Fifth Class Of The Andrew W. Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellows Announced By Six Major U.S. Museums

The Art Institute of Chicago, the High Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH), The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art are pleased to announce the 20192021 class of fellows designated for The Andrew W. Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellowship Program. The fellowship provides specialized training to students across the United States from historically underrepresented groups in the curatorial field and supports the goal of promoting inclusive, pluralistic museums. The students began their fellowships this fall. (More information about the need for a diverse educational pipeline into the curatorial field is available in the 2018 Art Museum Staff Demographic Survey.)

Fellows participate in The Andrew W. Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellowship Program during their undergraduate career, with the goal of continuing their education through graduate work. The two-year fellowship provides students with hands-on experience in a museum setting, assisting curators and staff on exhibitions, collections, and programs. Fellows are matched with a curatorial mentor at each museum who works to enrich the academic experience and to increase exposure to the museum context while broadening a fellow’s understanding of art and art history. Fellowships include regular engagement during the academic school year followed by full-time engagement over the summer.

Since the program began in 2014, 30 fellows have completed the Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellowship program. Two fellows have started the PhD program in art history at Harvard University, while nine others have completed Master’s degrees or are enrolled in graduate programs at the Courtauld Institute of Art; University of Chicago; University of Texas, Austin; University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies; Arizona State University; the Maryland Institute College of Art; the American University in Cairo; Cornell University; and the University of Southern California. Nearly half of the alumni are working in the arts either in staff positions or in other fellowship opportunities. 

The 2019-2021 Andrew W. Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellows:

Art Institute of Chicago: Iris Haastrup is a second-year student at Wellesley College double-majoring in art history and architecture. Haastrup is from the South Side of Chicago with familial ties to Mississippi and Nigeria. In her time at Wellesley, she is the lecture chair for the black student association, on the programming committee of the Davis Museum student advisory board, and a member of TZE arts and music society. Academically, Haastrup is interested in research regarding black women artists, the relationship between art and activism, equity in the arts, and the effects of sustainability in architecture. She is inspired by the works of Toni Morrison, Lorraine Hansberry, and Carrie Mae Weems. In her personal life, she enjoys making crafts and zines, skateboarding, and watching movies. For the 2019–20 academic year, Haastrup will be mentored by Constantine Petridis, Chair of the Department of the Arts of Africa and the Americas and Curator of African Art.

Kyndal Gragg is a third-year student at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) studying art history and urban planning. Gragg developed a passion for museums early in her academic career and believes that museums are like books in their storytelling capacity. Gragg is passionate about advocating for narratives from indigenous communities and the African diaspora so that they may be recognized for the longevity of their artistic contribution and seen as contemporary practitioners. Currently, Gragg is a collections assistant at UIUC’s Spurlock Museum and a research assistant for Krannert Art Museum where she researches and digitizes Andean materials for an upcoming reinstallation. Gragg is interested in supporting the collective history of the world and emphasizing a pluralistic appreciation for art. For the 2019–20 academic year, Gragg will be mentored by Andrew Hamilton, Associate Curator of Art of the Americas in the Department of the Arts of Africa and the Americas.

It’s an honor to once again have the support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in the ambitious work of developing our next generation of curatorial leaders. Our Mellon Fellows continue to bring fresh perspectives to the museum and we are excited to see participants from our first cohort embarking on graduate studies and beginning careers at cultural institutions across the country. We look forward to following their future accomplishments,” said James Rondeau, President and Eloise W. Martin Director at the Art Institute of Chicago.

The Art Institute of Chicago is a world-renowned art museum housing one of the largest permanent collections in the United States. An encyclopedic museum, the Art Institute collects, preserves, and displays works in every medium from all cultures and historical periods as well as hosts special exhibitions. With a collection of approximately 300,000 works of art, the museum has particularly strong holdings in Impressionist and Post-Impressionist painting, early 20th century European painting and sculpture, contemporary art, Japanese prints, and photography. The museum’s 2009 addition, the Modern Wing, features the latest in green museum technology and 264,000 square feet dedicated to modern and contemporary art, photography, architecture and design, and new learning and public engagement facilities. In addition to displaying its permanent collection, the Art Institute mounts approximately 35 special exhibitions per year and features lectures, gallery tours, and special performances on a daily basis. Location and Contact: 111 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, IL 60603 | 312 443-3600 | www.artic.edu

High Museum of Art: Destinee Filmore is a third-year student from Tampa, Florida studying art history and international studies at Spelman College. On campus, she is an active member and leader of several organizations, most notably, the Bonner Scholar Program, Social Justice Program, and Curatorial Studies Program. Filmore is interested in a wide range of research topics but is most intrigued by the impact made by African American artists on communities abroad during their voluntary or involuntary departures from the United States. Filmore intends to pursue a doctorate degree in art history following her time at Spelman and aspires to become a curator. She is also interested in advocating for the accessibility of arts-based education programs for low-income students and students of color as such programs were vital to her success. As a Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellow at the High Museum of Art, Filmore is receiving mentorship from Katherine Jentleson, Merrie and Dan Boone Curator of Folk and Self-Taught Art.

Adeja Sterling is a third-year student at Emory University studying art history in hopes of becoming a curator, art writer, and one day a museum director. Originally from New Orleans, Louisiana, but now residing in Atlanta, Georgia, Sterling has had a range of experiences in the Atlanta art scene, previously interning at ART PAPERS magazine, and with the Museum of Contemporary Art Georgia (MOCA GA). As a Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellow at the High Museum, Adeja will be mentored by Stephanie Heydt, Margaret and Terry Stent, Curator of American Art.

As we welcome a new class of Mellon Fellows to the High, we reflect on the remarkable impact this program has had on our institution, but also look forward to how it will continue to shape the future of the field,” said Rand Suffolk, Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr., director of the High Museum of Art. “Bringing diverse perspectives to museum leadership will help to ensure that our organizations remain relevant and essential in our communities. We are honored to continue this important work with the support of the Mellon Foundation.”

The High is the leading art museum in the southeastern United States, housed within facilities designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architects Richard Meier and Renzo Piano. With more than 16,000 works of art, the High Museum of Art has an extensive anthology of 19th- and 20th-century American fine and decorative arts; major holdings of photography and folk and self-taught work, especially that reflective of the American south; burgeoning collections of modern and contemporary art including paintings, sculpture, new media, and design; a growing collection of African art with work dating from pre-history to the present day; and significant holdings of European paintings and works on paper. The High is dedicated to a program reflective of the diversity of its communities, offering a variety of exhibitions and educational programs as well as a host of new experiences that engage visitors with the world of art, the lives of artists and the creative process. Location and Contact: 1280 Peachtree Street, N.E., Atlanta, GA 30309 | 404 733-4400 | www.high.org

Los Angeles County Museum of Art: Emily Le is a third-year student at the University of Southern California (USC), double majoring in art history and creative writing. Throughout her time at USC thus far, she has been working as a collections associate for the school’s Archaeology Lab and has also had the opportunity to co-curate an exhibit for the USC Fisher Museum, entitled Suppression, Subversion, and the Surreal: The Art of Czechoslovakian Resistance. As a first-generation college student and a child of Vietnamese immigrants, Le was not exposed to art, art history, or museums until later in life. Coming from this background, she wants to bring greater accessibility and diversity to the museum world, breaking down the idea of art as being a “cultural privilege.” Her curatorial mentor is Hollis Goodall, Curator of Japanese Art.

Jackeline Lopez is a third-year student majoring in anthropology with a focus in archaeology, as well as art history at the University of California, Los Angeles. Born and raised in South Central Los Angeles, she strives to apply anthropology to curatorial work and is particularly interested in the process of making exhibitions accessible to underrepresented communities. Her goal as an aspiring archaeologist and curator is to protect and preserve cultural patrimony, and to encourage cross-cultural connections. Lopez is currently involved in an archaeological project based in Portugal and recently completed her second field season there. Along with writing an honors thesis based on the project’s research, she plans to co-curate an exhibition with the site director to make their findings accessible to the local, rural community. Stephen Little, Florence & Harry Sloan Curator of Chinese Art and Department Head, Chinese, Korean, South and Southeast Asian Art, will be her curatorial mentor during her first year in the program.

We are pleased to welcome the incoming class of Mellon Undergraduate Curatorial Fellows,” said Michael Govan, LACMA CEO and Wallis Annenberg Director. “Now in its sixth year, we are beginning to see the potential long-term impact of this important fellowship, expanding the canon and the voices we hear from for generations to come.”

Located on the Pacific Rim, LACMA is the largest art museum in the western United States, with a collection of nearly 142,000 objects that illuminate 6,000 years of artistic expression across the globe. Committed to showcasing a multitude of art histories, LACMA exhibits and interprets works of art from new and unexpected points of view that are informed by the region’s rich cultural heritage and diverse population. LACMA’s spirit of experimentation is reflected in its work with artists, technologists, and thought leaders as well as in its regional, national, and global partnerships to share collections and programs, create pioneering initiatives, and engage new audiences. Location and Contact: 5905 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90036 | 323 857-6000 | www.lacma.org

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Award Winning Mixologist Julia Momose Shares How A Drizzle Of Honey Elevates Her Favorite Beverages

Drink and Be Merry with These Crowd-Pleasing Holiday Cocktails

The holiday season is known as the most wonderful time of the year, but sometimes entertaining can lead to more stress and mess than fun and festivities. A little organization and planning, such as having a well-stocked home bar and a few simple beverage recipes on hand, will help to take the pressure out of the season and keep gatherings merry and bright.

Master mixologist Julia Momose, owner and Bar Director of the celebrated Chicago bar Kumiko, knows a thing or two about creating crowd-pleasing cocktails and spirit-free beverages that are sure to delight family and friends during the holiday season. Momose believes that cocktail making should be fun, rather than intimidating, and that being prepared for holidays with a few basic bar ingredients, like honey, can set the stage for effortless holiday entertaining.

Momose favors the ease of honey to achieve well-balanced holiday beverages and has partnered with the National Honey Board to share how she incorporates it while entertaining at home and at Kumiko.

Julia Momose has been in the service industry for close to 15 years, starting her career as a student in Japan. When she moved to America for university, she continued to work in the service industry, training in all facets of hospitality. Currently she resides in Chicago, where she worked as the head bartender at GreenRiver Restaurant and Bar in Chicago. During her time there, GreenRiver was awarded its first Michelin star. In 2017, Momose partnered with the team at Oriole in Chicago to open a bar based on the philosophy of a thoughtful experience filled with deep appreciation and understanding of craftmanship. Momose’s newest venture is Kumiko, based on her Japanese heritage and a meticulous appreciation for details, located in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood. It offers a unique perspective on the notion of a bar, through a remarkable experience of dining and drinking. Time Magazine named Kumiko on its 2019 list of World’s Greatest Places and Bon Appetit included it as a nominee on its 2019 America’s Best New Restaurants List.

Momose favors the ease of honey to achieve well-balanced holiday beverages and has partnered with the National Honey Board to share how she incorporates it while entertaining at home and at Kumiko. Because the flavor of honey is affected by the floral source that the bees have foraged, there are more than 300 varietals of honey in the US alone. The nuanced flavors of different honey varietals not only add to its versatility, but also pair well with different spirits and are the secret to many of Momose’s favorite cocktail and spirit-free recipes.

From the lightness of a clover varietal to the richness of buckwheat, honey brings a wide range of flavors that complete any beverage,” said Momose. “Honey is in constant use at Kumiko, and at home too. This holiday season, I’ll be experimenting with honey varietals to create special drinks that will be sure to be crowd-pleasers at gatherings.”

To inspire stress-free cheer this holiday season, Momose is sharing some of her favorite honey-based beverages:

  • Mixing orange blossom honey with cold brew coffee and gin, Momose creates a Honey’d Coffee G&T. For a festive brunch bar, she recommends setting up several honey varietals with an assortment of single-origin cold brew coffees, gin, and tonic, and allowing guests to pick and choose their coffee and honey for a customized experience.
  • To create her own spin on a holiday season favorite, a hot toddy, Momose combines honey, chamomile and spices in a soothin Spiced Honey Toddy that is not only easy to make, but is also warm and soothing on a chilly Chicago night.
  • A hit with Momose’s family and friends during the festive season, The Berries and Bees combines honey, blackberries and whisky for a warming, uplifting cocktail that can be quickly made day or night.
  • The spirit-free Bright One with honey, yuzu juice and ginger beer creates a refreshing beverage that will ensure that you wake up feeling refreshed.

In addition to her recipes, Momose offers tips to easily create crowd-pleasing beverages during the holiday season and beyond:

  • Preparing the perfect cocktail is about balancing three critical elements: sweetness, fullness and flavor. While balancing sweet with bitter or sweet with acid is a critical element to drink making, so is finding ingredients that provide a pleasant texture and roundness.
  • Preparation is key, because you never know who may happen to drop by during the holidays. Having a well-stocked bar at home will ensure that you have the ingredients you need to create a well-balanced beverage. The must-haves for any bar include:
  1. Several varietals of honey – including wildflower, clover and blueberry – help to offset the intensity of the spirit and add flavor to the cocktail.
  2. Extra-credit liquor, like vermouth and orange liqueur, can be combined with mixers like sodas, tonic water and bitters to create a beverage that feels special.
  3. Fresh citrus, berries and herbs are easy to keep on hand and make great garnishes to put the finishing touch on a cocktail.
  • When making a spirit-free, it is all about layering flavors. Instead of using a traditional simple syrup made with granulated sugar, experiment with honey, which is naturally sweeter than sugar, and provides flavor and richness.

For more information about how Momose uses just a drizzle of honey in her favorite beverages, visit www.honey.com.

(PRNewsfoto/National Honey Board)

The National Honey Board (NHB) is an industry-funded agriculture promotion group that works to educate consumers about the benefits and uses for honey and honey products through research, marketing and promotional programs. The Board’s work, funded by an assessment on domestic and imported honey, is designed to increase the awareness and usage of honey by consumers, the foodservice industry and food manufacturers. The ten-member-Board, appointed by the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, represents producers (beekeepers), packers, importers and a marketing cooperative. For more information, visit www.honey.com.

“What Is Love?” Burberry Reveals Festive Holiday Campaign

Burberry‘s festive 2019 holiday campaign is out. To mark his first holiday campaign for the fashion house, Burberry Chief Creative Officer, Riccardo Tisci has assembled a cast of global talent to celebrate the notion of togetherness, union, hope and love.

Burberry Festive 2019 Holiday Collection. Courtesy of Burberry

The entire cast includes Alexis Chaparro, Arah Clarke, Ava Valentine, Blanket, Bodhi Horton, Boychild, Carla Bruni, Casper Chatfield, Cassius Varghese, Cecilia Chancellor, Christian Guzman, Dahely Nunez, Daisy Middleton, Elis Moaven, Fran Summers, Hector Polio, Howard Griffiths, Ikram Abdi Omar, Jacob Guerra, Jaeda Sherman, Jose Polio, Keith Summers, Kristians Jakovlevs, Lea T, Leissy De La Cruz, Louis Chatfield, Mahmood, Marina Morena, Noah Carlos, Noah Landes, Regina Limon Vega, Reia Zhing Cheong, Ruben Loftus-Cheek, Sasha Pivovarova, Shay, Valentin Bedford, Wu Tsang, Yoo Ah-in, Zhou Dongyu

Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott
Burberry Festive 2019 Holiday Collection. Courtesy of Burberry
Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

‘I am connected to the idea of unity, togetherness and challenging the perception of what love is today. This for me is the real spirit of the season. It’s one of my favorite times of the year – when I can stop, reflect and reconnect with those who make me feel happy and at home, no matter where I am in the world. I loved the idea of bringing together a group of people that have been so supportive of me since I joined Burberry to celebrate my first holiday campaign for the house,” states Riccardo Tisci, Burberry Chief Creative Officer.

Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott
Ikram Abdi Omar in Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

The campaign centres around a film of the cast dancing to the soundtrack of ‘What Is Love?‘ by Deee-Lite and is shot by renowned photography duo Mert Alas & Marcus Piggott.

Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

It was a real pleasure working on this project for Burberry. Working with Riccardo is about connection, it’s about the back and forth of discussing creative ideas and it’s this that makes our jobs even more interesting and exciting. We have been friends for many years so I guess we know each other’s sensibilities – there are always a lot of laughs!” says Mert and Alas. “My favourite Christmas memory is when we were preparing a Christmas dinner and the oven literally blew up! I burnt my lashes and of course we had no turkey. Disappointing, but it was a funny night!

And the cast itself seems to have had a fun and memorable time as well.

Carla Bruni (above) in Burberry Festive Campaign. Courtesy of Burberry. Photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott

CARLA BRUNI: “I love the concept of the campaign – this big group of different people coming together. I had a fabulous time with Riccardo and was thrilled to find myself behind the lens of Mert & Marcus again. On set, Riccardo gave me this feeling of freedom and modernity – his talent is beyond words. You can see that he has this profound and precious knowledge of fashion, and has this simplistic way of using the past to invent the future. My most precious festive memory is a Christmas Eve in a castle completely buried in snow in Touraine.

Burberry Festive 2019 Holiday Collection. Courtesy of Burberry
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Holiday Gift Guide: Skechers Premium Heritage Limited Edition Collection Returns with New Capsule of Styles in Time for Holiday

The Skechers Premium Heritage Limited Edition Holiday Collection is set to drop worldwide tomorrow, November 15. The five-pack offering, designed with luxurious materials on the Company’s most iconic outsoles, follows on the heels of the successful launch of the Premium Heritage One collection.

The Skechers Premium Heritage Limited Edition Holiday Collection drops around the world on November 15. (Photo: Business Wire)

In a world with fast trends and social media creating demand for the latest hot item, consumers want newness, freshness, and something that stands out and is available for a limited time,” said Michael Greenberg, president of Skechers. “That’s the foundation of our Skechers Premium Heritage concept. These are statement shoes with high-end materials and design details on signature Skechers outsoles. It’s a capsule that creates buzz with key opinion leaders.”

The new range expands on the first wave of Premium Heritage styles that launched in September. The Skechers Energy – Captains View updates the original chunky sneaker with red leopard print, tassels, blue overlays and an intricate rope collar. The Skechers D’Lites – Golden Idea delivers a subtle luxe look with soft black leather and gold chain detailing. And there are two looks on the Skechers D’Lites 3.0 – the Cheetah Queen delivers animal power with multi-colored cheetah print plus jeweled laces, and the Flashy Stud (available in both white and black colorways) runs with current logo trends with a massive rhinestone D’Lites embellishment over snakeskin detailing.

Skechers Logo

Skechers pioneered the chunky sneaker two decades ago with the Skechers Energy, and the look soon gained popularity around the globe thanks to the help of stars like Britney Spears who appeared in the style. The style evolved with the introduction of Skechers D’Lites – a lighter version of its original style – in 2007. Ten years later, Skechers D’Lites reemerged in Asia on the retro chunky sneaker trend, sparking a global movement that included models walking runways in New York, London, Milan, Berlin and other cities. Always remaining fresh and relevant, the classic look was updated with the more modernized chunkier Skechers D’Lites 3.0 collection and featured in numerous celebrated collaborations. The styles have appeared on fashion editorial pages globally, and covered by taste-making sites like HypeBae, HypeBeast and High Snobiety.

The new range of Skechers Premium Heritage Limited Edition styles launch November 15 exclusively at skechers.com and in select Skechers retail stores in the United States and around the globe as well as in select specialty retailers in international markets.

Mandarin Oriental Announces New Hotel and Residences in Dallas

Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group has announced that it will manage a luxury hotel in Dallas, Texas. The project, which will also feature branded residences, is scheduled to open in 2022.

The new development will comprise a 25-storey mixed-use tower located in the exclusive Turtle Creek neighbourhood. The project is within close proximity to the central business district and a number of cultural attractions including the Dallas Theatre Centre and Arts District.

We are delighted to announce a Mandarin Oriental property in this dynamic and sought-after Dallas neighbourhood, together with a premier residential project. We look forward to extending the Group’s presence into one of America’s most important business and leisure destinations,” said James Riley, Group Chief Executive of Mandarin Oriental. “Mandarin Oriental, Dallas and the Residences at Mandarin Orientalwill provide guests and owners with a range of luxurious amenities coupled with world-class service for which the Group is renowned,” he added.

Mandarin Oriental, Dallas will have 176 guestrooms and suites, four restaurants and bars including an all-day dining option, a lobby lounge, MO Bar and speciality restaurant. There will also be extensive meeting and function facilities and a spacious spa offering the Group’s award-winning signature wellness programmes. Other recreational facilities include a fitness centre and an outdoor swimming pool.

The tower will also house 100 luxuriousResidences at Mandarin Oriental located on the upper floors of the building, all with city or park views. These will be designed as some of the most exclusive homes in the city. Owners will enjoy Mandarin Oriental’s legendary service and direct access to the hotel’s facilities. In addition, there will be a range of private and bespoke resident amenities including an outdoor pool, club lounge and private gardens.

The owners and developers of the project are JMJ Development, LLC, a real estate company that engages in the development of real estate projects in the United States, Mexico and the United Arab Emirates.

We’re proud Mandarin Oriental is now part of our luxury portfolio,” said Timothy L. Barton, CEO of JMJ Development. “This development will be a welcome addition to the prestigious Turtle Creek neighbourhood and will set a new standard for luxury service in Dallas. It will offer a preferred choice to clientele who demand the finest accommodation.”

Whitney Museum Announces Recent Acquisitions, Including Works Acquired From 2019 Whitney Biennial

The Whitney Museum of American Art announced that it has acquired more than 250 works of art since last April. Among these acquisitions are 88 works by 40 artists who were featured in the 2019 Whitney Biennial.

John Edmonds, Tête d’Homme, 2018. Archival inkjet print. Sheet (sight): 23 5/8 × 29 9/16in. (60 × 75.1 cm) © John Edmonds. Purchase, with funds from the Henry Nias Foundation

Other recent acquisitions include works by artists who are joining the collection for the first time, including Laura Aguilar, John Ahearn, Maria Berrio, Jonathan Lyndon Chase, ektor garcia, Ajay Kurian, Wendy Red Star, Wallace & Donahue, and others.

Scott Rothkopf, Senior Deputy Director and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator commented: “Through the Biennial and our emerging artist program, the Whitney is committed to adding new voices to our collection, but we’re also deepening our relationships with artists already represented in it, with acquisitions of works by, among others, Alex Da Corte, Simone Leigh, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, and Hank Willis Thomas. We are particularly proud that our recent gifts and purchases highlight the museum’s increased scholarship on and engagement with Latinx and Indigenous artists.”

We are thrilled to be making many important acquisitions from the 2019 Whitney Biennial and to be continuing our long-standing tradition of expanding the collection through this flagship exhibition,” noted Jane Panetta, Curator and Director of the Collection, who was also a co-curator of the 2019 Whitney Biennial. “Additionally, we are very excited to be acquiring work that will be part of our upcoming collection presentation, Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019, featuring important examples by Shan Goshorn, Jordan Nassar and Elaine Reichek. In all instances, these new acquisitions point to the Whitney’s deep commitment to continuing to build an ambitious and inclusive collection and to the significant relationship between our exhibition program and the work we acquire.

Some highlights of works acquired from the Biennial include John Edmonds’s meticulously composed photographs which feature carefully choreographed subjects and settings to create portraits such as Tête d’Homme (2018) and The Villain (2018) that challenge the art historical canon while simultaneously interrogating and celebrating Black identity; Janiva Ellis’s canvas Uh Oh, Look Who Got Wet (2019) featuring a graphically rendered figure against the backdrop of a monumental landscape executed in brilliant colors with vivid attention to the materiality of paint; Kota Ezawa’s projected video animation National Anthem (2018) that utilizes repurposed footage of multiple NFL teams as the basis for small-scale watercolor paintings used to create this video depicting NFL players taking a knee during “The Star-Spangled Banner” in protest of police violence against unarmed Black men; Daniel Lind-Ramos’s Maria-Maria (2019), an assembled sculpture made of found materials whose haloed form, blue robes, and title suggest the Virgin Mary but also reference Hurricane Maria, the devastating 2017 storm that struck Puerto Rico; Jennifer Packer’s monumental, lush painting A Lesson in Longing (2019) featuring her signature, gestural figures and adept use of color; and Carissa Rodriguez’s high-definition video The Maid (2018) that tracks Sherrie Levine’s Newborn sculptures (1993–94) over the course of a day through various collections in homes, galleries, and museums.

The Whitney’s collection includes nearly 25,000 works created by approximately 3,500 artists during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This focus on the contemporary, along with a deep respect for artists’ creative process and vision, has guided the Museum’s collecting ever since its founding in 1930. The collection begins with Ashcan School painting and follows the major movements of the twentieth century in America, with strengths in modernism and Social Realism, Precisionism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop art, Minimalism, Postminimalism, art centered on identity and politics that came to the fore in the 1980s and 1990s, and contemporary work.

(View and download PDFs of recent acquisitions.)

The Whitney Museum of American Art is located at 99 Gansevoort Street between Washington and West Streets, New York City. Museum hours are: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday, and Sunday from 10:30 am to 6 pm; Friday from 10:30 am to 10 pm. Closed Tuesday except in July and August. Adults: $25. Full-time students, visitors 65 & over, and visitors with disabilities: $18. Visitors 18 years & under and Whitney members: FREE. Admission is pay-what-you-wish on Fridays, 7–10 pm. For general information, please call (212) 570-3600 or visit whitney.org.

TheMet150: “Making Marvels: Science and Splendor at the Courts of Europe”

Between 1550 and 1750, nearly every royal family in Europe assembled vast collections of exquisite and entertaining objects. Lavish public spending and the display of precious metals were important expressions of power, and possessing artistic and technological innovations conveyed status. In fact, advancements in art, science, and technology were often prominently showcased in elaborate court entertainments that were characteristic of the period. Opening November 25, Making Marvels: Science and Splendor at the Courts of Europe (November 25, 2019–March 1, 2020, The Met Fifth Avenue, Gallery 999, Iris and Gerald B. Cantor Exhibition Hall, Floor 2) will explore the complex ways in which the wondrous objects collected and displayed by early modern European monarchs expressed these rulers’ ability to govern. Making Marvels is organized by Wolfram Koeppe, the Marina Kellen French Curator in The Met’s Department of European Sculpture and Decorative Arts.

Gerhard Emmoser (German, active 1556–84). Celestial globe with clockwork, 1579. Partially gilded silver, gilded brass (case); brass, steel (movement). Overall: 10 3/4 × 8 × 7 1/2 in. (27.3 × 20.3 × 19.1 cm); Diameter of globe: 5 1/2 in. (14 cm). Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (17.190.636)

The exhibition will feature approximately 170 objects—including clocks, automata, furniture, scientific instruments, jewelry, paintings, sculptures, print media, and more—from The Met collection and more than 50 lenders. A number of these works have never been displayed in the United States. Among the many exceptional loans will be silver furniture from the Esterházy Treasury; the largest flawless natural green diamond in the world, weighing 41 carats and in its original 18th-century setting; the alchemistic table bell of Emperor Rudolf II; a large wire-drawing bench made for Elector Augustus of Saxony; a rare example of an early equation clock by Jost Bürgi; and a reconstruction of a late 18th-century semi-automaton chess player, known as “The Turk,” that once famously caught Napoleon Bonaparte cheating.

Max Hollein, Director of The Met, commented: “On a regular basis, news about the latest technological devices and their astonishing capabilities both fascinates and delights us. These familiar feelings echo those of princely patrons in centuries past who desired to possess and display the most marvelous artistic creations and inventions, made of the most precious and unusual materials and incorporating the newest scientific information.

Making Marvels is the first exhibition in North America to highlight the important conjunction of art, science, and technology with entertainment and display that was essential to court culture. The exhibition will be divided into four sections dedicated to the main object types featured in these displays: precious metalwork, Kunstkammer objects, princely tools, and self-moving clockworks or automata. (Kunstkammer is the term used in German-speaking provinces to describe these collections.)

In order to emphasize the scientific and technological content of these objects, the exhibition will begin by establishing the high level of material value and artisanal quality that princes had to meet in these displays of wealth and power. Visitors will encounter a set of superbly fashioned silver furniture that was considered the ultimate symbol of power, status, and wealth during the early modern period. The second section will be dedicated to the unusual objects of the Kunstkammer. These items were typically composed of newly discovered natural materials set in finely crafted mounts of silver or gold, whose highly inventive designs often embodied the most up-to-date knowledge of the natural world. Reflective of the multi-layered objects they housed, the Kunstkammer functioned simultaneously as places of amusement, research retreats for the investigation of nature, and political showcases for magnificence.

Knowledge of subjects such as natural philosophy, artisanal craftsmanship, and technology was considered tantamount to the practical wisdom, self-mastery, and moral virtue integral to successful governance. Pursuits such as metalsmithing, surveying, horology, astronomy, and turning at the lathe were part of the education and entertainment of princes in courts across Europe. The exhibition’s third section will present the scientific instruments, artisanal tools, and experimental apparatus used by rulers as they developed the technical skills so important to their princely identity.

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