Annenberg Space for Photography’s 10th Anniversary Celebration Continues With “W|ALLS: Defend, Divide, and the Divine”

Announcing the groundbreaking new photo exhibit that explores the use of walls across civilizations and over centuries – plus, “Light the Barricades,” a companion multi-site public art installation

Photo by Ami Vitale

Annenberg Space for Photography, L.A.’s premier destination for photography, explores the creation and use of walls over centuries and across civilizations with its new exhibition, W|ALLS: Defend, Divide, and the Divine. The show also includes the companion interactive public art installation Light the Barricades, located at three separate locations around the city, before coming together for presentation on the plaza just outside the Photo Space for the duration of the W|ALLS exhibit.

Forrest Meyers. Photo by Joseph Carlson

Annenberg Space for Photography is a cultural destination dedicated to exhibiting both digital and print photography in an intimate environment. The space features state-of-the-art, high-definition digital technology, traditional prints by some of the world’s most renowned photographers, and a selection of emerging photographic talents as well. The venue, an initiative of the Annenberg Foundation and its trustees, is the first solely photographic cultural destination in the Los Angeles area, creating a new paradigm in the world of photography.

Eastern State Penitentiary, PA. Photo by Bill Yates.

Opening October 5, W|ALLS: Defend, Divide, and the Divine examines the artistic, social, and political use of walls throughout history. From the Berlin Wall and Jerusalem’s Western Wall, to the Great Wall of China – as well as barriers built in India, Nigeria, Uzbekistan, Northern Ireland, and along the United States’ southern border – the exhibition delves into our long history of building walls and defining territories.

Photo by Tony De Los Reyes

The exhibit is divided into six sections: Delineation, Defense, Deterrent, The Divine, Decoration, and The Invisible. In each section, the work of photographers and artists – who have trained their eye on walls of all kinds throughout the world – will examine their architectural role in society, and the effects they have on the people who live near them. The section meanings overlap and change over time, much like the walls themselves – erected for one reason, their appearance and use is altered and modified, reflecting the civilizations that have grown and evolved around them. The show is curated by Dr. Jen Sudul Edwards, the Chief Curator and Curator of Contemporary Art at the Mint Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina.

9/11 Museum. Photo by Spencer Finch

W|ALLS features more than 70 artists, including Carol Guzy, Moises Saman, SHAN Wallace, Banksy, JR, John Moore, Marina Abramović, and Tanya Aguiñiga. Many of these featured photographers and artists will be included in a new, original documentary commissioned by the Annenberg Foundation exclusively for the exhibition.

The Annenberg Space for Photography has a long history of exploring our shared humanity around the world,” said Annenberg Foundation Chairman, President, and CEO Wallis Annenberg. “The W|ALLS exhibit will encourage visitors to explore the complex and multifaceted use of walls and challenge preconceived notions of why we build them. With Light the Barricades, we’re also offering public spaces for reflection and solidarity.”

Photo by AP Photo/Oded Bality

Light the Barricades is the Annenberg Space for Photography’s first foray into public art. From September 6 through September 22, the walls will be installed at three locations across Los Angeles– the Annenberg Community Beach House in Santa Monica, Grand Park in downtown Los Angeles, and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in Exposition Park.

Photo by Carol Guzy/The Washington Post

The installation consists of three 8′ x 27′ solar-powered walls illuminated from within (similar to a photographer’s lightbox) at all hours and features a fable on one side and a station for visitor reflection on the other. Created by Candy Chang (the artist behind the popular Before I Die public art project) and James A. Reeves, Light the Barricades was inspired by the I Ching, one of the oldest Chinese texts. Each wall will feature a word in large text that represents an emotional barrier: Resentment, Judgment, and Doubt. Offering an engaging opportunity for contemplation – both physically and emotionally – these walls shine a light on the difficult emotions that face individuals every day.

Photo by Grant Scroggie

When we considered how walls are used today, our first thought was the advertising that covers our cities. We want to translate the language of billboards into a contemporary ritual for contemplation, perhaps even a moment of humility,” said Candy Chang and James A. Reeves. “We selected the topics of resentment, judgment, and doubt not only because these emotions are largely universal, but they feel especially resonant today. They echo the psychosocial dynamics defining the current American mood. By reckoning with these barriers at a personal level, perhaps we can become more compassionate in our public life.”

Photo by Raffaelle Miraglia

Light the Barricades‘ three separate lightboxes will ultimately be presented together as one installation at the Photo Space in Century City for the duration of W|ALLS: Defend, Divide and the Divine, from October 5 through December 29, 2019.

Photo by Tony De Los Reyes

As a former Angeleno, I have visited the Annenberg Space for Photography often, and have learned much about the beauty and difficulties in our world through its illuminating shows,” said curator Dr. Jen Sudul Edwards. “Photography documents the human condition with a visual language broadly understood, capturing even the most delicate, complicated, urgent, and uplifting circumstances. The Annenberg Space for Photography offers a place to come together and contemplate our shared history and humanity; I’m honored to have been invited to curate W|ALLS and Light the Barricades and to contribute to that decade-long legacy.”

Photo by Raymond Thompson, Jr

Annenberg Space for Photography will also offer a variety of public programs to coincide with the exhibition, including unique workshops, educational and participatory panels, and conversations, as well as field trips, family activities, and more. 

Frist Art Museum Announces 2020 Schedule of Exhibitions

J.M.W. Turner, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, A Survey of Sub-Saharan African Art, Terry Adkins, Rina Banerjee, Jitish Kallat, Mel Ziegler, A Study of Medieval Bologna, and More

The Frist Art Museum has announced its 2020 schedule of exhibitions. In the Ingram Gallery, the year begins with J.M.W. Turner: Quest for the Sublime, an exhibition of works by one of the greatest landscape painters of all time. Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Sty J.M.W. Turner: Quest for the Sublime le highlights Mackintosh’s artistic production and locates it within the unique context of late nineteenth-century Glasgow. African Art from the New Orleans Museum of Art features ancestral figures, masks, and ceremonial costumes from one of the most important collections of traditional Sub-Saharan African art in the United States.(The Frist Art Museum is supported in part by the Metro Nashville Arts Commission, the Tennessee Arts Commission, and the National Endowment for the Arts.)

In the Upper-Level Galleries, an exhibition of works by Jitish Kallat features the dramatic interactive installation Covering Letter. Mel Ziegler: Flag Exchange invites consideration of worn and weathered American flags as symbols of our country’s identity, history, and future. Rina Banerjee: Make Me a Summary of the World is the first major U.S. survey of the artist’s work and includes installations, sculptures, and paintings that explore themes of multiple identities. Medieval Bologna: Art for a University City focuses on illuminated manuscripts, paintings, and sculptures made in Italy at the end of the Middle Ages.

In the Gordon Contemporary Artists Project Gallery, the Frist presents Terry Adkins: Our Sons and Daughters Ever on the Altar, a survey of the late artist’s multidisciplinary practices, which explores the intersection of music, art, and African American history through sculpture, prints, and video; and the text-based works of Bethany Collins, who examines the historic intersection of language and racism in her multimedia practice.

In the Conte Community Arts Gallery, the Frist presents The Nashville Flood: Ten Years Later commemorating the city’s historic natural disaster in photographs and oral histories; We Count: First-Time Voters, which honors the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment with visual representations of diverse group of Nashvillians’ first voting experiences; and 2020 Young Tennessee Artists: Selections from Advanced Studio Art Programs, the eighth biennial showcase of the finest two-dimensional artwork by high school students across the state.

The Frist Art Museum’s 2020 Schedule of Exhibitions (Titles and dates subject to change)

The Nashville Flood: Ten Years Later
January 10–May 17, 2020
Conte Community Arts Gallery (Organized by the Frist Art Museum)


Image Credit: The Cumberland River overflowed its banks in 2010, causing floodwaters to rise around the riverfront area and several blocks of downtown Nashville, May 3 2010. Photo by Larry McCormack. Courtesy of The Tennessean

The Nashville Flood: Ten Years Later will reflect on the historic 2010 flood in which a record-breaking rainfall caused the Cumberland River to crest almost twelve feet above flood stage. Thousands of homes and business were damaged or destroyed, and twenty-six people in the region died, eleven in Nashville. This exhibition will examine the event’s immediate and long-term impact on the city through photographs and excerpts of oral histories from the Nashville Public Library’s flood archive and The Tennessean newspaper with a focus on ten different zip codes, corresponding to Antioch, Belle Meade, Bellevue, Bordeaux, and other locations in addition to downtown Nashville. A section of “now and then” photos will illustrate the recovery, or lack of progress, in each area. Volunteerism, rescue efforts, inequities in disaster relief, and the rebuilding process will be addressed.

J.M.W. Turner: Quest for the Sublime
February 20–May 31, 2020
Ingram Gallery (Organized in cooperation with Tate)


J.M.W. Turner (1775–1851). Peace—Burial at Sea, exhibited 1842. Oil on canvas, 34 1/4 x 34 1/8 in. Tate: Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856. Photo © Tate, London 2019

Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775–1851) was a central figure in the Romantic movement and is considered to be among the greatest landscape painters in Western art. Long admired for his ingenuity, originality, and passion, Turner strove to convey the feeling of awe aroused by nature’s immensity and power—its palpable atmospheres, pulsating energy, the drama of storms and disasters, and the transcendent effect of pure light. On view in Quest for the Sublime are seminal oil paintings, luminous watercolors, and evocative sketches selected from Tate’s Turner Bequest. The exhibition conveys highlights of the artist’s career, from vertiginous mountain scenes and stormy seascapes to epic history paintings and mysterious views of Venice.

Terry Adkins: Our Sons and Daughters Ever on the Altar
February 20–May 31, 2020
Gordon Contemporary Artists Project Gallery at the Frist Art Museum and the Carl Van Vechten Art Gallery at Fisk University (Organized by Fisk University Galleries and the Frist Art Museum)

Terry Adkins: Our Sons and Daughters Ever on the Altar is a survey of the late artist’s multidisciplinary practice, which explored the intersection of music, art, and African American history through sculpture, prints, performance, and video. Co-organized and co-presented by the Frist Art Museum and Adkins’s alma mater Fisk University forty-five years after his graduation, the exhibition will feature works influenced by his time at Fisk, where he was mentored by Harlem Renaissance pioneer Aaron Douglas, and signature “recital” installations that pay tribute to musicians Bessie Smith and Jimi Hendrix, both of whom had ties to Tennessee.

Jitish Kallat
March 13–June 28, 2020
Upper-Level Galleries (Organized by the Frist Art Museum)

The internationally acclaimed Indian artist Jitish Kallat (b. 1974) is a Mumbai native who produces installations, paintings, photographs, and sculptures that often recall historic acts of speech. This exhibition features his 2012 work Covering Letter, a haunting interactive digital projection of a 1939 letter from Mahatma Gandhi to Adolf Hitler that pleads for peace weeks before the outbreak of World War II. In a darkened gallery, visitors will walk through the mist screen on which the letter is projected, breaking the words apart. Covering Letter was one of the works selected for India’s pavilion at this year’s 58th Venice Biennale.


Mel Ziegler: Flag Exchange
March 13–June 28, 2020
Upper-Level Galleries (Organized by the Frist Art Museum)

Mel Ziegler (b. 1956), the Paul E. Schwab Chair of Fine Arts Professor at Vanderbilt University, is renowned as a social and community engagement artist whose work seeks to foster discourse and the sharing of ideas relating to history, politics, and society. Flag Exchange is an installation of fifty American flags—one from each state—suspended row after row from the ceiling and surrounding a stage where museum visitors and special guests are invited to speak or present performances relating to the meaning of the flag in their own lives. The flags themselves symbolize a nation that has survived tumult and stress. They were collected from 2011 to 2016, when Ziegler periodically drove across the United States with a supply of new American flags, offering a broad spectrum of society—from suburban residents to farmers and small business owners—an opportunity to receive new flags in exchange for their old torn and weathered ones. Displayed in a gallery, the symbolism of rows of tattered, irregular flags encourages reflection on America’s identity, history, and future.


We Count: First-Time Voters
May 23–October 4, 2020
Conte Community Arts Gallery (Organized by the Frist Art Museum)

On August 18, 1920, the Tennessee state legislature voted to ratify the 19th Amendment to the US Constitution, which guarantees and protects women’s right to vote. As the 36th state to approve the amendment, Tennessee completed the two-thirds majority needed to make it the law of the land. We Count: First-Time Voters honors the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, guaranteeing and protecting women’s constitutional right to vote by highlighting the history of voting in the United States and the first voting experiences of a diverse group of Nashvillians. Selected individuals will share their stories with local artists—including Beizar Aradini, Megan Kelley, Jerry Bedor Phillips, Thaxton Waters, and Donna Woodley—who will create visual representations of these voting experiences in a range of mediums.


Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style
June 26–September 27, 2020
Ingram Gallery


Charles Rennie Mackintosh Port Vendres—La Ville, ca, 1925–26. Pencil and watercolor on paper 34 7/8 x 26 7/8 x 1 1/8 in. Glasgow Museums: Bought from the Mackintosh Memorial Exhibition, 1933, 1856

At the end of the nineteenth century, the Glasgow Style emerged as the major manifestation of Art Nouveau in Britain and established Glasgow as the Second City of the Empire. This exhibition showcases Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868–1928)—the greatest exponent of the Glasgow Style—as an architect, designer, and artist, and contextualizes his production within a larger circle of designers and craftspeople in the major Scottish city. Mackintosh worked most closely with his wife, Margaret Macdonald (1864–1933); Margaret’s sister, Frances Macdonald (1873–1921); and Frances’ husband, James Herbert McNair (1868–1955). They met as students at the progressive Glasgow School of Art in 1892 and together were known as The Four.


Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh. The May Queen: detail of a panel from the Ladies’ Luncheon Room, Ingram Street Tea Rooms, 1900. Gesso, hessian, scrim, twine, glass beads, thread, mother-of-pearl, and tin leaf, 62 1/2 x 179 7/8 in. overall. Glasgow Museums, Acquired by Glasgow Corporation, as part of the Ingram Street Tearooms, 1950. © CSG CIC Glasgow Museums Collection. Courtesy American Federation of Arts

Combining influences from the Arts and Crafts Movement, Celtic Revival, and Japonism, Glasgow artists created their own modern design aesthetic synonymous with sleek lines and emphatic geometries expressed in a wide range of materials. The exhibition presents 165 works of fine and decorative art, including architectural drawings, books, ceramics, furniture, posters, textiles, and watercolors, drawn from Glasgow’s most significant public and private collections.

Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style is a touring exhibition co-organized by Glasgow Museums and the American Federation of Arts. Support for the US national tour is provided by the Dr. Lee MacCormick Edwards Charitable Foundation.

Bethany Collins
June 26–September 27, 2020
Gordon Contemporary Artists Project Gallery (Organized by the Frist Art Museum)

Chicago-based artist Bethany Collins (b. 1984) explores the historic intersection of language and racism in her multimedia practice. She often manipulates and reprints existing written documents—such as the leading daily newspaper in Birmingham, Alabama, during the 1960s or the U.S. Department of Justice’s report on the Ferguson, Missouri, police department—to critique the accuracy and completeness of official records. Collins’s artist book America: A Hymnal (2017) features 100 different versions of “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” written since Rev. Samuel F. Smith published the original lyrics in 1831. The multiple reinterpretations of this patriotic anthem—most in support of a particular political or social cause—offer opportunities for reflection on what it means to be an American, a particularly resonant topic during a presidential election year.


Rina Banerjee: Make Me a Summary of the World
July 24–October 25, 2020
Upper-Level Galleries (Organized by the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the San José Museum of Art.)



Rina Banerjee (b. 1963). Dodo bird, 2013. Acrylic on watercolor paper, 30 x 44 in. Private collection, Miami. © Rina Banerjee. Image courtesy Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Paris/Brussels

Indian-born artist Rina Banerjee (b. 1963) creates richly layered works made from materials sourced throughout the world to reflect the splintered experience of migration, identity, tradition, and culture often prevalent in diasporic communities. In a single sculpture, one can find African tribal jewelry, colorful feathers, light bulbs, Murano glass, and South Asian antiques. This is the first major survey of Banerjee’s work in the United States and includes large-scale installations, sculptures, and paintings produced over two decades. While the works can be enjoyed as vividly colored and sensuously layered sculptures, they also address themes of multiple identities, feminism, the impact of colonialism, cultural appropriation, and globalization.

African Art from the New Orleans Museum of Art
October 23, 2020–January 17, 2021
Ingram Gallery (Organized by the New Orleans Museum of Art)


Image Credit: Unidentified (Eastern Pende Peoples). Helmet Mask (kipoko), n.d. Wood and pigment, 15 x 11 x 13 1/2 in. The New Orleans Museum of Art: The Robert P. Gordy Collection, 88.46

The exhibition features more than eighty objects, including ancestral figures, masks, ceremonial costumes, headdresses, ritual objects and reliquary guardian figures, drawn from one of the most important collections of traditional sub-Saharan African art in the United States. Created by artists from Gabon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Cameroon, Nigeria, Cote d’Ivoire, Mali and Ghana, these works of art are made from wood, ivory, stone, terra cotta, beadwork and brass. Displayed thematically—with contextual and archival photographs and video—the exhibition illuminates the various ways in which objects facilitate ancestral veneration, as well as the transmission and interconnection of artistic style.


Medieval Bologna: Art for a University City
November 20, 2020–February 14, 2021
Upper-Level Galleries (Organized by the Frist Art Museum)

This is the first museum exhibition in the United States to focus on medieval art made in the northern Italian city of Bologna. Home to the oldest university in Europe, Bologna fostered a unique artistic culture at the end of the Middle Ages. With its large population of sophisticated readers, the city became the preeminent center of manuscript production south of the Alps and it helped bring about a revolution in the medieval book trade. Manuscripts circulated in a thriving market of scribes, illuminators, booksellers, and customers operating mostly outside traditional monastic scriptoria. The university initially specialized in law, and many law books were illuminated in Bologna with brightly colored scenes. University professors enjoyed high social status and were buried in impressive stone tombs carved with classroom scenes.

The approximately 65 objects in the exhibition span from 1250 to 1400, from the first great flowering of manuscript illumination in Bologna to the beginnings of the construction and decoration of the ambitious Basilica of San Petronio in the city’s Piazza Maggiore. Lenders include the Cleveland Museum of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Lilly Library, New York Public Library, and University of Chicago Library.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue with seven essays, and, while it is on view, the Frist Art Museum will host the Andrew Ladis Trecento Conference, a biannual event that brings together historians of medieval and Renaissance art from around the world.

Target Celebrates 20 Years Of Collaborations With Designers

The Retailer Commemorates 20 Years Of Great Designs Accessible To All Audiences With A Limited Edition Anniversary Collection

This fall, Target Corporation celebrates the 20th anniversary of its first collaboration with a designer, a bold initiative that has continued to differentiate this great chain as a provider of Fashionable and affordable designs. This project, which began with renowned architect Michael Graves in 1999, has resulted in more than 175 collaborations with designers in the last two decades.

Photo provided by Target

To celebrate this anniversary, Target will relaunch almost 300 original and emblematic articles from 20 collaborations with past designers. This limited edition collection includes clothing, accessories, home decor and kitchenware. The Anniversary Collection will be available, while supplies last, until September 14 at all Target stores and on Target.com, with prices ranging from $ 7 to $ 160. Designers’ collections and items will vary between stores and customers can purchase up to five items per size and color. Customers can visit Target.com when the catalog is available to properly plan their visits. To underline Target’s commitment to inclusion, all women’s fashion will come with expanded size.

Target’s Anniversary Collection logo

Design has always been part of Target’s DNA. From our stores and the products we create, to the collaborations we establish, our commitment to affordable designs differentiates Target and is one of the reasons why customers enjoy shopping with us, “said Rick Gomez , executive vice president and digital and marketing director of Target. “Our marketing campaign will celebrate the inclusive nature of Target’s designs, and will include a book and documentary to highlight Target’s impact on the retail sector and the lives of our customers by making large designs available to all audiences.” .

Michael Graves

On the occasion of this event, Target has turned to its archives to offer its customers a limited edition collection with 20 of its collaborations with past designers, which incldes the following:

John Derian
  • Michael Graves (1999-2013)
  • Philippe Starck (2002)
  • Stephen Sprouse (2002)
  • Isaac Mizrahi (2003-2009)
  • Erin Fetherston (2007)
  • Proenza Schouler (2007)
  • Thakoon (2008)
  • John Derian (2008, 2010)
  • Anna Sui (2009)
  • Rodarte (2009)
  • Stephen Burrows (2010)
  • Zac Posen (2010)
  • Harajuku Mini (2011-2012)
  • Missoni (2011)
  • Jason Wu (2012)
  • Phillip Lim (2013)
  • Altuzarra (2014)
  • Lilly Pulitzer (2015)
  • Marimekko (2016)
  • Hunter (2018)
Stehen Sprouse

Target has forever changed the retail scenario by doing what was believed impossible, offering great designs at an incredible price. This anniversary celebrates our extensive design history and the wide variety of collaborations we have offered to our customers over the past 20 years “said Mark Tritton , executive vice president and director of Marketing for Target. “All the collaborations have contributed something special and exciting to our clients and, with 20 years behind us, we can say that this is only the beginning. We hope to continue offering our clients more incredible, inspiring and affordable designs, and increase the presence of Target every day.

Hunter

In addition to the launch of Target’s Anniversary Collection, Rizzoli, an editorial known for its extensive catalog of books of great quality and beauty, will publish a book that gathers Target’s rich design history, with comments from designers and followers of the collaborations of the retailer, which will be available from Tuesday, September 3.

MANHATTAN, NY, U.S.A, JULY 15, 2014 Joseph Altuzarra is seen with his sketches, inspiration, and fashion design samples that he created for Target, during a meeting to go over the work and ads with the Target advertising team and Spring Studios, at Spring Studios offices in Manhattan, NY. 7/15/2014 Photo by ©Jennifer S. Altman

Target has also recruited RadicalMedia, a producing partner, to create a documentary that will be released this fall and that closely analyzes how Target’s innovative approach to affordable designs has forever changed the retail sector.

Lily Pulitzer

The documentary includes the testimony of people who have played a key role in the collaborations of the retailer, both with emerging brands and designers, as well as with others already consolidated.