New-York Historical Society Leaps Into Election Year With Exhibitions Foregrounding Pillars Of American Democracy

Free Admission to Civics Exhibitions for College Students Through 2020

As election year 2020 begins, the New-York Historical Society is launching a series of special exhibitions that address the cornerstones of citizenship and American democracy. Starting on Presidents’ Day Weekend, visitors to Meet the Presidents will discover how the role of the president has evolved since George Washington with a re-creation of the White House Oval Office and a new gallery devoted to the powers of the presidency. Opening on the eve of Women’s History Month, Women March marks the centennial of the 19th Amendment with an immersive celebration of 200 years of women’s political and social activism. Colonists, Citizens, Constitutions: Creating the American Republic explores the important roles state constitutions have played in the history of our country, while The People Count: The Census in the Making of America documents the critical role played by the U.S. Census in the 19th century—just in time for the 2020 Census.

To encourage first-time voters to learn about our nation’s history and civic as they get ready to vote in the presidential election, New-York Historical Society offers free admission to the exhibitions above to college students with ID through 2020, an initiative supported, in part, by The History Channel. This special program allows college students to access New-York Historical’s roster of upcoming exhibitions that explore the pillars of American democracy as they prepare to vote, most of them for the first time.

The year 2020 is a momentous time for both the past and future of American politics, as the centennial of the 19th Amendment, which granted women the right to vote, coincides with both a presidential election and a census year,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of New-York Historical. “This suite of complementary exhibitions showcases the ideas and infrastructure behind our American institutions that establish and protect our fundamental rights to make our voices heard and opinions count. We hope that all visitors will come away with a wider understanding of the important role each citizen plays in our democracy.”

Rembrandt Peale, George Washington (1732–1799), 1853 Oil on canvas New-York Historical Society, Bequest of Caroline Phelps Stokes
The Constitution defines the president’s power and duties in broad strokes. George Washington was the first to put them into practice and was keenly aware of his singular place in history. Willing to assert his authority, he was just as willing to acknowledge the office’s constitutional limits. He was a president, not a king.

Meet the Presidents, February 14 – ongoing

President John F. Kennedy addresses the nation during the Cuban Missile Crisis, October 22, 1962. John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
As commander-in-chief, President John F. Kennedy could have tried to destroy the missiles with a military strike. Concerned about the risk of nuclear war, he instead asked national security advisers to develop other options. He ordered a naval quarantine to prevent Soviet ships from reaching Cuba and communicated directly with Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev. After 13 tense days, the Soviets removed the weapons.

Opening on Presidents’ Day Weekend, a special permanent gallery on New-York Historical’s fourth floor features a detailed re-creation of the White House Oval Office, where presidents have exercised their powers, duties, and responsibilities since 1909. Visitors to New-York Historical can explore the Oval Office, hear audio recordings of presidential musings, and even sit behind a version of the President’s Resolute Desk for a photo op.

President Lyndon B. Johnson talks with Martin Luther King Jr., Whitney Young, and James Farmer, December 3, 1963 LBJ Library photo by Yoichi Okamoto
Presidents are also the leaders of their party. However, serving both nation and party can be challenging, and leaders must sometimes choose between the two. President Lyndon Johnson put national needs first when he supported civil rights legislation that Southern Democrats had condemned.
President Harry Truman reads the Japanese surrender message surrounded by members of his Cabinet and others, August 14, 1945 Harry S. Truman Library & Museum
President Harry Truman’s Oval Office announcement that the Japanese had surrendered effectively ended World War II.

Presidents can furnish the Oval Office to suit their own tastes, and this re-creation evokes the decor of President Ronald Reagan’s second term, widely considered a classic interpretation of Oval Office design. The Resolute Desk, which has been used by almost every president, was presented by Queen Victoria of England in friendship to President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1880. The original was made from timbers from the British Arctic explorer ship H.M.S. Resolute, which was trapped in the ice, recovered by an American whaling ship, and returned to England. Other elements reminiscent of the Reagan-era on view include a famous jar of jelly beans, an inspirational plaque reading “It can be done,” and artist Frederic Remington’s Bronco Buster bronze sculpture of a rugged cowboy fighting to stay on a rearing horse.

Enit Zerner Kaufman, Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882–1945), ca. 1940–45 New-York Historical Society, Gift of Enit Kaufman
No president has faced a greater economic crisis than Franklin D. Roosevelt. Elected early in the Great Depression, he took immediate steps to create the economic relief and recovery programs known as the New Deal. He worked so effectively with Congress in his first 100 days in office that this period has since become a measure of a president’s early success
President Ronald Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev have their first meeting at the White House, December 8, 1987 Ronald Reagan Presidential Library & Museum
Presidents can furnish the Oval Office to suit their own tastes. This re-creation of the room evokes key elements of its appearance during Ronald Reagan’s second term. First Lady Nancy Reagan oversaw the office’s redecoration. She brought in Hollywood decorator Ted Graber and opted for a formal design that conveyed grandeur, power, and authority.

The Suzanne Peck and Brian Friedman Meet the Presidents Gallery traces, through artwork and objects, the evolution of the presidency and executive branch and how presidents have interpreted and fulfilled their leadership role. Highlights include the actual Bible used during George Washington’s inauguration in 1789 and a student scrapbook from 1962 chronicling JFK’s leadership during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Meet the Presidents is curated by Marci Reaven, vice president of history exhibits, and Lily Wong, assistant curator.

Women March, February 28 – August 30

Lori Steinberg
Pussyhat worn at Women’s March on Washington, 2017 Wool New-York Historical Society, Gift of Lori Steinberg, 2019.67.1

Clothing is frequently used by demonstrators to create a sense of unity or send a particular message. Many participants in the 2017 Women’s Marches wore home-made “pussy” hats. The original knitting pattern, created by the Pussyhat Project, was downloaded 100,000 times, and craft stores ran low on pink yarn.
State Presidents and Officers of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1892 Bryn Mawr College Special Collections
Although several Western states gave women the right to vote starting in 1869, the 1878 “Susan B. Anthony Amendment” proposing women’s suffrage gathered dust in Congress. New activism in the early 20th century reinvigorated the cause. While groups and individuals agreed on the end goal, they often disagreed philosophically. The National American Woman Suffrage Association, for example, initially pursued gradual change state by state, before focusing on a federal amendment.

For as long as there has been a United States, women have organized to shape the nation’s politics and secure their rights as citizens. Their collective action has taken many forms, from abolitionist petitions to industry-wide garment strikes to massive marches for an Equal Rights Amendment. Women March celebrates the centennial of the 19th Amendment—which granted women the right to vote in 1920—as it explores the efforts of a diverse array of women to expand American democracy in the centuries before and after the suffrage victory. On view in the Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, Women March is curated by Valerie Paley, the director of the Center for Women’s History and New-York Historical senior vice president and chief historian, with the Center for Women’s History curatorial team. The immersive exhibition features imagery and video footage of women’s collective action over time, drawing visitors into a visceral engagement with the struggles that have endured into the 21st century.

Women activists with signs for registration, 1956 Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Frances Albrier Collection. © Cox Studio
Wartime civil rights organizing shaped later civil rights efforts, from the Montgomery Bus Boycott in Alabama to voter registration drives in San Francisco and school desegregation protests in New York City. These proved to be formative trials for a generation of women, who witnessed the power of direct action. Many also confronted the ways such campaigns privileged male leadership. Activists eventually would draw on these experiences to launch new movements energized by collective action.
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Calvin Klein, Inc. and Calvin Klein Fragrances Announce CK ONE Underwear and Jeans and CK EVERYONE Fragrance

Company Debut Global Advertising Campaign

Calvin Klein, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of PVH Corp., andCalvin Klein Fragrances, a division of Coty Inc., today revealed the new CK ONE underwear and jeans collection and CK EVERYONE, a clean fragrance, both inspired by the raw and rebel spirit of the original CK ONE. The collection and fragrance are unveiled in a global advertising campaign, proclaiming, “I am one, I am many. I love everyone of me.”

A tribute to individuality and the freedom of self-expression, the campaign shot by Glen Luchford stars a group of modern multi-hyphenates including musician and actor Eliot Sumner, skater and photographer Evan Mock, musician and makeup artist MLMA, rapper and dancer Priddy the Opp, and models Cara Taylor and Parker Van Noord. The energic, enigmatic visuals explore the many aspects of self, boldly embracing and proudly showcasing to the world a collective individuality and shattering of the status quo. It is a powerful celebration for those unconstrained by boundaries, gender norms and definitions. The advertising campaign will be featured globally and supported by digital, social, high impact outdoor locations, print and TV.

The new fashion collection and fragrance mark the next chapter of the iconic CK ONE story. Jeans and underwear include staple wardrobe pieces with genderless appeal. CK ONE underwear features graphic prints with bold all-over monogram logos, repeating roses and new colorwaves in key cotton and micro fiber styles. Camo prints, color-blocked styles with a ribbed, sock-inspired waistband and a Recycle capsule featuring underwear and t-shirts made from recycled plastic water bottles will also drop later this season. The CK ONE jeans collection includes logo tees, graphic hoodies and timeless denim silhouettes such as oversized trucker jackets, denim vests, and mom and dad jeans, as well as skirts and shorts with raw hem cuts.

Calvin Klein introduces its first clean, gender-free and environmentally conscious fragrance, CK EVERYONE. CK EVERYONE is formulated with naturally derived ingredients, naturally derived alcohol, is vegan, recyclable, and comes in a folding carton that contains 30% post-consumer recycled materials. CK EVERYONE is a bold new fragrance for every generation, inspired by the authentic and youthful-minded. Master perfumer and creator of the original CK ONE fragrance, Alberto Morillas crafted a clean and genderless fragrance exuding freshness using 79% of naturally derived ingredients and ignoring the traditional signifiers of gender, as reflected in the non-conformity of both the scent and campaign. A citrus fragrance that uplifts with zesty organic orange oil is paired with a blue tea accord and a vibrant cedarwood base creating the perfect combination of clean freshness, sweet sensuality and provocative edge. Combining two icons, CK EVERYONE pays homage to the iconic CALVIN KLEIN UNDERWEAR waistband with a reusable signature elastic band on the bottle.

Coinciding with the launch in North America is the I LOVE EVERYONE OF ME POP-UP in New York City. Open to the public from Thursday, February 13 – Saturday, February 15, visitors will be able to explore and shop the new CK EVERYONE fragrance and CK ONE underwear and jeans. A dedicated fragrance room will allow visitors to discover the different fragrance notes while immersive photo moments play with the concept of individuality referenced in the ad campaign. At the experience, visitors will also have the opportunity to have their image projected on the brand’s famed Houston Street billboard during the duration of the activation.

I LOVE EVERYONE OF ME POP-UP:

666 Broadway, NY, NY 10012

February 13-15th/11am-8pm

ADVERTISING CREDITS:

Creative: Ferdinando Verderi and CALVIN KLEIN

Campaign videos: Sam de Jong

Advertising images: Glen Luchford

EDITORIAL CREDIT:

Fragrance – CK EVERYONE

Fashion – CK ONE underwear, jeans

SOCIAL MEDIA: #CKONE #CKEVERYONE

instagram.com/calvinklein; twitter.com/calvinklein;

youtube.com/calvinklein; facebook.com/calvinklein;

pinterest.com/calvinklein;

brand handle: @calvinklein

Nordstrom Introduces See You Tomorrow: A Resale Shop Curated By Olivia Kim

See You Tomorrow will be available online and in the NYC Flagship store starting on Jan. 31

Nordstrom is proud to announce its latest creative projects initiative, See You Tomorrow, a new recommerce experience launching on January 31, 2020. Powered by Yerdle, See You Tomorrow offers customers both an online resale site and an in-store shopping experience in the NYC Flagship store.

(Courtesy of Nordstrom)

Curated by Olivia Kim, vice president of creative projects at Nordstrom, the resale shop will feature a thoughtfully edited, authenticated assortment of pre-loved apparel and accessories from highly coveted brands. The shop is another avenue for the retailer to encourage discovery and engagement with customers.

We want to provide a unique and elevated resale shopping experience that encourages a sense of discovery and provides access to the brands our customers know and love, while giving them a convenient opportunity to participate in the circular fashion economy,” said Olivia Kim, “We want our customers to feel good not only about what they’re buying, but how they’re buying it.

Nordstrom Incorporated logo. (PRNewsFoto)

At launch, the shop will be stocked with merchandise sourced from the Nordstrom Quality Center (NQC), the facility that receives and processes returned and damaged merchandise from Nordstrom’s full-price channels. All merchandise will be expertly cleaned, repaired and refurbished before it becomes available for sale at See You Tomorrow.

Customers can also participate by contributing their pre-loved items through a customer intake program in the Nordstrom NYC Flagship store in exchange for Nordstrom gift cards that can be spent at Nordstrom, Nordstrom.com, Nordstrom Rack, NordstromRack.com, HauteLook and Trunk Club. Coming soon, Nordstrom will also launch an online intake program where customers will have the ability to mail in merchandise.

In addition to providing customers more ways to engage with us, See You Tomorrow is another step we’re taking to actively support our commitment to sustainability,” said Pete Nordstrom, co-president at Nordstrom. “We’re excited to show our customers another way Nordstrom is striving to leave the world better than we found it and circular fashion is another piece to this puzzle.

Nordstrom has partnered with Yerdle, a technology and logistics startup company, to power the backend operations of the resale platform including cleaning and repairing of product, inventory processing and fulfillment, pricing and authentication of certain luxury designer items in partnership with Entrupy.

The merchandise assortment will include women’s apparel, women’s shoes, handbags, men’s apparel, accessories and shoes, children’s wear and a limited selection of jewelry and watches. Throughout the duration of the shop, See You Tomorrow will highlight special brand partnerships, starting with Ganni, a Coppenhagen-based contemporary fashion brand.

TheSee You Tomorrow shop at the NYC Nordstrom Flagship Store was designed and built in collaboration with artist and furniture designer Marc Hundley, who has previously collaborated with Kim on previous projects at the Nordstrom NYC Flagship store.

The shop will also feature a café space with food and beverage through an outpost of Bonberi Bodega. The offering will include sustainable market finds including fresh juices, salads, grain bowls, noodles and more.

Nordstrom NYC is located at 235 West 57th Street and open during store hours on Monday-Saturday from 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

See You Tomorrow will be available to shop online starting Jan. 31 at Nordstrom.com/seeyoutomorrow.

High Museum Of Art Celebrates 2019 Achievements And Previews Innovative 2020 Initiatives

The High Museum of Art continued to expand its impact in 2019, proactively aligning its initiatives and programming with the needs and interests of the Atlanta community. Its dynamic exhibition program featured solo exhibitions of Romare Bearden, Virgil Abloh and Yayoi Kusama, as well as thematic exhibitions unveiling new narratives in select strengths of the High’s collection, including photography, folk and self-taught art, and Southern art. Commissions and acquisitions of major works continue to drive the momentum of the collection following the success of the 2018 reinstallation and included the first paintings to enter the Museum’s holdings by Henri Fantin-Latour, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani and Alfred Sisley. Additional innovative initiatives include the launch of Heartmatch, the Museum’s digital tool that creates a personalized interactive map of the Museum, and unparalleled access for all audiences to the High’s exhibitions and programs.

In 2020, the High will further its commitment to engaging new and existing audiences, setting precedents in museum education with an expanded department to spearhead creative aging and lifelong learning programs. The Museum is also dedicated to continuing to embrace changing populations and a shifting cultural landscape. The High will offer audiences an expansive range of exhibitions spanning collecting areas to showcase both global and Atlanta-inspired narratives, from the first U.S. presentation of Magnum Live Lab to “speechless: different by design,” an exhibition exploring new thinking around accessibility and design. The Museum will also realize plans to conserve major works within the permanent collection and will refine plans for future acquisition and exhibition priorities, continuing its stewardship of artworks for the community and its dedication to providing enriching experiences to current and future audiences.

We concluded 2019 energized by our success and resolved to continue advancing the Museum’s key initiatives to foster growth, inclusivity, collaboration and connectivity,” said Rand Suffolk, the High’s Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr., director. “We remain dedicated to developing exhibitions, programs and our collection to reflect and celebrate the incredible diversity of our city and region.

2019 Demographics:

The High continued to see strong visitor diversity last year across race/ethnicity, age and socioeconomic background. Through self-selecting surveys, the Museum found that 44 percent of its visitors are non-white. (According to the Metro Atlanta Chamber of Commerce’s 2018 statistics, approximately 47 percent of metro Atlanta’s population is non-white.) Nearly 50 percent of the Museum’s visitors have less than a bachelor’s degree, 46 percent have a household income of less than $100,000, and n early 80 percent are under the age of 55, with the highest percentage falling in the 18-24 age range.

2019 Exhibitions:

The High organized several notable exhibitions in 2019 celebrating diversity and featuring artists with regional significance and international renown. In September, the Museum opened “‘Something Over Something Else’: Romare Bearden’s Profile Series” (through Feb. 2, 2020), the first exhibition to bring more than 30 works from Bearden’s seminal series together since their debut nearly 40 years ago. After the High’s presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Cincinnati Art Museum. Currently on view is “Our Strange New Land: Photographs by Alex Harris” (through May 3, 2020), the latest iteration of the High’s acclaimed “Picturing the South” commission series, which invites photographers to create new work exploring current perspectives of Southern subjects and themes while building the Museum’s collection of contemporary photography.

Last year, the Museum’s folk and self-taught art and photography departments collaborated to present “Way Out There: The Art of Southern Backroads,” which celebrated the oft-neglected legacy of unconventional Southern creatives.

The Museum also showcased and supported the talents of local artists with “Of Origins and Belonging, Drawn from Atlanta” (June-September 2019), the most recent in its series of exhibitions featuring Atlanta-based artists, and “Supple Means of Connection” (July-September 2019), a commissioned suite of site-specific live art installations by glo founder Lauri Stallings, the Museum’s first choreographer as artist in residence.

The Museum continued to serve family audiences with its popular children’s book art exhibitions, presenting “The Pursuit of Everything: Maira Kalman’s Books for Children” (June-September 2019), the first in the series to focus on the work of a female artist.

In addition to exhibitions organized by the High, the Museum hosted major traveling exhibitions in 2019, including “Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors” (November 2018-February 2019), “Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings” (October-December 2019) and “Virgil Abloh: ‘Figures of Speech’” (through March 8, 2020).

This robust exhibition program welcomed new visitors to the Museum and resulted in a 8.5 percent increase in member households, providing a strong foundation for continued success in 2020.

2020 Exhibitions:

The High’s 2020 exhibition schedule exemplifies the Museum’s dedication to diversity and inclusivity while also highlighting the strengths of the collection, including photography and contemporary design.

In March, the High will be the first U.S. venue to present Live Lab (March 16-April 19, 2020), a photography residency and related exhibition organized in collaboration with the international photographic cooperative Magnum Photos. The project will feature American photographer Carolyn Drake and South African photographers Lindokuhle Sobekwa and Mikhael Subotzky, whose photographs will explore themes relevant to Atlanta. The collaboration is a testament to the strength of the Museum’s photography department and the High’s commitment to supporting the creation of new work and offering innovative ways for its audience to connect with their museum and with the greater community.

This spring, the High will open “speechless: different by design” (April 25-Sept. 6, 2020), a groundbreaking exhibition co-organized with the Dallas Museum of Art. Through immersive installations by six leading international designers, the exhibition explores the spectrum of sensory experience, aligning with the Museum’s ongoing and evolving commitment to access and to providing new experiences with art.

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