The Museum Of Modern Art Presents First US Retrospective In 30 Years Dedicated To Donald Judd, Opening In March 2020

The Museum of Modern Art’s exhibition Donald Judd, to go on view in The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Center for Special Exhibitions in The David and Peggy Rockefeller Building from March 1 through July 11, 2020, will be the first major US retrospective dedicated to Donald Judd (1928–1994) in over three decades. Presented solely at MoMA, the exhibition will explore the remarkable vision of an artist who revolutionized the history of sculpture, highlighting the full scope of Judd’s career through some 60 works in sculpture, painting, and drawing, from public and private collections in the US and abroad. Donald Judd is organized by Ann Temkin, The Marie-Josée and Henry Kravis Chief Curator of Painting and Sculpture, and Yasmil Raymond, Associate Curator, with Tamar Margalit, Curatorial Assistant, and Erica Cooke, Research Fellow, Department of Painting and Sculpture, MoMA.

Donald Judd. Untitled. 1967. Lacquer on galvanized iron; 12 units, each 9 × 40 × 31″ (22.8 × 101.6 × 78.7 cm), installed vertically with 9″ (22.8 cm) intervals. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Helen Acheson Bequest (by exchange) and gift of Joseph Helman. © 2019 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: John Wronn

Donald Judd was among a generation of artists in the 1960s who sought to entirely do away with illusion, narrative, and metaphorical content. He turned to three dimensions as well as industrial working methods and materials in order to investigate “real space,” by his definition. Donald Judd will survey the evolution of Judd’s work, beginning with his paintings, reliefs, and handmade objects from the early 1960s; through the years in which he built an iconic vocabulary of works in three dimensions, including hollow boxes, stacks, and progressions made with metals and plastics by commercial fabricators; and continuing through his extensive engagement with color during the last decade of his life.

Half a century after Judd established himself as a leading figure of his time, there remains a great deal to discover,” said Temkin. “MoMA’s presentation will emphasize the radicality of his approach to art-making and the visual complexity of his work.”

Donald Judd. Untitled. 1991. Enameled aluminum, 59″ × 24′ 7 1/4″ × 65″ (150 × 750 × 165 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Bequest of Richard S. Zeisler and gift of Abby Aldrich Rockefeller (both by exchange) and gift of Kathy Fuld, Agnes Gund, Patricia Cisneros, Doris Fisher, Mimi Haas, Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis, and Emily Spiegel. © 2019 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: John Wronn

We want to commend the leadership of MoMA, Ann Temkin, and her team for their in-depth research and their substantial commitment towards this significant exhibition. Don’s work remains as vital today as it was when he created it. We appreciate MoMA providing the opportunity for a new generation to engage with his work in New York,” said Rainer Judd, President, Judd Foundation.

Donald Judd. Untitled. 1966/68. Stainless steel and Plexiglas in six parts, 34 × 34 × 34″ (86.36 × 86.36 × 86.36 cm). Layton Art Collection Inc., Purchase, at the Milwaukee Art Museum. © 2019 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: John R. Glembin

The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. The essays included in the catalogue will examine subjects fundamental to Judd’s work and thinking, including methods of fabrication, his early paintings and sketchbooks, his relationship with museums, his interest in site-specific work, and his activities in the realms of design and architecture.

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Leadership support is provided by the Henry Luce Foundation.

Pottery Barn Introduces Mix-And-Match Textiles Collection With Fashion Designers Emily Current And Meritt Elliott

Pottery Barn has launched a new collection of textiles and bedding essentials with revered stylists and fashion designers, Emily Current and Meritt Elliott of Current/Elliott. Inspired by their ready-to-wear collection, THE GREAT, the new Emily & Meritt for Pottery Barn assortment celebrates personal style and embodies the spirit of creative fearlessness that is synonymous with the LA-based designers.

Emily Current and Meritt Elliott, a creative team since 1999, are the celebrated Los Angeles-based duo known for their whimsical and timeless sensibility that recalls classic Americana. Drawn to one another’s innate sense of style, Emily and Meritt first met in college and quickly realized the fresh and fearless aesthetic they share – an affinity for individuality, dressing without rules and mixing high and low with confidence and flair.

In Spring 2012, the twosome joined an elite rank of designers when they became members of the prestigious Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA). In a visual ode to their varied career, encapsulating their love affair with denim and imaginative worldview, Emily and Meritt penned A Denim Story: Inspirations from Bell-bottoms to Boyfriends, a coffee table book published by Rizzoli in Spring 2014. In Spring 2015, Emily and Meritt launched their much anticipated, multi-category women’s collection, aptly named THE GREAT. Whether they’re designing a collection, creating memorable outfits for clients, styling unforgettable editorial spreads and advertising campaigns, appearing as fashion experts, or consulting for companies inspired by their distinct world-view, Emily and Meritt always bring a playful, intelligent spirit to whatever they touch

Emily and Meritt exclusively for Pottery Barn (Photo: Business Wire)

True to Emily and Meritt’s casual and nostalgic Americana aesthetic, the latest chapter in their Pottery Barn partnership features washed garment-dyed fabrics in fall color palettes and chic prints that inspire endless combinations and create an effortless, lived-in collection for both bath and bedroom. From the warm solids in hues of army green, spice and indigo, the pops of bright marigold and soft vintage blush to the playful yet subtle star, stripe and dot patterns, the new Fall collection gives Pottery Barn customers yet another way to embrace and express their unique style within the home.

We’re thrilled to introduce the newest collection in our partnership with Pottery Barn — a range of sheets, duvets, quilts and towels in washed garment-dyed colors and special prints made for layering, mixing, and matching,” said Emily Current and Meritt Elliot. “We wanted to capture the look and feel of a well-loved fabric and designed this collection for the person who treasures effortless personal style.”

Emily and Meritt have a playful yet chic aesthetic that translates beautifully into approachable designs for the home,” said Monica Bhargava, Executive Vice President of Product Development and Design, Pottery Barn. “This collection of garment-dyed textiles evokes a sense of comfort and self-expression and allows the Pottery Barn customer to add cozy layers to their space just in time for fall.

The new Emily & Meritt for Pottery Barn collection is now available online at PotteryBarn.com and in select Pottery Barn stores. To learn more about the line, visit www.potterybarn.com/emilyandmeritt and join the conversation on social media with @potterybarn #EandMxPB.

The Whitney To Present A Performance Series In Conjunction With Jason Moran

The Whitney Museum of American Art has announced a series of live performances and activations presented in conjunction with the exhibition Jason Moran. Featuring both renowned and emerging artists and ensembles, the series is curated by interdisciplinary artist Jason Moran (b. 1975) and Adrienne Edwards, the Whitney’s Engell Speyer Family Curator and Curator of Performance. Moran’s eponymous solo museum exhibition, organized by the Walker Art Center, opens at the Whitney on September 20, 2019. Performances and activations include the Jazz on a High Floor in the Afternoon series, as well as two marquee events showcasing Moran in collaboration with artist Kara Walker, and three concerts with his long-running trio The Bandwagon, featuring bassist Tarus Mateen and drummer Nasheet Waits. Advance tickets for select events are available at whitney.org.

Image credit: Jason Moran, STAGED: Slug’s Saloon, 2018 © Jason Moran; Courtesy of the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York. Photograph by Farzad Owrang

The performance program commences with Jazz on a High Floor in the Afternoon. Cross-enerational artists activate Moran’s three mixed-media “set sculptures” —STAGED: Savoy Ballroom 1 (2015), STAGED: Three Deuces (2015), and STAGED: Slugs’ Saloon (2018). Each installation pays homage to an iconic New York jazz venue. Eighty-two-year-old jazz saxophone legend Archie Shepp will be joined by Moran for an intimate in-gallery performance to launch the series on September 27 at 7 pm. Joanne Brackeen, Oliver Lake, Michela Marino Lerman’s Love Movement, Cecil McBee, Onyx Collective, Tiger Trio, Fay Victor, and Jamire Williams will also perform within the installations as part of the series.

The artist David Hammons once said to me during a dinner party: ‘Jazz should happen on a high floor…in the afternoon,’” explained Moran. “Hammons’s statement goes against the late-night, smoky basement, dimly lit, jam session club scene. These sessions, minus the smoke, happen every night here in New York. During the exhibition, musicians will come to perform on a high floor, with an understanding of the basement.

Taking jazz outside for a free outdoor event on the Museum’s largo on October 12, Moran joins artist Kara Walker for the New York debut of Katastwóf Karavan (2018), a steam-powered calliope housed in a parade wagon that will be installed and activated outside the Museum for a one-day-only presentation. Featuring the steam whistle typical of a calliope, the custom-fabricated instrument is programmed by Walker with a compilation of jazz, gospel, and songs that, in Walker’s words, represent both “Black protest and celebration.” During the Whitney activation, the calliope will play at set times throughout the afternoon on the Museum’s outdoor largo. Moran will play the calliope live at sunset.

Walker created Katastwóf Karavan for the Prospect.4 Triennial in New Orleans as a site-specific commission that debuted in 2018. Drawing on the calliope’s associations with nineteenth-century New Orleans riverboats, as well as the steam engine and other Industrial Revolution-era inventions like the cotton gin, the work’s layered references reveal connections between the history of the city’s cultural landscape and slavery in the American South. Walker conceived the caravan, with her signature silhouette imagery, in response to the inadequacy of a memorial plaque at Algiers Point, identifying a former holding site on the Mississippi where enslaved Africans were abused and quarantined before transportation to slave markets across the river. Titled to incorporate the Haitian Creole word that in English translates to “catastrophe,” Katastwóf Karavan interrogates the way in which these dehumanizing and violent experiences have been historicized and underexamined. Through collaboration between image and sound, Walker and Moran create an alternative register—with “music as bearer of our emotional history,” as Walker describes—for those catastrophic forces that have shaped culture into the present.

From December 19 to 21, The Bandwagon—pianist Jason Moran, bassist Tarus Mateen, and drummer Nasheet Waits—performs a twenty-year history with music, stories, and images. The piano trio is a mainstay in the jazz tradition; trios led by Ahmad Jamal and Bill Evans have defined a style that has continued to evolve. When the Bandwagon emerged in the late ‘90s, the group quickly found language that sounded fluid and miscalculated. This would become their signature sound, which led to a groundbreaking movement as much dedicated to the past as to—more importantly—its conceptual futures.

Moran, Mateen, and Waits first began performing together in 1998 as the rhythm section of the band New Directions (named after legendary jazz drummer Jack DeJohnette’s 1978 album). In late 1999, after the New Directions group disbanded, Moran, who had recently signed to Blue Note Records, began touring with Mateen and Waits, billed as the Jason Moran Trio. Soon after, they began referring to themselves as The Bandwagon. In 2000, Moran released Facing Left with The Bandwagon, the first of more than six albums featuring the ensemble.

All events are presented in conjunction with the exhibition Jason Moran, which includes the range of art Moran has explored, from his own sculptures and drawings to collaborations with visual artists to performance and video. Filling the Whitney’s eighth floor galleries, the exhibition is overseen at the Whitney by Adrienne Edwards, the Engell Speyer Family Curator and Curator of Performance, with Clémence White, curatorial assistant. Edwards originated the exhibition at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in 2018.

Jason Moran Performances: Schedule and Ticketing Details

Curated by celebrated jazz pianist, composer, and visual artist Jason Moran and Whitney performance curator Adrienne Edwards, the series features live in-gallery performances, activations, and evening concerts presented in conjunction with Moran’s first solo museum exhibition on view at the Whitney from September 20, 2019 through January 5, 2020. For complete ticket information and schedule, please visit whitney.org.

Jazz on a High Floor in the Afternoon

Tickets are required ($25 adults; $18 members, students, seniors, and visitors with a disability) for Friday and Saturday afternoon Jazz on a High Floor in the Afternoon performances and include Museum admission. Tickets for performances during Pay-What-You-Wish hours (Fridays, 7–10 pm) will be distributed day–of, on a first come first served basis at the Museum starting at 7 pm.

  • Archie Shepp with Jason Moran, Friday, September 27, 7 pm, Gallery, Floor 8
  • Archie Shepp with Lafayette Harris & Avery Sharpe, Saturday, September 28, 4 pm, Gallery, Floor 8
  • Fay Victor with Anthony Coleman, Ratzo Harris, and Tom Rainey, Friday, October 18, 5 and 7 pm, Gallery, Floor 8
  • Fay Victor with Darius Jones and Christopher Hoffman, Saturday, October 19, 2 and 4 pm, Gallery, Floor 8
  • Oliver Lake
  • Friday, October 25, 7 pm
  • Saturday, October 26, 4 pm, Gallery, Floor 8

Onyx Collective

  • Friday, November 1, 5 and 7 pm
  • Saturday, November 2, 2 and 4 pm
  • Gallery, Floor 8

Jamire Williams

  • Friday, November 8, 5 and 7 pm
  • Saturday, November 9, 2 and 4 pm
  • Gallery, Floor 8

Cecil McBee

  • Friday, November 15, 7 pm
  • Saturday, November 16, 4 pm
  • Gallery, Floor 8

Joanne Brackeen

  • Friday, November 22, 5 and 7 pm
  • Saturday, November 23, 2 and 4 pm
  • Gallery, Floor 8

Michela Marino Lerman Love’s Movement

  • Friday, December 6, 5 and 7 pm
  • Saturday, December 7, 2 and 4 pm
  • Gallery, Floor 8

Tiger Trio

  • Friday, January 3, 5 and 7 pm
  • Saturday, January 4, 2 and 4 pm
  • Gallery, Floor 8

Kara Walker and Jason Moran: Katastwóf Karavan

  • Saturday, October 12, 1–6:30 pm
  • Largo, Outdoors
  • This event is free.

The Bandwagon at 20

  • Thursday, December 19, 8 pm
  • Friday, December 20, 8 pm
  • Saturday, December 21, 8 pm
  • Susan and John Hess Family Theater, Floor 3
  • Tickets are required ($25).

Order And Ornament: Roy Lichtenstein’s Entablatures To Provide Focused Examination Of Artist’s Process

Opening September 27 at The Whitney, Order and Ornament: Roy Lichtenstein’s Entablatures will present a concentrated selection of fifteen works on paper related to the artist’s Entablatures Series, as well as a display of preparatory materials. The first exhibition at the Whitney devoted to the artist since the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation’s transformative gift of the Roy Lichtenstein Study Collection, this focused look at a single pivotal series illustrates how the gift allows the Museum to examine the artist’s work in new ways.

An agreement between the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation and the Whitney established The Roy Lichtenstein Study Collection, initiated with a promised gift from the Foundation of over 400 examples of Lichtenstein’s work in all media and from all periods of his working career, from the early 1940s to the artist’s death in 1997. The collection comprises paintings, sculptures, prints, photographs, drawings, tracings, collages, and maquettes by the artist, as well as studio materials selected to represent Lichtenstein’s artistic practice and process. The Foundation’s planned gifts to other institutions in addition to the Whitney will encourage collaborations between the Museum and a host of other institutions throughout the country and internationally.

Order and Ornament: Roy Lichtenstein’s Entablatures, organized by David Crane, curatorial fellow, will be on view in the Susan and John Hess Family Gallery on the Museum’s third floor.

Roy Lichtenstein (1923–1997), Entablature VIII, 1976. Embossed screenprint and collage: sheet, 29 1/8 × 44 7/8 in. (74 × 114 cm); image, 21 13/16 × 38 in. (55.4 × 96.5 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; The Roy Lichtenstein Study Collection, gift of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation 2019.141. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Order and Ornament highlights Lichtenstein’s inventive processes and techniques across drawings, collages, prints, photographs, and archival materials, including one of the artist’s sketchbooks. The works included in the capsule presentation range from never-before-exhibited photographic studies that initiated the Entablatures series in the early 1970s to the technically complex prints that form its culmination in 1976. Inspired by the architectural facades and ornamental motifs the artist encountered around Wall Street and elsewhere in Lower Manhattan, the works in the exhibition address many of Lichtenstein’s central artistic themes while demonstrating a unique emphasis on texture, surface, relief, and reflectivity.

Named for the horizontal structures that rest atop the columns in Classical Greek architecture, Lichtenstein’s Entablatures Series represents a distinctly American derivative, one based in revivalist, industrialized imitations that were built en masse in the early twentieth century. By isolating these, Lichtenstein traces the effect of mass production and replication on cultural forms, much as he had done in his earlier Pop paintings of comics and consumer goods. A sustained investigation into pattern and repetition, the Entablatures series also underscores the echoes of Classical order embedded within the contemporaneous serial structures of Minimal sculpture and Color Field painting.

The Entablatures series is an incredibly rich body of work, representing a high watermark for material experimentation in Lichtenstein’s career. Multilayered in its formal and conceptual references, the series offers an incisive and drily ironic look at the intersection of contemporary art, Classical and modern architecture, and hackneyed emblems of, in the artist’s words, ‘the establishment,’” said Crane.

The Whitney Museum of American Art To Present Jason Moran This September

The first solo museum show of Jason Moran (b. 1975, Houston, Texas), the interdisciplinary artist who grounds his work in music composition, will make its New York debut at the Whitney September 20, 2019. Jason Moran, which originated at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in the spring of 2018, presents the range of art Moran has explored, from his own sculptures and drawings to collaborations with visual artists to performance and video.

Jason Moran, STAGED: Slug’s Saloon

An immersive installation will fill the Whitney’s eighth floor galleries from September 20, 2019 through January 5, 2020. The exhibition will be activated by in-gallery musical performances by the artist himself and by other musicians throughout the run of the show. Two marquee events unique to the Whitney’s presentation will include the New York premiere of Kara Walker’s Katastwóf Karavan (2018), a steam-powered calliope housed in a parade wagon, and a special twentieth anniversary concert for Moran’s trio, The Bandwagon.

Jason Moran is overseen at the Whitney by Adrienne Edwards, the Engell Speyer Family Curator and Curator of Performance, who originated the show at the Walker.

A renowned musician and composer known for jazz styles from stride piano to free improvisation, Moran’s experimental approach to artmaking aligns objects with sound in an effort to underscore their inherent theatricality. Whether executed through the medium of sculpture, drawing, or sound, his works bridge the visual and performing arts. In all aspects, Moran’s creative process is informed by one of the essential tenets of jazz music: the “set,” in which musicians come together to engage in a collaborative process of improvisation, riffing off of one another to create the musical experience.

Jason Moran is one of the most vital and boundary-breaking creative voices of our time, and his wide-ranging collaborations with other visual and performing artists have had a profoundly generative effect on their work as well as on his own artistic development,” remarked Scott Rothkopf, the Whitney’s Senior Deputy Director and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator. “This exhibition extends the Whitney’s long and vibrant history of presenting artists who traverse the boundaries of the visual and performing arts and brings together so many artists who are dear to the Museum. We’re thrilled the show marks Adrienne Edwards’s curatorial debut in our galleries and also Jason’s return to the Whitney, following his appearances in Glenn Ligon: AMERICA in 2011 and our Biennial the following year.”

Jazz pianist, composer, and performance artist Jason Moran was born in Houston, Texas in 1975 and earned a degree from the Manhattan School of Music in 1997, where he studied with Jaki Byard. He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2010 and has been the Artistic Director for Jazz at the Kennedy Center since 2014. Deeply invested in reassessing and complicating the relationship between music and language, Moran’s extensive efforts in composition, improvisation, and performance challenge the status quo while respecting the accomplishments of his predecessors.

It is heartening to have the national tour of Jason’s exhibition culminate in New York City, where he and so many of his collaborators live and make their work. New York is where jazz has evolved, and the venues that fostered it are referenced directly in the major sculptures that serve as stages within the show,” noted Edwards. “Presenting the exhibition at the Whitney makes for a double ‘homecoming,’ since Jason and his collaborators have long-standing histories with the Museum, having exhibited here or featuring in our collection. Taking its cue from Jason’s art and that of his collaborators, this show questions the boundaries between artistic disciplines and how they are presented. It is a solo show that is also a group show; it takes place in neither a white cube nor a black box theater or nightclub, but rather in an in-between space that is some combination of them all. It is a survey exhibition, yet holds together like a singular art installation—at times a visual art show and at other times a performance venue.

Jason Moran, which originated at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis in the spring of 2018, and has traveled nationally to the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston and the Wexner Center for the Arts, considers the artist’s solo and collaborative works as generative investigations that further the fields of experimental jazz, performance, and visual art. Shown together for the first time in this exhibition, Moran’s mixed-media “set” installations STAGED: Savoy Ballroom 1 (2015), STAGED: Three Deuces (2015), and STAGED: Slugs’ Saloon (2018) pay homage to iconic jazz venues of New York’s past. Collaboration has been central to Moran’s experiments, and among the many artists with whom he has collaborated are Stan Douglas, Lizzie Fitch and Ryan Trecartin, Theaster Gates, Joan Jonas, Glenn Ligon, Julie Mehretu, Adam Pendleton, Lorna Simpson, and Carrie Mae Weems. These collaborative works are exhibited here, many in a synchronized loop arranged by Moran on projection screens. Moran’s original musical scores and a recent selection of his charcoal drawings from the ongoing Run series, which give sculptural presence to sound, are also featured in the exhibition.

STAGED

Sculptural vignettes based on storied New York City music venues, Moran’s STAGED works reimagine the architecture of these cultural landmarks and double as concert stages. STAGED: Savoy Ballroom 1 and STAGED: Three Deuces were part of Moran’s contributions to the 2015 Venice Biennale international exhibition All the World’s Future, curated by Okwui Enwezor. The latest sculpture from the series, STAGED: Slugs’ Saloon (2018), was commissioned for this exhibition by the Walker Art Center. Each is integrally connected to the social history and real politics of the venues for which they are named—important sites of invention and innovation in jazz that were also testing grounds of American policies of nondiscrimination at the height of the Jim Crow period of segregation.

The legendary Savoy Ballroom, which operated between 1926 and 1958 on Lenox Avenue in Harlem, was synonymous with the Swing Era and presented legendary big bands and performers, including Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Cab Calloway, Chick Webb, and Count Basie. Moran’s STAGED: Savoy Ballroom 1 is lined with an ornate Dutch wax print fabric and features a lush curving wall and overhanging ceiling. The sculpture’s pristine veneer seems counter to the repetitive and droning prison work songs that emanate from speakers. Midtown Manhattan’s Three Deuces club, which operated on 52nd Street from the mid-1940s to 1950s, was an incubator for bebop pioneers like Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, and Max Roach. To evoke this seminal venue with STAGED: Three Deuces, Moran uses pale vinyl padding compressed under a barely eight-foot-tall ceiling and focuses on the corner of a room to conjure the compressed dimensions of the original venue.

Similarly, STAGED: Slugs’ Saloon pays homage to the celebrated East Village jazz venue that presented music from 1964 to 1972 on East Third Street. Often referred to as a “jazz dive”, Slugs’ Saloon showcased free jazz and some of the most important avant-gardists of the era, including Albert Ayler, Ornette Coleman, Cecil Taylor, and Sun Ra. While the original space was described as narrow and oftentimes tightly packed, Moran’s Slugs’ Saloon is open with two mirrors flanking the stage and a multitier platform with a wooden floor that holds a vintage upright piano and drum set. The lower level holds a single chair and Wurlitzer Americana II jukebox, programmed with whistling tunes and samplings of audience incantations from the Village Vanguard.

RUN

Moran’s drawings from the Run series, originally shown at Luhring Augustine in 2016 for his first gallery exhibition, offer highly gestural entrees into the artist’s process. To create the works, Moran tapes elongated pieces of paper on the keys of a piano or keyboard and caps his fingers with charcoal. The paper then catches the movements of his playing. Reminiscent of Robert Morris’s series of Blind Time drawings, the works also bring to mind David Hammons’s basketball drawings and body prints or the impromptu drawings created by Joan Jonas during live performances. Achieved through acts of repetition, the Run series reveals the usually private and deliberate process of jazz composition and the artist’s performance practice, offering viewers an intimate view of his body’s movements in relation to the piano.

COLLABORATIONS

Projects and collaborations, central to Moran’s practice, are represented in the exhibition through the presentation of the artist’s work with leading visual artists. Since 2005, Moran has completed four collaborations with pioneering video performance artist Joan Jonas, and the evolution of much of Moran’s visual work, such as his extension of performance techniques to the process of drawing in the Run series or his transposition of traditional cultural forms into contemporary art, can be tracked through his work with Jonas. Moran first collaborated with Jonas on the music for The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things, an opera performed for the first time in 2005 at Dia: Beacon, and later on Reading Dante (2007–10), Reanimation (2012), and They Come to Us without a Word II (2015). For his first foray into filmmaking, artist Glenn Ligon tapped Moran to compose the score for Death of Tom (2008), an abstract re-creation of a scene from Edwin S. Porter’s fourteen-minute silent film version of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. In Stan Douglas’s six-hour, single-channel film Luanda-Kinshasa (2013) depicting a fictional jazz-funk band in a recording session sometime in the mid-1970s, Moran appears as the band leader and worked with Douglas on song sequencing for this intricately composed film.

Exclusive to the presentation of Jason Moran at the Whitney will be the temporary installation of Kara Walker’s Katastwóf Karavan (2018) outside in front of the Museum. A steam-powered calliope housed in a parade wagon featuring silhouetted scenes on all four sides in Walker’s distinctive style, Katastwóf Karavan debuted in 2018 at the Prospect.4 Triennial in New Orleans. Katastwóf Karavan takes its title from the Haitian Creole phrase for “caravan of catastrophe” and alludes to the subjugation, violence, and humiliation of life for African Americans in the Antebellum South. The work also plays songs and sounds programmed by Walker and Moran that the artists associate with the long history of African American protest music. In the Prospect.4 Triennial, Moran played the work live via keyboard for two improvised performances. Moran will present another improvised performance with the work at the Whitney in October 2019.

Moran’s recording and performing activity has included collaborations with masters of the jazz form, including Charles Lloyd, Bill Frisell, and the late Sam Rivers. His work with his acclaimed trio The Bandwagon (with drummer Nasheet Waits and bassist Tarus Mateen) has resulted in a profound discography for Blue Note Records. Moran has a long-standing collaborative practice with his wife, the mezzo-soprano and composer Alicia Hall Moran. For the 2012 Whitney Biennial, together they organized BLEED, a five-day performance gathering that featured more than ninety performers, including Rashida Bumbray, Bill Frisell, Joan Jonas, Lorraine O’Grady, Esperanza Spalding, and Kara Walker. In 2016, Moran and Hall Moran formed the indie label YES RECORDS. Releases include Moran’s critically-acclaimed live solo piano recording, The Armory Concert (2016), as well as Thanksgiving at the Vanguard (2017), and BANGS (2017). Moran, who teaches at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston, has produced several film scores and soundtracks, including the scores for Ava DuVernay’s films Selma and 13th.

Moran’s work has been presented by institutions including the Walker Art Center, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Park Avenue Armory, the Dia Art Foundation, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Harlem Stage, and Jazz at Lincoln Center. His first solo museum exhibition Jason Moran premiered in Minneapolis at the Walker Art Center from April 26 through August 26, 2018 and traveled to the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston from September 19 through January 21, 2019. It was on view at the Wexner Center for the Arts through August 11, 2019 before its U.S. finale in Moran’s hometown of New York City at the Whitney.

This exhibition is accompanied by a 272-page publication, published in conjunction with the Walker Art Center’s 2018 exhibition, which considers the artist’s practice and his collaborative works as interdisciplinary investigations that further the fields of experimental jazz and visual art. Edited by Adrienne Edwards, it features an interview with the artist, and essays by Philip Bither, Okwui Enwezor, Danielle Jackson, Alicia Hall Moran, George E. Lewis, and Glenn Ligon. These texts are accompanied by a photo essay by Moran, a section documenting the creation of Moran’s STAGED sculptures, installation views from the Walker, photographs and other ephemera, and a complete list of works included in the Walker exhibition.

Jason Moran is organized by the Walker Art Center, and curated by Adrienne Edwards with Danielle A. Jackson. The Whitney’s presentation is overseen by Adrienne Edwards, the Engell Speyer Family Curator and Curator of Performance.

Jason Moran is sponsored by Delta. Generous support for Jason Moran is provided by The Philip and Janice Levin Foundation and public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Significant support is provided by Norman and Melissa Selby and the Joyce and George Wein Foundation.

Alan Michelson: Wolf Nation To Open At The Whitney Museum of American Art On October 25

Alan Michelson: Wolf Nation presents four works in video, sound, print, and augmented reality that invoke place from an Indigenous perspective. The artist—who is Kanyen’keha:ka (Mohawk), a member of one of the six nations of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Confederacy—traverses local landscapes and temporalities in his art, treating geographical sites as archives and exploring territory typically bypassed in American history and largely absent from American memory. Wolf Nation, organized by Chrissie Iles, Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz Curator, with Clémence White, curatorial assistant, will be on view in the Museum’s fifth floor Kaufman and Goergen Galleries and in the lobby from October 25, 2019 through January 12, 2020.

Alan Michelson with Steven Fragale, Town Destroyer, 2019

Scott Rothkopf, Senior Deputy Director and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, remarked, “Alan Michelson’s influential practice has critically and poetically foregrounded Indigenous perspectives to reorient how all of us can see history and place. The Whitney is thrilled to present this beautiful and haunting show, and we remain committed to expanding our work with Indigenous artists in both our collection and exhibition and public programs.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is Wolf Nation (2018), an immersive video installation recently acquired for the Whitney’s permanent collection. Originally commissioned by Storm King Art Center, Wolf Nation transforms webcam footage of red wolves, a critically endangered indigenous species, into a poignant meditation on displacement. The work links their possible eradication with that of their namesake, the Wolf Tribe of the Lenape, also known as the Munsees, whose homelands encompassed present southern New York and northern New Jersey. Michelson translates the format and color of wampum belts—horizontal purple and white beadwork sashes used in Indigenous diplomacy whose symbolic designs encoded solemn messages—into panoramic video and sound. Wolf Nation is both an evocative affirmation of solidarity across species and a stark appeal to the forces responsible for their persecution.

Michelson commented, “American landscape is complicated when you’re Indigenous. For example, this year is the 240th anniversary of the Sullivan-Clinton Expedition, George Washington’s brutal invasion and destruction of Iroquoia, the Haudenosaunee homelands which now comprise most of New York state. Sixty of our towns, and hundreds of our houses, farms, crops, orchards, and livestock were burned and pillaged in a scorched-earth campaign that forced our people from their lands as homeless refugees. This is only one of the tragic but unacknowledged legacies that underpin our contemporary landscape. That history needs to be confronted.”

Also included in the exhibition is Shattemuc (2009), a video installation made for the Henry Hudson Quadricentennial, which retraces part of Hudson’s historic voyage on the river once known as “Shattemuc” to the region’s Indigenous inhabitants. Captured at night in the searchlight beam of a moving boat, the illuminated shoreline progresses from wooded palisade to industrial quarry, riverside town, power plant, and marina, encapsulating the development that followed upon Hudson’s journey. In Shattemuc, as throughout his oeuvre, Michelson appropriates and redirects colonial technologies of mapping and surveillance as well as landscape painting, the moving panorama of the nineteenth century, and other forms.

The soundtracks for Wolf Nation and Shattemuc are composed by White Mountain Apache composer and musician Laura Ortman, whose work was included in the 2019 Whitney Biennial.

Premiering are two new augmented reality works that Michelson produced with artist Steven Fragale, accessed through an interactive app that visitors are invited to download on their devices. Town Destroyer (2019) is an eighteen-foot-long wallpaper mural based on the interior of the mansion at Mount Vernon, George Washington’s historic estate in Virginia, and executed in the style of scenic wallpapers of the period. Inserted into the scene is a bust of Washington that, when viewed through the app, becomes three-dimensional on the screen. Moving images on the virtual bust’s surface and spatial audio tell the story of the brutal Sullivan-Clinton Campaign of 1779, the Washington-ordered invasion and destruction of Iroquoia, the Haudenosaunee homelands that now constitute the bulk of present New York state.

Sapponckanikan (Tobacco Field), 2019, created for the Museum’s lobby, responds to the history of the Whitney’s neighborhood, formerly a Lenape village and tobacco field of the same name. When activated by the visitor through an app downloaded to their phone, a large circle of tobacco plants of the variety used ceremonially across Turtle Island (North America) will appear on the phone screen. Rustling gently in a virtual wind, the plants, based on those in the artist’s sister’s garden at Six Nations Reserve, create a duality of time and place and speak to Indigenous survivance—active presence and resistance—over four difficult centuries.

Alan Michelson (Mohawk, b. 1953) is an internationally recognized New York-based artist, curator, writer, lecturer, and member of one of the six nations of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) Confederacy. For over thirty years, working across a diverse range of media and combining meticulous research with a site-based practice grounded in local context, he has critically and poetically uncovered troubling colonial legacies and challenged national myths.

Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, Michelson’s four-channel video installation, was recently featured in the 2019 Venice Biennale, and has also been shown in the eighteenth Sydney Biennale and the fifth Moscow Biennale. His work is in the permanent collections of the Whitney, National Gallery of Canada, and the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. His practice includes public art, and Mantle (2018), his permanent public monument honoring Virginia’s Indian nations installed at the capitol in Richmond, Virginia, was recognized in the prestigious 2019 Public Art Network Year in Review. The feature article “In the Studio: Alan Michelson” appeared in the December 2018 issue of Art in America. Michelson is co-founder and co-curator, in conjunction with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School, of the groundbreaking Indigenous New York series.

Iles noted, “For Alan Michelson, the moving image operates as a form of witnessing. Wolf Nation resurfaces invisible histories of place—the forest, the river, the field, and the land—and translates them into visual imagery that asserts the Indigenous voice. Distilled from diverse sources, each work is horizontal or circular in form, echoing Indigenous concepts of time and space—multi-perspectival and cyclical, rather than monocular and linear. By creating works that evoke place and historical memory, Michelson allows his viewers to see Indigeneity—and Native cultures—as visceral, and lived.”

Tiffany & Co. Announces Tiffany & Love, the New Fragrances for Him and for Her

Tiffany & Co. today announced the launch of the brand’s latest fragrances, Tiffany & Love for Him and Tiffany & Love for Her, produced and distributed by Coty Inc., and debuting globally in October 2019.

Tiffany & Love is the next chapter in perfumery for Tiffany & Co., and honors the brand’s legacy of celebrating love and commitment. The two complementary fragrances are a tribute to emotional connection, and the many ways love is defined and expressed. This is the brand’s first exploration into the dual fragrance category, and the inaugural launch of men’s fragrance under the creative direction of Reed Krakoff, chief artistic officer, Tiffany & Co.

As a brand, we’ve always celebrated the enduring power of love in all its forms,” says Krakoff. “Our new Tiffany & Love fragrances are a reflection of modern love and the authentic connections that reflect the strength, joy, and promise we find in one another.

Tiffany & Love by Tiffany & Co. © 2019 Cass Bird

Inspired by Krakoff’s creative vision and the energetic spirit of New York City, legendary photographer, director and artist Cass Bird shot the global advertising campaign in black and white on the streets of New York City. Through Bird’s lens, the campaign imagery captures intimate moments between real couples with their hands intertwined in gestures of love.

Legendary photographer, director and artist Cass Bird shot the global advertising campaign in black and white on the streets of New York City.

To demonstrate this idea of commitment, acceptance and togetherness, Tiffany & Co.’s iconic ampersand symbol is elevated to signify personal connections that create a bond between two people. To accompany the campaign video (here), Tiffany & Co. selected Grammy® award-winning music producer Mark Ronson and singer-songwriter King Princess to remake The Turtles’ song “Happy Together,” an ode to love.

Tiffany & Love fragrances

With the launch of Tiffany & Love, we sought to create fragrances for romantics that define love in their own way,” says Simona Cattaneo, chief marketing officer, Coty Luxury. “The fragrances embody and embrace all forms of love, inspiring all to join the #LoveYourWay conversation by sharing authentic stories of personal love and connection.”

TIFFANY & LOVE FOR HER

The Tiffany & Love fragrances are both crafted by a duo of perfumers, and express the magnetism and electricity of love. Each fragrance has its own unique structure but share a common hero ingredient, blue sequoia. Tiffany & Love for Him is a citrusy aromatic fragrance with a wood-infused base created by perfumers Sophie Labbé and Nicolas Beaulieu of IFF. Tiffany & Love for Her is a modern woody floral scent created by perfumers Honorine Blanc and Marie Salamagne of Firmenich.

Tiffany & Love For Him

Building on the brand’s legacy of extraordinary craftsmanship and design, the Tiffany & Love flacons are cylindrical in shape, and honor the iconic Tiffany Blue® hue. Complementary but distinct, the Tiffany & Love glass bottles are each tinted a different shade reminiscent of Tiffany Blue® and feature a gleaming ampersand that echoes the iconic Tiffany & Co. logo and acts as a symbol of connection. A silver plaque sits on the shoulders of each bottle bearing the signature ingredients of each juice, while a Tiffany Blue® cap for Her and a contrasting black for Him, are embellished with a graphic T pattern.

In 1837, Charles Lewis Tiffany founded his company in New York City where his store was soon acclaimed as the palace of jewels for its exceptional gemstones. Since then, TIFFANY & CO. has become synonymous with elegance, innovative design, fine craftsmanship and creative excellence. Today, with more than 14,000 employees, TIFFANY & CO. and its subsidiaries design, manufacture and market jewelry, watches and luxury accessories – including more than 5,000 skilled artisans who cut diamonds and craft jewelry in the Company’s workshops, realizing its commitment to superlative quality. The Company operates more than 300 TIFFANY & CO. retail stores worldwide as part of its omni-channel approach. To learn more about TIFFANY & CO. as well as its commitment to sustainability, please visit Tiffany.com

PRICING AND AVAILABILITY
Tiffany & LOVE For Her Eau de Parfum 1.7oz $105
Tiffany & LOVE For Her Eau de Parfum 3.0oz $135
Tiffany & LOVE For Him Eau de Toilette 1.7oz $77
Tiffany & LOVE For Him Eau de Toilette 3.0oz $95

Tiffany & Love will launch globally as of October 1, 2019.