VMFA to Exhibit Working Together: Louis Draper and the Kamoinge Workshop

Exhibition features the work of 15 Kamoinge Workshop members and explores their role in 20th-century art history

Kamoinge Group Portrait, 1973, Anthony Barboza (American, born 1944), digital print. Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Eric and Jeanette Lipman Fund, 2019.249 © Anthony Barboza photography

Beginning this February, the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts will highlight the work of a remarkable group of African American photographers in the exhibition Working Together: Louis Draper and the Kamoinge Workshop. On display in the Evans Court Gallery from February 1 to June 14, 2020, the exhibition features nearly 180 photographs by fifteen of the early members of the Kamoinge Workshop. Working Together tells the story of the first two decades of this collective of artists, who expanded the boundaries of photography as an art form during a critical era of Black self-determination in the 1960s and 1970s. This free exhibition is curated by Dr. Sarah Eckhardt, VMFA’s Associate Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art.

The exhibition has local roots through Louis Draper (1935–2002), who was born in Henrico County and attended the Virginia Randolph School and Virginia State College (now University) before moving to New York in 1957. It was there that Draper met other African American photographers, and in 1963 they came together to form the Kamoinge Workshop. The word Kamoinge means “a group of people acting and working together” in Gikuyu, the language of the Kikuyu people of Kenya. The collective met weekly to look at each other’s work, support one another, and organize their own exhibitions. They were also the driving force behind the Black Photographers Annual, a publication that featured the work of black photographers at a time when mainstream publications offered few opportunities for African Americans. Besides Draper, the early Kamoinge members represented in this exhibition are Anthony Barboza, Adger Cowans, Danny Dawson, Roy DeCarava, Al Fennar, Ray Francis, Herman Howard, Jimmie Mannas, Herb Randall, Herb Robinson, Beuford Smith, Ming Smith, Shawn Walker and Calvin Wilson.

Planning for this exhibition began in 2015 when the museum acquired Draper’s complete archive from his sister, Nell Draper-Winston. The archive consists of more than 50,000 items, including photographs, negatives, contact sheets, slides, computer disks, audiovisual materials, and camera equipment, as well as 15 boxes of valuable documents and publications, which include significant materials about the formation and early years of the Kamoinge Workshop. Thanks to a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Draper archive is now completely catalogued, digitized and will be available on the museum’s website before the exhibition opens. VMFA also received a grant from Bank of America to conserve, stabilize and digitize works in its collection of Kamoinge photographs.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is proud to house the archive of this talented Richmond photographer as well as the most extensive collection of photographs by early members of the Kamoinge Workshop,” said VMFA Director Alex Nyerges. “Our hope is that visitors will learn more about this collective of photographers and experience the beautiful images they created during a time when works by African American artists were marginalized or ignored.”

When I first had the privilege of looking at Draper’s photographs and began reading his descriptions of the collective’s purpose, I realized this story was of national significance—both art historically and politically,” said Eckhardt.

Eckhardt pointed to a quote by Draper from the VMFA archive that underscores the significance of the African American collective that formed at the height of the civil rights movement and is still active today: “Cognizant of the forces for change revolving around Kamoinge, we dedicated ourselves to speak of our lives as only we can,” Draper wrote. “This was our story to tell and we set out to create the kind of images of our communities that spoke of the truth we’d witnessed and that countered the untruth we’d all seen in mainline publications.”

The exhibition is accompanied by a 304-page illustrated catalogue by Eckhardt, which includes a preface by Deborah Willis and additional essays by Erina Duganne, Romi Crawford, John Edwin Mason and Bill Gaskins. After the exhibition closes at VMFA it will travel to the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York and two additional museum venues in the United States.

Working Together: Louis Draper and the Kamoinge Workshop is organized by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. Sponsors include Altria Group, the Fabergé Ball Endowment, the Elisabeth Shelton Gottwald Fund, the Community Foundation for a greater Richmond, Michael Schewel and Priscilla Burbank, the Wayne and Nancy Chasen Family Fund of the Community Foundation for a greater Richmond, Drs. Ronald A. and Betty Neal Crutcher, and Philip and Kay Davidson. VMFA is grateful to the Bank of America Art Conservation Project and the National Endowment for the Humanities for their partnership in making this exhibition possible. Marketing support for Evans Court exhibitions is provided by the Charles G. Thalhimer Fund.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, Virginia, is one of the largest comprehensive art museums in the United States. VMFA, which opened in 1936, is a state agency and privately endowed educational institution. Its purpose is to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret art, and to encourage the study of the arts. Through the Office of Statewide Partnerships program, the museum offers curated exhibitions, arts-related audiovisual programs, symposia, lectures, conferences, and workshops by visual and performing artists. In addition to presenting a wide array of special exhibitions, the museum provides visitors with the opportunity to experience a global collection of art that spans more than 6,000 years. VMFA’s permanent holdings encompass nearly 50,000 artworks, including the largest public collection of Fabergé outside of Russia, the finest collection of Art Nouveau outside of Paris, and one of the nation’s finest collections of American art. VMFA is also home to important collections of Chinese art, English silver, French Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, British sporting and modern and contemporary art, as well as renowned South Asian, Himalayan, and African art. In May 2010, VMFA opened its doors to the public after a transformative expansion, the largest in its history.

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is the only art museum in the United States open 365 days a year with free general admission. For additional information, telephone 804.340.1400 or visit www.VMFA.museum.

Living Well: Prized Seasonal Delicacies Enrich The Winter Menus At Michelin-Starred Spring Moon And Gaddi's

Hailed as one of Asia’s most revered dining destinations since opening its doors in 1928, The Peninsula Hong Kong received a double seal of approval from the Michelin Guide Hong Kong Macau 2020. World-renowned French fine-dining institution Gaddi’s was awarded one Michelin star for the first time, and refined Cantonese restaurant Spring Moon garnered a coveted Michelin star for the fourth consecutive year.

Michelin-starred Gaddi’s

The arrival of winter heralds a heart-warming high point of the culinary calendar. Both Michelin-starred restaurants, Gaddi’s and Spring Moon will present an array of sumptuous seasonal delicacies, includes Winter Specialties which features eagerly anticipated seasonal ingredients and the five-course Black Truffle Tasting Menu inspired by treasured truffles. Diners are invited to appreciate the culinary art in both the oriental and French style with a classic yet contemporary interpretation.

Roe Deer Wellington

Perfectly prepared to warm the heart, stomach and body, Chinese Cuisine Executive Chef Lam Yuk Ming’s Stewed mutton brisket with fish maw, bamboo shoots and black mushrooms in a clay pot seals and enriches the precious sauces from juicy cuts of brisket. Enticing Cantonese creations also include Steamed glutinous rice with whole green crab, diced air-dried meat, shrimps, mushrooms, salted egg yolks and minced garlic, with glutinous rice in lotus leaves infusing an earthy aroma while preserving both the lightly sticky texture and a hint of signature crab sweetness.

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Graff Buys 20.7ct Firebird Vivid Yellow Diamond From ALROSA

Graff Diamonds, the world-renowned hi-end jewelry brand, has acquired the Firebird 20.7ct diamond from ALROSA. The parties do not disclose the transaction details, but note that it achieved one of the highest prices per carat for such a stones in recent years.

20.7ct Firebird Vivid Yellow Diamond From ALROSA

Yellow Asscher-cut 20.69 ct diamond was graded by GIA as Fancy Vivid Yellow – VS1 – Excellent polish and symmetry. Created by nature and brought to perfection by ALROSA cutting and polishing masters, the diamond resembles a simultaneous ensemble of flame, reflections of sunlight on crystal water and a trail of sparkles coming from the tail of a Firebird.

20.7ct Firebird Vivid Yellow Diamond From ALROSA

This Fancy Vivid Yellow with high clarity and very special step-cut is truly unique. And one can only imagine the wealth of rough colors that comes from that fire that sparks the diamond’s lightness. It is extremely rare and very special in the world of diamonds to see unique yellow diamond like this,” said John King, GIA Chief Quality Officer.

The diamond is a part of “The Spectacle” unique diamonds collection, dedicated to the Russian ballet. There are two more diamonds in the collection, one of them is “Spirit of the Rose” 14.8 ct Fancy Vivid Purple-Pink stone. Another diamond will be announced later when cutting and polishing is finished.

The “Firebird” ballet was part of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes productions with music composed by Igor Stravinsky. The plot is based on the Russian fairytale of the Firebird, the blessing and curse it possesses for its owner.

The Firebird diamond was created from “Stravinsky,” a 34.17 ct rough, bearing rare honey-yellow overtones and incredible clarity. Discovered at the “Ebelyah” mine in Yakutia, it became the largest yellow rough diamond extracted in Russia in 2017.

Nat Geo WILD and Sun Valley Film Festival Launch Seventh Annual Wild to Inspire Short Film Contest to Celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day

Grand Prize Includes Festival Screening and Filmmaking Expedition Abroad

In partnership with the Sun Valley Film Festival, Nat Geo WILD announces the seventh annual Wild to Inspire short-film contest. This year, the contest is seeking short films inspired by the milestone 50th anniversary of Earth Day. National Geographic has a storied history of inspiring people to care about the planet and is now looking for films to help with this mission. Films should celebrate the natural world, inspire viewers to work toward a planet in balance in the 21st century and draw a connection to the Earth Day anniversary.

The grand-prize winner will receive a once-in-a-lifetime, all-expenses-paid excursion to one of the far corners of the globe to find out firsthand what it’s like to be a National Geographic filmmaker. Past winners have traveled to Africa and Peru.

U.S. residents are invited to submit a short film of three minutes or less using the submission platform Submittable™. Up to three finalists, announced in early March 2020, will receive an invitation to attend SVFF, which unites filmmakers and industry insiders from around the world, in Sun Valley, Idaho, March 18-22. At SVFF, the finalists will screen their films for festival attendees and before a panel of judges that includes Nat Geo WILD executives. The grand-prize winner will be announced at the festival’s closing ceremony.

National Geographic has always been at the forefront of storytelling excellence, having redefined the natural history genre throughout the decades,” says Chris Albert, EVP of global communications at National Geographic and Nat Geo WILD. “Which is why it’s so relevant to inspire the next generation of filmmakers who are eager to put our planet in the spotlight and encourage guardianship and sustainability through heightened awareness of our living, breathing and dynamic planet.

Since 2012, the Sun Valley Film Festival has invited fans and filmmakers to America’s first ski resort to celebrate the magic of storytelling. The year-round Sun Valley Film Initiative develops professionals and illuminates the process of filmmaking, propelling emerging voices with grants and education. Each March, SVFF celebrates with a slate of cutting-edge films and TV premieres, industry panels, engaging Coffee Talks with entertainment luminaries, a Screenwriters Lab led by award-winning writers and a series of parties culminating with the spectacular SVFF Awards Bash. The 2020 SVFF will be held March 18-22. SVFF is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. (Learn more at sunvalleyfilmfestival.org.)

Sun Valley is committed to bringing together the best and brightest in filmmaking while also celebrating the aspiring creators whose work deserves our attention,” says Teddy Grennan, executive director of the Sun Valley Film Festival. “Screening Wild to Inspire finalists during our annual festival is just one way this contest helps foster new talent.”

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Travel/Living Well: Auberge Resorts Collection To Bring Unique Character And Modern Luxury To The Heart Of Austin, Texas, With Commodore Perry Estate

Auberge Resorts Collection, a portfolio of award-winning hotels, resorts and residences, today announced that it plans a Spring 2020 opening for its first urban retreat in the dynamic destination of Austin, Texas. Commodore Perry Estate, Auberge Resorts Collection will be a modern interpretation of a residential estate from yesteryear, where guests are invited to sit back, celebrate and inspire thoughtful conversation. Designed by internationally known designer Ken Fulk, the resort will bring a new level of contemporary glamour, whimsical soul and effortless luxury representative of Austin’s uniqueness. The intimate 10-acre resort offers a uniquely Texas familiarity brimming with character, independent spirit and charm, boasting 42 rooms and 12 suites, and amenities including an organic urban farm, Lutie’s – the signature garden restaurant, a members club and a serene outdoor swimming pool.

Auberge Resorts Collection (PRNewsFoto/Auberge Resorts Collection)

It is with great pride that we welcome Commodore Perry Estate to the Auberge family. Bringing a combination of exquisite design, exceptional location and an authentically Austin experience, this one-of-a-kind Estate introduces a new level of style and distinctive luxury to the diverse city,” said Marco Bustamante, General Manager, Commodore Perry Estate. “We are delighted that Auberge Resorts Collection has been welcomed so warmly into the vibrant Austin community, and are excited to be a best-loved destination for events, weddings and celebration.”

Commodore Perry Estate, Auberge Resorts Collection

Built in the Jazz Age in 1928, Commodore Perry Estate was originally the country home of Commodore Edgar and Lutie Perry, a place for them to entertain and connect with family when they weren’t traveling through Europe. The 10,800-square-foot Italianate mansion was designed by Dallas architect Henry Bowers Thompson in 1927. Declaring the home, “a great place to throw a party,” Perry was popular for his Gatsby-esque soirées on property. In subsequent decades, Commodore Perry Estate went through many chapters, housing several schools and adding a chapel, and serving as the site of prominent weddings and important Austin events. Located just north of The University of Texas at Austin in the historic neighborhood of Hancock, Commodore Perry Estate is surrounded by expansive grounds, lush green English gardens, spring-fed Waller Creek and a stone wall enclosing the property to create an ideal setting for year-round getaways. The intimate chapel and gardens are the perfect backdrop for special events, weddings and private celebrations.

Commodore Perry Estate features signature imaginative elements from powerhouse designer Ken Fulk, known for projects such as San Francisco’s The Battery and Saint Joseph’s Arts Society, Legacy Records in New York’s Hudson Yards and notable private residential commissions. The layered aesthetic is part history, part imagination and all Austin. The imaginative interiors represent over two years of Fulk’s shopping excursions to Round Top Antiques Show, the Lone Star State’s haven for antiquing. Fulk has curated a mix of custom and heirloom vintage pieces creating an atmosphere that feels collected over time. Fulk worked in collaboration with renowned architecture firm Moule and Polyzoides and award-winning local Austin firms Clayton & Little and Ten Eyck Landscape Architects to restore Commodore Perry Estate to its former glory.

When I first saw Commodore Perry Estate, I was simply mesmerized. It was as if a European country estate had been transported to a bucolic Texas hill country landscape,” said Fulk. “We strived to craft experiences that combined a relaxed European elegance and  true gracious Texas hospitality with an ease and comfort to every experience that will welcome members and visitors to sit back and enjoy themselves.”

As the centerpiece of the property, the original Mansion instantly communicates an elevated, residential atmosphere. Guests will feel as though they’re arriving at the stately home of an old family friend. Handed keys upon arrival, guests will be invited to enjoy the Mansion as they would their own private estate. The five bedrooms from the Perry’s original residence have been transformed into uniquely charming hotel suites as a nod to its original inhabitants. Edgar Perry’s Suite, with its safari-inspired play of patterns, reflects a love of world travel and high culture, while Lutie Perry’s Suite presents a softer side in a palette of pink velvet, faux fur and muted leopard carpet. The downstairs Living Room boasts a new cocktail bar, and the sunny Solarium, with its original tile floors, is perfect for small bites or cocktails. The Dining Room and Breakfast Room are dedicated to informal dining experiences throughout the day. With a wide range of indoor and outdoor lounge options, including the Loggia and Terrace, members and resident members can enjoy a daily menu of Estate favorites and signature cocktails with prime seating for club programming, such as intimate concerts, lectures or tastings. Membership at The Commodore Perry Estate offers members and their guests’ exclusive access to the resort in addition to inspired, cultural programming, experiences and events.

The new private club at Commodore Perry Estate will draw membership from the diverse fabric of the ever-changing Austin community. Offering a stunning environment for locals to meet, dine, collaborate and nourish while cultivating community connection and building on the Estate’s history and traditions. The club also seeks to acknowledge and support exceptional local and national talent in the arts, fashion, culinary, wellness and finance realms to not only provide a rich and unique experience for members, but to also give back to the Austin community.

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Record Year For Watches At Sotheby’s

Highest Annual Total in the Company’s History Auction Sales Top $109 million *Up 22% on 2018*

Driven by Record Prices, including for An Independent Watchmaker and An English Watch $4.6m for George Daniels’ Legendary “Space Traveller I”

Landmark “Masterworks of Time” Collection Generates Enthusiasm among International Collectors

2019 In Figures

A Record Year

• Auction sales achieved an unprecedented $108.7m – up 22% on 2018 (153% on 2010)

• 44% of the lots realised prices over their high estimate • Average lot value: $49,000 (up 10% on last year) • 7 timepieces sold over $1m (16 over $500,000) • Record for an English watch & an independent watchmaker: $4.6m for George Daniels’ Space Traveller I

• Record year for private sales • More Sales – New Experiences: Record number of lots sold: 3,369 lots (24% more than last year) Cars & Watches: Auction highlights are exhibited alongside RM Sotheby’s flagship sales around the world

An Ever-Expanding Globalized Market

• 100 countries across the globe participated in our watch sales (17% more than last year)

• Half of the buyers had never taken part in watch auctions at Sotheby’s before

The Continued Growth of Online Sales

• 56% of the lots sold online, four times more than five years ago • 80% of the bidders participated online • 65% of the buyers placed their winning bids online (up 20% over last year)

• The proportion spent online has more than tripled in the past five years. This year, it was up 22% over 2018

IW501099 Big Pilot watch – Worn by Bradley Cooper at the 91st Academy Awards

• Top Watch sold online set an auction record for a Millennium wristwatch by George Daniels: a Millennium in yellow gold from 2000 sold for US$ 289,800 in Hong Kong in April.

Lot 2300 – George Daniels, Millennium, Yellow Gold Automatic Centre Seconds Wristwatch With Date 036

• Online-only Sales have doubled in value since 2018. Many of these were driven by innovative thematic and partner sales. For example in February, an IWC Big Pilot’s watch that was worn by Oscar nominee Bradley Cooper while attending and performing at the 91st Academy Awards ceremony, sold for $75,000. Proceeds went to the Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Youth Foundation.

HIGHLIGHTS

MASTERWORKS OF TIME – History in the Making

Pocket watches stole the show this year, with “Masterworks of Time”, one of the most important collections of timepieces remaining in private hands, setting many landmarks. With two additional auctions scheduled in 2020, the first wave of auctions has already brought $15.8 million, thereby surpassing the low estimate for the entire 800-watch strong collection (est. $15-27m). Two of the highest prices of the year were achieved in London in July:

George Daniels, London, The Space Traveller I, 1982

World record for a timepiece by an independent watchmaker and an English watch: George Daniels’ legendary “Space Traveller I”, rocketed to a sky-high $4.6m – over 30 times the price set by the watch 31 years ago (pictured left and on p.1). Conceived to honour the astronauts that the great watchmaker so admired, this is one of the most technically accomplished watches of all time. For further information, a post-sale release is available here.

George Daniels, London, The Space Traveller I, 1982 [Front View]

Record for a 17th-Century Watch: A masterpiece of enamel, Jehan Cremsdorff’s extraordinary gold, enamel and diamond-set verge watch, realized $2.7 million. When this watch last appeared at auction in 1986, it took collectors by storm, soaring to CHF 1.8 million ($998,336) – then the highest price for any pocket watch ever sold at auction.

Jehan Cremsdorff – Gold Enamel and diamond-set verge watch 1650
Jehan Cremsdorff – Gold Enamel and diamond-set verge watch 1650 (front)

PRIDE OF PLACE FOR PATEK PHILIPPE

A Reference 2499, first series made in 1951 realised US$ 1.5m

• A Skymoon Tourbillon Reference 5002 in pink gold, circa 2011 fetched US$ 1.4m

Lot 2356 – Patek Philippe, Reference 5002 Skymoon Tourbillon

• A Skymoon Tourbillon, reference 5002p-001 from 2006 fetched US$ 1.1m

Lot 184 – Patek Philippe reference 2497

• Record for a Reference 2497 in pink gold: a model from 1953 with a remarkable case by Emile Vichet achieved US$ 979,775

Lot 184 – Patek Philippe reference 2497

• Record for a Reference 5208: a reference 5208P-001 from circa 2014 made US$ 888,145

Lot 2328 – Patek Philippe Reference 5020

• Record for aReference 5020: a possibly unique platinum perpetual calendar chronograh made in 2008 achieved US$ 709,900

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Nat Geo Channel Is Bringing Back the Best of Its 2019 Programming for You to Binge Over the Holidays.

It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year! Catch up on all your NGC favorites from the past year, including The Hot Zone, Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted, Running Wild with Bear Grylls and more!

See why IndieWire named National Geographic one of the top five Best Television Platforms of 2019!

Don’t forget to plan movie night! Academy Award-winning documentary film Free Solo airs Dec. 26 at 9/8c.

Tune in for two full weeks of marathon programming beginning today.

That’s a wrap! National Geographic is saying goodbye to 2019 with some of your all-time favorite National Geographic Channel programs of the year. From the dangerously frigid Alaskan terrain to the 3,200-foot summit of El Capitan, explore breathtaking sights, heart-pounding adventure and groundbreaking science from wherever you’re spending the holidays. After a year of such amazing content, we won’t judge if you stay on the couch for the whole two weeks.

This year’s breadth of programming continued to break boundaries through thrilling exploration, risk-taking and transcendent storytelling. Highlights of the two-week blitz include the following:

  • To kick things off, Nat Geo is exploring new life and old legends with Expedition Amelia: Bob Ballard’s Search (Dec. 23 at 8 p.m.), on the search for renowned aviator Amelia Earhart’s remains, and episodes of Lost Cities with Albert Lin (Dec. 23 at 9 and 10 p.m.), as the National Geographic Explorer uncovers the greatest mysteries of ancient cities from El Dorado, to Stonehenge, to Petra!
  • You thought the cold weather was tough! Catch the animal kingdom’s most epic survival stories as Bear Grylls guides you through Hostile Planet (Dec. 24 at 11 a.m.), showcasing the world’s most extreme environments and the animals that have adapted to cruel evolutionary curveballs.
  • The year 2019 was a milestone one for the multi-Emmy-winning series Life Below Zero (Dec. 25 at 9 a.m.) as it celebrated its 100th episode. Meet some of the toughest individuals in the world as they attempt to survive in the most unforgiving and remote corners of America. After watching all day, tune in to a new special episode on Dec. 25 at 9 p.m.
  • Spend the holidays with some of Hollywood’s most beloved celebrities as they push physical and mental limitations on Running Wild with Bear Grylls (Dec. 26 at 9 a.m.). With guests including Brie Larson, Cara Delevingne, Armie Hammer, Channing Tatum, Bobby Bones and more, you won’t want to miss the chance to catch up on the boldest season yet.
  • Grab some popcorn (and your seats!) — don’t miss the Academy Award-winning documentary film Free Solo (Dec. 26 at 9 p.m.), as climber Alex Honnold sets out to achieve his lifelong dream: climbing the world’s most famous rock, 3,200-foot El Capitan in Yosemite National Park, without a rope.
  • Looking for some not family-related drama? Tune in to Nat Geo’s most-watched scripted series yet, The Hot Zone (Dec. 28 at 5 p.m.). An edge-of-your-seat thriller inspired by Richard Preston’s international bestseller, The Hot Zone recounts the appearance of Ebola on U.S. soil in 1989 and the courageous heroine who put her life at risk to stop this deadly killer. These episodes will include never-before-seen enhancements with real archival footage, scientific interviews and more, diving into the true story behind this lethal outbreak.
  • Forget your classic holiday libations! Gordon Ramsay serves up a taste of adventure in Gordon Ramsay: Uncharted (Dec. 29 at 9 a.m.) as he travels across the globe to learn about local flavors. His journey takes him to Peru’s Sacred Valley, Alaska’s panhandle, New Zealand’s rugged south, Morocco’s mountains, Hawaii’s Hana Coast and Laos’ Mekong River.

In addition to the marathons highlighted above, there’s even more. Don’t miss your chance to watch wildlife prosper in America’s National Parks (Dec. 24 at 5 p.m.) or explore the depths of the oceans with all kinds of sharks (When Sharks Attack beginning Dec. 30 at 9 a.m.) (yes, that rhyme was intentional). And better yet, see what’s in store for 2020 with a sneak peek of the reimagined Brain Games hosted by Keegan-Michael Key (Dec. 29 at 10 p.m.).

For more information on the two-week best of Nat Geo Channel marathon, visit www.natgeotv.com