Barbie Unveils Oscar de la Renta Doll

Barbie® has partnered with the design house, Oscar de la Renta to launch the Oscar de la Renta Barbie® doll, just in time for wedding season. This bridal doll is the perfect gift for the stylish bride-to-be.

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The Oscar de la Renta Barbie® doll will be available for $175 on http://www.TheBarbieCollection.com, http://www.Oscardelarenta.com and select retailers. (Images provided by BarbieMedia)

As a fashion icon, Barbie continues to be a muse to fashion’s top designers. Oscar de la Renta was famously the first to design for the doll back in 1985, and again in 1998. Once again, in 2016, Oscar de la Renta captures a refined and elegant bridal look that all brides-to-be will dream of wearing on their wedding day. This doll is a beautiful memento celebrating a milestone with a best-in-class designer and longtime fashion partner.

We are honored to work with the Oscar de la Renta team on this beautiful design capturing their signature bridal look in Barbie scale,” said Robert Best, Senior Design Director at Barbie. “Barbie is the only girl who can have a closet full of wedding dresses without ever walking down the aisle.

Inspired by the runway “Something Blue” bridal look, the Oscar de la Renta Barbie is a take-your-breath-away vision in an ivory, embroidered lace over chiffon, trumpet gown. The simplicity of the gown’s fluid lines and the tiers of the wispy light blue train, personify the designer’s passion for interpreting romance in a classic way. The jewelry pieces are exact replicas of those worn on the runway in Spring 2014. Barbie also wears a delicate rhinestone ring and carries a bouquet made of tulle. Her bridal look is complete with gold-accented ivory pumps and an elegant chignon reminiscent of classic elegance and refined beauty.

Alex Bolen, Chief Executive Officer of Oscar de la Renta LLC said, “We are so pleased to partner [again] with Mattel in the creation of the Oscar de la Renta Bridal Barbie. Like us, Mattel makes beautiful products with the utmost precision and highest standards of quality. Our third partnership, spanning over the course of 30 years, is a testament to the timelessness of both of our brands. We look forward to bringing the Oscar de la Renta bridal experience to a new audience with this fun and unique product offering.”

The Oscar de la Renta Barbie® doll will be available for $175 on www.TheBarbieCollection.com, www.Oscardelarenta.com and select retailers.

Barbie Exhibition at Musee des Arts décoratifs (Paris) Now through September 18, 2016

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The very first Barbie doll. The Barbie exhibition at the Musee des Arts décoratifs in Paris. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

From the moment Barbie was introduced to the world, a fashion icon was born. Since her debut in 1959, Barbie has served as a model and muse to the most world renowned names in fashion and the arts. She provides the ultimate canvas for their imaginations, to identify and play out their dreams. Today, she continues to be at the center of pop culture, reflecting the times and inspiring conversation. More than just a toy, Barbie has mirrored a culture and its evolution.

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The Barbie exhibition at the Musee des Arts décoratifs in Paris. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

In 2016, Barbie is being honored by museums around the world including the Musee des Arts décoratifs in Paris, paying tribute to this iconic doll whose story has made an indelible mark on the socio-cultural history of toys in the 20th and 21st Centuries. Drawing on Mattel archives which include over 700 dolls and work by contemporary artists and designers, the exhibition highlights the historical heritage of Barbie for both adults and children. More than just a toy, Barbie has mirrored a culture and its evolution.

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The Barbie exhibition at the Musee des Arts décoratifs in Paris. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

Throughout her history she has adapted to social, political and cultural changes and evolved, embracing new trends and challenging stereotypes, always embracing the dreams and ambitions of contemporary life for the next generation of girls.

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The Barbie exhibition at the Musee des Arts décoratifs in Paris. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

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The Barbie exhibition at the Musee des Arts décoratifs in Paris. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

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The Barbie exhibition at the Musee des Arts décoratifs in Paris. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

Barbie has always given girl’s choices – from her 180 careers, to inspirational roles, to her countless fashions and accessories. And earlier this year Mattel literally changed the face of the brand with a range of new dolls represent the world girls see around them with variety in body type, skin tones and style allowing girls to find a doll that speaks to them.2016_Barbie_ RueSaintHonore

The newest generations of girls know there’s nothing they can’t do, and they’ve never been told otherwise. They have the confidence to try new things, take risks, and stand out among their peers. Barbie supports this empowered thinking, and reinforces it with every doll that is made — from Computer Engineer Barbie to Princess Power Barbie. Because when girls grow up in a world without limitations, they will show us that anything really is possible.

Barbie® Launches Misty Copeland Doll

Doll Launch Embodies Copeland’s (and Barbie’s) “You Can Be Anything” Message and Continues the Brand’s Legacy of Honoring Female Heroes

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Ballet dancer Misty Cope;land with her namesake doll from Mattel’s Barbie “Sheroes” Line. (All images provided by BarbieMedia) 

Mattel’s Barbie® is honoring ballet dancer Misty Copeland by unveiling a doll in her likeness to continue to show girls they can be anything. Copeland, the first African-American female principal dancer with American Ballet Theatre (ABT), has been a role model to girls throughout her career.

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The fashions for the doll were inspired by Copeland’s Firebird costume from her first American Ballet Theatre principal role. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

I always dreamed of becoming an ABT ballerina and through Barbie I was able to play out those dreams early on,” said Copeland. “It’s an honor to be able to inspire the next generation of kids with my very own Barbie doll.”

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The fashions for the doll were inspired by Copeland’s Firebird costume from her first American Ballet Theatre principal role. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

The doll is part of the Barbie Sheroes program, honoring female heroes who inspire girls by breaking boundaries and expanding possibilities for women everywhere. Copeland joins an esteemed group of diverse Barbie Sheroes, including Ava DuVernay, Emmy Rossum, Eva Chen, Kristin Chenoweth, Sydney “Mayhem” Keiser, Trisha Yearwood and Zendaya.

The fashions for the doll were inspired by Copeland’s Firebird costume from her first American Ballet Theatre principal role, which she is performing again on May 18 (matinee) and 19 as part of ABT’s annual spring season at the Metropolitan Opera House. Copeland was intimately involved in the doll’s design and partnered with the Barbie design team on all the details.

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The fashions for the doll were inspired by Copeland’s Firebird costume from her first American Ballet Theatre principal role. (All images provided by BarbieMedia)

Copeland shows girls how to break boundaries both on and off the stage. She began dancing on a Boys & Girls Club basketball court and continues to be very active in local Clubs in various cities. She also works with Project Plié, ABT’s comprehensive initiative to increase racial and ethnic representation in ballet and diversify America’s ballet companies.

This initiative furthers the Barbie “You Can Be Anything” campaign message echoing that when a girl plays with Barbie, she imagines anything she can become. Earlier this year, Barbie expanded their Fashionistas® line by introducing even more diversity with three new body types – tall, curvy and petite – seven skin tones, 22 eye colors, 24 hairstyles and countless on-trend fashions and accessories.

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The fashions for the doll were inspired by Copeland’s Firebird costume from her first American Ballet Theatre principal role. (All images provided by BarbieMedia) 

Misty Copeland is at the center of a cultural conversation around how women continue to break boundaries,” said Lisa McKnight, General Manager and Senior Vice President, Barbie. “As a brand, we want to honor women, like Misty, who are inspiring the next generation of girls to live out their dreams. We know role play often leads to real “play” in life and we’re thrilled to celebrate Misty with her very own doll.

The doll is available for $29.95 on www.thebarbiecollection.com and rolling out to retailers nationwide.

“June Leaf: Thought Is Infinite”, Now Open at The Whitney

June Leaf (b. 1929), Head, 1975.

june Leaf (b. 1929), Head, 1975. Pen and ink and colored pencil on paper, 13 7/8 × 19 7/8 in. (35.2 × 50.5 cm). Collection of the artist. Photograph by Alice Attie

Opening today, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, June Leaf: Thought Is Infinite presents the artist’s remarkable achievement in drawing over the past five decades. In addition to drawings, installed to suggest the way the works have inhabited Leaf’s studio, the exhibition also includes a smaller selection of the artist’s sculpture and painting.

June Leaf (b. 1929), Harvey, c. 2004–05.

June Leaf (b. 1929), Harvey, c. 2004–05. Pastel and charcoal on paper, 29 1/2 × 34 1/2in. (74.9 × 87.6 cm). Collection of the artist. Photograph by Alice Attie

June Leaf’s vision is deeply personal and bravely frank in addressing the frailties of the human condition. Her work falls within a trajectory of the fantastic: the fraught, symbolic mental landscapes introduced into Western art by Hieronymus Bosch and continuing in various strains with Francisco Goya, James Ensor, Odilon Redon, and the Surrealists. Leaf’s imagery frequently suggests a direct and physical struggle between men, women, and unseen forces, with control up for grabs and outcomes uncertain. She often combines ink, charcoal, and chalk with acrylic paint in vibrant colors on mottled, distressed surfaces. With a skittering touch, she builds shape with an almost paradoxically unstable force—her forms can look as if they are in the process of becoming and might dissolve at any moment. Leaf lets the chance of splotches and splatters interact with more deliberate rendering, her virtuosity and control always present.

June Leaf (b. 1929), Man (Dreaming), 1972.

June Leaf (b. 1929), Man (Dreaming), 1972. Acrylic, and brush and ink on paper, 24 3/4 × 39 3/4 in. (62.9 × 101 cm). Collection of the artist. Photograph by Alice Attie

June Leaf (b. 1929), Mother-Ballroom, c. 1978 (detail).

June Leaf (b. 1929), Mother/Ballroom, c. 1978 (detail). Pen and ink, fiber-tipped pen, graphite pencil, rubbing, and colored pencil on paper, 27 × 21 in. (68.6 × 53.3 cm). Collection of the artist. Photograph by Alice Attie

June Leaf (b. 1929), Robert Enters the Room, 1973.

June Leaf (b. 1929), Robert Enters the Room, 1973. Acrylic, collage, gelatin silver prints, and pen and ink on paper, 22 × 28 in. (55.9 × 71.1 cm). Collection of the artist. Photograph by Alice Attie

The show will be on view through July 17, 2016 in the John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation Gallery on the Museum’s main floor, which is accessible to the public free-of-charge. June Leaf: Thought Is Infinite is organized by Carter E. Foster, Steven and Ann Ames Curator of Drawing, with artist Alice Attie.

June Leaf (b. 1929), Study for Woman Monument, 1975.

June Leaf (b. 1929), Study for Woman Monument, 1975. Pen and ink, and acrylic on paper, 17 × 14 in. (43.2 × 35.6 cm). Collection of the artist. Photograph by Alice Attie

June Leaf (b. 1929), The Tin Barrel, 2015.

June Leaf (b. 1929), The Tin Barrel, 2015. Acrylic, charcoal, and collage on paper, 30 × 22 in. (76.2 × 55.9 cm). Collection of the artist. Photograph by Alice Attie

Lands’ End Introduces Canvas by Lands’ End

This week, Lands’ End launched Canvas by Lands’ End, a youthful, modern collection for men and women. The line was designed in America and developed in Italy, with strong global influences in all aspects of the styling, design and fit; the Canvas by Lands’ End label is inspiring and attainable.

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Canvas by Lands’ End(TM). Available at http://www.canvasbylandsend.com (PRNewsFoto/Lands’ End, Inc.)

Brush strokes on dresses, star prints, and vibrant colors epitomize independence and individuality. The collection’s simple and chic approach allows the strong silhouettes to take center stage with versatile pieces that emphasize a comfortable ease in fit. Each piece can be worn day into night and week into weekend. Craftsmanship and elevated design is the cornerstone of Canvas by Lands’ End, featuring a range of fabrics woven in Italy, tailored by expert patternmakers with fit expertise, with original hand-painted graphic designs.

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Canvas by Lands’ End(TM), a youthful, modern collection for men and women. Available at wwwcanvasbylandsend.com (PRNewsFoto/Lands’ End, Inc.)

From designer styles to relaxed looks, the collection features dresses, sweaters, tops, pants and jackets for both men and women. Some of the favorites from the collection for women include the long sleeve silk tee, $85, the elbow sleeve dress, $165, the long jumpsuit, $175, the pencil skirt, $95, and the short swing parka for $275. For men, the long sleeve chambray shirt, $69, the cotton slub hoodie, $129, chambray suit trousers, $99, and the barracuda jacket for $169, are just a few of the great new styles available.

Smithsonian American Art Museum and Renwick Gallery April 2016 Programs

Program location is noted with each program. Programs are free and open to the public unless ticket information is noted.

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Art Talks and Activities

Yoga in Luce

Wednesday, April 13, 2016, 6 – 7:30pm

Bring your mat and relax with this vinyasa yoga and art appreciation series in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Luce Foundation Center. Participants will be invited to reflect on a Luce Center artwork of their choosing before a credentialed instructor from Flow Yoga Center leads a one hour, all levels class.

Location: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Luce Foundation Center

Tickets: $10, Must pre-register online

Event Link: http://americanart.si.edu/calendar/event.cfm?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D118351429 

Art Signs: ASL Gallery Talk

Thursday, April 14, 2016, 5:30pm

Join the Smithsonian American Art Museum for gallery conversations about artworks presented by an ASL gallery guide. For more information email wilsoncl@si.edu.

Location: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Meet in F Street Lobby

Tickets: Free

Event Link: http://americanart.si.edu/calendar/event.cfm?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D117380432

Artist Talk with Janet Echelman

Saturday, April 16, 2016, 2pm

Hear artist Janet Echelman discuss her immersive work 1.8, a suspended net that surges across the Renwick Gallery’s Grand Salon in waves evoking a tsunami. Echelman discusses how she creates her woven pieces and how the Renwick’s architecture inspired this work.

Location: Renwick Gallery, 2nd Floor

Tickets: Free

Event Link: http://americanart.si.edu/calendar/event.cfm?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D118112327

Luce Artist Talk with Soomin Ham

Sunday, April 17, 2016, 1:30pm

Join Flashpoint Gallery’s exhibiting artist Soomin Ham at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Luce Foundation Center as she discusses her work in photography and mixed media and where it falls in the progression of art history.

Location: Smithsonian American Art Museum, Luce Foundation Center

Tickets: Free

Event Link: http://americanart.si.edu/calendar/event.cfm?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D115173557

Artist Talk with Eric Serritella

Sunday, April 17, 2016, 2pm

Hear a talk at the Renwick Gallery from ceramicist Eric Serritella, whose trompe l’oeil works challenge ideas about nature and the environment. He discusses the variety of processes he uses, including the wheel, hand-building techniques, carving, and firing.

Location: Renwick Gallery, 2nd Floor

Tickets: Free

Event Link: http://americanart.si.edu/calendar/event.cfm?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D118112383

WONDER Gallery Talk with Seán Brady

Wednesday, April 20, 2016, noon

Get a closer look at Jennifer Angus’s Renwick Galleryinstallation In the Midnight Garden with a talk from Seán Brady, chair of the Entomology Department at the National Museum of Natural History.

Location: Renwick Gallery, 1st Floor, Meet at Information Desk

Tickets: Free

Event Link: http://americanart.si.edu/calendar/event.cfm?trumbaEmbed=view%3Devent%26eventid%3D118112396 Continue reading

Nashville’s Frist Center for the Visual Arts Presents Inka Essenhigh’s Paintings of Dreamlike Environments, Linking the Ethereal with the Everyday

“Inka Essenhigh: Between Worlds” May 27–October 9, 2016

Inka Essenhigh: Between Worlds, on view in the Frist Center for the Visual Arts Gordon Contemporary Artists Project Gallery from May 27 to October 9, 2016, features paintings and prints created over the past decade that connect dreamlike visions steeped in mysticism with allusions to twenty-first-century reality. Evoking a wide range of folklore and allegorical traditions as well as surrealist approaches to tapping into the unconscious, Essenhigh’s work both delights and challenges viewers’ understanding of how nature and humanity, as well as time and distance, are entwined.

Inka Essenhigh. City Street, 2013.Oil on linen, 60 x 70 inches. Courtesy of Jacob Lewis Gallery and the artist, New York

Inka Essenhigh. City Street, 2013.Oil on linen, 60 x 70 inches. Courtesy of Jacob Lewis Gallery and the artist, New York

Inka Essenhigh. The Woodsman, 2012

Inka Essenhigh. The Woodsman, 2012. Oil on canvas, 72 x 68 x 1 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist and Victoria Miro Gallery, London © Inka Essenhigh

Born in 1969, Inka Essenhigh earned her BFA from Columbus College of Art and Design in Ohio, and her MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York. Her paintings have been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Miami, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Her works are in the collections of the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the Denver Art Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Seattle Art Museum, Tate Modern, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Inka Essenhigh. Saint in the Snow, 2011

Inka Essenhigh. Saint in the Snow, 2011. Painted monotype printed from a steel matrix, 17 5/8 x 15 1/2 in. Courtesy of Pace Prints and the artist, New York

Essenhigh was included in the Frist Center’s 2012 presentation of Fairy Tales, Monsters, and the Genetic Imagination, which featured contemporary artists who invent humanlike, animal, or hybrid creatures to symbolize life’s mysteries, desires, and fears. Addressing the recurring sense of duality in Between Worlds, Chief Curator Mark Scala notes, “In these paintings, boundaries are melted: interior becomes exterior; solid becomes fluid; the sensual overlaps with the absurd; plant becomes human; clarity and mystery coexist. Continue reading