differences by age and stage were found. Compared with white women, breast cancer incidence was higher among black women aged <60 years, but lower among black women aged ≥60 years. Black women had a lower percentage of breast cancers diagnosed at a localized stage (54%) than did white women (64%) (Table). Among white women, breast cancer incidence decreased from 1999 to 2004, and then stabilized, decreasing 0.8% per year on average; however, breast cancer incidence was stable from 1999 to 2005 among black women and then nonsignificantly increased (Figure 1). Breast cancer incidence trends differed by race and age, particularly during 1999–2004 when rates decreased only among white women aged ≥50 years. During 1999–2013, among women aged 60–79 years, rates of breast cancer incidence decreased significantly among white women, but increased significantly among black women (https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/breast/statistics/trends_invasive.htm).

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Figure 1: Trends* in invasive female breast cancer incidence, by race† and year of diagnosis — United States,§ 1999–2013 (CDC/MMWR, October 14, 2016)

During 2010–2014, approximately 41,000 deaths from breast cancer occurred each year (Table). Breast cancer mortality was 41% higher among black women (29.2 deaths per 100,000 population) than white women (20.6 deaths per 100,000 population). Breast cancer death rates decreased during 2010–2014 among both blacks and whites, although differences in trends by race and age were found (Figure 2). Overall, breast cancer death rates decreased faster among white women (−1.9% per year) compared with black women (−1.5% per year). Among women aged <50 years, breast cancer death rates decreased at the same pace among black and white women, whereas white women aged ≥50 years had significantly larger decreases. The largest difference by race was observed among women aged 60–69 years: breast cancer death rates decreased 2.0% per year among white women compared with 1.0% among black women.

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FIGURE 2. Average annual percentage change* in female breast cancer death rates, by age group and race† — United States, 2000–2014 (CDC/MMWR October 14, 2016)

Discussion

Recent trends in breast cancer incidence suggest that the convergence and now equal incidence for black and white women has been primarily because of incidence increasing among black women, particularly among those aged 60–79 years, and concomitant decreasing or stable rates in white women. Breast cancer mortality is approximately 40% higher among black women compared with white women, with faster decreases in mortality among white women. This report confirms previous findings by race overall (1), and presents age-specific changes for incidence and mortality by race. Continue reading