WHITNEY INAUGURATES NEW EMERGING ARTIST SERIES, PRESENTING U.S. DEBUTS OF JARED MADERE, RACHEL ROSE, AND SOPHIA AL-MARIA

In conjunction with the opening of its new building in the Meatpacking District, the Whitney Museum of American Art reaffirms its commitment to young and emerging artists with an ongoing series dedicated to presenting their debut solo exhibitions in the United States. To inaugurate this new initiative, the Museum has announced that three young artists, Jared Madere (b. 1986), Rachel Rose (b. 1986), and Sophia Al-Maria (b. 1983), will receive their first one-person exhibitions in the country over the next year. Since its founding in 1930, the Whitney has had a long and consistent engagement with living artists, often presenting work early in their careers in the Breuer building’s Lobby Gallery or at the Museum’s former Altria satellite branch (1983–2008). With this new emerging series, the Museum builds upon its legacy of introducing upcoming artists to a broader public. In addition, the artists will work closely with the Whitney’s curatorial staff, and will be invited to fully explore the flexible nature of the exhibition spaces in the Museum’s dynamic new building.

Associate curator Christopher Y. Lew, who is organizing all three shows, stated, “The Whitney has had a long tradition of supporting emerging artists which goes back to the Lobby Gallery exhibitions at the Breuer building in the late 1960s. We want to provide a platform for emerging artists at this crucial point in their careers and present to a broad audience the many kinds of new art being made today.

The three emerging artists to receive their first U.S. solo exhibitions follow:

Jared Madere
October 16, 2015–January 3, 2016

newspaper, wigs, flowers, blood, toilet, frozen peas, chair, coat hanger; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and David Lewis Gallery. image courtesy Le Magasin Grenoble

Jared Madere (b. 1986), Untitled (detail), 2015. newspaper, wigs, flowers, blood, toilet, frozen peas, chair, coat hanger; dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist and David Lewis Gallery. image courtesy Le Magasin Grenoble

Jared Madere (b. 1986), who is based in New York, will create a new installation in the John R. Eckel, Jr. Foundation Gallery on the first floor, which is free to the public. Madere primarily creates installation-based works featuring disparate materials such as salt, flowers, foodstuffs, and plastic tarps that are assembled and aggregated in a manner that insists on their material connections to society, economics, industry, and human emotion. For Madere, the meanings and associations of objects are never stripped away—floral arrangements can point to longing or sadness and a burnt coat is imbued with isolation and dejection. Madere has participated in numerous exhibitions at venues including David Lewis, New York; Bortolami Gallery, New York; Michael Thibault Gallery, Los Angeles; Croy Nielsen, Berlin; and Le Magasin, Grenoble, France; and he is also the founder of Bed-Stuy Love Affair, an artist-run gallery focused on emerging art.

Rachel Rose
October 30, 2015–February 7, 2016

Rachel Rose (b. 1986), still from A Minute Ago, 2014. HD video, 8:43 min. Courtesy Pilar Corrias, London

Rachel Rose (b. 1986), still from A Minute Ago, 2014. HD video, 8:43 min. Courtesy Pilar Corrias, London

Based in New York, Rachel Rose (b. 1986) is known for her striking video installations that deftly merge moving images and sound with nuanced environments. Her video and installations address how we define mortality and her subjects range from zoos and a robotics perception lab, to Philip Johnson’s Glass House, the American Revolutionary War and 19th century park design. She anchors these sites in a range of perspectives on death—from our vulnerability to catastrophe to the impact of history on our lifespan. She investigates specific sites and ideas by connecting them to broader, related subject matter. Rose’s presentation in the Whitney’s fifth-floor Kaufman Gallery will physically engage with the architecture of the Museum’s new Renzo Piano–designed building. Using her own footage and found material, Rose addresses the ubiquity of images and how it generates meaning in contemporary society. Rachel Rose lives and works in New York. In addition to her forthcoming solo exhibitions at The Whitney Museum of American Art, she will helm solo shows at Castello di Rivoli, Frieze London,  and The Aspen Art Museum.

Sophia Al-Maria
Summer 2016

Sophia Al Maria (b. 1983), still from Between Distant Bodies, 2013. Video Installation on 2 cuboglass TVs. Courtesy the artist and The Third Line

Sophia Al Maria (b. 1983), still from Between Distant Bodies, 2013. Video Installation on 2 cuboglass TVs. Courtesy the artist and The Third Line

Sophia Al-Maria (b. 1983) is an artist, writer, and filmmaker who studied comparative literature at the American University in Cairo, and aural and visual cultures at Goldsmiths, University of London. For the past few years, she has been carrying out research around the concept of Gulf Futurism. Al Marie is part of an emerging generation of international artists who are mining the intersections of technology, culture, and identity. Her primary interests are around the isolation of individuals via technology and reactionary Islam, the corrosive elements of consumerism and industry and the erasure of history and the blinding approach of a future no one is ready for. She explores these ideas with certain guidebooks and ideas including but not limited to, Zizek’s The Desert of the Unreal, As-Sufi’s Islamic Book of the Dead, as well as imagery from Islamic eschatology, post humanism and the global mythos of Science Fiction.

In 2016, she will premiere a new video at the Whitney, inspired by the Gruen Transfer, a phenomenon in which a controlled environment—combined with visual and auditory stimuli—is used to distract and manipulate consumers. Her work has been exhibited at the Gwangju Biennale, the New Museum in New York, and the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London. Her writing has appeared in Harper’s Magazine, Five Dials, Triple Canopy and Bidoun. Her first solo exhibition, Virgin with a Memory, was presented at Cornerhouse, Manchester, in 2014 and her memoir, The Girl Who Fell to Earth, was published by Harper Perennial in 2012.  She currently lives and works in Doha, Qatar.

 

 

Extraordinary People Seek New Beginnings in the 2015 season of PBS’s POV

Down But Not Out: Extraordinary People Seek New Beginnings In the 28th Season of POV, Beginning Monday, June 22, 2015 on PBS

Documentaries Spotlight Passionate Individuals Who Transform Themselves And Their Communities

Vince Lombardi famously said, “It’s not whether you get knocked down, it’s whether you get up.” The 15 compelling films in the new season of PBS’s award-winning documentary series POV (Point of View) introduce extraordinarily strong and determined individuals. Subjects including an artist jailed for speaking freely and members of the Syrian resistance willing to lose their lives exhibit incredible resilience when, time and again, they fight to get back on their feet.

The 28th season of POV begins on Monday, June 22, 2015 at 10 p.m. (check local listings) on PBS and continues through the fall. POV is American television’s longest-running independent documentary showcase and the recipient of a 2013 MacArthur Foundation Award for Creative and Effective Institutions.

Photo Credit

Photo Credit: American Documentary, Inc.

This summer, POV films take viewers into the lives of characters on the front lines of current events. The season launches with Out in the Night, a powerful documentary about four African-American lesbians who stand their ground as they face law enforcement, the criminal justice system and media bias after being accused of gang assault. The Tribeca award-winner Point and Shoot tracks a young man from Baltimore as he drops into the middle of the Libyan Revolution, while the Sundance award-winning Return to Homs witnesses the transformation of peaceful Syrian protesters into armed insurgents. In Ai Weiwei: The Fake Case, the Chinese government’s attempt to silence the titular artist only serves to give him a stronger voice.

Closer to home, The Overnighters reveals the toll taken on a small town at the center of a modern-day gold rush, where thousands of workers seek a fresh start in the North Dakota oil fields. The theme of new beginnings continues in Tough Love, where persistent parents navigate the legal system and Child Protective Services, battling to regain custody of their children.

This year’s films feature strong individuals viewers won’t easily forget,” said POV Executive Producer Chris White. “Intimate and urgent, these are the stories of our times. We are proud to present a slate of films that challenge, enlighten and inspire.

Three special presentations slated for the fall explore how art shapes identity, and will be paired with other arts-related PBS programs. In the Oscar®-nominated Cutie and the Boxer, two visual artists depict themselves, each other and their embattled 40-year marriage in their work, and in Ai Weiwei: The Fake Case, the Chinese government’s attempt to silence the titular artist only serves to give him a stronger voice. In Art and Craft, an art forger is so expert that he blurs the line between original and copy–and perhaps between himself and the masters whose work he reproduces.

“This year’s films feature strong individuals viewers won’t easily forget,” said POV Executive Producer Chris White. “Intimate and urgent, these are the stories of our times. We are proud to present a slate of films that challenge, enlighten and inspire.”

POV 2015 Schedule (All programs air Mondays at 10 p.m. unless otherwise indicated; check local listings):

June 22: Out in the Night by blair dorosh-walther

In 2006, under the neon lights of a gay-friendly neighborhood in New York City, a group of African-American lesbians were violently threatened by a man on the street. The women fought back and were later charged with gang assault and attempted murder. The tabloids quickly dubbed them a gang of “Killer Lesbians” and a “Wolf Pack.” Three pleaded guilty to avoid a trial, but the remaining four–Renata, Patreese, Venice and Terrain–maintained their innocence. The award-winning Out in the Night examines the sensational case and the women’s uphill battle, revealing the role that race, gender identity and sexuality play in our criminal justice system. A co-production of ITVS. A co-presentation with the National Black Programming Consortium (NBPC).

June 29: The Overnighters by Jesse Moss

Chasing the American dream, thousands of workers flock to a North Dakota town where the oil business is booming. But instead of well-paying jobs, many find slim work prospects and a severe housing shortage. Pastor Jay Reinke converts his church into a makeshift dorm and counseling center, allowing hundreds of men, some with checkered pasts, to stay despite the congregation’s objections and neighbors’ fears. When opposition to the “overnighters” reaches a boiling point, Pastor Jay makes a decision with shattering consequences. A modern-day Grapes of Wrath, The Overnighters tells an electrifying story about the promise of redemption and the limits of compassion. Winner, Special Jury Award for Intuitive Filmmaking: Documentary, 2014 Sundance Film Festival.

July 6: Tough Love by Stephanie Wang-Breal

What makes a good parent? How do you prove you are responsible after you’ve been deemed unfit? Having lost custody of their children to Child Protective Services, two parents–one in New York City and one in Seattle–fight to win back the trust of the courts and reunite their families in Stephanie Wang-Breal‘s moving film. Acknowledging their past parenting mistakes due to poverty, poor choices and addiction, both Hannah and Patrick contend with a complex bureaucracy to prove they deserve a second chance. A co-production of ITVS.A co-presentation with the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM).

July 13: Web Junkie by Shosh Shlam and Hilla Medalia

Internet addiction has been declared a national health crisis in China, the first country in the world to classify this evolving diagnosis. Web Junkie follows the treatment of three Chinese teenagers, obsessive gamers whose preference for the virtual world over the real one is summed up in one jarring statement: “Reality is too fake.” Israeli filmmakers Shosh Shlam and Hilla Medalia gained extraordinary access to a three-month military-style rehab program in Beijing, illuminating a process that, while stern, may help set a standard as the wider world comes to grips with the devastating consequences of excessive Internet use. Official Selection of the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.

July 20: Return to Homs by Talal Derki

War changes people, including 19-year-old Basset Saroot, who went from star goalkeeper for the Syrian national soccer team to peaceful advocate for Arab Spring reforms to armed insurgent. Return to Homs, which focuses on Basset and his ragtag group’s transformation and struggles, is a heart-stopping, often wrenching study of the brutal war President Bashar al-Assad’s regime has waged against the Syrian people–a war fought mostly out of camera range that has produced epic heroism and tragedy. Winner of Sundance’s 2014 World Cinema Grand Jury Prize for Documentary, this is an unprecedented view inside a conflict that many accuse the world of overlooking. Winner of the first George Polk Documentary Film Award.

July 27: Tea Time by Maite Alberdi

Ritual is often associated with powerful and impersonal institutions, but for five Chilean women, ritual centers on a monthly gathering that has sustained them through 60 years of personal and societal change. Tea Time is a charming and poignant look at how a seemingly mundane routine of tea and pastries has helped the well-heeled participants commemorate life’s joys and cope with infidelity, illness and death. A celebration of the small things that help us endure, Tea Time, filmed over five years, illuminates a beautiful paradox: As familiar worlds slip away, friendships grow ever stronger and more profound. A co-production of ITVS International. A co-presentation with Latino Public Broadcasting.Official Selection of the 2014 International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam.

Aug. 3: Beats of the Antonov by hajooj kuka

Sudan has been in an almost constant state of civil war since it achieved independence in 1956, and it split into a pair of sovereign states in 2011. On the border between the two, Russian-made Antonov planes indiscriminately drop bombs on settlements in the Nuba Mountains below. Yet, incredibly, the people of the Blue Nile respond to adversity with music, singing and dancing to celebrate their survival. Beats of the Antonov explores how music binds a community together, offering hope and a common identity for refugees engaged in a fierce battle to protect cultural traditions and heritage from those trying to obliterate them. Winner, Grolsch People’s Choice Documentary Award, 2014 Toronto International Film Festival.

Aug. 10: Encore Presentation — When I Walk by Jason DaSilva

Jason DaSilva was 25 and a rising filmmaker when he was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis and inspired to film this forthright–and surprisingly uplifting–look at his new life. He searches for a cure, yet a different miracle comes his way. Official Selection of the 2013 Sundance Film Festival. A co-production of ITVS. A co-presentation with CAAM. Continue reading

Macy’s Welcomes Back “American Icons” This Summer

Macy’s offers fashion from America’s favorite brands, early summer events and a partnership with Got Your 6 in support of America’s veterans

From May 13 to July 4, share photos using #AmericanSelfie for a chance to be included
in the national broadcast of Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks®

Macy’s announces the return of “American Icons,” launching this week in celebration of America‘s Independence Day (July 4th) and the American landscape, the people, places and things that make this country great. The campaign will kick off with #AmericanSelfie, a social media initiative inspiring customers to share photos of what America means to them, as well as fashions from celebrated designers and icons, in-store events and a special program in support of America’s veterans.

(Image courtesy of Macy's)

(Image courtesy of Macy’s)

American Icons is a meaningful program that offers Macy’s a chance to connect with our customers in celebration of our great country,” said Martine Reardon, Macy’s chief marketing officer. “With #AmericanSelfie, they can show us why they love America while supporting Got Your 6, a nonprofit organization that serves to empower veterans and strengthen communities. We are also rolling out the latest fashion from the country’s most beloved brands and hosting fun summertime events to make this year’s tribute to America more special than ever.”

From now to July 4, Macy’s is inviting customers to use #AmericanSelfie to share their favorite “selfie” photos that capture the faces, places and things they love on Instagram and Twitter, to show people nationwide what they enjoy most about this country. In support of America’s military veterans, with each use of #AmericanSelfie, macys_on_black_se_8540Macy’s will donate $1, up to $250,000, to Got Your 6, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping our returning service members make America stronger. Plus, #AmericanSelfie will be part of Macy’s annual 4th of July Fireworks show, the nation’s largest Independence Day display telecast nationally on NBC.

Got Your 6 is a campaign that unites nonprofit, Hollywood, and government partners and believes that veterans are leaders, team builders, and problem solvers who have the unique potential to strengthen communities across the country. As a coalition, Got Your 6 works to integrate these perspectives into popular culture, engage veterans and civilians together to foster understanding, and empower veterans to lead in their communities. The organization also knows that most veterans leave the military seeking new challenges, and the campaign ensures that there are opportunities for them to continue their service.

In the military, “Got your six” means “I’ve got your back.” The saying originated with World War I fighter pilots referencing a pilot’s rear as the six o’clock position. It is now a ubiquitous term in the military that highlights the loyalty and cooperation found in military culture. The Got Your 6 campaign chose this term, because it is emblematic of the many skills that veterans bring back into their communities when they return home.

Through entertainment industry partners, Got Your 6 works to normalize the depictions of veterans on film and television to dispel common myths about the veteran population. Through nonprofit and government partners, Got Your 6 likewise ensures successful veteran reintegration and empowers veterans to lead here at home. Together, Got Your 6 and its partners are shifting public perceptions so that veterans’ leadership and skills are recognized and utilized at home to strengthen communities.

Each year, around a quarter-million service members exit the military and re-enter civilian life. It is essential that Americans see the potential for veterans to strengthen our communities. Got Your 6 works to ensure that veterans return home to be seen as leaders and civic assets. For the past decade, our country has framed “veteran reintegration” as a major societal problem or struggle. On the contrary, Got Your 6 believes that it is crucial for Americans to see veteran reintegration as an opportunity, because veterans are uniquely suited to solve some of our nation’s most difficult challenges.

The average American has little first-hand connection to the military and often believes that, in general, veterans are much more likely than civilians to experience unemployment, substance abuse, homelessness, and various other issues. These notions are largely misconceptions. They paint a picture of veterans as “broken.” As a result, veterans often say they feel more pity than respect from the civilian population. When veterans fail to successfully reintegrate back into American society, it is often because their communities do not expect them to succeed or excel. Got Your 6 believes that if the country does not call upon returning veterans, then we will miss out on a generation of leaders.

Macy’s is continuing its partnership with Got Your 6 to help empower military veterans and families to make America stronger. In addition to the contribution made through the #AmericanSelfie initiative, Macy’s will host “Got Your 6 Saturday” on May 16, when customers can give $3 at any register and receive a savings pass, with 100 percent of the purchase price donated to Got Your 6. With this pass, shoppers will receive a 25 percent discount all day on purchases, exclusions and restrictions apply. Beyond “Got Your 6 Saturday,” Macy’s shoppers can still support America’s veterans from May 17 through May 25 by giving $3 for a 15 percent/20 percent discount savings pass to drive additional donations to Got Your 6 and its nonprofit partners.

Star-Studded Fashion
Macy’s has lined up an all-star cast of brands to offer shoppers the most covetable clothing and accessories – just in time for the warm weather season. Macy’s customers will be treated to collections by Calvin Klein, I.N.C. International Concepts, Tommy Hilfiger, Michael Kors, Martha Stewart Collection, Locker Room Lids, Thalía Sodi, Ryan Seacrest Distinction and the lovable characters from PEANUTS®, among others, for the hottest trends in fashion all summer long. This year’s talent and brands will be featured in the new print, digital and in-store American Icons advertising campaign, as well as a 112-page direct mail book of curated merchandise, also available at macys.com/americanicons.

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Set against the ultra-modern backdrop of the new Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City, Calvin Klein continues its tradition of cutting-edge, minimal designs. Featuring sleek silhouettes and a black-and-white color palette, the range is crisp and contemporary. Spring’s athletic vibe manifests in a dynamic way with moto-jackets and slide sandals, allowing for both fit and function.

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I.N.C. International Concepts celebrates 30 years of fashion-forward designs, and has tapped world-renowned models Heidi Klum and Gabriel Aubry to lead the festivities. For women, the collection boasts eclecticism, featuring prints, colors, and details like fringe that give off a worldly vibe. For men, lightweight blazers, printed wovens and fitted jeans comprise a collection that emanates relaxed sophistication.

1429798085_DesignerWeLove_Thalia

American Icons - Coast to Coast  - Thalia Sodi

With a landmark Art Deco hotel in the heart of South Beach as a backdrop, the Thalía Sodi collection for American Icons exudes energy and excitement. Just in time for hot summer nights, Thalía Sodi offers customers a bold, vibrant collection of clothing, jewelry and footwear that is simply head-turning. Figure-flattering and feminine, the collection’s dresses and separates make women feel confident and beautiful. The use of bright colors and vivid prints reflects the vivacity of Thalía, and the use of gold throughout the statement footwear and jewelry highlight the glamour and opulence of the range.

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Ryan Seacrest

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Ryan Seacrest has proven to be a media powerhouse in broadcast and radio, all while impeccably dressed. Through his eponymous line, Seacrest brings the same polish and sophistication to men throughout the country. The Ryan Seacrest Distinction collection for American Icons features tailored suits, sport coats, trousers and shirting that are bold and clean. Ties, cufflinks and pocket squares provide the perfect finishing touches, creating undeniably stylish looks perfect for any occasion. Continue reading

INC INTERNATIONAL CONCEPTS UNVEILS 30 YEARS OF INC NATIONAL TV COMMERCIAL STARRING BRAND AMBASSADOR HEIDI KLUM

Macy’s Latest Spot Features an Original Performance by Heidi Klum, Directed by Rankin

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INC International Concepts unveils its first TV commercial starring Heidi Klum as part of the brand’s “30 Years of INC” celebration and national advertising campaign. The commercial will debut on national broadcast networks starting May 13, 2015.

Based on her long-standing relationship with INC, Klum came to the campaign with a strong, hands-on vision for the creative direction of the spot and worked with Macy’s to assemble a team of renowned creative partners, including longtime collaborator Rankin. In addition to recording the vocals, a rock’n’roll inspired tribute to INC’s 30th, she commissioned Ian Love to write and produce the track.

Macys_2015_Feb_0692 SPRING

Behind the scenes with Heidi Klum as she shot the the first TV commercial as part of INC International Concepts’ “30 Years of INC” campaign. The spot stars brand ambassador Klum, who hit the studio to record the vocals for commercial’s music, an original rock-n-roll inspired version of “Happy Birthday.” The commercial was directed by Klum’s longtime friend and acclaimed photographer Rankin. In the ad, she’s wearing pieces from the Spring/Summer 2015 INC 30th Anniversary Collection.

Macys_2015_Feb_0786 SPRING

Behind the scenes with Heidi Klum as she shot the the first TV commercial as part of INC International Concepts’ “30 Years of INC” campaign. The spot stars brand ambassador Klum, who hit the studio to record the vocals for commercial’s music, an original rock-n-roll inspired version of “Happy Birthday.” The commercial was directed by Klum’s longtime friend and acclaimed photographer Rankin. In the ad, she’s wearing pieces from the Spring/Summer 2015 INC 30th Anniversary Collection.

Ms. Klum was also instrumental in  choosing the trio of looks that she’s seen wearing throughout the spot, including a white body-conscious dress, gold lace jacket, and striking black jumpsuit. All these looks (and others) are part of INC International Concepts’ Spring/Summer 2015 Collection, available exclusively at Macy’s stores and online at macys.com.

The commercial follows the brand’s announcement of its year-long “30 Years of INC” campaign starring Klum and Gabriel Aubry, which includes national print, digital/online, in-store and outdoor components. As part of this commemorative year, INC unveiled a luxe retrospective book in March 2015 and will launch an anniversary capsule collection in September 2015.

INC was founded in 1985 as a men’s brand originally called C.O.D. (Clothes On Delivery). But due to a legal issue, the name had to be changed, and INC International Concepts was born. The rest, as they say, is history—thirty great years of history that has seen the emergence of an international lifestyle brand and Macy’s has spent the last three decades creating unforgettable collections for women, men and the home. Klum previously starred in a TV commercial for INC, shot by Bob Giraldi, in 1997. She also appeared in a print campaign for INC in 1999, and has worked with the brand through her role as host of Project Runway.

Says Klum, “Since we’re celebrating INC’s 30th Birthday, we wanted this commercial to feel like a party. I love to sing, so recording my own version of ‘Happy Birthday’ felt like a natural part of the creative process. I had a blast dancing around on set. I’ve worked with Rankin for over 10 years, and he really knows how to bring out the best in me.

Absolut Unveils Latest Iteration of Absolut Nights Campaign with Inspiring Short Film Featuring Empire of the Sun and Launch of New Limited Edition Bottle

Absolut celebrates the latest iteration of Absolut Nights – the next step of the brand’s Transform Todaycampaign – dedicated to inspiring consumers to push nightlife conventions beyond their limits. A short film featuring a never-before-heard track from electronic music duo, Empire of the Sun, leads the campaign by showcasing real experiences of Absolut nightlife. Inspiring consumers to reinvent their own night out, Absolut has launched Absolut Spark, a new limited edition illuminated bottle.

At Absolut, we believe in a world where there’s no such thing as a ‘standard’ night out, ” said Joao Rozario, VP of Marketing, Absolut. “By infusing the unexpected into the ordinary, Absolut Nights aims to inspire nightlife lovers to use the night as their canvas to explore what the future of nightlife looks like. ”

Absolut Nights was launched with a global series of one-of-a-kind events (in New York, Sao Paolo, Berlin and Johannesburg) that use the night as a creative canvas, inviting audiences to play inside unique artistic experiences. Over the course of four weeks, Absolut collaborated with artists (Vita Motus, Charles Gadeken, Studio XO and Marianna Krawczyk) that are pushing the boundaries of their field and worked with them to transform one element of the night at each event – Light, Dance Floor, Style and Persona. Each event featured a different artist who reimagined a traditional nightlife convention – from over-sized, inside-out disco ball to pyrotechnic-triggering dance floors – to create a collective rush of adrenaline for event attendees. The result was four unique events, which pushed the boundaries for what partiers should expect from a night out.

The experiences were filmed by Grammy-winning director Melina Matsoukas, who honed an expertise of capturing live events by working with the world’s top musicians. The film content invites viewers inside the incredible world of Absolut Nights, showcasing how the individual artists transformed the night in ways no one has ever have imagined before.

In Johannesburg, Absolut collaborated with Charlie Gadeken, the fire artist responsible for many of Burning Man’s most awe-inspiring kinetic sculptures, allowing 200 Johannesburg partiers to play inside this unique artistic experience. In a once-in-a-life-time opportunity, Gadeken’s custom art installation captured the energy of the night and the crowd by transforming it into a pyrotechnical frenzy, triggered by the audience movement.

In a remote desert location, a mirrored cube was flanked with row after row of pyrotechnics. When the guests start dancing inside the cube, the fireworks reflected and heightened the energy of the experience. As the night reached a fever pitch, explosions created a shimmering shape and the unique landscape was engulfed in smoke, sparks and color. From inside the cube, the audience experienced the beauty of pandemonium that they helped to create.

Absolut Nights: Sao Paulo

Absolut Nights: Sao Paulo

Absolut Nights: Sao Paulo

Absolut Nights: Sao Paulo

In Sao Paulo, Absolut invited seventy-five partiers to become someone else for just one night. Upon entering the Victor Hugo mansion, attendees of this one-night-only artistic experience were given a new identity, complete with a persona, a story, and a handmade costume customized for each character. Created in collaboration with acclaimed videogame writer Marianne Krawczyk, the experience transformed her skill of creating interactive environments by bringing one to life as an immersive environment in which the greatest partiers in history converge at a party for the ages.

Partygoers wore bespoke outfits made with fabrics embedded with lasers and mirrors which were wirelessly controlled from a central server, so they could choreograph and synchronize the lasers. Wearable technology allowed guests to be integral part of the artistic experience, breaking free of their expectations of a night out.

Partygoers wore bespoke outfits made with fabrics embedded with lasers and mirrors which were wirelessly controlled from a central server, so they could choreograph and synchronize the lasers. Wearable technology allowed guests to be integral part of the artistic experience, breaking free of their expectations of a night out.

 

Absolut Nights: Berlin

Absolut Nights: Berlin

In Berlin, Absolut combined high fashion and high tech in the jungle with laser couture (created by Studio XO) and joined forces with the fashion/technology designers to offer a transformational and interactive nightlife experience at Kraftwerk, the iconic representation of Berlin’s industrial history, giving the city a never before seen collaborative celebration. As the third event in the global Absolut Nights series, Absolut invited 200 Berliners to play inside a unique artistic experience created at the intersection of nightlife and nature.  Continue reading

The Museum at FIT Explores “Global Fashion Capitals”

Fashion & Textile History Gallery, June 2 – November 14, 2015
All photographs © The Museum at FIT
The globalization of fashion has given rise to new fashion cities that now annually host hundreds of fashion weeks around the world. Each city’s cultural identity and particular economic, political, and social circumstances combine to elevate its designers to international attention. Global Fashion Capitals explores the history of the established fashion capitals, Paris, New York, Milan, and London, and the emergence of 16 new fashion cities (including Tokyo, Antwerp, Stockholm, Berlin, St. Petersburg/Moscow, Madrid, Sydney/Melbourne, Mexico City, Sao Paolo, Istanbul and Mumbai).
A fashion capital is a city which has a major influence on international fashion trends and in which the design, production and retailing of fashion products – plus events such as fashion weeks, awards and trade fairs – generate significant economic output. The cities considered the Big Four fashion capitals of the world are: London, Paris, Milan and New York.
Fashion capitals usually have a broad mix of business, financial, entertainment, cultural and leisure activities and are internationally recognised for having a unique and strong identity. It has also been noted that the status of a fashion capital has become increasingly linked to a city’s domestic and international profile. Fashion capitals are also likely be part of a wider design scene, with design schools, fashion magazines and a local market of affluent consumers.
The exhibition (at The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, Seventh Avenue at 27 Street, New York City 10001-5992) opens with a digital style map that geographically locates the fashion capitals and showcases their latest runway and street style photographs. Global Fashion Capitals continues city-by-city, starting with Paris, the birthplace of haute couture, represented by designs from Charles Frederick Worth, Gabrielle Chanel, Christian Dior, and the emerging couturier, Bouchra Jarrar.

Fashion has always existed at the crossroads of art and consumerism and never more so than in today’s society. The way we perceive our desires, bodies, and eras shapes fashion every season, as it shapes us. Paris fashion is at the center of it all. The French were the first to make an industry out of fashion, not just dress-making, and they have been exporting their style since the 17th century which is frankly before most of the world had even realized what fashion was. It all kicked off in the 17th century when the association of France with fashion and style was initiated by, surprise surprise, Louis XIV’s court.

The House of Worth, Cape, Circa 1890. Paris. Gift of the Estate of Elizabeth Arden. 69.160.9 Hip-length cape in cream lace with wide neckline border of black silk velvet; trimmed with black silk chenille bobble tassels

The House of Worth, Cape, Circa 1890. Paris. Gift of the Estate of Elizabeth Arden. 69.160.9
Hip-length cape in cream lace with wide neckline border of black silk velvet; trimmed with black silk chenille bobble tassels

The House of Worth, Cape, Circa 1890. Paris. Gift of the Estate of Elizabeth Arden. 69.160.9 Hip-length cape in cream lace with wide neckline border of black silk velvet; trimmed with black silk chenille bobble tassels

The House of Worth, Cape, Circa 1890. Paris. Gift of the Estate of Elizabeth Arden. 69.160.9
Hip-length cape in cream lace with wide neckline border of black silk velvet; trimmed with black silk chenille bobble tassels

The Sun King made it his business to be at the center of all that was beautiful in the world so the luxury goods industry in France became a royal commodity. The creation of the fashion press in the 1670s catapulted French fashion into the spotlight and the notions of different fashion “seasons” and the changing of styles became available to a bigger audience. Louis XIV himself was responsible for starting the trend for outrageous wigs of curled hair. The king was going bald so he over-compensated and the rest of the court followed suit.

Balenciaga , Cocktail dress , 1959, Paris. Gift of Kay Kerr Uebel. 75.170.1_20050512_01 Short evening dress in chartreuse ribbed silk with black chinÈ r; with bateau neckline; bubble skirt on hip yoke; and attached black satin ribbon tie; separate coordinating black satin ribbon sash

Balenciaga , Cocktail dress , 1959, Paris. Gift of Kay Kerr Uebel. 75.170.1_20050512_01
Short evening dress in chartreuse ribbed silk with black chinÈ r; with bateau neckline; bubble skirt on hip yoke; and attached black satin ribbon tie; separate coordinating black satin ribbon sash

In fact, he moved the needle towards extravagant fashion even more so because of his wigs. The French Royal court turned into a farcical game of one-upmanship where fashion was concerned – Whose wig is the tallest? Whose skirt is the widest and most covered in tiny bows? In Paris fashion big was the rage. This was most evident in the french movie, Ridicule, the 1996 French film set in the 18th century at the decadent court of Versailles, where social status can rise and fall based on one’s ability to mete out witty insults and avoid ridicule oneself, as well as one’s ability to be the most preening peacock in the room. The story also examines the social injustices of late 18th century France, in showing the corruption and callousness of the aristocrats.

The rebels were, of course, very quick to change all this and went very fast towards the opposite direction — what before had been of a baroque, almost decadent, excess, now everything was simple — as per the ideas of the era and also because hygiene had improved wonders by now and people had to buy more fabric to have at least one piece of clothing to wear while they cleaned the other one. And then the 1800s came and department stores were opened, giving a boost to Paris fashion. Instead of courtiers, France now had the bourgeoisie and, as the driving force that made the economy move from hand to hand (as in, they could actually move money around), French fashion found its way into society.

It wasn’t long until the couturier (designer) was born. It is, of course, as usually with designers, a controversial statement, but a man from England named Charles Frederick Worth is more or less accepted into the popular vernacular as the man who totally dominated the industry. He was the first to be considered a designer and not just a dressmaker – he invented the fashion show and the fashion label as a status symbol. He went on to become so successful and respected, in fact, that he earned the final say on whatever their customers were going to wear, regardless of their opinion. He also came up with the idea of actually sketching the design before producing an expensive sample garment. He was hailed as a genius for that.

In the late 19th and early 20th century, the French fashion industry exploded (Vogue was founded in 1892) and Jacques Doucet and Madeline Vionnet founded fashion houses. They were influenced by Art Nouveau and Orientalist trends and so finally women were “liberated” from corsets and heavy petticoats and instead wore their whimsical designs with flowing bias-cut dresses. In 1925 a little known designer called Coco Chanel first came into prominence and revolutionized Paris fashion and then the world’s.

In 1947, the world’s attention was on Paris once more as Christian Dior unveiled his “New Look” – the clinched in waists contrasted with majestic busts and full skirts delighted the post-war clientele in its femininity. Hubert de Givenchy and Pierre Balmain both opened fashion houses soon after and Paris was the center of the world again.

The 1960s saw the Parisian youth becoming disillusioned with French fashion, (apparently too elegant and elaborate) favoring instead the casual style seen in London. In 1966, Yves Saint Laurent put Paris in the spotlight again with his a prêt-à-porter (“ready to wear”) line which made fashion accessible to the masses. In fact, even though Paco Rabanne and Pierre Cardin pushed fashion towards the future, creating bold shapes they always had to stay under YSL’s shadow. He was undoubtedly king of the latter part of the century. He pioneered the tuxedo suit for women, seducing everyone with his androgynous style and Left Bank beatnik chic.***

The New York section begins with a circa 1938 iridescent evening gown by Nettie Rosenstein and ends with Alexander Wang’s sporty spring/summer 2015 neon orange dress. New York also includes styles by Claire McCardell, Halston, and Ralph Lauren.
Nettie Rosenstein, Evening dress, Circa 1938, New York, Gift of Gloria Carr de Veynac. 76.32.1

Nettie Rosenstein, Evening dress, Circa 1938, New York, Gift of Gloria Carr de Veynac. 76.32.1

Claire McCardell, Dress, 1954, New York . Gift of Sally Kirkland. 76.33.34_20080425_01 Sleeveless dress in beige muslin with black windowpane check; fitted midriff panel; calf-length flared skirt; wide wrap & tie sash

Claire McCardell, Dress, 1954, New York . Gift of Sally Kirkland. 76.33.34_20080425_01
Sleeveless dress in beige muslin with black windowpane check; fitted midriff panel; calf-length flared skirt; wide wrap & tie sash

Milan claimed its place as Italy’s fashion capital during the 1970s. Milan has established a long history within the fields of fashion, textiles and design in general. Throughout the late 19th century, the Lombard capital was a major production centre, benefitting from its status as one of the country’s salient economic and industrial powerhouses. Milanese fashion, despite taking inspiration from the leading Parisian couture of the time, developed its own approach, which was by nature devoted to sobriety, simplicity and the quality of the fabric. Throughout the 20th century, the city expanded its role as a fashion centre, with a number of rising designers contributing to Milan’s image as a stylistic capital. Following this development, Milan emerged in the 1970s and 1980s as one of the world’s pre-eminent trendsetters, maintaining this stint well into the 1990s and 2000s and culminating with its entrenchment as one of the “big four” global fashion capitals. As of today, Milan is especially renowned for its role within the prêt-à-porter category of fashion.

Milan’s fashion history has evolved greatly throughout the years. Milan began as a center of fashion in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, as in Venice and Florence, the making of luxury goods was an industry of such importance that in the 16th century the city gave its name to the English word “milaner” or “millaner”, meaning fine wares like jewellery, cloth, hats and luxury apparel. By the 19th century, a later variant, “millinery”, had come to mean one who made or sold hats.

In the mid-19th century cheaper silk began to be imported from Asia and the pest phylloxera damaged silk and wine production. More land was subsequently given over to industrialisation. Textile production was followed by metal and mechanical and furniture manufacture. In 1865, the first major department store in the country opened in Milan by the Bocconi brothers (which was called Alle Città d’Italia and later in 1921 became La Rinascente). This was regarded as a novelty at the time with regards to retailing in Italy. Though, traditionally, artisans would sell the items they made directly or to small stores, the opening of these new department stores modernized the distributions of clothes in the city.

In the 1880s and late 19th century, the Milanese style was partially inspired by French fashion, which at the time was still dominant in terms of influence, yet adapted according to local tastes; this included a generally somber and simple style, which was moderate in terms of decoration and ornamentation, and put an emphasis on the quality of tailoring and the different fabrics and textiles. The general Milanese interest in styling was reflected in the number of fashion magazines which circulated in the city at the time, as well as the fact that the people were ready to follow trends; nevertheless, the Milanese style was relatively traditional. The city had several tailors and seamstresses which in 1881 amounted to 249 and in 1886 to 383 (which were listed in guides).

In this period, the city was one of the biggest industrial powerhouses in Italy, and had a diversified fashion and clothing economy which was mainly based on small workshops rather than large companies (highlighted in an 1881 census). The importance of this industry continued in the city into the early 20th century, where 42,711 out of 175,871 workers were in the clothing sector in 1911.
However, in the 1970s, Milan’s fashion image became more glamorous, and as Florentine designs were deemed to be “very formal and expensive”, the city became a more popular shopping destination, with numerous boutiques which sold both elegant and everyday clothes. Milanese designs were known for their practicality and simple elegance, and became more popular and affordable than Florentine and Parisian designs. The city became one of the main capitals for ready-to-wear female and male fashion in the 1970s.  Milan started to become an internationally successful and famous fashion capital towards the late-1980s and early 1990s.
Milan has been home to numerous fashion designers, including Giorgio Armani, Valentino Garavani, Gianni Versace, Gianfranco Ferrè,Domenico Dolce, Stefano Gabbana, Miuccia Prada, Mariuccia Mandelli alias Krizia, Antonio Marras, Alessandro Dell’Acqua, Franco Moschino, Gimmo Etro, Mila Schön, Nicola Trussardi, Ottavio Missoni, Donatella Versace, Maria Grazia Chiuri, Pierpaolo Piccioli and Giuseppe Zanotti in addition to Fausto Puglisi, Francesco Scognamiglio, Alessandra Facchinetti, Gabriele Colangelo, Simonetta Ravizza, Stella Jean and Marco De Vincenzo, just to name a few younger designers.
Prada , Ensemble , Fall 2007, Milan, Gift of Prada, 2007.20.1 Coat with black textured wool blazer fringed with plastic strips, stitched to orange fleece skirt with rust pile hem band; red silk ribknit toeless stockings; black satin shoes with hardware buckle, high curved heel and back covered in taupe satin

Prada , Ensemble , Fall 2007, Milan, Gift of Prada, 2007.20.1
Coat with black textured wool blazer fringed with plastic strips, stitched to orange fleece skirt with rust pile hem band; red silk ribknit toeless stockings; black satin shoes with hardware buckle, high curved heel and back covered in taupe satin

Most of the major Italian fashion houses and labels are based in Milan, even though many of them were founded in other cities. They include: Armani, Bottega Veneta, Canali, Costume National, Dolce & Gabbana, Dsquared2, Etro, Iceberg, Les Copains, Marni, Missoni, Miu Miu, Moncler, Frankie Morello, Moschino, MSGM, N°21, Prada, Fausto Puglisi, Tod’s, Trussardi, Valentino, Versace, Giuseppe Zanotti, Zagliani, Ermenegildo Zegna, and the eyewear company Luxottica.
Christopher Kane, Dress, Fall 2014, London, Museum Purchase, 2015.15.1

Christopher Kane, Dress, Fall 2014, London, Museum Purchase, 2015.15.1

Christopher Kane, Dress, Fall 2014, London, Museum Purchase, 2015.15.1

Christopher Kane, Dress, Fall 2014, London, Museum Purchase, 2015.15.1

London captured international attention with “youthquake” fashions during the 1960s. Provocative designers such as Vivienne Westwood, John Galliano, and Alexander McQueen established London as a creative fashion hub during the decades since.

 

When selecting which emerging fashion capitals to include in the exhibition, the curators considered a number of indicators to show that a city’s fashion scene is growing. All the featured cities are home to forward-thinking designers who have achieved domestic success and attracted international interest. They also hold fashion weeks attended by international press and fashion buyers.

 

 

Several factors drive the development of a city’s fashion scene—politics, economics, and government support among them. For example, Johannesburg fashion blossomed during the post-apartheid era, led by designers such as Nkhensani Nkosi of Stoned Cherrie. Current events in Ukraine have ignited the creativity of designers such as Anton Belinskiy, who staged a photoshoot amid Kiev’s street protests.
China’s economic growth over the last decade created consumer demand for international fashion, developing into support for successful domestic designers, such as Shanghai’s Masha Ma. Nigeria’s economy, the largest in Africa, supports Lagos’ developing fashion industry and the growing international reach of brands like Maki Oh and Lisa Folwaiyo. The governments of Copenhagen and Seoul actively fund and promote their fashion industries.
On October 13, 2015, The Museum at FIT, in conjunction with CUNY Graduate Center, will host a one day symposium on the topic of global fashion capitals. The morning session will take place on the FIT campus and will consist of a student fair, where visitors can interact with members of the international fashion community. The morning will also include a fashion show featuring five designers from emerging fashion capitals and a panel discussion moderated by MFIT curators Ariele Elia and Elizabeth Way. The afternoon session will take place at the CUNY Graduate Center, details to follow.
Global Fashion Capitals is organized by Ariele Elia, assistant curator of costume and textiles, and Elizabeth Way, curatorial assistant, The Museum at FIT.

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DEWAR’S® Scratches Its Way To A Smooth And Flavorful New Scotch

For the first time in the brand’s history, Dewar’s® borrows a tradition from its bourbon counterparts – scratching the barrels after charring –  to create a unique, new liquid: Dewar’s Scratched CaskDewar’s Scratched Cask is a blend of up to 40 carefully selected single malt and single grain whiskies left to mature in oak casks at the brand’s home in Scotland for a minimum of four years. At that point, instead of bottling the blend, the mature liquid is married in handcrafted American oak casks, selected by master blender Stephanie Macleod. These barrels,

DEWAR'S(R) SCRATCHES ITS WAY TO A SMOOTH AND FLAVORFUL NEW SCOTCH (PRNewsFoto/DEWAR'S)

DEWAR’S(R) SCRATCHES ITS WAY TO A SMOOTH AND FLAVORFUL NEW SCOTCH (PRNewsFoto/DEWAR’S)

bourbon and virgin oak, are heavily charred and then lightly scratched at the char layer to alter the flavor of the whisky. The liquid is then left to blend and breathe for additional months, a production process called finishing.

The result is surprisingly smooth with a flavorful finish.

We are thrilled to continue to push the envelope in Scotch and create a bridge from one whiskey category to the other,” said Dan Pilas, VP and Brand Managing Director, Dewar’s Blended Scotch Whisky Portfolio. “Dewar’s Scratched Cask is not a hybrid, but different technique that combines the best of Scotch whisky and American whiskey know-how to create a new liquid that is smooth from start to finish.

Founded in 1846 by John Dewar, DEWAR’S has grown from a small wine and spirits merchant shop in Scotland, to one of the largest Scotch whisky brands in the world.  Best known for its iconic DEWAR’S White Label, the top selling blended Scotch whisky in the USA, it has expanded its family to create a portfolio of premium and super premium whiskies including DEWAR’S 12 Year Old, DEWAR’S 15 Year Old, DEWAR’S 18 Year Old and the exclusive DEWAR’S Signature. These whiskies are crafted using the DEWAR’S oak marrying ageing process. Pioneered by DEWAR’S in 1899, it involves returning the hand-crafted blend to vintage oak casks for further maturation. The result is a smoother taste with a long, lingering finish; a taste that wins medals and applause, making DEWAR’S the world’s most awarded Scotch.

Dewar’s Scratched Cask signature serves include “Scratch and Soda,” as well as variations on classic cocktails like the Rob Roy or Old Fashioned. This limited release will be available as of May 2015 while supplies last, and will retail for $25.99 at select luxury liquor retailers nationwide.