Shopbop.com Launches The Principle Collection

The Exclusive Denim Collection Features Customized Styles From The World’s Leading Brands

Shopbop.com, the premier, global shopping destination for women, announces the launch of The Principle Collection. An exclusive denim line out today, The Principle Collection is comprised of 15 unique styles, each created in partnership with a top denim brand in the industry. 
Working with over 1,000 brands worldwide, Shopbop.com offers women in 165 countries an assortment of ready-to-wear and accessories with fast, free global shipping worldwide and free returns in the U.S. and Canada.

Shopbop Logo.  (PRNewsFoto/Shopbop.com)

Shopbop Logo. (PRNewsFoto/Shopbop.com)

Launched over 15 years ago as a denim-centric online boutique, today Shopbop continues to be a go-to resource for the most coveted denim brands worldwide, with over 1,000 jeans currently on site. The Principle Collection was born out of this extensive knowledge of the denim category and obsession with finding the perfect fit. Working closely with designers from leading labels to customize everything from silhouettes and washes to tailoring and hardware, Shopbop presents a highly curated and beloved range of styles and fits that comprise the modern dream denim wardrobe.

Ranging in price from $98 to $345, the Principle Collection features:
– 3×1 High Rise Cropped Micro Flare
– AG High Rise Ankle Skinny
– Blank Denim Vegan Leather Ankle Skinny
– Citizen of Humanity “Girlfriend” Slim Slouchy
– Current/Elliott Boyfriend Jean
– FRAME Paperbag Waist Wide Leg
– J Brand Trouser Jean
– McGuire Mid Rise Patch Pocket Flare
– MiH High Rise Super Flare
– MiH Petite High Rise Super Flare 
– MOTHER Straight Leg
– Paige Mid Rise Slim Bootcut
– Paige Petite Mid Rise Slim Bootcut
– Rag & Bone/Jean Pencil Leg Straight

R13 Mid Rise Skinny

One key element in the collection is the standardization of rises throughout the line, with all mid-rises at 9.8″ and high-rises at 10.8″. This simplistic approach allows the Shopbop girl to know her preference after trying her first pair, even if she’s purchasing across brands. In addition, special tweaks were made to pre-existing cult-favorite styles to optimize fit, including an updated ankle length on the Blank Denim Vegan Leather Ankle Skinny to avoid bunching at the hem and giving the Paige Mid-Rise Slim Bootcut a slimmer, ultra-flattering cut. Two silhouettes, the Citizens of Humanity “Girlfriend” Slim Slouchy and the FRAME Paperbag Waist Wide Leg, are completely new introductions for the brands while MiH offers their first-ever petite option, the Petite High Rise Super Flare.


With over 15 years of working with the top denim designers in the industry and a history of discovering new brands, we recognized an opportunity to combine our experience in the category with our deep knowledge of the Shopbop customer,” says Darcy Penick, Chief Merchandising Officer, Shopbop. “By focusing on how she shops for jeans and her preferences–and identifying the most standout qualities from some of our favorite brands– The Principle Collection offers customized pairs that particularly appeal to our shopper’s wardrobe needs and that she won’t find anywhere else.

The Principle Collection‘s signature silhouettes are available year round, with special seasonal washes and extensions planned for the future. Shopbop offers 24/7 customer service in multiple languages, fast, free global shipping and free returns in the U.S. and Canada as well as Amazon Prime benefits for members who order within the U.S. (Shopbop is part of the Amazon.com Inc. group of companies.)

Denim: Past, Present and Future on Display at The Museum at FIT

Denim: Fashion’s Frontier

Fashion & Textile History Gallery, The Museum at The Fashion Institute of Technology

December 1, 2015 – May 7, 2016

All photography © Copyright 2015 The Museum at FIT

Men’s work pants, denim and brushed cotton, circa 1840, USA, museum purchase. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Men’s work pants, denim and brushed cotton, circa 1840, USA, museum purchase. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Denim has long been one of the world’s most beloved fabrics. Your jeans do more than cover your body. They hold you. They support and comfort, they remind you that you are girded for the struggle. They take your measure and keep your faith. Jeans mold to you and become yours alone. If you eat too much, they tell you. Denim is a sturdy cotton warp-faced twill textile in which the weft passes under two or more warp threads. This twill weaving produces the familiar diagonal ribbing of the denim that distinguishes it from cotton duck (a linen canvas). After being made into an article of clothing, most denim articles are washed to make them softer and to reduce or eliminate shrinkage (which could cause the article to not fit properly after its owner washes it). In addition to being washed, “washed denim” is sometimes artificially distressed to produce a “worn” look. Much of the appeal of artificially distressed denim is that it resembles dry denim which has faded. In jeans made from dry denim, such fading is affected by the body of the person who wears them and by the activities of his or her daily life. This process creates what many enthusiasts feel to be a more “natural” look than the look of artificially distressed denim.

Embellished men's jeans; blue denim 5-pocket jeans with multicolor overall applique, beadwork, hand and machine embroidery, incorporating leather, vinyl, contrast fabric, rhinestones and cord. Levi Strauss & Co., jeans, embroidered denim, circa 1969, USA, gift of Jay Good. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Levi Strauss & Co., jeans, embroidered denim (blue denim 5-pocket jeans with multicolor overall applique, beadwork, hand and machine embroidery, incorporating leather, vinyl, contrast fabric, rhinestones and cord), circa 1969, USA, gift of Jay Good. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

According to anthropologist Daniel Miller, “On any given day, nearly half the world’s population is in jeans.” The cultural significance of this has yet to be fully determined.

Denim: Fashion’s Frontier will explore the dynamic history of denim and its relationship with high fashion from the 19th century to the present. The exhibition, presented by The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, (Seventh Avenue at 27 Street, New York City 10001-5992) will trace denim from its origins in work wear of the 19th century, through its role as a symbol of counterculture rebellion in America, to its acceptance into mainstream culture. It will culminate with the arrival of blue jeans as luxury items during the late 20th century, and denim’s subsequent deconstruction by contemporary designers through postmodern pastiche and experimentation.

Comme des Garçons (Junya Watanabe), dress, repurposed denim, spring 2002, Japan, museum purchase. Photograph by William Palmer.

Comme des Garçons (Junya Watanabe), dress, repurposed denim, spring 2002, Japan, museum purchase. Photograph by William Palmer.

In 1853, a Bavarian immigrant named Levi Strauss, an astute merchant in San Francisco, responded to the gold-rush need for tough miner’s clothes. He had his stock of brown cotton tent canvas run up as plain trousers, no belt loops and no back pockets. A cinch belt in the back kept them up. Scrabbling among too many rocks and too little gold, crawling along shafts, wrestling timber supports and balky dray mules, Strauss’s “overalls” lasted. They were cheap and they felt good.

Strauss switched to denim (from Serge de Nimes, a twill made in southern France) and had it dyed in reliable, uniform indigo. By the 1860s, Levi Strauss‘s blue pants were daily wear for miners and farmers and cattlemen throughout the West. In 1873 he bought, for $69—the price of the patent application — an idea from a Russian immigrant tailor in Reno for making miner’s pants stronger by riveting the critical seams. They were nicknamed jeans after the city of Genoa, where sailors wore blue cotton canvas.

White and black organic tunisian denim one shoulder gown with black denim trim and shoulder strap, pieced black panel at waist, front zippered slit at front L, and pleated white denim deatchable train attached at back . Edun, dress, white and black denim, 2007, USA, gift of Edun. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Edun, dress, white and black organic tunisian denim one shoulder gown with black denim trim and shoulder strap, pieced black panel at waist, front zippered slit at front L, and pleated white denim deatchable train attached at back . Edun, 2007, USA, gift of Edun. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Walking suit, striped denim, circa 1915, USA, museum purchase. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Walking suit, striped denim, circa 1915, USA, museum purchase. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

By 1880 the Levi was full-blown, with orange stitching (including the trademark “arcuate” design across the back pockets, once the functional anchor for pocket lining), bar tacking, rivets, watch pocket and the “Two Horse” leather patch. Lot numbers are assigned to products and, for the 01-weight denim used, the “waist-high overalls” are called 501s. It’s true; more so than most of the thin ghosts we call up for our heritage, Levi’s are rooted in the real stuff.

Henry David Lee was another kind of merchant. He started out in Ohio selling kerosene and moved west to Salina, Kansas, with a small bundle of venture capital. The H. D. Lee Mercantile Company sold fancy canned goods and offered a line of Eastern work clothes. When shortages and shipping didn’t suit Henry David, he set up his own garment works, producing overalls, jackets and dungarees. Dungarees refer specifically to cotton drill pants without bib fronts, and generally to the rough blue cotton cloth named for the dyer’s section of Bombay—Dungri—where it originated. Lee’s chauffeur probably came up with the Lee Union-All, a denim coverall that became the uniform of mechanics and other workers in grimy environments. Later, it evolved into the flight suit.

In the 1920s, about the time Lee was introducing the first zipper fly, Levi Strauss was deleting the crotch rivet. Chafed horsemen had pressed the company for years to remove it, but it took a fly-fishing trip by the chairman of the board to do so. As he crouched near a campfire listening to a story, that central copper rivet heated up nicely. The chairman bolted upright—and the rivet went. Later, with the universal acceptance of jeans, the back-pocket rivets that scratched school desks, dining room chairs, saddles and car fenders became extinct.

Alongside this chronology, Denim: Fashion’s Frontier will highlight important points of engagement between high fashion and denim that are often left out of typical denim histories. Themes addressed will include the role of advertising in creating popular mythologies, as well as issues of distressing, connoisseurship, and environmental concerns. The goal will be to shed new light on one of the world’s most popular types of clothing, and to explore how a particular style of woven cotton has come to dominate the clothing industry.

The exhibition opens with an example of Levi Strauss & Co.’s most famous style of jeans—the 501XX—positioning its importance as the original template for the five-pocket, riveted jean that continues to dominate the market today.

The exhibition’s historic chronology begins with rare pieces of denim work wear from the 19th century, including a pair of work pants from the 1830s-40s that predate Levi Strauss & Co.’s jeans production and a woman’s work jacket from the late 19th century, which demonstrates that denim was not only a menswear fabric.

By the start of the 20th century, denim was regularly used for a variety of clothing, from prison garb to naval uniforms, both of which are on view in the exhibition. Also on view in this section is a fashionable women’s walking suit from the 1910s rendered entirely in a striped, white denim. Cut in accordance with the fashionable silhouette of the time, the ensemble illustrates the widening applications for denim.

During the interwar years, two distinct genres of lifestyle clothing emerged that shifted denim’s cultural associations: “Western wear” (which emerged alongside the popularity of dude ranch vacations) and “play clothes” (which were designed to outfit fashionable men and women while engaging in an array of new leisure activities, such as tennis and days at the beach). Examples from both of these categories are on view, including a pair of “Lee Riders” from the 1940s and a woman’s denim play ensemble from the 1930s. Also on view from this period is an haute couture blouse by Elsa Schiaparelli that imitates the look of denim. The blouse is accentuated with pearl essence buttons to play on the tradition of western wear rodeo shirts.

Jumpsuit, denim, 1942-45, USA, gift of David Toser. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Jumpsuit, denim, 1942-45, USA, gift of David Toser. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

With the onset of World War II, women went to work as part of the war effort when men left for the front. The all-in-one denim jumpsuit—an example of which is on view—became the unofficial uniform of these female factory workers, personified in the figure of “Rosie the Riveter.”

Simultaneously, a new market emerged for practical-yet-fashionable clothing that affluent women could wear while tending to their own households, a need that arose in the wake of housekeepers defecting to work for the war effort. Claire McCardell was the first to capitalize on this new demand in 1942 with her denim “Pop Over” dress.

As World War II came to a close, a new influence shaped the cultural view of denim in 1950s America: the biker gang. Jeans became the center of controversy, and there was a general public outcry against denim as a symbol (and even the cause) of teenage unrest. Examples of denim garments from this time include a Levi Strauss & Co. 507 denim jacket.

18th century/1960s-inspired ensemble with light blue denim redingote and micro mini skirt embroidered with large floral border design, silk crepe de chine camisole and boned corset in contrasting pale and deep pink floral prints. Roberto Cavalli, ensemble, embroidered denim, spring 2003, Italy, gift of Roberto Cavalli. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Roberto Cavalli, Ensemble, embroidered denim(18th century/1960s-inspired ensemble with light blue denim redingote and micro mini skirt embroidered with large floral border design, silk crepe de chine camisole and boned corset in contrasting pale and deep pink floral prints), spring 2003, Italy, gift of Roberto Cavalli. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

To combat fears of juvenile delinquency, a group of denim mills and manufacturers banded together to found The Denim Council in 1955. The Special Collections of FIT’s Gladys Marcus Library contains the papers of The Denim Council, which include press clippings, reports, and cartoons. Examples of these on display in the exhibition shed new light on denim’s rapid rise in popularity during this period.

In the 1960s, denim became closely associated with the hippie counterculture movement. Within the movement, denim was important for its working class connotations and as a comment on the growing materialism of postwar American culture. The hippies’ particular use of denim established certain trends, such as bellbottom jeans, embroidered denim, and patched denim. Examples of these different styles are on view.

By the early 1970s, the counterculture movement had crossed into the mainstream, taking denim with it. A prime example of this transition is a pair of denim shorts printed with a photograph of the crowd at the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair. The print transforms the hippies themselves into a decorative motif, in essence making them a commodity of the consumerist industry they were protesting against. At the same time, denim began appearing in the work of major fashion designers, such as Yves Saint Laurent. A denim safari jacket by Saint Laurent from this period is shown alongside a denim leisure suit by American designer John Weitz.

European companies, such as Fiorucci, started a cultural craze for Italian and French jeans in the late 1970s. These jeans were defined by their sexy fit and were often so tight that wearers were forced to lie down in order to zip them up. Examples of Fiorucci’s signature “Safety Jeans” represent this trend. Also on view in this section is a pair of the original Calvin Klein Jeans—often heralded as the first “designer” jeans—which were immortalized by Brooke Shields in the company’s controversial 1980 commercials.

Raphael, leisure suit, denim, circa 1973, Italy, gift of Chip Tolbert. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Raphael, leisure suit, denim, circa 1973, Italy, gift of Chip Tolbert. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

During the 1980s, the practice of “finishing” denim with different techniques, such as stonewashing and acid-washing, became standard across the industry. The innovation of stonewashing is often linked to French duo Marithé & François Girbaud. An example of their work is juxtaposed with jeans from another important 1980s brand: Guess. This section of the exhibition also includes a selection of designer experiments with denim from the 1980s, including a look from Ralph Lauren’s “Prairie” collection of 1981. Continue reading

New Denim Styles At H&M Help Close The Loop For More Sustainable Fashion

This September, H&M will introduce 16 new denim styles made using recycled cotton from textiles collected in the Garment Collecting initiative in H&M stores. The pieces for men, women and kids, are the latest steps toward H&M’s goal towards creating a closed loop for fashion, and will be available in all stores worldwide, as well as online.

Creating a closed loop for textiles, in which unwanted clothes can be recycled into new ones, will not only minimize textile waste, but also significantly reduce the need for virgin resources as well as other impacts fashion has on our planet,“says Karl-Johan Persson, CEO of H&M.

H&M wants to create a closed loop for its textiles, in which the fabrics from unwanted clothes can be recycled into new ones. The aim is to reduce the environmental impact of the fashion industry, by limiting waste that goes to landfill and saving on natural resources used in the production of fabric.

Since 2013, H&M customers worldwide have been able to bring unwanted clothes from any brand into its stores as part of its Garment Collecting Initiative. So far, over 18,000 tons have been collected globally.

Right now, H&M is able to use 20% recycled cotton from collected clothes, and is investing in new technology to increase this share without losing quality. H&M has a target to increase the number of garments made with at least 20% recycled fabric by 300% compared to 2014.

The new denim pieces, made from recycled cotton and organic cotton, include for women three styles of jeans, from skinny to distressed ‘girlfriend’ jeans, plus a denim jacket, flared dungarees and a denim jumpsuit. For men, there is a zip-up denim jacket, alongside two distressed slim leg styles, and a pair of joggers in coated denim. There are kids pieces too, including a zip-up hoodie with cute animal ears, along with stretch jeans sequined at the knee, or a street style hooded shirt, with distressed jeans.

Top 10 Ways to Celebrate New Year’s Eve in Las Vegas

The countdown is on. 2015 is right around the corner and in the Entertainment Capital of the World, there’s no shortage of ways to celebrate. While Las Vegas has all the usual NYE suspects, why not consider some new ways to bring in the New Year, like eating 23-karat gold flecked lasagna or kicking off 2015 with Justin Timberlake? So, how should you celebrate New Year’s Eve in Sin City? Here are 10 ideas:

Top 10 Ways to Celebrate New Year's Eve in Las Vegas (PRNewsFoto/MGM Resorts International)

Top 10 Ways to Celebrate New Year’s Eve in Las Vegas (PRNewsFoto/MGM Resorts International)

10. Taste the decadence. Say adieu to 2014 at The Mirage with Portofino‘s White Diamond truffle and 23-karat gold flaked lasagna. The $100 “Diamond and Gold” Lasagna tantalizes taste buds with layers of pasta stuffed with porcini mushrooms, Iberico ham, Prosciutto di Parma, 24-month-aged Parmigiano-Reggiano, buffalo mozzarella and Kobe Bolognese. This luxurious creation is finished with foie gras-infused Alfredo sauce.

9. Dance the year away. If confetti blasts and partying like a rock star are more your style, check out the top headliners at the finest nightclubs in the world. Calvin Harris with Eva Shaw & Burns will headline a special New Year’s Eve set at Hakkasan at MGM Grand. Alesso will drop beats at LIGHT at Mandalay Bay and The Bank at Bellagio will feature an exclusive live performance by Trey Songz.

8. Party with Macklemore. If you’re donning your latest thrift shop finds this New Year’s Eve, 1OAK at The Mirage is the place to be, as Grammy Award-winning hip-hop duo Macklemore and Ryan Lewis take the stage to perform hits like “Thrift Shop” and “Same Love.”

7. Go out with a bang. Fireworks light up the sky along Las Vegas Boulevard at midnight so it’s crucial to find a good vantage point well ahead of time. miX Lounge at Delano Las Vegas boasts an outdoor patio and floor-to-ceiling windows facing The Strip. You won’t miss a single burst with this epic view.

6. Catch the water works. Water and fire usually don’t play well together, but on New Year’s Eve on The Strip, it might be the best mash-up yet! Using dramatic music, water and light, The Fountains of Bellagio soar up to 460 feet in beautifully choreographed synchronization. With the glimmering fireworks in the background and the waterworks right in front of you, the combination makes for one stunning sight!

5. Pig out. Steak is so 2014; celebrate the start of 2015 at Monte Carlo’s Yusho with a whole pig’s head. Cooked for a full 24 hours and served with a plethora of Japanese fixings like stuffed buns, cabbage kimchi and bowls of ramen, this will be a New Year’s Eve dinner you won’t soon forget. Just be sure to order at least a full day in advance.

4. Paint the town gold.Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino will transform into a golden wonderland, complete with elaborate gold-themed accents, lavish culinary selections, incredible cocktails and more. The masquerade-style affair encourages guests to welcome 2015 in an exuberant environment. The party continues with chart-toppers Maroon 5 as they take over the Mandalay Bay Events Center for two special performances December 30 and 31.

3. Beef up your new year. Ring in the New Year with the most indulgent burger experience on The Strip – the legendary FleurBurger 5000 from celebrated chef Hubert Keller of Fleur at Mandalay Bay. The foie gras and black truffle-topped Kobe burger is accompanied by a bottle of Chateau Petrus 1995 poured in Ichendorf Brunello stemware, imported from Italy. After the meal, Fleur will ship the glasses to your home along with a personal note from Chef Keller. All this decadence for the price of $5,000!

2. Cure your hangover. Hangovers are all too common come New Year’s Day. Luckily, Vegas has as many hangover cures as ways to incur said hangover. Developed by a group of experienced emergency room physicians, REVIV, located at The Underground at MGM Grand, features a wide range of intravenous and vitamin therapies to combat hangovers including three different types of IV therapies. If the “hair of the dog” cure is more your style, check out the Instagram-worthy Bloody Mary at Todd English P.U.B. inside The Shops at Crystals, where a cart is rolled tableside and guests select from an insane amount of garnishes including a bacon cheeseburger slider, a chicken wing, shrimp and a mini corn dog.

1. Put on your suit and tie. In Vegas, the party doesn’t end at the stroke of midnight. This year, continue your celebration of a fresh start, a new year and a new day with none other than Justin Timberlake, who will close out his 20/20 Experience World Tour January 1 and 2 at the MGM Grand Garden Arena.

Denim Diaries: GUESS Partners with Top Fashion Bloggers to Promote Fall Denim

This fall, GUESS? goes back to its roots with a strong emphasis on denim through innovative designs and new washes in classic and updated silhouettes. To celebrate all things denim, GUESS? has partnered with four top fashion bloggers to create GUESS Denim Diaries ; a series of photos, videos and styling tips chronicling each blogger’s individual style by challenging them to create five unique looks using GUESS’ Fall 2013 collection. Each girl was shot in street-style photos in Manhattan’s picturesque Soho neighborhood or breathtaking Venice Beach, California. The GUESS? Denim Diaries campaign launches on August 12, 2013, where fans can shop the blogger’s looks or enter to win the Denim Diaries sweepstakes.

To celebrate all things denim, @GUESS has partnered with four top fashion bloggers to create GUESS Denim Diaries; a series of photos, videos and styling tips chronicling each blogger's individual style by challenging them to create five unique looks using GUESS? Fall 2013 collection. The GUESS Denim Diaries campaign launches on August 12th with Julie Sarinana of Sincerely Jules. Fans can shop the blogger's looks or enter to win the Denim Diaries sweepstakes.  (PRNewsFoto/GUESS?, Inc.)

To celebrate all things denim, @GUESS has partnered with four top fashion bloggers to create GUESS Denim Diaries; a series of photos, videos and styling tips chronicling each blogger’s individual style by challenging them to create five unique looks using GUESS? Fall 2013 collection. The GUESS Denim Diaries campaign launches on August 12th with Julie Sarinana of Sincerely Jules. Fans can shop the blogger’s looks or enter to win the Denim Diaries sweepstakes. (PRNewsFoto/GUESS?, Inc.)

Danielle Bernstein of We Wore What and Carolina Engman of Fashion Squad were chosen as the featured New York bloggers. Danielle gravitated toward distressed and printed denim pieces, pairing them with relaxed tees and pumps to compliment her effortlessly-cool, laid back style. Carolina channeled her Swedish style by creating polished and minimalist looks by mixing rich black coated denim and dark wash skinny jeans with button-down tops and layering with jackets. Both mastered denim on denim looks which perfectly represents GUESS’ western trend for fall.

Guess? Fall/Winter 2013 Campaign

Guess? Fall/Winter 2013 Campaign

Continue reading