Everyone Loves To Love Donna Summer

Soundtrack Companion To The Original Dance Floor Diva’s Biographical Broadway Musical Features All Of Her Influential, Chart-Topping Tracks, Via New Island Def Jam/UMe Collection on April 20

On April 20, Island Def Jam/UMe is set to properly fete Donna Summer, the undisputed Queen of Disco and The First Lady of Love, with Summer: The Original Hits. This catchy collection of Summer’s greatest hits is a companion to Summer: The Donna Summer Musical, an exciting new Broadway musical based on her rich and storied life.

Offical-Artwork

Soundtrack Companion To The Original Dance Floor Diva’s Biographical Broadway Musical Features All Of Her Influential, Chart-Topping Tracks, Via New Island Def Jam/. UMe Collection on April 20UMe (PRNewsFoto/Universal Music Enterprises)

Previews for Summer: The Donna Summer Musical commenced on March 28, 2018, at the legendary Lunt-Fontanne Theatre in New York City with the official opening on April 23, 2018. (Preorder Summer: The Original Hits here)

Donna Summer was born in Boston on New Year’s Eve, 1948. She embraced the core tenets of gospel as a young singer while cutting her teeth with a local rock band and in European musicals, developing an individual vocal élan that also married the best elements of Rock, R&B, and Disco. Her signature style is on full display on The Original Hits in such iconic tracks as forever-seductive “Love To Love You Baby,” the defiantly declarative “Bad Girls,” the MTV-era female-empowerment anthem “She Works Hard For The Money,” the fiery dance/rock mesh of “Hot Stuff,” and the urgent ballad-to-crescendo disco blend of “Last Dance.”

Giorgio Moroder, her frequent collaborator, legendary Italian electronic-music pioneer, and producer who partnered with Pete Bellotte, instantly recognized Summer’s vocal prowess — and how to maximize her performance in the studio. When Moroder heard Richard Harris‘s dramatic version of Jimmy Webb’s lost-love lament “MacArthur Park” on the radio while driving on the Hollywood Freeway, he knew who had to sing it for him in an innovative arrangement. “Even before I recorded it, I knew it would be perfect for her voice,” Moroder confirmed.

Summer, the producer continued, had an uncanny knack for conveying unbridled emotion over studio-driven technology. “She humanized the machines,” Moroder said, citing the groundbreaking and highly influential “I Feel Love” as the key “legacy track” of their many years of fruitful collaboration. “That song is a combination of mechanical instruments and Donna’s beautiful, romantic voice. It was obviously great to work with a great artist like Donna.”

Summer’s influential work is given a fresh, respectful update with two rare remixes headed by renowned Grammy®-nominated remix producer Ralphi Rosario: “MacArthur Park (Rosabel’s Radio Mix),” a No. 1 Dance hit in 2013, and “Hot Stuff,” a new rework in collaboration with Erick Ibiza, that debuts on this collection. Another rarity in the collection is Summer’s German-language rendition of “White Boys” that she recorded while in the German cast of Hair.

Even though Summer sadly passed away in 2012, her cultural impact and sonic legacy carry ever onward, and she garnered a well-deserved posthumous induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2013. If you’re lookin’ for some hot stuff to listen to this evening, look no further than Summer: The Original Hits.

Donna Summer SUMMER: THE ORIGINAL HITS [CD & DIGITAL DELUXE VERSION]

  • I Feel Love
  • Love To Love You Baby
  • I Remember Yesterday
  • On My Honor
  • White Boys – From “Haare (Hair)”
  • Faster And Faster To Nowhere
  • MacArthur Park
  • Heaven Knows – With Brooklyn Dreams
  • No More Tears (Enough Is Enough) – Duet With Barbra Streisand
  • Pandora’s Box
  • On The Radio
  • I Love You
  • Bad Girls
  • She Works Hard For The Money
  • Dim All The Lights
  • Unconditional Love
  • Hot Stuff
  • Last Dance
  • The Dance Continues…
  • MacArthur Park (Rosabel’s Radio Mix)**
  • Hot Stuff (Ralph Rosario & Erick Ibiza 2018 Rework)**

** Exclusive bonus tracks to the Digital Deluxe Version

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New Exhibition Explores Lost And Censured Murals Of Los Angeles That Exposed Unequal Treatment Of Mexicans And Mexican Americans

¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicana/o Murals under Siege” provides a historical backdrop to issues of social justice that continue to plague California and the nation today

Murals became an essential form of artist response and public voice during the Chicana/o Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. They were a means of challenging the status quo and expressing both pride and frustration at a time when other channels of communication were limited for the Mexican American community. Because they threatened established authority, Chicana/o murals were often censored, neglected, whitewashed, or destroyed.

California Historical Society Murales Rebeldes

New Exhibition, “¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicano/a Murals under Siege”, Explores Lost And Censured Murals Of Los Angeles That Exposed Unequal Treatment Of Mexicans And Mexican Americans. (PRNewsfoto/California Historical Society).

The California Historical Society presents its latest exhibition and companion publication,“¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicano/a Murals under Siege”, which provides an important historical backdrop to issues of social justice that sparked outrage in California more than a half-century ago and continue today and provides insight to similar injustice that plague today’s socio-political environment. ¡Murales Rebeldes! will be on view at the galleries of the California Historical Society, located at 678 Mission Street in San Francisco, from April 7 to September 16, 2018. Continue reading

“No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” Opens March 30 at Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery

Exhibition Brings Large-Scale Installations From Famed Desert Gathering to Washington

Cutting-edge artwork created at Burning Man, the annual desert gathering that is one of the most influential events in contemporary art and culture, will be exhibited in the nation’s capital for the first time this spring. “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” will take over the entire Renwick Gallery building, exploring the maker culture, ethos, principles and creative spirit of Burning Man. Several artists will debut new works in the exhibition. In addition to the in-gallery presentation, the Renwick exhibition will expand beyond its walls for the first time through an outdoor extension titled “No Spectators: Beyond the Renwick,” displaying sculptures throughout the surrounding neighborhood.

Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Totem of Confessions, 2015. Photo by Daniel L Hayes.

Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Totem of Confessions, 2015. Photo by Daniel L Hayes.

Burning Man is both a cultural movement and a thriving temporary city of more than 75,000 people that rises out of the dust for a single week each year in late summer in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. During that time, enormous experimental art installations are erected, some of which are then ritually burned to the ground. The desert gathering is a uniquely American hotbed of artistic ingenuity, driving innovation through its philosophies of radical self-expression, community participation, rejection of commodification and reverence for the handmade.

The scale, the communal effort and the technical challenges inherent in creating works for the desert are part of what sets Burning Man apart from other art experiences,” said Stephanie Stebich, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “It is an amazingly creative laboratory where innovators go to play and to push the boundaries of their craft. Displaying the art of Burning Man at the Renwick is the latest example of our focus on new directions in craft and making.”

FoldHaus, Shrumen Lumen, 2016. Photo by Rene Smith.

FoldHaus, Shrumen Lumen, 2016. Photo by Rene Smith.

Nora Atkinson, the museum’s Lloyd Herman Curator of Craft, is organizing the exhibition in collaboration with the Burning Man Project, the nonprofit organization responsible for producing the annual Burning Man event in Black Rock City, for facilitating and extending the culture that has issued from Burning Man into the wider world and for cultivating its principles reflecting an immediate, non-commercial and participatory culture. The outdoor extension of the exhibition is presented in partnership with Washington, D.C.’s Golden Triangle Business Improvement District, a 43-square-foot neighborhood that stretches from the White House to Dupont Circle. The Burning Man community across the globe was instrumental in suggesting artworks for inclusion in the exhibition.

No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” opens March 30, 2018. The Renwick is the sole venue for the exhibition, which will close in two phases. The first floor will showcase works by Candy Chang, Marco Cochrane, Duane Flatmo, Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Five Ton Crane Arts Collective, Scott Froschauer, Android Jones and Richard Wilks and will close Sept. 16, 2018. The second floor, featuring works by David Best, FoldHaus Art Collective, Aaron Taylor Kuffner, HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu), Christopher Schardt and Leo Villareal, will remain on view through Jan. 21, 2019. “No Spectators: Beyond the Renwick,” will be presented in the surrounding neighborhood through December 2018. Continue reading

“Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” Opens April 6 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Exhibition Examines A Rare Portfolio Presented In Its Entirety For The First Time

Diane Arbus (1923—1971) was one of the most original and influential artists of the 20th century. “Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” forges new ground as the first exhibition to focus on the portfolio Arbus was working on at the end of her life. This heretofore missing piece from her biography was as important to her evolving artistic identity as it was to the broader public recognition of photography as a fine-art practice. Central to the transition Arbus was making away from magazine work at the time of her death, the portfolio bridges a lifetime of modest recognition with a posthumous career of extraordinary acclaim.

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Photo Credit: Diane Arbus, A woman with her baby monkey, N.J. 1971, 1971, gelatin silver print, 14 7/8 x 15 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum; Museum purchase. © The Estate of Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” is on view from April 6, 2018, to Jan. 21, 2019, at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The exhibition is organized by John Jacob, the McEvoy Family Curator for Photography. The museum is the only venue for the exhibition.

Having started her career as a studio photographer with her husband Allan Arbus, Diane Arbus quit the studio in 1956 and later studied with Lisette Model at the New School in New York City. She became a magazine photographer, working on assignment for high-profile periodicals including Esquire and Harpers Bazaar. In 1963 she was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship for a project that focused on American customs. The Guggenheim was among the most prestigious of fellowships available to artists, including photographers, making it an important source of financial and artistic support for those like Arbus who sought to break free from the strictures of magazine photography. Her later work was emotionally complex and explored subject matter outside of the mainstream, such as portraits of individuals whose professional, personal or physical attributes deviated from what was considered normal or acceptable in Arbus’ time, and photographs that frankly captured sexuality or revealed underlying currents of domestic tension and dysfunction.

At the time of her death, Arbus was already a growing influence on the field of photography but not widely known to the larger public. It was her portfolio, A box of ten photographs, that initiated the transition, connecting her past as a magazine photographer with her emergence as a serious artist. The publication of six photographs from the portfolio in Artforum and the presentation of the complete portfolio at the Venice Biennale were the first steps toward the almost mythical status of Arbus today.

Stephen Frank, Diane Arbus with her photograph Identical twins, Roselle, N.J. 1966, during a lecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1970. © Stephen A. Frank

Stephen Frank, Diane Arbus with her photograph Identical twins, Roselle, N.J. 1966, during a lecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1970. © Stephen A. Frank

This exhibition sheds new light on a crucial and often overlooked stage in Arbus’ career, as well as on a transformational moment in the history of contemporary photography,” said Stephanie Stebich, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director at the Smithsonian American Art. “The museum was an early champion of photography as an important art form reflecting the American experience. We’re proud of the role that SAAM played in bringing the work of Diane Arbus to wider recognition in the 1970s and are pleased to present A box of ten photographs in its entirety to a new generation.

In late 1969, Arbus began to work on a portfolio. At the time of her death in 1971, she had completed the printing for eight known sets of a planned edition of 50 of A box of ten photographs, as she titled it, only four of which she sold during her lifetime. Two were purchased by photographer Richard Avedon; another by artist Jasper Johns. A fourth was purchased by Bea Feitler, art director at Harper’s Bazaar. For Feitler, Arbus added an 11th photograph, “A woman with her baby monkey N.J. 1971.” This is the first exhibition to focus exclusively on A box of ten photographs, using the set that Arbus assembled especially for Feitler. It was acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 1986, and it is the only one of the portfolios completed and sold by Arbus that is publicly held. Continue reading