Asheville Winter Travel News: Surprisingly Cozy And Refreshing Off-Season Adventures In The Blue Ridge Mountains

S’more flights, mountaintop yoga under the winter sun, new downtown hotel and art hubs with long-range views and “Downton Abbey” at Biltmore

Often overlooked and underrated, winter in Asheville, N.C., is a bit of a secret in a Blue Ridge Mountain city world-famous for fall color and lush summer adventure. Mostly moderate winter weather means Asheville’s Art Deco Downtown remains walkable and cozy with picture-perfect long-range views of snowy peaks, romantic restaurants and easy access to hiking and walking trails. This winter brings a mix of cozy new offerings including wellness experiences to beat the winter blues, a new downtown hotel with expansive views and luxury wellness amenities, “Downton Abbey” costumes and life-sized set recreations at The Biltmore, beverages to warm the soul and new cultural offerings to tuck into. http://www.ExploreAsheville.com/winter19-20

Ashewville Convention and Visitors Bureau logo

Why Winter?

Stunning panoramic views, the best rates of the year and last-minute travel deals from an array of mountaintop retreats and inviting B&Bs—some offering private hot tubs overlooking the surrounding peaks and valleys, fireplaces in epic locales and the chance to see nationally traveling bands in intimate music venues. Find out more at www,ExploreAsheville.com/winter.

NEW HOTEL WITH EXPANSIVE VIEWS & SERENITY-THEMED AMENITIES

Just opened, the Kimpton Hotel Arras has added a new icon and four-star luxury property to Asheville’s famed Art Deco skyline. In addition to a completely new Art Deco façade for Asheville’s tallest building, the 128-room hotel offers grand views of the surrounding mountains and an extensive food focus with two restaurants by local chef Peter Pollay—Bargello, a Mediterranean-inspired restaurant, and District 42, a more casual spot with outdoor seating, small bites and hand-crafted cocktails. The hotel also offers an artisanal serenity cart, available upon request for guest room delivery, filled with everything from books by Asheville authors to lavender sachets and evening cordials. Wellness amenities also include a massage room and yoga area.

“DOWNTON ABBEY” AT BILTMORE

On the heels of the hit “Downton Abbey” movie, Downton Abbey: The Exhibition arrives at America’s Largest Home on Nov. 8 with set recreations and artifacts, more than 50 of the show’s costumes and exclusive multimedia elements. Housed at Biltmore‘s Amherst and Legacy locations, the exhibition will run through April 7, 2020, and will highlight the parallels between the show, the movie and Biltmore’s Vanderbilt family, friends and staff. (More info. )

COZY WINTER TOURS: TEA & TAROT, MOUNTAINTOP YOGA + ROOFTOP FIRE PITS

  • Winter Blues, Bye: Check out the enlightening new Tea and Tarot offering from Asheville Wellness Tours that includes an educational, traditional Chinese tea experience and a group tarot reading at one of Asheville’s coziest tea houses.
  • Warm Your Spirit on Top of a Mountain: Asheville Wellness Tours is offering the Yoga on the Mountain Hike this winter. Make your way through the forest and then warm your spirit with yoga under the winter sun. Enjoy a peaceful mountain, crisp fresh air and long-range views along the way.
  • Rooftop Fire Pits & Mountain Views: Asheville Rooftop Bar Tours offer a guided tour to some of Asheville’s most scenic spots. Winter means gorgeous sunset views, crystal clear vistas of the surrounding mountains, hot toddies and fire pits.

NEW ART MUSEUM JOINS ARRAY OF FRESH, IMMERSIVE CULTURAL ADVENTURES

Views Inside & Out: Asheville Art Museum reopens this November with a new state-of-the-art building that features education facilities, an art library, a lecture and performance space, a new ArtPLAYce for families and children and the addition of a rooftop sculpture terrace and café with views of downtown architecture and the surrounding mountains. The opening exhibition “Appalachia Now!” is a survey of contemporary art in Southern Appalachia, highlighting 50 emerging artists from the region.

More NEW Cultural Experiences Downtown:

  • One of Asheville’s most beloved festivals now has a brick-and-mortar location downtown. Opening to the public this winter, LEAF Global Arts Center will be a cornerstone in the continued rebirth of the city’s historical African-American business district, The Block. The Center will offer educational experiences for guests rooted in music, art, community and culture inclusivity via a mini-theater and global immersion room using virtual reality, unique musical instruments and a stage for performances and interactive artist workstations.
  • Opening this November, The Center for Craft is expanding with The National Craft Innovation Hub, including new public galleries featuring local and national makers, lecture space, classrooms and a co-working space, cementing Asheville’s reputation as a force in the nation’s fine art and maker scene. To celebrate the reopening, the “Craft Futures 2099” exhibition showcases 10 local and national artists and their craft objects of the future, an exploration of what’s been and what’s to come in the world of craft. The exhibition runs until February 2020. All Center for Craft galleries are free and open to the public.

FOOD & BEVERAGE NEWS: CRAFT BEER & MAKER COLLAB, NIGHTLIFE GETS A MAKEOVER + S’MORE FLIGHTS

  • New Brewery Blends National Park History and Maker Culture: Set in the buildings that once housed young forestry workers of the New Deal-era Civilian Conservation Corps, Burial Beer Co.’s Forestry Camp Restaurant and Bar just opened, offering beer, wine and coffee and highlighting local makers, from bakers to artists to musicians. James Beard semifinalist Brian Canipelli, chef and owner of Cucina 24, leads the food program.
  • “Beauty Academy” Pairs Drinks, Food & Live Music: This newly opened venture from Charlie Hodge (Sovereign Remedies), Asheville Beauty Academy, features cocktails, champagne and brandy menus, a small food program and live music. The iconic downtown building, built in 1913, was home to the Asheville Beauty Academy in the 1950s and more recently a beloved jazz and blues bar.
  • Brewing Beyond Beer: New downtown brewery DSSOLVR opens this November with beer offerings fit for the pickiest of beer enthusiasts to the most casual of light beer drinkers, as well as their own mead, wine, cider and cold-brew coffee.
  • S’more Flights: Sunshine Sammies, known for ice cream sandwiches and their gourmet takes on after-school snacks like moon pies and zebra cakes, is making winter a little warmer with s’more flights. Think house-made marshmallows, scratch-made graham crackers, dark chocolate and toppings in a variety of rotating flavors.
  • Winter Teas Infuse Local Flavors: Asheville Tea Company, working with a dozen local and regional farms, is warming up spirits this winter with their Snow Day blend (utilizing French Broad Chocolate cacao nibs), Winter Wonderland (a blend of white tea, Fraser Fir, wintergreen, peppermint, birch bark and yarrow flower) and Nutcracker (black tea, cinnamon, hickory nuts and vanilla bean).

ICONIC WINTER EXPERIENCES Discover more at ExploreAsheville.com/winter.

  • Unobstructed Views: Take in stunning panoramic views of the surrounding mountains while on a winter hike. Multiple trailhead access points remain open all year long on the Blue Ridge Parkway and across Pisgah National Forest. Find your perfect winter trail with Explore Asheville‘s NEW Asheville Hike Finder, where you can sort by difficulty, distance from Asheville and features like waterfalls or views.
  • Best Deals: Winter offers the best rates of the year for travel deals + fewer crowds. Cozy travel packages include wellness opportunities and other winter adventures. Find more at ExploreAsheville.com/deals.
  • Cabin Fever: Asheville’s array of mountaintop retreats and inviting B&Bs offers private hot tubs overlooking the surrounding peaks and valleys, candlelight dinners and the opportunity to get away from it all.
  • Secret Season for Music: Deep-seated bluegrass roots harmonize with new talent and innovative sounds in Asheville. In winter many nationally traveling local bands come home to the region to play shows and pop in to jam sessions.
  • Fireplaces with a View: From rooftops to cozy spots to imbibe, Asheville’s trend of fireplaces accompanied by spectacular vistas of downtown architecture and mountain scenery is highlighted at venues like Capella on 9 at the AC Hotel Asheville Downtown and Hemingway’s Cuba at Cambria Downtown Asheville. Other hot spots with epic fireplace offerings: Omni Grove Park Inn, Pillar Bar at the Hilton Garden Inn Asheville Downtown and Wicked Weed Brewing.
  • Signature winter events in Asheville include: The Big Crafty (December), showcasing handmade art from hundreds of local artists; The Fringe Arts Festival (January), an innovative series of boundary-pushing arts performances; Big Band Dance Weekend (January) at the Omni Grove Park Inn; and Asheville Restaurant Week (January). Find more winter events at ExploreAsheville.com/events.

“In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury” at The Art institute of Chicago

The Art Institute of Chicago presents an examination of midcentury art and design with In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury, on view now through January 12, 2020. The exhibition, which opened on September 6, 2019, brings together the work of Clara Porset (b.1895), Lola Álvarez Bravo (b.1903), Anni Albers (b.1899), Ruth Asawa (b.1926), Cynthia Sargent (b.1922), and Sheila Hicks (b.1934), reflecting the unique experiences of these designers and artists in Mexico between the 1940s and 1970s. Despite their singularities, they created work that reflected on artistic traditions, while at the same time opened up new readings of daily life at a time of great social and political change.

The work of Clara Porset, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Anni Albers, Ruth Asawa, Cynthia Sargent, and Sheila Hicks has never been shown together before. While some of these artists and designers knew one another and collaborated together, they are from different generations, and their individual work encompasses a range of media varying from furniture and interior design to sculpture, textiles, photography, and prints. They all, however, share one defining aspect: Mexico, a country in which they all lived or worked between the 1940s and 1970s. During this period they all realized projects that breached disciplinary boundaries and national divides.

This exhibition takes its title from a quote by Clara Porset who, encouraging makers to seek inspiration widely, wrote: “There is design in everything…in a cloud…in a wall…in a chair…in the sea…in the sand…in a pot. Natural or man-made.” A political exile from Cuba, Porset became one of Mexico’s most prominent modern furniture and interior designers. Influenced by Bauhaus ideas, she believed that design and art could reshape cities, elevate the quality of life, and solve large-scale social problems. She shared these values with the other artists and designers in this exhibition, who were also committed to forging relationships across cultures; bringing different voices into dialogue; and responding productively to a moment of profound cultural and economic transformation. While some knew one another and worked together, this constellation of practitioners was from different generations, and their individual work encompasses a range of media varying from furniture and interior design to sculpture, textiles, photography, and printmaking.

Clara Porset. Butaque, about 1955–56. Gálvez Guzzy Family/Casa Gálvez Collection. Photo by Rodrigo Chapa, courtesy of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Clara Porset conceived designs informed by modernism with clean lines and forms, while also inspired by Mexican lifestyles. Mexican photographer Lola Álvarez Bravo created dynamic photomontages by cutting and pasting together parts of different photographs to produce images that emphasized the intense urban development. She also photographed Porset’s work. Following Porset’s invitation to visit Mexico, German émigré Anni Albers saw the country’s landscape and architecture as a vital source of inspiration, informing the abstract visual language of her designs. Japanese American Ruth Asawa, who took a class on craft and housing with Porset in Mexico City, was drawn to the artistry in utilitarian looped-wire baskets that she encountered in Toluca and her sculptures made with this wire technique became her primary practice. Cynthia Sargent and her husband Wendell Riggs moved to Mexico City from New York in 1951, where they produced several popular lines of textiles and rugs in their weaving workshop, collaborated with Porset for her exhibition Art in Daily Life (1952), and encouraged an appreciation of crafts by founding the weekly market Bazaar Sábado. Sheila Hicks, who moved in the same artistic circles as Porset, set up a workshop in Taxco el Viejo where she collaborated with and learned from local weavers, while producing pieces that were resolutely her own.

In the decades following the Mexican Revolution, which ended around 1920, Mexico was rapidly modernizing, and the art scene of its capital was as cosmopolitan and vibrant as it is today. Government projects promoted the country’s artisanal traditions in an attempt to build a cohesive national identity. This open climate attracted intellectuals and artists, such as the six celebrated here. They were transformed by what they learned, drawing inspiration from Mexican lifestyles and artistic practices, including the patterns of ancient indigenous sculptures, the geometries of archaeological sites, and the complex technical qualities found in thousands of years of textile traditions.

Anarquía arquitectónica en la ciudad de México (Architectural Anarchy in Mexico City), about 1953
Lola Álvarez Bravo. Familia González Rendón. © Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona Foundation

Mexican artist Lola Álvarez Bravo, a close friend and collaborator of Porset, was one of few women photographers working in the country during this period. Her photographs are essential to understanding Porset’s no longer extant projects, and her dynamic photomontages, created by cutting and pasting together parts of different photographs to create new images, provide insights into Mexico’s richly layered social, political, and geographical landscape during the 1940s and 1950s.

Study for Camino Real, 1967
Anni Albers. The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, 1994. © The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2019. Photo by Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art

Porset was also friends with German émigré Anni Albers. Encouraged to visit Mexico by Porset, she first traveled to the country in 1935 and made 13 subsequent trips. Mexico’s landscape and architecture became a vital source of inspiration and remained so throughout her career, providing an abstract visual language for her designs. The triangle motif, for instance, that she used repeatedly in textiles and screenprints was drawn from archaeological Zapotec sites such as Monte Albán.

Untitled (S.535, Hanging Five-Lobed Continuous Form within a Form with Two Interior Spheres and One Teardrop Form), 1951
Ruth Asawa. Courtesy of Charles and Kathy Harper Collection. © Estate of Ruth Asawa, Courtesy David Zwirner. Photo by Dan Bradica

Mexico also left a deep impression on Japanese American Ruth Asawa. In 1947, two years after taking a class with Porset at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, she returned to the country and was drawn to the artistry in utilitarian looped-wire baskets that she encountered in Toluca. From then on, sculptures made with this wire technique became her primary practice.

Scarlatti, designed in 1958, produced about 1968–1969
Cynthia Sargent. Riggs-Platas Family Collection. Photo by Wendy McEahern

American Cynthia Sargent moved to Mexico City from New York with her husband Wendell Riggs in 1951 and produced several popular lines of rugs in their weaving workshop. Porset championed Sargent’s work and included her fabric designs in her pivotal exhibition Art in Daily Life. Sargent and Riggs went on to co-found the Bazaar Sábado, an influential market for Mexican and expatriate art and craft that continues to this day.

Learning to Weave in Taxco, Mexico, about 1960
Sheila Hicks. Gift of Martha Bennett King in memory of her brother, Dr. Wendell Clark Bennett. © Sheila Hicks

While American artist Sheila Hicks never met Porset, she was aware of Porset’s designs through her close friendship with architect Luis Barragán, who worked with both artists. After studying Latin American weaving traditions and traveling to South America, Hicks relocated to Mexico in the late 1950s and set up a workshop in Taxco el Viejo, where she collaborated with and learned from local weavers, while producing pieces that are resolutely her own.

As a story, In a Cloud… reminds us that, for many, transnational migration is both a fact of life and a provocation of creativity; it also challenges easy assumptions about the directions that migration can take. Current political discourse in the United States often frames Mexico as a place that people either leave or move through and not as a country that attracts immigrants of its own. As this exhibition makes clear, it was this country’s openness to artistic practice that drew a host of ambitious modern artists and designers from around the world.

The work of these independent-minded designers and artists provides six distinct yet aligned models of creative practices that followed alternative routes and opened up new possibilities. Displayed together, their work makes the case for a continued evaluation of Mexico’s creative landscape and contributes to burgeoning discussions aimed at a more inclusive history of modern art and design,” said Zoë Ryan, John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design, Department of Architecture and Design, the Art Institute of Chicago.

The pieces in this exhibition resulted from a complex dynamic of cultural learning and exchange. Each artist went beyond replication and applied their newfound knowledge and practices to create their own unique output while crediting the sources of their inspiration. These works highlight the importance of these still-influential contributions to art and design.

Major funding for In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury is provided by the Gordon and Carole Segal Exhibition Fund; the Walter and Karla Goldschmidt Foundation; Margot Levin Schiff and the Harold Schiff Foundation; and Barbara Bluhm-Kaul and Don Kaul.

Additional support is provided by Maria and William D. Smithburg; Kimberly M. Snyder; the George Lill Foundation Endowment; Nada Andric and James Goettsch; the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts; Thomas E. Keim and Noelle C. Brock; the Butler-VanderLinden Family Fund; the Terra Foundation for American Art; The Danielson Foundation; The Robey Chicago; and CNA.

The Museum Of Modern Art Announces Sur Moderno: Journeys Of Abstraction—The Patricia Phelps De Cisneros Gift

Major Exhibition at the Opening of New MoMA Will Display Over 100 Important Works by Latin American Artists

The Museum of Modern Art announces Sur moderno: Journeys of Abstraction―The Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Gift, a major exhibition drawn primarily from the paintings, sculptures, and works on paper donated to the Museum by the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros between 1997 and 2016.

Since its founding in 1929, The Museum of Modern Art has collected, exhibited, and studied the art of Latin America. Today, MoMA’s collection includes more than 5,000 works of modern and contemporary art by artists from Latin America distributed across its six curatorial departments, representing important figures in early modernism, Expressionism, Surrealism, abstraction, architecture, and Conceptual and contemporary art.

Alfredo Hlito (Argentine, 1923–1993). Ritmos cromáticos III (Chromatic Rhythms III), 1949. Oil on canvas, 39 3/8 × 39 3/8″ (100 × 100 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund

On view from October 21, 2019, through March 14, 2020, Sur moderno celebrates the arrival of the most important collection of abstract and concrete art from Latin America by dedicating an entire suite of galleries on the Museum’s third floor to the display of artists from Brazil, Venezuela, Argentina, and Uruguay.

Lygia Clark (Brazilian, 1920–1988). Contra relevo no. 1 (Counter Relief no. 1). 1958. Synthetic polymer paint on wood, 55 1/2 × 55 1/2 × 1 5/16″ (141 × 141 × 3.3 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Promised gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund. Courtesy of “The World of Lygia Clark” Cultural Association

The exhibition highlights the work of Lygia Clark, Gego, Raúl Lozza, Hélio Oiticica, Jesús Rafael Soto, and Rhod Rothfuss, among others, focusing on the concept of transformation: a radical reinvention of the art object and a renewal of the social environment through art and design. The exhibition is also anchored by a selection of archival materials that situate the works within their local contexts. Sur moderno is organized by Inés Katzenstein, Curator of Latin American Art and Director of the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America, The Museum of Modern Art, and consulting curator María Amalia García, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET)–Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Argentina, with Karen Grimson, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Drawings and Prints, The Museum of Modern Art.

María Freire (Uruguayan, 1917–2015). Untitled. 1954. Oil on canvas, 36 1/4 × 48 1/16″ (92 × 122 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund in honor of Gabriel Pérez‑Barreiro

The exhibition is divided into two main sections based on the concept of transformation. The first section, “Artworks as Artifacts, Artworks as Manifestos,” presents a group of works that subverted the conventional formats of painting and sculpture. Cuts, folds, articulated objects, cut-out frames, and experiments that question the autonomy of the art object are some examples of these artists’ material explorations. One of the first works visitors encounter in the exhibition, Willys de Castro’s Active Object (1961), fuses the materiality of painting with the principles of free-standing sculpture, inviting the viewer to circle around a painted canvas. Another work in this section, Gyula Kosice’s Articulated Mobile Sculpture (1948), questions the grounds of traditional sculpture by combining strips of brass to create a movable structure that defies classification.

Hélio Oiticica (Brazilian, 1937–1980). Relevo neoconcreto (Neoconcrete Relief) 1960. Oil on wood, 37 7/8 × 51 1/4″ (96 × 130 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of Gary Garrels. © Projeto Hélio Oiticica

The exhibition’s inclusion of Spatial Construction no. 12 (c. 1920) by Aleksandr Rodchenko highlights the influence of Russian Constructivism on South American art. Similarly, images of Piet Mondrian’s works were widely circulated and had a great impact on the development of abstraction in the region. His Broadway Boogie Woogie (1942–43), on view in the exhibition, inspired investigations of kineticism among artists such as Jesús Rafael Soto, whose Double Transparency (1956) is an attempt to transform the two-dimensionality of Mondrian’s painting into a three-dimensional experience.

Lygia Pape (Brazilian, 1927–2004). Untitled. 1956. Acrylic on wood, 13 3/4 × 13 3/4 × 3 1/8″ (35 × 35 × 8 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros through the Latin American and Caribbean Fund in honor of Sharon Rockefeller. Courtesy of Projeto Lygia Pape

In the second section, “Modern as Abstract,” the language of abstraction is displayed as both a product of and a catalyst for the transformation of the artists’ surroundings. The geometrical principles of abstract painting carried over into the everyday, where artists and architects recognized one another as allies, leading to a shared operation and set of ideals. Here, María Freire’s Untitled (1954), for example, is displayed alongside archival materials and works from MoMA’s Architecture and Design collection, in an exploration of public sculptural projects and furniture design.

The final part of the exhibition is dedicated to the grid, one of modern art’s central motifs of experimentation. Gego’s Square Reticularea 71/6 (1971) and Hélio Oiticica’s Painting 9 (1959) are two examples of works in the exhibition that approached the transformation and expansion of the rational grid in different ways. Oiticica disrupted the strict geometric system with his rhythmically arranged rectangles, while Gego warps and deconstructs the reticular structure.

Over the last 25 years, the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros has donated more than 200 works by Latin American artists to The Museum of Modern Art. In addition to those generous donations, in 2016 the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros established the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America at MoMA. The Institute’s programming includes fellowships for scholars, curators and artists, and an extended research initiative that contributes to a series of public programs hosted by the Museum, as well as symposia in Latin America, and publications in digital and printed format.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, with contributions from such prominent scholars in the field as María Amalia García, Irene V. Small, and Mónica Amor. The volume also includes a conversation between Patricia Phelps de Cisneros and MoMA director Glenn D. Lowry, and a dialogue between Inés Katzenstein, the Museum’s current curator of Latin American art, and Luis Pérez-Oramas, who, in addition to serving as MoMA’s Latin American art curator between 2003 and 2017, was one of the principal curators involved in the development of the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros.

SPONSORSHIP:

Generous funding for the exhibition is provided by Agnes Gund.

Additional support is provided by Adriana Cisneros de Griffin and Nicholas Griffin.

Leadership contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund, in support of the Museum’s collection and collection exhibitions, are generously provided by the Kate W. Cassidy Foundation, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Mimi and Peter Haas Fund, Jerry I. Speyer and Katherine G. Farley, 3 Eva and Glenn Dubin, The Sandra and Tony Tamer Exhibition Fund, Alice and Tom Tisch, The David Rockefeller Council, The Contemporary Arts Council of The Museum of Modern Art, Anne Dias, Kathy and Richard S. Fuld, Jr., Kenneth C. Griffin, The Keith Haring Foundation, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder, and Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro.

Major contributions to the Annual Exhibition Fund are provided by the Estate of Ralph L. Riehle, Emily Rauh Pulitzer, Brett and Daniel Sundheim, Karen and Gary Winnick, The Marella and Giovanni Agnelli Fund for Exhibitions, Clarissa Alcock and Edgar Bronfman, Jr., Agnes Gund, and Oya and Bülent Eczacıbaşı.

Now Open: The Spectacular New Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya

The New Property Marks A New Era Of Luxurious Hospitality And Personalized Service In The Capital Of Kuwait

Four Seasons Invites Guests To Experience Its Newest Hotel In The Gulf Region With Special Introductory Offer

Entering the all-new Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait at Burj Alshaya, one’s eyes are immediately drawn to the dramatic staircase, spiraling 13 meters (43 feet) up through the soaring lobby, appearing to defy gravity as it makes its way toward the sky. Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait at Burj Alshaya is part of a growing collection of Four Seasons hotels and resorts in the Gulf region, including award-winning hotels in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain and Qatar, and three properties in the United Arab Emirates.

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya - Grand Stairways in Lobby

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya – Grand Stairways in Lobby

Our own ‘stairway to heaven’ is quickly becoming the symbol of Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait, and indeed it reflects the optimism one feels in this dynamic city,” notes General Manager Didier Jardin on the occasion of the Hotel’s opening day. “For our team of 415 staff, it’s a daily inspiration to take the hospitality experience to new heights, proudly introducing renowned Four Seasons service culture in a new country while being at the vanguard of the company’s continuing leadership around the world.

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya - Kuwait City

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya in Kuwait City (Far Right)

Located within the new, two-tower Burj Alshaya development – the stylish new centerpiece of Kuwait City – Four Seasons is ideally situated for business and leisure travelers visiting the city, as well as local guests to dine, entertain and relax. Indeed, with 2,912 square meters (31,349 square feet) of beautifully-appointed event spaces hosting up to 1,200 guests, Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait already has many important business meetings and social events on the calendar – including 21 weddings so far.

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya - Royal Suite

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya – Royal Suite

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya - Guest Room

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya – Guest Room

With 217 guest rooms plus 67 lavish suites, the property easily transforms for each individual guest, whether in the city to do business, enjoy an urban getaway for two, or with the whole family for a holiday filled with shopping, sightseeing and playing in the outdoor pool. Four dining venues – plus a fifth opening this month – showcase the creations of international culinary talent while celebrating local tastes and traditions. A two-level spa complex hosts innovative treatments as well as a state-of-the-art fitness center and second swimming pool.

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya - Hotel Public Space

Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait At Burj Alshaya – Hotel Public Space

The Look of the New Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait

Conceived by Gensler architects and designed by Yabu Pushelberg, Four Seasons Hotel Kuwait easily stands among the most striking hotels in the world, and yet it is distinctly Kuwaiti in style and ambiance. Continue reading

The Radical Art of Fashion: Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between at The Met

Body Meets Dress-Dress Meets Body, Spring-Summer 1997 (3)

Body Meets Dress-Dress Meets Body, Spring-Summer 1997 (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute Spring 2017 exhibition, Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between, on view through September 4, examines Kawakubo’s fascination with the space between boundaries. And the reviews—both personal and professional—has been unanimously positive. It is, indeed, one of the best examples of fashion being art and art being fashion, without one diminishing the other in any way shape or form. 

White Drama, Spring-Summer 2012 (2b)

White Drama, Spring-Summer 2012. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Blood and Roses, Spring-Summer 2015 (7)

Blood and Roses, Spring-Summer 2015. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Blue Witch, Spring-Summer 2016

Blue Witch, Spring/Summer 2016. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Clustering Beauty, Spring-Summer 1998 (1)

Clustering Beauty, Spring-Summer 1998. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

18th Century Punk, Autumn-Winter 2016-17 (2)

18th Century Punk, Autumn-Winter 2016-17. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

A thematic exhibition, rather than a traditional retrospective, this is The Costume Institute’s first monographic show on a living designer since the Yves Saint Laurent exhibition in 1983.

Abstract Excellence, Spring-Summer 2004

Abstract Excellence, Spring-Summer 2004 (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Bad Trash, Autumn-Winter 2008-2009 (3)

Bad Trash, Autumn-Winter 2008-2009 (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Ballerina Motobike, Spring-Summer 2005

Ballerina Motobike, Spring-Summer 2005 (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Body Meets Dress-Dress Meets Body, Spring-Summer 2017

Body Meets Dress-Dress Meets Body, Spring-Summer 2017 (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Ceremony of Separation, Autumn-winter 2015-16 (1)

Ceremony of Separation, Autumn-winter 2015-16. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Crush, Spring-Summer 2013 (1)

Crush, Spring-Summer 2013. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Francesca Granata of The Atlantic wrote the following: 

The designer has long been alternately hailed as an innovator and demonized for creating aggressively unattractive clothing that is out-of-step with its time. From cocoon dresses with no waistline to sweaters full of holes to oddly shaped dresses, Kawakubo has been responsible for radical reconsiderations of the silhouette through experimental pattern-making, draping, knotting, and eventually the use of padding. This sense of out-of-step–ness is evident in the Costume Institute’s spring show. Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between is a cerebral exhibition, serving as a surprisingly timely reminder of the need to embrace bodily differences and vulnerabilities.

07.18thCenturyPunk,Autumn2016

Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969), 18th-Century Punk, autumn/winter 2016–17; Courtesy of Comme des Garçons. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

She further went to write, “Throughout the Met show, we see an unapologetically rebellious artist undercutting prevailing mores. A few years ago, the Costume Institute presented a controversial (and poorly understood) show on punk rock in fashion. Though her designs weren’t exactly prevalent in CBGB, Kawakubo (whose garments were included in that exhibit) is in some ways the true inheritor of that mantle, her work constantly pushing back on the grandeur around her.”

Roberta Smith, Chief Art Critic of The New York Times, calls it “a magnificent, challenging show”, further adding in a rave review, “Every year, the Costume Institute makes a different case for art in fashion and for fashion as art, usually in an immersive context and with impressive results. The Kawakubo show takes this argument into radical terrain. It doesn’t focus on art within fashion as did the recent show featuring Charles James’s sinuously sculptural ball gowns, which were functioning garments. Rather, its center is a staggering panoply of mostly quasi-wearable three-dimensional forms that are a kind of hybrid, an art of “the in-between,” driven by Ms. Kawakubo’s insatiable quest for originality, or as she prefers to call it, “newness.” The result is an inspirational show that places Ms. Kawakubo at the forefront of several modernisms — in art and design, Europe and Asia — upending notions of style and gender, conflating past and present and constantly pressing forward with fresh ideas about form, process and meaning.”

Ms. Kawakubo regards her fashions and their environments as a Gesamtkunstwerk, or “total work of art.” This synthesis is reflected in the exhibition, designed as a complete expression of the Comme des Garçons “universe.” It is intended to be a holistic, immersive experience, facilitating a personal engagement with the fashions on display. A pathway is suggested by the numbers in an exhibit booklet, beginning with these red ensembles that reflect Kawakubo’s enduring preoccupation with blurring the boundaries between body and dress. Visitors are encouraged, however, to forge their own paths and experience the exhibition as a voyage of discovery.

Cubisme, Spring-Summer 2007 (4)

Cubisme, Spring-Summer 2007 (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Cubisme, Spring-Summer 2007

Cubisme, Spring-Summer 2007 (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Holes, Autumn-Winter 1982-83

Holes, Autumn-Winter 1982-83 (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Inside Decoration, Autumn-Winter 2010-11 (2B)

Inside Decoration, Autumn-Winter 2010-11(All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Lost Empire, Spring-Summer 2006 (3)

Lost Empire, Spring-Summer 2006. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

Not Making Clothes, Spring-Summer 2014

Not Making Clothes, Spring-Summer 2014. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017 )

The Future of Silhouette, Autumn-Winter 2017-18

The Future of Silhouette, Autumn-Winter 2017-18. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017)

The Infinity of Tailoring, autumn-Winter 2013-14 (3)

The Infinity of Tailoring, autumn-Winter 2013-14. (All Images, unless specified otherwise, courtesy of Fashion+lifestyle 2017)

The exhibition features approximately 140 examples of Kawakubo’s womenswear designs for Comme des Garçons, dating from the early 1980s to her most recent collection. Objects are organized into nine dominant and recurring aesthetic expressions of interstitiality in Kawakubo’s work: Absence/Presence, Design/Not Design, Fashion/AntiFashion, Model/Multiple, High/Low, Then/Now, Self/Other, Object/Subject, and Clothes/ Not Clothes. Continue reading

Miami Museum Month Celebrates New Openings and Great Offers

Throughout May, Locals and Visitors Can Enjoy BOGO Deals and Special Offers

The Greater Miami Convention & Visitors Bureau will celebrate Miami Museum Month during the month of May, with much-anticipated museum openings and can’t miss “Buy One, Get One Free” admissions and membership savings.

(Visit MiamiMuseumMonth.com to download coupons and incentives to explore Miami & The Beaches’ most renowned collections of art and culture. Official sponsor Citibank® will also provide cardholders with a 10% discount at participating museum stores for the month-long program.)Miami_Museum_Month_logo

Miami Museum Month is part of the GMCVB’s increasingly popular Miami Temptations Program, which takes a thematic focus on the best that Miami has to offer with monthly deals and special events. Temptations programs include: Miami Cruise Month (January), Miami Romance Month (February), Miami Shop Month (March), Miami Sports & Wellness Month (April), Miami Film Month (June), Miami Spa Month (July-August), Miami Spice Restaurant Month (August-September), Miami Attractions Month (October), Miami Live Arts Month (November), and Miami Heritage Month (December).

Interior of the Planetarium at The Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science. (Photo Business Wire)

Interior of the Planetarium at The Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science. (Photo: Business Wire)

The Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science is slated to open on May 8, 2017, in Downtown Miami‘s Museum Park. During Miami Museum Month, visitors can enjoy an exclusive 10 percent off Family and Family Plus membership packages. (Please see coupon for more details; valid from May 9 through May 31, 2017.) Poised to be one of the only institutions worldwide boasting both a state-of-the-art planetarium and cutting edge aquarium, the 250,000 square-foot facility sits on four acres of land overlooking Biscayne Bay surrounded by Downtown Miami’s dazzling skyline. For more details, visit MiamiMuseumMonth.com. Continue reading

Pendry Hotels Announces The Grand Debut Of The Pendry San Diego

Highly Anticipated New Luxury Brand Launch Sets the Stage with Premiere Opening in San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter

Pendry Hotels has announced the grand opening of its first hotel in San Diego’s renowned downtown Gaslamp Quarter. A new luxury brand from Montage International, in partnership with The Robert Green Development Company, The Pendry is a refreshing take on the hospitality establishment that blends thoughtful and gracious service with a new approach to inspired design and authentic programming that appeals to today’s luxury guest. Pendry San Diego features 317 guest rooms, three dining concepts, three bars, Spa Pendry, private meeting and event spaces and a vibrant lobby experience.

pentry-hotels-logo

Pentry Hotels Logo

Pendry San Diego is located at 550 J Street, San Diego, in the epicenter of the city’s historic and energetic Gaslamp Quarter, blocks from Petco Park, the home of the San Diego Padres, and the San Diego Convention Center; and is the debut property from Pendry Hotels, a new luxury hospitality brand from Montage International. Located in the city’s renowned Gaslamp Quarter, Pendry San Diego strikes a balance between modern and traditional, pairing classic Southern California influence with luxury amenities. Boasting six unique restaurants and bars and highlighting some of the city’s most talented chefs, Pendry San Diego is the city’s most anticipated new hospitality and lifestyle offering. (For more information, follow @pendryhotels or visit www.pendryhotels.com.)

pendry-san-diego-credit-christian-horan

Pendry San Diego. Photo Credit: Christian Horan

We are thrilled to debut the first Pendry hotel, Pendry San Diego, in the heart of San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter,” said Alan J. Fuerstman, founder, chairman, and CEO, Montage International. “San Diego is the ideal city for us to launch the brand and we look forward to welcoming guests and locals alike to experience all that the hotel has to offer.”

From its early inception, The Pendry vision has been clear,” said Michael Fuerstman, creative director and co-founder, Pendry Hotels. “We wanted to take our extensive experience in hospitality and combine it with our vision of modern-day luxury and style; one that is rooted in local culture, beautiful design, international inspiration and authentic service. It’s a hotel experience that should feel organic and luxurious at the same time and the San Diego property will bring that vision to life beautifully. We are very excited to open our doors in the heart of the Gaslamp Quarter where we think locals and travelers will embrace and appreciate the Pendry point of view.

Pendry San Diego offers a dynamic hub where guests and visitors can work, relax, socialize and dine in one central location. Rooms are beautifully appointed with custom furnishings, luxurious bathrooms, and a sophisticated yet understated design nod to the city’s beach and surf culture. 36 suites offer stunning views of the city skyline and harbor, the historic streets of the Gaslamp Quarter or direct access to The Pool House outdoor deck. Guests and locals will enjoy a Tom Adler curated pop-up art gallery highlighting Ron Church surf photography. Each space within the hotel is rooted in design, culture and an inspired aesthetic that speaks to San Diego’s unique coastal voice and rapidly growing influence in arts, food, craft beer, and technology.

Pendry San Diego is home to the following restaurants, bars, nightlife, retail and wellness concepts:provisional-kitchen-at-the-pentry-san-diegoprovisional1

Provisional Kitchen, Café & Mercantile Designed in partnership with Raan and Lindsay Parton from Los Angeles’ Alchemy Works retail concept, Provisional is a restaurant and marketplace featuring seasonal fare and gourmet takeaway offerings from Executive Chef Chris Osbourne. The communal dining space features a Vittoria Coffee espresso bar, sky-high ceilings, bistro tables and a retail marketplace set within a greenhouse. The marketplace features a curated collection of items including homeware, ceramics, apothecary items, pantry staples, and jewelry.

nasons-hero

Nason’s Beer Hall

Nason’s Beer Hall A new addition to the famous San Diego craft beer scene, Nason’s is a California coastal establishment featuring local and international beers, global comfort food, and vintage bar games. Its name pays homage to Nason & Co. Farmer’s Market, formerly located in the current location of the beer hall in the early 1900’s. Continue reading