Reader’s Digest Reveals the 2018 Top Ten “Nicest Places In America”

Now America Votes to Decide Which Place Will be Featured on “Good Morning America” and the Cover of Reader’s Digest

Reader’s Digest has named the 10 finalists of its second annual search for “The Nicest Place in America,” a national crowd-sourced effort to uncover places where people are kind and treat each other with respect. In an era of cultural and political divides, “Nicest Places” is Reader’s Digest’s response.Readers Digest Logo

The nationwide search received 450 submissions. The finalists were selected by Reader’s Digest editors along with input from a panel of guest judges from partner organizations, including Robin Roberts, co-anchor of ABC’s “Good Morning America.

Readers Digest Top 10 Nicest Places America

Reader’s Digest “Nicest Places in America”

Here are the 10 Nicest Places in America:

Bothell, WAIn Bothell, every May 10 is “Cup of Kindness” day, when everyone is urged to share a good deed, a movement that was born from an unlikely friendship. The other 364 days are pretty special, too.  How do you celebrate a birthday in Bothell? Well, if you’re one local resident, you do it by collecting charity for those in the community who are less fortunate.

Ellijay, GA: Ellijay is the kind of town where locals make a seat at the table for you, whether they know you or not, and the infectious kindness of Ellijay makes it impossible not to be drawn in. Families stop into town for a day. Then for a vacation season. Then for a lifetime.

Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore, MD: Come for the books, stay for the legal advice, job assistance, and other extras that make this public library system a haven in the heart of a troubled city. The Enoch Pratt Free Library is a place where lives are changed.

Kalamazoo, MI: The city has made a promise to all of its high-school students: If you get into a state college, it’s paid for – as long as you keep your grades up. It’s called The Kalamazoo Promise. After gun violence marred the city a few years back, the city gave itself a new motto as it supported survivors: “Kalamazoo Strong.”

Katy, TX: Hurricane Harvey couldn’t wash away the spirit of kindness in this Houston-area city—perhaps best exemplified by the owner of a fully stocked store awaiting its grand opening: he opened his doors and told first responders to come take what they needed.

Life Moves Yoga in Killeen, TX: Who says tough guys and gals don’t do yoga? Drop into the Life Moves Yoga studio in Killeen, Texas, just outside the gates of the nation’s largest army base at Fort Hood. There, you’ll find a healthy home away from home geared to soldiers, including wounded warriors, and their spouses facing long separations due to deployments.

Mower County, MN: Paying it forward is a way of life in Mower County, where one small plumbing business, built from the ashes of tragedy, has changed the lives of so many folks in the area who just need a little help. Even in a state known for “Minnesota Nice,” the people of Mower County stand out.

North Evergreen Street in Burbank, CA: Despite being smack-dab in the middle in one of the world’s most populated areas, this tiny enclave feels like a small town. Neighbors look out for one another, locking each other’s doors when one forgets, sharing vegetables from their gardens, and supporting each other in good times and bad.

North Riverside, IL: Is there a rule book for being nice? In North Riverside there is. The town has put together a 65-page manual on caring for each other that can be boiled down into one dictate: the Golden Rule.

Yassin’s Falafel, Knoxville, TN: Syrian refugee Yassin Terou couldn’t speak English when he arrived in Knoxville, Tennessee, seven years ago. Today, he is embraced by locals as a leader in the city for his charitable outreach, and his falafel restaurants are known as a safe place for all who enter. Continue reading

Queer Eye’s Jonathan Van Ness Will Join SMIRNOFF™ Vodka at the 2018 NYC Pride March

In Honor of LGBTQ Pride month and Inclusivity for all, SMIRNOFF Vodka Pledges to Donate an Additional One Million Dollars to the Human Rights Campaign in Support of the LGBTQ Community

This Sunday, SMIRNOFF™ vodka continues its decades of support for the LGBTQ community by partnering with Queer Eye television personality, hairdresser, web series star and podcaster, Jonathan Van Ness, to bring love in all its forms to life at the NYC Pride March. From dancing in the streets with SMIRNOFF drag queens to self-love selfies to strutting alongside marchers up Fifth Avenue, Van Ness will join the brand at the 2018 Pride March to encourage people everywhere to show their support for equality and love of all kinds.

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Smirnoff logo

SMIRNOFF is all about inclusivity and democratizing fun times for everyone, which totally speaks to me as a member of the LGBTQ community,” said Van Ness. “I could not be more excited to join SMIRNOFF for this year’s New York City Pride March. It truly is the ultimate celebration of love and equality for all, and once you add SMIRNOFF into the mix it becomes one big, fabulous, inclusive party. Who wouldn’t want to be a part of that?!

SMIRNOFF’s Pride March celebration is meant to showcase that Pride comes in all different flavors, shapes, and colors. To celebrate PRIDE loud and proud, SMIRNOFF will have a large presence in this Sunday’s New York City Pride March. The brand has proudly participated in the parade since 2013, but is prepared to make this the biggest year yet with an over-the-top float, that is bold and inspiring, just like the LGBTQ community, in celebration of love in all its forms and “Pride in Every Flavor.” In addition to Jonathan van Hess as its host, the brand will also host 200 marchers, electrifying special guests will be performing along the parade route to get the crowd excited and engaged. In addition to New York City, SMIRNOFF is excited to bring its celebration of “Pride in Every Flavor” to Pride Marches in San Francisco, Atlanta, San Diego and more.

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SMIRNOFF ‘Love Wins’ bottles

SMIRNOFF originally launched its “Love Wins” campaign in May 2017 with its limited-edition “Love Wins” bottle packaging for SMIRNOFF No. 21 vodka. Now, in 2018, the “Love Wins” bottles are back and are available nationwide for a limited time. Inside each bottle is the iconic SMIRNOFF No. 21 vodka, triple distilled and ten-times filtered, from the world’s most awarded name in vodka in the last ten years. As a brand that has supported the LGBTQ community for several decades, and was honored alongside DIAGEO with the prestigious 2018 Corporate Equality Award by the HRC this past February, SMIRNOFF is proud to continue to support love in all its forms.

SMIRNOFF’s redesigned 2018 “Love Wins” bottles feature the newly updated, special-edition bottle packaging, which highlights 34 real LGBTQ couples from across the United States. Each couple featured on the 2018 packaging submitted their photos through the brand’s website last year for a chance to be a part of the SMIRNOFF “Love Wins” campaign. Jessica & Whitney from Alabama, whose story began with a simple Facebook message, and Jeremy and Wutichai from Washington, D.C., who met while volunteering for the Peace Corps in Thailand, are just some of the real couples featured on the new bottles currently on shelves across the United States. Every SMIRNOFF “Love Wins” bottle is unique, with a different set of photographs that display real love and real people, along with its iridescent rainbow aesthetic and LGBTQ SMIRNOFF logo.

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SMIRNOFF’s Ad Creative

In addition to the brand’s partnership with Van Ness, SMIRNOFF has also announced an increased commitment to the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), with a pledge to donate $1 for every SMIRNOFF “Love Wins” bottle made to the HRC for a minimum of one million dollars over three years, starting in 2019. These funds will go towards supporting local HRC events to drive awareness of the fight for LGBTQ equality and help empower those who are leading that fight for equality in HRC’s 32 volunteer-led local steering committees in communities across the country. Continue reading