Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Announces Nominees For 2020 Induction

35th Annual Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame Induction Ceremony To Take Place On May 2, 2020 At Public Auditorium In Cleveland, Ohio

Fans can cast their vote for Inductees at Google, Rockhall.com, or the Museum.

All Images courtesy of The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

2020 induction logo

The Rock and Rool Hall of Fame (1100 Rock and Roll Boulevard, Cleveland, Ohio 44114. Phone: 216.781.7625) today announced the nominees for 2020 Induction, and the list includes previous nominees and first-time nominees. Nominees for induction into the Class of 2020 are:

Pat Benatar Promotional Photo, 1984, from album “Tropico”
  • Pat Benatar
  • Dave Matthews Band
  • Depeche Mode
  • The Doobie Brothers
  • Whitney Houston
  • Judas Priest
  • Kraftwerk
  • MC5
  • Motörhead
  • Nine Inch Nails
  • The Notorious B.I.G.
  • Rufus featuring Chaka Khan
  • Todd Rundgren
  • Soundgarden
  • T.Rex
  • Thin Lizzy

To be eligible for nomination, an individual artist or band must have released its first commercial recording at least 25 years prior to the year of nomination. Nine out of 16 of the Nominees are on the ballot for the first time, including Dave Matthews Band, The Doobie Brothers, Motörhead, The Notorious B.I.G., Pat Benatar, Soundgarden, T.Rex, Thin Lizzy, and Whitney Houston.

Whitney Houston

Inductees will be announced in January 2020. The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame 2020 Induction Ceremony, presented by Klipsch Audio, takes place at Public Auditorium in Cleveland, Ohio on May 2, 2020. The Ceremony is preceded by Induction Week, which includes a special dedication of the 2020 Inductee exhibit, Celebration Day, and other events and activities at the Museum and around town! Ticket on-sale information will be announced later.

Depeche Mose

Nominee ballots are sent to an international voting body of more than 1,000 artists, historians and members of the music industry. Factors such as an artist’s musical influence on other artists, length and depth of career and the body of work, innovation and superiority in style and technique are taken into consideration.

Nominees to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2020, top to bottom: Kraftwerk, MC5, Motorhead, Nine Inch Nails, T.Rex

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame offers fans the opportunity to participate in the induction selection process. Beginning today and continuing through 11:59 p.m. EST on January 10, 2020, fans can go to Google and search “Rock Hall Fan Vote” or any nominee name plus “vote” to cast a ballot with Google, vote at rockhall.com, or at the Museum in Cleveland. The top five artists, as selected by the public, will comprise a “fans’ ballot” that will be tallied along with the other ballots to choose the 2020 inductees.

Above, The Dave Matthews Band (top) and Todd Rundgren (bottom)

Nominees were announced live on SiriusXM VOLUME channel 106’s “Feedback” morning show today with hosts Nik Carter and Lori Majewski along with Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Foundation President & CEO Joel Peresman.

The Notorious B.I.G

Rock Hall donors and members get exclusive Induction ticket opportunities. Donate or join by January 31, 2020 to be eligible. Visit rockhall.com/support to learn more.

Rufus, featuring Chaka Khan

Klipsch Audio, a leading global speaker and headphone manufacturer, is a strategic partner and presenting sponsor of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, its Induction Ceremony events and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s Main Stage. Klipsch’s renowned products deliver the power, detail and emotion of the live music experience throughout the iconic museum.

Black and white promotional photograph of Thin Lizzy, 1991

Follow the Rock Hall on Facebook (@rockandrollhalloffame), Twitter and Instagram (@rockhall) and join the conversation at #RockHall2020.

Legendary Chef Charlie Palmer to Celebrate The Progression of American Cuisine With Inaugural American Fare Event in Napa

The Renowned Chef’s Collective Of Chefs To Reimagine Recipes And Partner With Elite Napa Wineries To Raise Funds For Children’s Museum Of Napa Valley

Chef Charlie Palmer teams up with our visiting chefs and top Napa Valley Cabernet producers for this one of a kind food and wine event at Archer’s boutique hotel set in the heart of downtown Napa.

Chef Charlie Palmer announces American Fare, a celebration of American cuisine, will take place Monday, November 18 at Charlie Palmer Steak and Sky & Vine Rooftop Bar at Archer Hotel Napa. At American Fare, the Charlie Palmer Collective of chefs will each partner with top Napa Valley Cabernet producers to recreate recipes from Charlie Palmer’s American Fare cookbook. Guests will get to taste and judge who they think is best. Proceeds from this one-of-a-kind event will benefit the Children’s Museum of Napa Valley. Hotel packages and à la carte tickets are now available for purchase on american-fare.com.

More than 30 years ago, I made a commitment to featuring regional American ingredients at Aureole,” said Chef Charlie Palmer. “Since then, our collective’s footprint has expanded tremendously but my dedication to the constant progression of domestic cuisine is unwavering. I’m excited to see how this next generation of talented chefs has reimagined my Progressive American recipes.”

American Fare will feature sustainably raised, heritage breed, antibiotic-free pork, beef, poultry and game courtesy of Joyce Farms, a family-owned company dedicated to using humane, all-natural and regenerative farming methods.

American Fare showcases the very best of American-inspired bites and Cabernet wines from Napa.

Participating Chefs

  • Francisco Lopez, Jr., Executive Chef – Charlie Palmer Steak Napa
  • Jason Collins, Executive Pastry Chef – Charlie Palmer Steak Napa
  • Scott Romano, Executive Chef – Dry Creek Kitchen
  • Lisa Kaufman, Executive Pastry Chef – Dry Creek Kitchen
  • Eduardo “Lalo” Saavedra, Executive Chef – Charlie Palmer Steak Las Vegas
  • Alexandre Grégoire, Executive Chef – Aureole Las Vegas
  • Michael Mahoney, Executive Chef – Charlie Palmer Steak Reno
  • Chris Engel, Executive Chef – Aureole NY
  • Fernando Marulanda, Executive Chef – Upper Story/Crimson & Rye
  • Michael Ferraro, Director of Culinary Concepts, Charlie Palmer Collective
  • Mike Ellis, Executive Chef – Charlie Palmer Steak DC

Participating Wineries & Additional Stations

  • Atelier Find Foods
  • Black River Caviar
  • Charles Krug
  • Clos Du Vol
  • Duckhorn Vineyards
  • Faust
  • John Anthony
  • Journeyman Meat Co
  • Louis M. Martini
  • OHM Coffee Roasters
  • Raymond Vineyards
  • Red Mare
  • Silver Oak
  • Vintage Sweet Shoppe
  • Whitehall Lane

Events

American Fare Event

Monday, November 18, 2019 | 6:00-9:00 p.m. | Archer Hotel Grand Salon

$95

Chef Charlie Palmer’s American Fare showcases the very best of food and wine with American-inspired bites by the master chef along with creations from the Charlie Palmer Collective, all paired with iconic Napa Valley Cabernet wines. Guests will enjoy live music by Full Chizel.

American Fare After Party with Tito’s Handmade Vodka*

Monday, November 18, 2019 | 9:00-11:00 p.m. | Sky & Vine Rooftop Bar

$40

Continue the American Fare experience with a VIP after party with hand-crafted cocktails featuring Tito’s Handmade Vodka. Mingle with Charlie Palmer, guest chefs and winemakers with the best views in Napa.

*After party tickets must be purchased with an American Fare event ticket.

Tickets & Hotel Packages

A limited number of Archer Hotel Napa lodging packages are also available for purchase via american-fare.com

Hotel Lodging Package ($550)

  • One Night Accommodations for Two in Deluxe King Guest Room
  • Valet Parking
  • Two Tickets to Charlie Palmer’s American Fare Event
  • Two Tickets to American Fare After Party with Tito’s Handmade Vodka

American Fare is sponsored in part by Tito’s Handmade Vodka, Joyce Farms and Fiji. For more information and a complete listing of sponsors, visit american-fare.com.

Jack Daniel’s Announces Launch of Tennessee Apple

Refreshing apple liqueur crafted with Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey available now

At 70 Proof, Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Apple Features A Perfect Blend Of Green Apples Enhanced By The Sweet Bold Notes Of Jack.

The Jack Daniel Distillery introduces Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Apple, a blend of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey with finely crafted apple liqueur. The newest member of the Jack Daniel’s family launches nationally this month.

Introducing the newest member of the Jack Daniel’s family: Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Apple, a blend of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey with finely crafted apple liqueur. (Photo: Business Wire)

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Apple is crafted from Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey, charcoal mellowed and matured in new American oak barrels, and apple liqueur made from the highest quality ingredients to deliver a delicious Jack Daniel’s experience. Jack Apple is a deliciously smooth and refreshing apple-flavored whiskey that’s uniquely Jack.

Mr. Jack was known for being an innovator and always exploring how to do things differently, including adding different flavors and ingredients,” said Jack Daniel’s Master Distiller Jeff Arnett. “Tennessee Apple couples the character of our Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey with the taste of crisp, green apples. It’s like a freshly picked apple in a glass of Jack.

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Apple logo

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Apple is nationally available now in 50 ml, 375 ml, 750 ml and 1-liter bottle sizes with a suggested retail price of $26.99 for 750 ml.

JACK DANIEL’S, OLD NO. 7, and TENNESSEE APPLE are registered trademarks. ©2019 Jack Daniel’s. Whiskey Specialty, 35% Alcohol by Volume (70 Proof). Jack Daniel Distillery, Lynchburg, Tennessee. JackDaniels.com

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Honors Indigenous Peoples’ Day with Launch Of Free Community Celebration That Places Native American Voices at the Forefront

Presented in Partnership with Akomawt Educational Initiative and Jonathan James-Perry (Aquinnah Wampanoag Nation)

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), is offering its first free celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day on Monday, October 14, presented in partnership with the Akomawt Educational Initiative and Jonathan James-Perry, Tribal Citizen of the Aquinnah Wampanoag Nation.

The community celebration re-positions Columbus Day as a holiday to honor the original inhabitants of the Americas. Part of the Fenway Alliance’s 18th annual Opening Our Doors Day, Indigenous Peoples’ Day at the MFA recognizes the heritage of Native Americans and the histories of their nations and communities, promoting the artistry of indigenous peoples in Greater Boston and New England. Throughout the day, visitors can explore the Native North American Art Gallery, enjoy music and dance, and drop in on a variety of family art-making activities. Indigenous Peoples’ Day is sponsored by Ameriprise Financial. Additional programming support is provided by The Lowell Institute.

The MFA was founded in 1870 and stands on the historic homelands of the Massachusett people. This event is one step in building bridges and engaging indigenous communities with the Museum through local and region-wide partnerships with artists, performers, educators, tribal nation leaders and community members,” said Makeeba McCreary, Patti and Jonathan Kraft Chief of Learning and Community Engagement at the MFA. “As a museum, we acknowledge the long history of the land that we occupy today and seek ways to make these narratives more prominent and visible within our galleries.”

During the celebration, visitors are invited to share their perspectives on Cyrus Dallin’s Appeal to the Great Spirit (1909), a monumental sculpture on the MFA’s Huntington Avenue lawn, through a community-activated art project. Visitor feedback will help to inform the interpretation of the work—continuing conversations that began during a spring 2019 lecture and community discussion. In the afternoon, a welcome and blessing will be held by Matthew Teitelbaum, Ann and Graham Gund Director; Elizabeth Solomon, Member of the Massachusett Tribe at Ponkapoag; Jonathan James-Perry, Tribal Citizen of the Aquinnah Wampanoag Nation; and Chris Newell, Passamaquoddy, Akomawt Educational Initiatve.

Additional highlights of the community celebration include:

  • Tours in the Native North American Art Gallery co-led by MFA curators and educators from the Akomawt Educational Initiative
  • Native American hoop dance performances by Toronto-based professional hoop dancer Lisa Odjig (Ojibwe), telling the story of creation; narrated by renowned musician Chris Newell (Passamaquoddy), also the co-founder and director of education at the Akomawt Educational Initiative
  • Vocal performances by Jennifer Kreisberg (Tuscarora, North Carolina)
  • Hand drum and contemporary powwow song performances by the Iron River Singers, an intertribal northern style group composed of Ojibwe, Abenaki and Wampanoag singers from the South Coast of Massachusetts
  • Interactive songs and dances by The Kingfisher Dance Theater, featuring members of the Southern New England Native community
  • Art-making activities led by Elizabeth James-Perry (Aquinnah Wampanoag) and Kerri Helme (Mashpee Wampanoag)
  • Weaving and beadwork demonstrations with artist Sparrow Plainbull (Haliwa-Saponi)

Indigenous Peoples’ Day one of 11 annual community celebrations at the MFA, co-created with valued community partners, artists and performers, highlighting external perspectives and local expertise. The series includes Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Lunar New Year, Nowruz, Memorial Day, Highland Street Foundation Free Fun Friday, Latinx Heritage Night, ASL Night, Diwali and Hanukkah.

Schedule of Indigenous Peoples’ Day Events. Museum admission is free all day, 10 am–5 pm

Share Your Thoughts

  • 10 am–4 pm | Huntington Avenue Lawn
  • What do you see when you look at Cyrus Dallin’s sculpture Appeal to the Great Spirit? Share your thoughts about this artwork. Your response will inform its future interpretation.

Welcome and Blessing

  • 1:30 pm | Shapiro Family Courtyard
  • Matthew Teitelbaum, Ann and Graham Gund Director; Jonathan James-Perry, Tribal Citizen of the Aquinnah Wampanoag Nation; and Chris Newell, Akomawt Educational Initiative

Native American Hoop Dance Featuring Lisa Odjig (Ojibwe)

  • 11 am and 2 pm | Shapiro Family Courtyard
  • Watch as two-time World Hoop Dance Champion Lisa Odjig tells the story of creation using music, dance and multiple flexible hoops. Narrated by renowned musician and MC Chris Newell (Passamaquoddy).

Jennifer Kreisberg (Tuscarora Nation)

  • Noon and 3 pm | Remis Auditorium
  • Mother, singer, composer, producer, teacher, and activist—Jennifer Kreisberg (Tuscarora, North Carolina) comes from four generations of Seven Singing Sisters through her maternal line. She is known for her fierce vocals and soaring range.

Iron River Singers

  • Enjoy hand drum and contemporary powwow songs from Iron River Singers, an intertribal northern style group comprised of Ojibwe, Abenaki, and Wampanoag singers from the South Coast of Massachusetts.

The Kingfisher Dance Theater

  • 11:30 am, 1 pm, and 3 pm | Gallery 250
  • Enjoy interactive song and dance with members of the Southern New England Native community.

Art-making Activities

  • 10 am–1 pm | Education Center in the Druker Family Pavilion, Room 159
  • Elizabeth James-Perry (Aquinnah Wampanoag): Wampum
  • 11am–4 pm | Gallery 168
  • Sparrow Plainbull (Haliwa-Saponi): Weaving and beadwork

Examining the Collection Tours

  • 10:30 am and 2:30 pm | Gallery LG33
  • Join Akomawt Educational Initiative educators and MFA curators in the Native North American Art gallery as they discuss the defining characteristics of “Native art” and who gets to make these decisions. Hear about techniques used in the works on display and learn about the ever-changing cultural contexts in which we understand them.

Guided Tours

Meet at Sharf Visitor Center

Join a free guided tour to explore highlights from the Museum’s many collections.

  • 10:30 am | Highlights of the Museum Collections
  • 11:30 am | Art of Asia
  • 12:15 pm | Art of the Americas
  • 12:30 pm | 3 in 30 Minutes
  • 1 pm | Introduction to the Contemporary Collection
  • 1:45 pm | Art of Europe
  • 2:30 pm | Art of the Ancient World
  • 3:15 pm | Highlights of the Museum Collections

Education, access and community programs at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), connect visitors from Boston’s neighborhoods, New England and around the world with art. The MFA welcomes more than one million visitors annually, serving many through its learning and community engagement programs. Opportunities for free and discounted admission for students, teachers, children, EBT card holders and military personnel and veterans can be found at mfa.org/visit, including free access for college students through the MFA’s University Membership and Pozen Community College Access program. Visitors can also learn about access programming for visitors with disabilities online, which includes free entry for personal care attendants. Additionally, the MFA Citizens program offers free one-year family memberships to newly naturalized U.S. citizens living in Massachusetts. The Museum is free for all after 4 pm every Wednesday and offers 11 free community celebrations annually. Each year, the Museum welcomes approximately 55,000 students and teachers—kindergarten through high school—for school group visits. Additional educational programming includes gallery talks, lectures, artist demonstrations, studio art classes and art-making workshops for hospital patients. In 2020, the MFA is marking its 150th anniversary with a yearlong celebration of generosity, community and inclusion through a series of special events and initiatives.

The MFA is located on the Avenue of the Arts at 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. For more information, call 617.267.9300, visit mfa.org or follow the MFA on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Holy Halloween! Hollywood, DIY And Social Media Popular Inspirations For Costume Choice, According To Savers® Annual Halloween Survey

This year, the perfect costume is less about perfectionism and more about personalization

Americans love Halloween and a unique costume is a must-have for a Hallowinning celebration. But dressing up for Halloween this year involves more than just looking good; there are a number of personal considerations including customization and value that come into play when creating the perfect costume. So, it’s no surprise that of those surveyed nearly 90 percent of shoppers admired unique costumes put together with second-hand items, and 74 percent said they’d shop thrift if second-hand stores have a Halloween section, according to new research by the Savers® family of thrift stores (Savers®, Value Village™ and Unique®).

Savers logo (PRNewsfoto/Savers)

Trends to Watch in 2019:

  • Disney, Marvel & HBO-Inspired Costumes: Ninety-two percent of Americans believe movies and TV shows will be the top inspirations for Halloween costumes this year, with Avengers, The Lion King, Game of Thrones, Captain Marvel and Toy Story topping the charts.
  • Gen Zs Want to Stand Out, In Person & Online: Seventy percent of Gen Zs want to stand out with their costume choice and the majority (76 percent) plan to post their Halloween experiences on social media.
  • DIY and Customization Reigns: A “cool” costume needs to be creative, original and homemade, according to survey respondents, and 61 percent claim they’d like to wear a costume that no one else will have. More than ever before, Americans are enjoying the experience of DIY-ing their costumes, using a mix of previously owned and brand-new items. Sixty-four percent plan on customizing their costume with personal touches to “make it their own,” with merely a quarter planning on buying a new, as-is packaged costume.
  • You, or Your Alter Ego? The jury is out. Sixty-eight percent of Americans use their creative freedom to showcase bits of their personality, while 59 percent match their costume to their alter ego.

Keeping costs down is also important for Halloween shoppers this year. A whopping 80 percent of those surveyed spend $50 or less on a costume, while 52 percent spend less than $25, so choosing secondhand is ideal for those who still want a creative, original costume, at a price point that works for them.

As the one-stop Halloween destination, Savers® offers a variety of brand new and pre-owned Halloween merchandise,” said Kristine Hung, Head of Marketing & Merchandising at Savers. “Shopping second-hand during Halloween is a smart, sustainable choice, considering today’s consumer cares about unique style, the planet and their wallet.”

At Savers®, enthusiastic Halloween shoppers can find a lot more than just something to wear:

  • More Than Just Second Hand: Want to let out your alter ego, or pull together an imaginative look this Halloween? Every year, Savers® offers an exclusive line of brand-new Halloween costumes called “Alterego®,” wigs, makeup and accessories – perfect to combine with the reused clothing and accessories that already fill the aisles.
  • Costume Consultants: Need some help getting creative? In-store costume consultants and look books at Savers® can help you create a unique look with DIY Halloween costumes, tips and tricks.
  • It’s All About the Décor: Going all out for Halloween means more than just dressing up. Savers® loads its shelves with new and pre-loved Halloween décor to help decorate homes inside and out – whether that means creating a haunted house for trick-or-treaters or sticking to simple décor for a party.
  • Halloween Hub: Savers.com provides a store locator tool, costume inspiration and instructions for Halloween DIY costumes and home décor.
  • Social Media: More than 75 percent of Gen Zs plan to post their Halloween experiences on social media and the same percentage of Millennials plan on posting their kids’ Halloween experiences. Join in on the fun by engaging with Savers® on social platforms via the #Hallowinning hashtag on Facebook.com/Savers, @SaversVVillage on Twitter and @Savers_thrift on Instagram.

Savers® believe good style is more than how you put together your closet and home – it’s being able to do good while looking good – for yourself, your neighborhood and your planet. As a for-profit, purpose-driven retailer, the Savers® family of thrift stores provide a wide selection of must-have secondhand clothing, accessories and household goods at an affordable price and keeps more than 700 million pounds of reusable goods from reaching landfills each year. Learn more at www.savers.com

*Methodology Note: The Savers® Halloween Shopping Survey was conducted by Edelman Intelligence during the summer of 2019 and polled 2,000 nationally representative consumers aged 18 and older in the United States and Canada.

Tom Hanks to be Recipient of the 2020 Cecil B. deMille Award at The 77th Golden Globes Awards

September 24, 2019– The Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA) announced that eight-time Golden Globe winner and 15-time nominee, Tom Hanks, will be honored with the coveted Cecil B. deMille Award at the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards. The highly-acclaimed star of such legendary films such as Big, Forrest Gump, Saving Private Ryan, Cast Away, and the upcoming release of A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood will accept the honor at Hollywood’s Party of the Year® on Sunday, January 5, 2020 airing LIVE coast-to-coast from 5-8 p.m. PT/8-11 p.m. ET on NBC.

Tom Hanks the star of Columbia Pictures’ “Captain Phillips.” Photo Credit: AUSTIN HARGRAVE

The Hollywood Foreign Press Association is proud to bestow the 2020 Cecil B. deMille Award to Tom Hanks,” said HFPA President Lorenzo Soria. “For more than three decades, he’s captivated audiences with rich and playful characters that we’ve grown to love and admire. As compelling as he is on the silver screen, he’s equally so behind the camera as a writer, producer, and director. We’re honored to include Mr. Hanks with such luminaries as Oprah Winfrey, George Clooney, Meryl Streep, Martin Scorsese, and Barbra Streisand to name a few.”

Chosen by the HFPA Board of Directors, the Cecil B. deMille Award is given annually to a talented individual who has made a lasting impact on the film industry. Honorees over the decades include Jeff Bridges, Robert De Niro, Audrey Hepburn, Harrison Ford, Jodie Foster, Sophia Loren, Sidney Poitier, Steven Spielberg, Denzel Washington, Robin Williams, and many more.

Hanks’ complex and moving performances have earned him the honor of being one of only two actors in history to win back-to-back Best Actor Academy Awards®, he won his first Oscar® in 1994 for his moving portrayal of AIDS-stricken lawyer Andrew Beckett in Jonathan Demme’s Philadelphia. The following year, he took home his second Oscar for his unforgettable performance in the title role of Robert ZemeckisForrest Gump. He also won the Golden Globe Award for both films, as well as a Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Award® for the latter.

In 2013, Hanks was seen starring in Golden Globe-nominated film Captain Phillips, for which he received Golden Globe, SAG, and BAFTA nominations as well as in AFI’s Movie of the Year Saving Mr. Banks with Emma Thompson. Hanks was most recently seen alongside Streep in Spielberg’s Golden Globe and Oscar-nominated film The Post, for which he was nominated for a Golden Globe and won Best Actor with the National Board of Review. He will next be seen portraying Mr. Fred Rodgers in the upcoming biopic A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood. Additional upcoming projects include the WWII drama Greyhound, which he also wrote, the post-apocalyptic BIOS and Paul Greengrass’ pre-Civil War drama News of the World.

His other feature credits include the Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski and Lana Wachowski film Cloud Atlas; Stephen Daldry’s Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close; the animated adventure The Polar Express, which he also executive produced and which reunited him with director Robert Zemeckis; the Coen brothersThe Ladykillers; Spielberg’s The Terminal and Catch Me If You Can; Sam MendesRoad to Perdition; Frank Darabont’s The Green Mile; Nora Ephron’s You’ve Got Mail and Sleepless in Seattle; Penny Marshall’s A League of Their Own; Ron Howard’s Apollo 13; The Da Vinci Code; Angels & Demons; Splash; Hologram for a King; Inferno;Sully; and the computer-animated blockbusters Cars, Toy Story, Toy Story 2, Toy Story 3 and Toy Story 4.

In 1996, Hanks made his successful feature film writing and directing debut with That Thing You Do!, in which he also starred. More recently, he wrote, produced, directed and starred in Larry Crowne, with Julia Roberts. Hanks and Playtone produced 2002’s smash hit romantic comedy My Big Fat Greek Wedding, with his wife Rita Wilson. Other producing credits include Where the Wild Things Are, The Polar Express, The Ant Bully, Charlie Wilson’s War, Mamma Mia!, The Great Buck Howard, Starter for 10, and the HBO series Big Love, Band of Brothers, The Pacific and From the Earth to the Moon.

In 2002, Hanks received the American Film Institute’s Life Achievement Award.

He was later honored by the Film Society of Lincoln Center with the Chaplin Award in 2009. In 2014, Hanks received a Kennedy Center Honor.

Rare Depictions Of Early America By Pioneering Woman Artist And French Refugee At New-York Historical Society

Artist in Exile: The Visual Diary of Baroness Hyde de Neuville, November 1, 2019 – January 26, 2020

Artist in Exile: The Visual Diary of Baroness Hyde de Neuville sheds light on this fascinating artist, whose life reads like a compelling historical novel.

This fall, the New-York Historical Society introduces visitors to a little-known artist whose work documented the people and scenes of early America. Artist in Exile: The Visual Diary of Baroness Hyde de Neuville, on view November 1, 2019 – January 26, 2020 in the Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery of the Center for Women’s History, presents 114 watercolors and drawings by Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771–1849). Self-taught and ahead of her time, Neuville’s art celebrates the young country’s history, culture, and diverse population, ranging from Indigenous Americans to political leaders. Curated by Dr. Roberta J.M. Olson, curator of drawings at New-York Historical, this exhibition is the first serious exploration of Neuville’s life and art—showcasing many recently discovered works including rare depictions of European scenes and people at work, a lifelong sociological interest—and is accompanied by a scholarly catalogue.

Baroness Hyde de Neuville’s status as a woman, an outsider, and a refugee shaped her view of America and Americans, making her a particularly keen and sympathetic observer of individuals from a range of socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “Neuville could never have envisioned that her visual diary—created as a personal record of her travels and observations of early America—would become an invaluable historical document of the early republic. Yet her drawings vividly evoke the national optimism and rapid expansion of the young United States and capture the diversity of its inhabitants.”

Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771–1849) Self-Portrait (1771–1849), ca. 1800–10 Black chalk, black ink and wash, graphite, and Conté crayon on paper New-York Historical Society, Purchase, 1953.238
Born in France into an aristocratic family, Neuville received an education that probably included drawing lessons. In 1794, she married royalist Jean Guillaume Hyde de Neuville during the unsure times of the French Revolution. In 1800, the couple was imprisoned and forced into hiding. The future baron was condemned as an outlaw for his alleged participation in a plot to assassinate Napoleon.
Fearing for her husband’s safety, the independent baroness attempted to disprove the charges. In 1805, she took her cause directly to Napoleon, pursuing the French Army across Germany and Austria and finally obtaining an audience with him in Vienna. Impressed with her courage, the Emperor allowed the couple to go into exile. They arrived in New York in 1807 and stayed for seven years. During their second residency (1816–22), when her husband served as Minister Plenipotentiary, they lived primarily in Washington, D.C., where Henriette became a celebrated hostess and cultural figure.

Born to an aristocratic family in Sancerre, France, Henriette married ardent royalist Jean Guillaume Hyde de Neuville, who became involved during the French Revolution in conspiracies to reinstate the Bourbon monarchy and was accused of participating in a plot to assassinate Napoleon. In an effort to disprove the charges against her husband, the baroness took her cause directly to Napoleon, who was impressed with her courage and allowed the couple to go into exile. They arrived in New York in 1807 and stayed for seven years. During their second American residency (1816–22), when her husband served as French Minister Plenipotentiary in Washington, D.C., Henriette became a celebrated hostess. John Quincy Adams described her in his diary as “a woman of excellent temper, amiable disposition… profuse charity, yet judicious economy and sound discretion.” In 1818, she presciently stated that she had but one wish “and that was to see an American lady elected president.”

Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771–1849) Peter of Buffalo, Tonawanda, New York, 1807 Watercolor, graphite, black chalk, and brown and black ink with touches of gouache on paper New-York Historical Society, Purchase, 1953.220
Neuville identifies her sitter as “Peter of Buffalo.” The word “tonaventa” refers to nearby Tonawanda, site of the Tonawanda Seneca Reservation. Neuville’s sitter has manipulated ear lobes pierced with one earring, which, like his bare feet, are traditional for Seneca tribesmen. He wears hybrid apparel: an undershirt, a fur piece, and leggings with garters, and carries a trade ax known as a halberd tomahawk, a knife, and a powder horn—as well as a string of wampum.
Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771–1849) Pélagie Drawing a Portrait, from the “Economical School Series”, 1808 Black chalk, gray watercolor, graphite, and pink gouache on blue paper New-York Historical Society, Gift of Mark Emanuel, 2018.42.21
Neuville sketched studies of students at the Economical School (École Économique), the couple’s major contribution to cultural life of New York City. Incorporated in 1810, its mission was to educate French émigrés and fugitives from the French West Indie, and to offer affordable education to impoverished children. Its five board members included the future baron, who was secretary, as well as members of the New-York Historical Society. The baron admired American charity schools and wanted to provide the same opportunities to children and adults of both sexes. The baroness’ drawings of its students are the only visual evidence of this significant institution.

Artist in Exile follows Neuville’s life, reconstructing her artistic education and tracing her artistic practice, which included portraiture, landscapes and cityscapes, ethnographic studies, botanical art, and other genres. Highlights of the exhibition include Neuville’s views of the Hudson and Mohawk rivers, street scenes of her neighborhood (now known as Tribeca), a watercolor documenting an “Indian War Dance” performed for President Monroe, and portraits of subjects ranging from Indigenous Americans to immigrant students at a Manhattan school founded by the Neuvilles. The exhibition opens with Neuville’s miniature self-portrait (ca. 1800-1810) that was likely created for her husband to carry on his travels. Pictured wearing a fashionable daytime empire-waist dress over a chemisette, fingerless mitts, and hoop earrings, the baroness looks away, not engaging the viewer as is customary with self-portraits that are drawn using a mirror because she based it on another study.

Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771–1849) Martha Church, Cook in “Ordinary” Costume, 1808–10 Watercolor, graphite, black chalk, brown and black ink, and touches of white gouache on paper New-York Historical Society, Purchase, 1953.276
Neuville’s inscription identifies the sitter as a cook named Martha Church, dressed in everyday attire. Neuville endowed the subject with dignity. It is unclear whether Church, a black woman, was a free domestic or a slave, or whether she was of Caribbean or African descent. Many of the artist’s works demonstrate a sociological interest and celebrate work.

Upon first reaching the United States, the Neuvilles journeyed up the Hudson River and to Niagara Falls, where Henriette was one of the first to record many early settlements, buildings, and rustic scenes. In the watercolor Distant View of Albany from the Hudson River, New York (1807), she drew the panoramic view from the sloop Diana as it traveled downriver from Albany, chronicling the river long before artist William Guy Wall’s renowned Hudson River Portfolio (1820–25). The atmospheric vista conveys the majestic sweep of the Hudson and the reflections on its surface. In Break’s Bridge, Palatine, New York (1808), Neuville, who was intrigued by engineering and technology, depicts a newly constructed Mohawk River bridge destroyed by rushing waters. The couple in the foreground of the image is the Neuvilles, with their pet spaniel, Volero.

Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771– 1849) Distant View of Albany from the Hudson River, New York, 1807 Watercolor, brown ink, black chalk, and graphite with touches of gouache on paper New-York Historical Society, Purchase, 1953.242
Neuville drew the panoramic view from the sloop Diana, traveling downriver from Albany. Her atmospheric vista conveys the majestic sweep of the Hudson River, together with reflections on its surface. Albany became the state capital in 1796. Her works recording the river importantly predate The Hudson River Portfolio (1820–25).

Neuville also captured vivid views of New York City residents and buildings—many of them long since demolished—bringing to life the burgeoning urban center and its ethnically diverse population. Corner of Greenwich Street (1810) represents a scene at the intersection of Greenwich and Dey streets. Near the cellar hatch of the brick house at the center stands an Asian man, who may be the Chinese merchant Punqua Winchong, making this work one of the earliest visual records of a Chinese person in the United States.

Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771– 1849) Indian War Dance for President Monroe, Washington, D.C., 1821 Watercolor, graphite, black and brown ink, and gouache on paper Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum
Neuville’s scene depicts the “Indian War Dance” performed during the visit of a delegation of 16 leaders of the Plains Indian tribes to President James Monroe at the White House on November 29, 1821. The delegation included representatives of the Pawnee, Omaha, Kansa, Ottoe, and Missouri tribes. Neuville, who was in attendance, recorded the event, portraying at the left Hayne Hudjihini (Eagle of Delight), one of the five wives of halfchief Shaumonekusse (Prairie Wolf), wearing the horned headdress. In the upper background she sketched Monroe with his four companions, including the baron wearing a feathered bicorne hat.

The Neuvilles contributed to the cultural life in New York as co-founders of the École Économique (Economical School), incorporated in 1810 as the Society of the Economical School of the City of New York. Its mission was to educate the children of French émigrés and fugitives from the French West Indies and to offer affordable education to impoverished children. Henriette sketched the students at the school, and many works from the “Economical School Series” are on view in the exhibition, including the recently discovered life size portrait, Pélagie Drawing a Portrait (1808), which demonstrates the school’s emphasis on drawing. Her series is the only visual record of the school’s existence.

Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771– 1849) Corner of Greenwich Street, 1810 Watercolor, graphite, and touches of black ink on paper New York Public Library, The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs: Print Collection, Stokes 1810-E17b
Neuville’s watercolor records Greenwich Street running perpendicular to Dey Street, where the Neuvilles lived. Nothing remains of this neighborhood, which would be occupied by World Trade Center. Near the cellar hatch of the brick house at the center stands an Asian man. He may be the Chinese merchant Punqua Winchong, who was in New York and Washington in 1807–08, and who attended one of the Neuvilles’ famous Saturday parties on March 28, 1818. This work is one of the earliest visual records of a Chinese person in the U.S.

The couple returned to France in 1814 after the fall of Napoleon and the restoration of King Louis XVIII and the Bourbon monarchy. In 1816, Louis XVIII appointed the baron French Minister Plenipotentiary, and the Neuvilles returned to the U.S., settling in Washington, D.C. They became renowned for their lavish Saturday evening parties and their friendships with President James Monroe and James and Dolley Madison. Among the notable events the Neuvilles attended was an “Indian War Dance,” performed by a delegation of 16 leaders of the Plains Indian tribes in front of President Monroe and 6,000 spectators at the White House on November 29, 1821. Neuville’s watercolor documenting the event includes likenesses of half-chief Shaumonekusse (Prairie Wolf) and one of his five wives, Hayne Hudjihini (Eagle of Delight). Later, the “War Dance” was also performed at the Neuvilles’ house.

Neuville’s portraits of individuals celebrate the ethnic and cultural diversity of the early American republic, and her portrayals are notable for their ethnographic integrity and avoidance of stereotypes. In the portrait of Peter of Buffalo, Tonawanda, New York (1807), the sitter has ear lobes pierced with earrings and bare feet, traditional for Seneca tribesmen. Wearing an undershirt, a fur piece, and leggings with garters, he carries a tomahawk, a knife, a powder horn, and a string of wampum. In the portrait Martha Church, Cook in “Ordinary” Costume (1808–10), Neuville depicts a cook in her everyday attire, as part of the artistic tradition of occupational portraits that originated in Europe and appeared in New York in the early 19th century.

Anne Marguérite Joséphine Henriette Rouillé de Marigny, Baroness Hyde de Neuville (1771–1849) Tomb of Washington at Mount Vernon, Virginia, 1818 Watercolor, graphite, black chalk, and brown ink on paper Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum
After George Washington’s death in 1799, his remains were placed in a family vault at Mount Vernon. During the Neuvilles’ second residency, the national hero’s tomb became an obligatory tourist stop. Unlike many other representations, Neuville included a view of the main house with its veranda overlooking the Potomac River, together with a unique anecdotal incident: a caretaker opens the vault’s wooden door to reveal stacks of coffins belonging to the Washington family. In 1831, a new family tomb was constructed, and the coffins were transferred to its vault.

The exhibition features works from New-York Historical’s collection, the most extensive in the world, as well as important loans from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the New York Public Library, the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Division of Art, Prints and Photographs; the Museum of the City of New York, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum, Hagley Museum and Library, and Princeton University, Firestone Library, Rare Books and Special Collections, Graphic Arts Collection.

Publication and Programming
Accompanying the exhibition is the scholarly publication Artist in Exile: The Visual Diary of Baroness Hyde de Neuville, published by GILES, an imprint of D Giles Limited. Written by Dr. Roberta J.M. Olson with assistance by Alexandra Mazzitelli, the publication also features an essay by Dr. Charlene M. Boyer Lewis.

A gallery tour of Artist in Exile, led by curator Roberta J.M. Olson, takes place on January 6. In honor of the baroness’ heritage, several French movies will be shown as part of New-York Historical’s Friday night Justice in Film series: 1938’s The Baker’s Wife on November 8 and 1946’s Beauty and the Beast on December 6. On select weekends throughout the exhibition’s run, young visitors can explore the baroness’ life and the art she created with touch objects and Living Historians.

The Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation provided lead funding for Artist in Exile: The Visual Diary of Baroness Hyde de Neuville, with important support given by the Wyeth Foundation for American Art. Additional support provided by Furthermore, a program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund; the Greater Hudson Heritage Network; Nicole, Nathan, and Brian Wagner; Helen Appel; Pam Schafler; David and Laura Grey; and Myron and Adeline Hofer.