Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants 2018 List Announced in Macao

The 2018 list of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, was announced at an awards ceremony at Wynn Palace, Macau. Now in its sixth year, the 2018 edition includes eight new entries.50BestASIA_2015_logo

The list is created from the votes of the Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants Academy, an influential group of over 300 leaders in the restaurant industry across Asia. For the 2018 edition, Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants is once again working with professional services consultancy Deloitte as its official independent adjudication partner. To see more details on Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants voting process, visit http://www.theworlds50best.com/asia/en/our-manifesto.html

Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants list is published by William Reed Business Media, which also publishes The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, launched in 2002, and Latin America’s 50 Best Restaurants, launched in September 2013. William Reed Business Media is entirely responsible for the organization of the awards, the voting system, and the list.

Photo.G. Production www.Lcygary.com

The winning chefs and restaurateurs celebrate at sixth annual Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants awards ceremony, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, at Wynn Palace, Macau.

Gaggan in Bangkok claims the No.1 spot for a fourth year, retaining the dual titles of The Best Restaurant in Asia, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, and The Best Restaurant in Thailand.

The 2018 edition of Asia’s 50 Best Restaurants list includes Bangkok newcomer Paste (No.31), headed by Bongkoch ‘Bee’ Satongun, who is also named elit® Vodka Asia’s Best Female Chef 2018.

Japan

Den (No.2) earns the title of The Best Restaurant in Japan while La Cime in Osaka debuts at No.17, earning the Highest New Entry Award, sponsored by Aspire Lifestyles. Acclaimed Japanese chef Yoshihiro Narisawa is this year’s recipient of the peer-voted Chefs’ Choice Award, sponsored by Estrella Damm.

L’Effervescence (No.20) in Tokyo won the inaugural Sustainable Restaurant Award in Asia, presented to the restaurant with the highest environmental rating, as determined by audit partner the Sustainable Restaurant Association.

Singapore

Singapore claims seven entries on the 2018 list with Odette (No.5) named The Best Restaurant in Singapore. Continue reading

The Glenlivet® Launches New Mystery Limited-Edition Single Malt Scotch Whisky, The Glenlivet Code

Released Without Cask Information Or Tasting Notes, The Glenlivet Code Challenges Consumers To “Unlock The Taste” Through An Immersive Digital Experience

The Glenlivet® takes whisky enthusiasts on a journey of discovery, while also putting their single malt knowledge to the test with the U.S. launch of limited-edition The Glenlivet Code, a mysterious single malt introduced without cask information or tasting notes. Inspired by the iconic British Code breakers, the latest innovation is a unique combination of flavors that will measure the senses of even the most discerning whisky drinker by entering a digital tasting experience where they will be challenged to “Unlock the Taste” of the mystery whisky.

The Glenlivet Code Logo

The Glenlivet Code Logo (PRNewsfoto/Pernod Ricard USA)

With The Glenlivet Code, we had a unique opportunity to create a whisky that has never been crafted before, using new casks and techniques to push the boundaries of what people expect from The Glenlivet,” said Master Distiller, Alan Winchester.This year’s limited edition is a labyrinth of flavors that will test the senses of even the most discerning whisky drinker and we’re excited to invite consumers worldwide to take on the ultimate challenge by unlocking its mystery taste. The interactive experience will allow whisky enthusiasts at all levels to build their knowledge of the category while also developing a deeper understanding of The Glenlivet.

The Glenlivet Code Bottle

The Glenlivet Code Bottle (PRNewsfoto/Pernod Ricard USA)

The global launch for The Glenlivet Code is supported by the innovative digital campaign to cement The Glenlivet’s role as the definitive Speyside single malt, renowned for its heritage as an authority within the single malts category. Maintaining this exceptional quality that The Glenlivet is famed for, The Glenlivet Code embodies the brand’s smooth and fruity tasting notes with some additional twists to unlock. The mystery whisky is crafted from specially selected casks to produce a new, never-before created single malt scotch whisky.

To begin the decoding challenge, consumers are invited to scan a code on the back of The Glenlivet Code bottle carton using the Shazam app to enter a virtual underground room. There, they will be greeted by a hologram of Winchester, who will challenge them to decode the taste of the liquid by selecting four aromas for the nose and four flavors for the palate from several possible combinations.

After decoding the flavors of the new whisky, participants will be given a score which they can post on their social channels to see how they rank against their peers. The official tasting notes will be revealed at the end of the year to give consumers the time to discover and enjoy the liquid themselves.

The unveiling of The Glenlivet Code follows the launch of our latest global campaign, ‘The Definitive Whisky, The Glenlivet,’ which celebrates the unwavering pursuit of our founder, George Smith, to create The Definitive Speyside single malt,” said Patrick Caulfield, Brand Director, The Glenlivet, Pernod Ricard USA. “We continue to follow in our founder’s footsteps by acting as a visionary within the category. The Glenlivet Code is our latest example of brand innovation within our portfolio and aims to build consumer knowledge of the single malt category while also developing a deeper understanding of The Glenlivet’s award-winning taste.”

The Glenlivet Code will be available at U.S. retailers from the end of April 2018 at a suggested retail price of $120 a bottle. Consumers can log onto www.TheGlenlivet.com to find out more about the digital experience and share their experience on social media using #TheGlenlivetCode.

Smithsonian American Art Museum Acquires Three Masterworks by Beloved American Artist Grandma Moses

Works Are Part of a Promised Gift That Will Anchor 2023 Exhibition

The Smithsonian American Art Museum announced that it has acquired three masterworks by beloved American painter Anna Mary Robertson “Grandma” Moses (1860 –1961). The paintings are a gift of Jane Kallir and the Kallir family in memory of Otto Kallir, who first showed Moses’ work in his New York City Gallery, Galerie St. Etienne, in 1940, and who remained her steadfast supporter and collector. The three donations are the first of 10 major Moses paintings that the Kallir family has promised to give SAAM between now and 2026. A major traveling exhibition of Moses’ art is being planned at SAAM for the fall of 2023 and will feature all 10 works.

Grandma Moses, Grandma Moses Goes to the Big City, 1946, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum, © Grandma Moses Properties, Gift of the Kallir Family in memory of Otto Kallir

Grandma Moses, Grandma Moses Goes to the Big City, 1946, oil on canvas, Smithsonian American Art Museum, © Grandma Moses Properties, Gift of the Kallir Family in memory of Otto Kallir

The three paintings, “Out for Christmas Trees” (1946), currently on view on the first floor, “Grandma Moses Goes to the Big City” (1946), on view in the Luce Center, and “Turkeys” (1958), are stellar examples of Moses’ colorful and lively style, which was inspired by her many decades as a farm wife. Capturing holidays and the spirit of the season, “Out for Christmas Trees” and “Turkeys” show rural life in full swing, while in “Grandma Moses Goes to the Big City,” the artist commemorated a significant milestone in her own life. Moses depicts herself at age 80 amidst the bustle of a working farm, about to embark on her first trip—by automobile—to New York City to see her own paintings on view at Galerie St. Etienne.

The Smithsonian American Art Museum is dedicated to telling the story of the American experience, and Grandma Moses is a key part of this story,” said Stephanie Stebich, the Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “The Kallirs’ generous gift allows the museum to share Grandma Moses’ unique style and subjects across the arc of her career for the benefit of the public who has long been fascinated by this American original.

Moses, born in 1860, captured a nation transitioning from the 19th to the 20th century. In the 1940s and especially in the 1950s, her style was viewed as quintessentially American and more accessible than postwar modern art. In 1953, she was featured on the cover of Time magazine, celebrated for her youthful spirit and the “old timey” style of her paintings and subject matter. While Moses’ art has been on view at SAAM for a number of years, her work only became part of the collection in 2015 when Charles Nelson Brower donated the painting “Christmas” (1958).

Historically, women artist have too often been overlooked, and this issue is particularly acute among self-taught artists, whose work was often lost before it was ever appreciated,” said Leslie Umberger, SAAM’s curator of folk and self-taught art. “Moses was a notable exception; her work was appreciated and cared for, and she became both an American icon and a market success during her lifetime, a rarity on several levels. Both her story and her art are truly remarkable.”

Jane Kallir, co-director of Galerie St. Etienne and the author of four books on Grandma Moses, has long stewarded the Moses research archive that Otto Kallir began compiling in 1940; she will serve as a consultant on the exhibition.

I am thrilled that the Smithsonian American Art Museum has affirmed its commitment to Grandma Moses, and I hope that the museum will become a magnet for Moses scholars, as well as for the many Americans who love her work,” Kallir said.

SAAM has championed self-taught art as an embodiment of the democratic spirit since 1970 when it acquired and preserved James Hampton’s iconic “The Throne of the Third Heaven of the Nations’ Millennium General Assembly.” It is one of the only major American museums to advocate for a diverse populist voice within the context of what is traditionally considered great art. The museum shows folk and self-taught art throughout the museum and has had dedicated gallery spaces for such work for more than 45 years; a new installation of these galleries, organized by Umberger, opened in 2016. “Between Worlds: The Art of Bill Traylor” opens at SAAM Sept. 28, and runs through March 17, 2019. Other recent exhibitions featuring self-taught artists included “Untitled: The Art of James Castle” (2014), “Ralph Fasanella: Lest We Forget” (2014) and “Mingering Mike’s Supersonic Greatest Hits” (2015).

The Smithsonian American Art Museum celebrates the vision and creativity of Americans with artworks in all media spanning more than four centuries. Its National Historic Landmark building is located at Eighth and F streets N.W., above the Gallery Place/Chinatown Metrorail station. Museum hours are 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily (closed Dec. 25). Admission is free.

Paul McCartney 2018 Catalog Reissues Out May 18

On May 18, Paul McCartney will release four 2018 edition catalog reissues via MPL/Capitol: NEW, Chaos And Creation In The Backyard, Wings Greatest and Thrillington. All four titles will be issued in affordable single CD digipak and 180gram black vinyl single LP formats—and will be made available for the first time in limited edition 180gram color vinyl pressings. All vinyl LPs will include a download card.

UMe McCartney 2018 Edition Catalogue Reissues

Paul McCartney 2018 Catalog Reissues Out May 18, Featuring Limited Edition 180g Color Vinyl Pressings.

Upon its release in 2013, NEW was lauded by Rolling Stone as “energized and full of joyous rock & roll invention.” Executive produced by Giles Martin and also featuring production by Mark Ronson, Ethan Johns, and Paul Epworth, NEW entered the U.S. chart at #3. The album scored positive reviews from Entertainment Weekly to Pitchfork and all points in between, while the title track, “Queenie Eye” and “Save Us” would become staples of the McCartney live show over the course of the Out There and One On One world tours. NEW‘s 2018 edition will feature the first vinyl pressing of the album since its 2013 release, including a limited edition pink vinyl 180gram vinyl LP with download card and 12×12″ insert.

Released in 2005, Chaos And Creation In The Backyard was instantly hailed as continuing a hot streak that included Flaming Pie, Run Devil Run, and Driving Rain. Produced by Nigel Godrich (Radiohead, Beck) and featuring the singles “Fine Line” and the Grammy-winning “Jenny Wren,” Chaos And Creation… debuted at #6 on the Billboard chart. It remained on the charts for nearly half a year, while Paul mounted the massive ‘US’ Tour. In 2007, “Jenny Wren” won the Grammy for Best Male Pop Vocal Performance, while the album was nominated in three other categories including Album of the Year. The 2018 edition of Chaos And Creation… will make the album available on vinyl for the first time since its initial run and will include a limited edition gold vinyl 180gram vinyl LP with download card and 12×12″ insert.

Originally released in 1978, Wings Greatest was the first ever compilation of Paul McCartney’s post-Beatles hits, featuring four classics that had previously been unavailable on any McCartney album: “Another Day,” “Junior’s Farm,” “Hi, Hi, Hi” and “Mull of Kintyre.” The penultimate Wings album release, Wings Greatest was naturally a worldwide hit and the soundtrack to the 70s for a generation. As part of its 2018 edition reissue, Wings Greatest will be available as a limited edition blue vinyl 180gram vinyl LP with download card and 20″x30″ poster.

Recorded in 1971 but not released until 1977, Thrillington remains one of the most enigmatic entries in the storied McCartney discography. Credited to the pseudonym Percy “Thrills” Thrillington, a fictitious socialite whose activities were chronicled in UK newspaper ads, Thrillington was actually a fully reimagined instrumental lounge/jazz version of Paul and Linda McCartney’s RAM. With Thrillington’s 2018 edition, Percy is given a new lease on life with this collector’s item available on vinyl for the first time since the 1977 first pressings that fetch hefty sums on the collectors’ market, plus a limited edition red/black marbled 180gram vinyl LP with download card.

Everyone Loves To Love Donna Summer

Soundtrack Companion To The Original Dance Floor Diva’s Biographical Broadway Musical Features All Of Her Influential, Chart-Topping Tracks, Via New Island Def Jam/UMe Collection on April 20

On April 20, Island Def Jam/UMe is set to properly fete Donna Summer, the undisputed Queen of Disco and The First Lady of Love, with Summer: The Original Hits. This catchy collection of Summer’s greatest hits is a companion to Summer: The Donna Summer Musical, an exciting new Broadway musical based on her rich and storied life.

Offical-Artwork

Soundtrack Companion To The Original Dance Floor Diva’s Biographical Broadway Musical Features All Of Her Influential, Chart-Topping Tracks, Via New Island Def Jam/. UMe Collection on April 20UMe (PRNewsFoto/Universal Music Enterprises)

Previews for Summer: The Donna Summer Musical commenced on March 28, 2018, at the legendary Lunt-Fontanne Theatre in New York City with the official opening on April 23, 2018. (Preorder Summer: The Original Hits here)

Donna Summer was born in Boston on New Year’s Eve, 1948. She embraced the core tenets of gospel as a young singer while cutting her teeth with a local rock band and in European musicals, developing an individual vocal élan that also married the best elements of Rock, R&B, and Disco. Her signature style is on full display on The Original Hits in such iconic tracks as forever-seductive “Love To Love You Baby,” the defiantly declarative “Bad Girls,” the MTV-era female-empowerment anthem “She Works Hard For The Money,” the fiery dance/rock mesh of “Hot Stuff,” and the urgent ballad-to-crescendo disco blend of “Last Dance.”

Giorgio Moroder, her frequent collaborator, legendary Italian electronic-music pioneer, and producer who partnered with Pete Bellotte, instantly recognized Summer’s vocal prowess — and how to maximize her performance in the studio. When Moroder heard Richard Harris‘s dramatic version of Jimmy Webb’s lost-love lament “MacArthur Park” on the radio while driving on the Hollywood Freeway, he knew who had to sing it for him in an innovative arrangement. “Even before I recorded it, I knew it would be perfect for her voice,” Moroder confirmed.

Summer, the producer continued, had an uncanny knack for conveying unbridled emotion over studio-driven technology. “She humanized the machines,” Moroder said, citing the groundbreaking and highly influential “I Feel Love” as the key “legacy track” of their many years of fruitful collaboration. “That song is a combination of mechanical instruments and Donna’s beautiful, romantic voice. It was obviously great to work with a great artist like Donna.”

Summer’s influential work is given a fresh, respectful update with two rare remixes headed by renowned Grammy®-nominated remix producer Ralphi Rosario: “MacArthur Park (Rosabel’s Radio Mix),” a No. 1 Dance hit in 2013, and “Hot Stuff,” a new rework in collaboration with Erick Ibiza, that debuts on this collection. Another rarity in the collection is Summer’s German-language rendition of “White Boys” that she recorded while in the German cast of Hair.

Even though Summer sadly passed away in 2012, her cultural impact and sonic legacy carry ever onward, and she garnered a well-deserved posthumous induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2013. If you’re lookin’ for some hot stuff to listen to this evening, look no further than Summer: The Original Hits.

Donna Summer SUMMER: THE ORIGINAL HITS [CD & DIGITAL DELUXE VERSION]

  • I Feel Love
  • Love To Love You Baby
  • I Remember Yesterday
  • On My Honor
  • White Boys – From “Haare (Hair)”
  • Faster And Faster To Nowhere
  • MacArthur Park
  • Heaven Knows – With Brooklyn Dreams
  • No More Tears (Enough Is Enough) – Duet With Barbra Streisand
  • Pandora’s Box
  • On The Radio
  • I Love You
  • Bad Girls
  • She Works Hard For The Money
  • Dim All The Lights
  • Unconditional Love
  • Hot Stuff
  • Last Dance
  • The Dance Continues…
  • MacArthur Park (Rosabel’s Radio Mix)**
  • Hot Stuff (Ralph Rosario & Erick Ibiza 2018 Rework)**

** Exclusive bonus tracks to the Digital Deluxe Version

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instagram.com/officialdonnasummer

New Exhibition Explores Lost And Censured Murals Of Los Angeles That Exposed Unequal Treatment Of Mexicans And Mexican Americans

¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicana/o Murals under Siege” provides a historical backdrop to issues of social justice that continue to plague California and the nation today

Murals became an essential form of artist response and public voice during the Chicana/o Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. They were a means of challenging the status quo and expressing both pride and frustration at a time when other channels of communication were limited for the Mexican American community. Because they threatened established authority, Chicana/o murals were often censored, neglected, whitewashed, or destroyed.

California Historical Society Murales Rebeldes

New Exhibition, “¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicano/a Murals under Siege”, Explores Lost And Censured Murals Of Los Angeles That Exposed Unequal Treatment Of Mexicans And Mexican Americans. (PRNewsfoto/California Historical Society).

The California Historical Society presents its latest exhibition and companion publication,“¡Murales Rebeldes! L.A. Chicano/a Murals under Siege”, which provides an important historical backdrop to issues of social justice that sparked outrage in California more than a half-century ago and continue today and provides insight to similar injustice that plague today’s socio-political environment. ¡Murales Rebeldes! will be on view at the galleries of the California Historical Society, located at 678 Mission Street in San Francisco, from April 7 to September 16, 2018. Continue reading

“No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” Opens March 30 at Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery

Exhibition Brings Large-Scale Installations From Famed Desert Gathering to Washington

Cutting-edge artwork created at Burning Man, the annual desert gathering that is one of the most influential events in contemporary art and culture, will be exhibited in the nation’s capital for the first time this spring. “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” will take over the entire Renwick Gallery building, exploring the maker culture, ethos, principles and creative spirit of Burning Man. Several artists will debut new works in the exhibition. In addition to the in-gallery presentation, the Renwick exhibition will expand beyond its walls for the first time through an outdoor extension titled “No Spectators: Beyond the Renwick,” displaying sculptures throughout the surrounding neighborhood.

Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Totem of Confessions, 2015. Photo by Daniel L Hayes.

Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Totem of Confessions, 2015. Photo by Daniel L Hayes.

Burning Man is both a cultural movement and a thriving temporary city of more than 75,000 people that rises out of the dust for a single week each year in late summer in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. During that time, enormous experimental art installations are erected, some of which are then ritually burned to the ground. The desert gathering is a uniquely American hotbed of artistic ingenuity, driving innovation through its philosophies of radical self-expression, community participation, rejection of commodification and reverence for the handmade.

The scale, the communal effort and the technical challenges inherent in creating works for the desert are part of what sets Burning Man apart from other art experiences,” said Stephanie Stebich, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. “It is an amazingly creative laboratory where innovators go to play and to push the boundaries of their craft. Displaying the art of Burning Man at the Renwick is the latest example of our focus on new directions in craft and making.”

FoldHaus, Shrumen Lumen, 2016. Photo by Rene Smith.

FoldHaus, Shrumen Lumen, 2016. Photo by Rene Smith.

Nora Atkinson, the museum’s Lloyd Herman Curator of Craft, is organizing the exhibition in collaboration with the Burning Man Project, the nonprofit organization responsible for producing the annual Burning Man event in Black Rock City, for facilitating and extending the culture that has issued from Burning Man into the wider world and for cultivating its principles reflecting an immediate, non-commercial and participatory culture. The outdoor extension of the exhibition is presented in partnership with Washington, D.C.’s Golden Triangle Business Improvement District, a 43-square-foot neighborhood that stretches from the White House to Dupont Circle. The Burning Man community across the globe was instrumental in suggesting artworks for inclusion in the exhibition.

No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man” opens March 30, 2018. The Renwick is the sole venue for the exhibition, which will close in two phases. The first floor will showcase works by Candy Chang, Marco Cochrane, Duane Flatmo, Michael Garlington and Natalia Bertotti, Five Ton Crane Arts Collective, Scott Froschauer, Android Jones and Richard Wilks and will close Sept. 16, 2018. The second floor, featuring works by David Best, FoldHaus Art Collective, Aaron Taylor Kuffner, HYBYCOZO (Yelena Filipchuk and Serge Beaulieu), Christopher Schardt and Leo Villareal, will remain on view through Jan. 21, 2019. “No Spectators: Beyond the Renwick,” will be presented in the surrounding neighborhood through December 2018. Continue reading

“Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” Opens April 6 at the Smithsonian American Art Museum

Exhibition Examines A Rare Portfolio Presented In Its Entirety For The First Time

Diane Arbus (1923—1971) was one of the most original and influential artists of the 20th century. “Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” forges new ground as the first exhibition to focus on the portfolio Arbus was working on at the end of her life. This heretofore missing piece from her biography was as important to her evolving artistic identity as it was to the broader public recognition of photography as a fine-art practice. Central to the transition Arbus was making away from magazine work at the time of her death, the portfolio bridges a lifetime of modest recognition with a posthumous career of extraordinary acclaim.

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Photo Credit: Diane Arbus, A woman with her baby monkey, N.J. 1971, 1971, gelatin silver print, 14 7/8 x 15 in. Smithsonian American Art Museum; Museum purchase. © The Estate of Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus: A box of ten photographs” is on view from April 6, 2018, to Jan. 21, 2019, at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The exhibition is organized by John Jacob, the McEvoy Family Curator for Photography. The museum is the only venue for the exhibition.

Having started her career as a studio photographer with her husband Allan Arbus, Diane Arbus quit the studio in 1956 and later studied with Lisette Model at the New School in New York City. She became a magazine photographer, working on assignment for high-profile periodicals including Esquire and Harpers Bazaar. In 1963 she was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship for a project that focused on American customs. The Guggenheim was among the most prestigious of fellowships available to artists, including photographers, making it an important source of financial and artistic support for those like Arbus who sought to break free from the strictures of magazine photography. Her later work was emotionally complex and explored subject matter outside of the mainstream, such as portraits of individuals whose professional, personal or physical attributes deviated from what was considered normal or acceptable in Arbus’ time, and photographs that frankly captured sexuality or revealed underlying currents of domestic tension and dysfunction.

At the time of her death, Arbus was already a growing influence on the field of photography but not widely known to the larger public. It was her portfolio, A box of ten photographs, that initiated the transition, connecting her past as a magazine photographer with her emergence as a serious artist. The publication of six photographs from the portfolio in Artforum and the presentation of the complete portfolio at the Venice Biennale were the first steps toward the almost mythical status of Arbus today.

Stephen Frank, Diane Arbus with her photograph Identical twins, Roselle, N.J. 1966, during a lecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1970. © Stephen A. Frank

Stephen Frank, Diane Arbus with her photograph Identical twins, Roselle, N.J. 1966, during a lecture at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1970. © Stephen A. Frank

This exhibition sheds new light on a crucial and often overlooked stage in Arbus’ career, as well as on a transformational moment in the history of contemporary photography,” said Stephanie Stebich, The Margaret and Terry Stent Director at the Smithsonian American Art. “The museum was an early champion of photography as an important art form reflecting the American experience. We’re proud of the role that SAAM played in bringing the work of Diane Arbus to wider recognition in the 1970s and are pleased to present A box of ten photographs in its entirety to a new generation.

In late 1969, Arbus began to work on a portfolio. At the time of her death in 1971, she had completed the printing for eight known sets of a planned edition of 50 of A box of ten photographs, as she titled it, only four of which she sold during her lifetime. Two were purchased by photographer Richard Avedon; another by artist Jasper Johns. A fourth was purchased by Bea Feitler, art director at Harper’s Bazaar. For Feitler, Arbus added an 11th photograph, “A woman with her baby monkey N.J. 1971.” This is the first exhibition to focus exclusively on A box of ten photographs, using the set that Arbus assembled especially for Feitler. It was acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum in 1986, and it is the only one of the portfolios completed and sold by Arbus that is publicly held. Continue reading

The Whitney Announces Spring Public Programs

This spring, the Whitney Museum of American Art presents a series of talks, performances, and workshops in conjunction with its exhibitions Between the Waters, Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables, Nick Mauss: Transmissions, and Zoe Leonard: Survey. These public programs offer opportunities to engage with artists and scholars to consider the questions and themes explored in each exhibition.

SCHEDULE OF PUBLIC PROGRAMS

The schedule is subject to change.

Nick Mauss (b. 1980), Transmissions, March 16–May 14, 2018

Nick Mauss (b. 1980), Transmissions, March 16–May 14, 2018. Whitney Museum of American Art. Performers pictured: Ahmaud Culver, Jasmine Hearn, and Anna Witenberg, March 13, 2018. Photograph © Paula Court

Strange Fruit, Saturday, March 24, 3 pm

Over five years, Zoe Leonard sewed together skins of fruit to create Strange Fruit (1992–1997). Leonard chose not to preserve the resulting work, intending for its decay to be on view. On the occasion of the work’s appearance for the first time since 2001 in Zoe Leonard: Survey, a range of voices will reflect on Strange Fruit and its multiple historical inflections, its relevance and resonance today, and its very specific material existence. Speakers include writer, AIDS activist, and film- and videomaker Gregg Bordowitz; conceptual, interdisciplinary, transgender artist Jonah Groeneboer; interdisciplinary artist Katherine Hubbard; writer and scholar Fred Moten; artist Cameron Rowland; and conservator of contemporary art Christian Scheidemann. Elisabeth Sherman, assistant curator, moderates the conversation.

Tickets are required ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors, plus Museum admission; free for members).

A Chilling Make Believe: Alexis Rockman on Grant Wood
Friday, April 6, 6:30 pm

This talk by artist Alexis Rockman examines the romanticized and ambivalent view of a pre-industrial rural world depicted in Grant Wood’s landscape paintings. Situating Wood in a tradition of American art in which national identity depends on a personal visual vocabulary, Rockman shares his longstanding engagement with Wood through paintings that mix contemporary dread and hope for our ecological future.

Tickets are required ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors).

Demian DinéYazhi’: An Infected Sunset
Friday, April 20, 7 pm

In conjunction with the exhibition Between the Waters, Demian DinéYazhi’ reads selections from his poem, An Infected Sunset. This long-form descriptive prose poem is a reflection on queer sex, survival, death politics, indigenous identity, environmental injustice, and the importance of honoring community. The evening begins with a performance by Laura Ortman (White Mountain Apache).

Free with Museum admission during Pay-As-You-Wish Fridays. Advanced registration required.

Badlands Unlimited presents What is Cryptocurrency?
Friday, April 27, 6:30 pm

Bitcoin, Ethereum, Monero, and other cryptocurrencies claim to hold the potential to revolutionize the very nature of global economics by decentralizing how money and value are exchanged. This program explores the basics of crypto: its history, technology, and current application in the field of finance and beyond. Maya Binyam and Grayson Earle, co-founders of Bail Bloc, a cryptocurrency app that seeks a real-world exchange value against bail, also lead a conversation about what crypto can be for artists and writers.

Tickets are required ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors).

Transmissions: Nick Mauss in conversation with Elena Filipovic, Jennifer Homans, and Elisabeth Sussman
Friday, May 4, 6:30 pm

In conjunction with Nick Mauss: Transmissions, this roundtable conversation explores the genesis of the exhibition through multiple circuits of inquiry and dialogue, how the interdependence of dance and art histories can be exhibited, and what challenges are brought up in the presentation of ephemeral, time-based, collaborative works. Addressing some of the counter-histories proposed by Transmissions, this conversation emphasizes exhibition-making as an artistic form. Mauss speaks with Elena Filipovic, director and curator, Kunsthalle Basel, Jennifer Homans, founder and director, The Center for Ballet in the Arts at NYU, and Elisabeth Sussman, Sondra Gilman Curator of Photography and co-curator of Nick Mauss: Transmissions, each of whom has worked closely with the artist. This program is organized in collaboration with The Center for Ballet and the Arts at New York University.

Tickets are required ($10 adults; $8 members, students, and seniors). Continue reading

John A. Farrell To Be Awarded New-York Historical Society’s 2018 Barbara And David Zalaznick Book Prize In American History For Richard Nixon: The Life

$50,000 Prize and Title of American Historian Laureate to Be Presented at Weekend with History Friday, April 13, 2018

Pam Schafler, chair of New-York Historical Society’s Board of Trustees, and Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of New-York Historical, announced that author John A. Farrell will be honored with New-York Historical’s annual Barbara and David Zalaznick Book Prize in American History for Richard Nixon: The Life (Penguin Random House, 2017).

The award recognizes the best book of the year in the field of American history or biography. Mr. Farrell will receive a $50,000 cash award, an engraved medal, and the title of American Historian Laureate, which will be presented on April 13, 2018. The ceremony is part of New-York Historical’s 13th annual Chairman’s Council Weekend with History, a two-day event featuring an array of speakers discussing important historical events that have made an impact on New York City and the nation.

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New-York Historical Society logo

Selected by a prize committee comprising historians and New-York Historical leadership from a field of more than 136 submissions, Richard Nixon: The Life is a defining portrait of a man who led America in a time of turmoil and left the nation divided. We live today, Farrell shows, in a world Richard Nixon made. Within four years of his first political victory, Nixon was a U.S. senator; in six, the vice president of the United States of America. Nixon’s sins as a candidate were legion; and in one unlawful secret plot, as Farrell reveals, Nixon acted to prolong the Vietnam War for his own political purposes. Finally elected president in 1969, Nixon packed his staff with bright young men who devised forward-thinking reforms addressing health care, welfare, civil rights, and protection of the environment. It was a fine legacy, but Nixon cared little for it. He aspired to make his mark on the world stage instead, and his 1972 opening to China was the first great crack in the Cold War. Continue reading

Philadelphia Museum of Art to Present New Work by Rachel Rose

Philadelphia Museum of Art Presents a New Work by Rachel Rose, On View May 2 through August 18, 2018

Rose is the Inaugural Recipient of The Future Fields Commission in Time-Based Media Grant

The Philadelphia Museum of Art will present a new video installation by Rachel Rose, the inaugural recipient of the Future Fields Commission in Time-Based Media, which has been jointly awarded to the artist by the Museum and the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo. A project under development for nearly two years, this commission represents the most ambitiously scaled production in the artist’s career to date, leading to the creation of a work that will enter the collections of these two institutions. Titled Wil-o-Wisp, Rose’s work will be on view from May 2 through August 18, 2018, at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. It will then travel to the Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo in Turin, Italy, where it will open in November.

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Production image from Wil-o-Wisp, 2018, by Rachel Rose (Jointly owned and commissioned by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo. Funding is made possible for the Philadelphia Museum of Art through the Contemporary Art Revolving Fund). Photo by Nancy Green, on-site at Plimoth Plantation, Massachusetts, 2017.

Timothy Rub, the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer, stated: “Seeing this project evolve since the awarding of the commission has been deeply gratifying. It demonstrates just how vital it is for institutions like ours to support emerging talent at precisely the time when such support is needed. This collaboration with our partners in Turin has also provided a wonderful opportunity to expand and strengthen our engagement with contemporary art.”

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Production image from Wil-o-Wisp, 2018, by Rachel Rose (Jointly owned and commissioned by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo. Funding is made possible for the Philadelphia Museum of Art through the Contemporary Art Revolving Fund). Photo by Nancy Green, on-site at Plimoth Plantation, Massachusetts, 2017.

In 2016, the two esteemed arts and culture organizations established the Future Fields Commission in Time-Based Media as a collaborative initiative to jointly commission and acquire new work by artists from around the world who are active in video, film, performance, and sound. The Commission supports the creation and production of a new work every two years that will be presented at both the Museum and the Fondazione. With its unique focus and its commitment to the joint acquisition of the works produced with the support of this initiative, the commission aims to give unprecedented opportunities to international artists who are exploring new territory in these experimental modes of contemporary art. Rachel Rose is the inaugural recipient.

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Production image from Wil-o-Wisp, 2018, by Rachel Rose (Jointly owned and commissioned by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo. Funding is made possible for the Philadelphia Museum of Art through the Contemporary Art Revolving Fund). Photo by Nancy Green, on-site at Plimoth Plantation, Massachusetts, 2017.

Rachel Rose has emerged as an important voice in contemporary video, widely recognized for her deft digital editing that aligns disparate visual images and historical references. This new commission has provided her with an opportunity to widen the scope of her interests by investigating narrative devices and story-telling. In Wil-o-Wisp, the artist has directed a live action video in which a woman’s fate becomes inextricably tied to moments of upheaval, suspicion, and persecution in 16th century agrarian England, a time during which the Enclosure Movement led to the privatization of land throughout the country. The video follows various vignettes of Elspeth’s life, cycling between familial moments and tragedy, the practice of magic and her persecution.PMAhorizontal

Rose strings dramatic moments together with temporal shifts, varying rhythms, an emotive score, and carefully constructed visual effects. The work reflects upon the harsh realities of English rural life during a time of a rising culture of suspicion in which women, such as Elspeth, engaging in nontraditional healing practices were often seen as threatening to an increasingly regulated society. The title of the work, Wil-o-Wisp, refers to ghostly lights that could be seen hovering at night over bogs and marshes and that, in folklore, could have the sinister effect of leading people astray. In Rose’s work, the title speaks to the characters whose paths are determined both by willful choices and the power of coincidence.

Directing a cast and crew of about thirty people, Rose shot the work at Plimoth Plantation, a living history museum in Plymouth, Massachusetts, that offered a period setting of houses in an English vernacular style and an austere winter landscape. Working with both trained and street-cast actors, as well as Plimoth Plantation guides, Rose both utilized the character of the site and added to it, creating her own imagined world within this setting. From costumes to set decorations, Rose combined period and contemporary materials.

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Production image from Wil-o-Wisp, 2018, by Rachel Rose (Jointly owned and commissioned by the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo. Funding is made possible for the Philadelphia Museum of Art through the Contemporary Art Revolving Fund). Photo by Nancy Green, on-site at Plimoth Plantation, Massachusetts, 2017.

Rose’s video is characterized as much by her intensive approach to post-production as by the attention she gives to the script and on-set staging. After filming the work in Plimoth, she added components such as a narrative sung by an ethereal voice in iambic pentameter. Orchestral and electronical scores serve to gather momentum and produce an emotional effect. Animals and people generate ghostly doubles, and a bright green moss seems to take over the barren landscape. In this work, Rose also continues her use of Medieval marginalia: drawn characters that populated Medieval manuscripts are here collaged to form words announcing certain protagonists and moments within the larger narrative. These elements coalesce with the depicted dramatic events to create a world in which the circumstance of history meets the coincidence and magic of fate.

Installed as a single-channel video and approximately ten minutes in length, Wil-o-Wisp will fill a large gallery that will include an eighteen-foot widescreen. It will be framed within an environment which is currently under development by the artist.

Erica Battle, The John Alchin and Hal Marryatt Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, said: “While Rachel Rose’s carefully woven narrative is set in the past, it speaks to larger themes and concerns that are relevant to our world today. Wil-o-Wisp reflects the inescapable feeling that history is cyclical.”

Rachel Rose (American, born 1986) creates video installations that combine video, sound, and architectural elements. She has had solo exhibitions at the Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria (2017), the Aspen Art Museum (2016), the Museu Serralves in Porto, Lisbon (2016), the Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London (2015), and the Whitney Museum of American Art (2015). She was the recipient of the Frieze Artist Award (2015), and her work is collected by prominent institutions such as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; LUMA Foundation, Arles; Musée d’Art Moderne, Paris; Ishikawa Foundation; Tate, London; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, among others. Rose received a BA from Yale University, New Haven, as well as an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, London, and an MFA from Columbia University, New York. Continue reading

‘Painted In Mexico’ And Celebrated Around The World

The vitality and inventiveness of artists in 18th-century New Spain (Mexico) is the focus of the exhibition Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790: Pinxit Mexici, opening April 24 (and running through July 22, 2018) at The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met Fifth Avenue, Floor 2, Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Exhibition Hall, Gallery 999).

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Juan Patricio Morlete Ruiz (Mexico, 1713–1772), Portrait of Doña María Tomasa Durán López de Cárdenas, c. 1762, Oil on canvas. 40 3/16 × 33 1/16 in. (102 × 84 cm). Galería Coloniart. Collection of Felipe Siegel, Anna and Andrés Siegel, Mexico City

Through some 112 works of art (primarily paintings), many of which are unpublished and newly restored, the exhibition will survey the most important artists and stylistic developments of the period and highlight the emergence of new pictorial genres and subjects. Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790 is the first major exhibition devoted to this neglected topic.

Prior to its presentation at The Met, the exhibition was shown at the Palacio de Cultura Banamex-Palacio de Iturbide (Fomento Cultural Banamex), Mexico City (June 29–October 15, 2017), and it is currently on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (November 19, 2017–March 18, 2018).

During the first century after the conquest of Mexico, artists from Europe—mainly immigrants from Spain—met the growing demand for images of all types, both religious and secular. Some of these artists established family workshops in Mexico that endured for generations. By the middle of the 17th century, artists born and trained in Mexico, responding to the mounting needs of both individual and institutional patrons, had risen to prominence and developed pictorial styles that reflected the changing cultural climate.

The 18th century ushered in a period of artistic splendor, as local schools of painting were consolidated, new iconographies were invented, and artists began to organize themselves into academies. Attesting to the artists’ extraordinary versatility, painters whose monumental works cover the walls of chapels, sacristies, choirs, and university halls were often the same ones who produced portraits, casta paintings (depictions of racially mixed families), folding screens, and intimate devotional images. The volume of work produced by the four generations of Mexican painters that spanned the 18th century is nearly unmatched elsewhere in the vast Hispanic world.

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Attributed to José de Ibarra (Mexico, 1685–1756), From Spaniard and Mulatta, Morisca, c. 1730. Oil on canvas. 64 9/16 × 35 13/16 in. (164 × 91 cm). Private Collection, Madrid

The growing professional self-awareness of artists during the period led many educated painters not only to sign their works to emphasize their authorship but also to make explicit reference to Mexico as their place of origin through the Latin phrase pinxit Mexici (painted in Mexico). This expression eloquently encapsulates the painters’ pride in their own tradition and their connection to larger, transatlantic trends.

Painted in Mexico, 1700–1790 unfolds in seven major chronological and thematic sections:

Great Masters introduces the works of leading painters around whom others congregated, emphasizing intergenerational ties and the steady coalescence of a local tradition. It highlights the role of Juan Rodríguez Juárez in stimulating a stylistic change and spurring the establishment of an independent painting academy around 1722. Through an academic approach based on copying and drawing—aided by the arrival of prints and paintings from Europe—these artists and their contemporaries perfected their compositional skills, refined their depiction of space and architecture, and paid increasing attention to the anatomical correctness of figures.

Master Storytellers and the Art of Expression considers the resurgence of narrative painting in 18th-century Mexico in response to a growing demand for images that could convey complex sacred stories from the Bible and the lives of the saints. Often conceived as series, these works decorated the interiors of churches, convents, colleges, and other public spaces. An emphasis on domestic interiors and everyday details served to establish a connection with the viewer and humanize sacred content. Continue reading

“Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789)” Comes to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, April 16–July 29, 2018

The Palace of Versailles has attracted travelers since it was transformed under the direction of the Sun King, Louis XIV (1638–1715), from a simple hunting lodge into one of the most magnificent public courts of Europe. French and foreign travelers, royalty, dignitaries and ambassadors, artists, musicians, writers and philosophers, scientists, grand tourists and day-trippers alike, all flocked to the majestic royal palace surrounded by its extensive formal gardens.

The Arrival of the Papal Nuncio_300dpi

The Arrival of the Papal Nuncio, 1690s. Oil on canvas, 48 7/8 x 61 in. (124 x 155 cm). Collection of Aline Josserand-Conan, Paris. Photo by Christophe Fouin

Versailles was always a truly international setting. Countless visitors described their experiences and observations in correspondence and journals. Court diaries, gazettes, and literary journals offer detailed reports on specific events and entertainments as well as on ambassadorial receptions that were also documented in paintings and engravings.

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Dress (grande robe à la française). French, 1775–85. Silk brocade (woven 1760s), H. from neck to train 59 7/8 in. (152 cm). The Kyoto Costume Institute (AC11075 2004-2AB) © The Kyoto Costume Institute, photo by Takashi Hatakeyama

Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789) is was previously on view at the Château de Versailles through February 25, 2018.

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Charles-Gabriel Sauvage, called Lemire père (French, 1741– 1827). Figure of Louis XVI and Benjamin Franklin, 1780– 85. Porcelain, 12 3/4 x 9 1/2 x 6 in. (32.4 x 24.1 x 15.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of William H. Huntington, 1883 (83.2.260)

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Charles Cozette (French, 1713–1797). Folding Screen with Views of the Château de Versailles from the Avenue de Paris and the Cour du Cheval Blanc at the Château de Fontainebleau, ca. 1768–70. Wood, oil on canvas, painted leather, 79 1/2 x 153 1/8 in. (202 x 389 cm). Collection of Monsieur and Madame Dominique Mégret, Paris. Photo by F. Doury

Opening April 16 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Visitors to Versailles (1682–1789) will track these many travelers from 1682, when Louis XIV moved his court to Versailles, up to 1789, when Louis XVI (1774–1792) and the royal family were forced to leave the palace and return to Paris. (Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue, The Tisch Galleries, Gallery 899, 2nd floor) Continue reading

New-York Historical Society To Explore “Fashion, Feathers, And The Rise Of Animal Rights” Activism In Honor Of Landmark Migratory Bird Reaty Act Centennial

“Feathers: Fashion and the Fight for Wildlife” On View April 6 – July 15, 2018

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Unidentified maker. Accessory set, including muff and tippet, 1880–99, United States Herring Gulls, feathers, silk. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Brooklyn Museum Costume Collection, 2009.300.2050a-c. This unusual muff and tippet, made with four adult Herring Gulls harvested during breeding season, demonstrates how accessory manufacturers exploited these birds. Gulls are and were great scavengers, and continue to be instrumental in cleaning our shorelines. The 19th-century fashion for their feathers and bodies, however, nearly drove them into extinction.

The New-York Historical Society presents a special exhibition that melds fashion, activism, and the history of the groundbreaking Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918. Feathers: Fashion and the Fight for Wildlife, on view April 6–July 15, 2018, examines the circumstances that inspired early environmental activists—many of them women and New Yorkers—to champion the protection of endangered birds. The exhibition showcases bird- and plumage-embellished clothing and accessories. It also features original watercolors by John James Audubon of birds endangered before the passage of the statute, models for The Birds of America, from the Museum’s renowned collection. The exhibition is part of the Year of the Bird, a centennial celebration of the Act organized by National Geographic, the National Audubon Society, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and BirdLife International. Recordings of bird songs from The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology—together with objects on loan from other institutions, books, ephemera, and photographs—animate the narrative.

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John James Audubon (1785–1851), Tundra Swan (Cygnus columbianus), Study for Havell pl. 411, 1838. Watercolor, graphite, oil, black ink, black chalk, and white gouache? with touches of pastel and glazing on paper, laid on card. Purchased for the New-York Historical Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.411 Swans’ down, the soft, fine, under-feathers, of swans were used for trimming clothes—as in the evening dress on display—and for cosmetic powder puffs. Tundra Swans once nested over most of North America but disappeared rapidly as civilization advanced westward. By the 1930s, fewer than 100 remained south of Canada. With protection from hunting and the disturbance of plumers, northwestern populations have rebounded. Today, their population is stable enough to sustain a limited hunting season in some areas.

Administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 was one of the first federal laws to address the environment, prohibiting the hunting, killing, trading, and shipping of migratory birds. It also regulated the nation’s commercial plume trade, which had decimated many American bird species to the point of near extinction.

Feathers: Fashion and the Fight for Wildlife commemorate the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act by delving into history and examining the economic and social circumstances that inspired the early environmentalists and activists who lobbied for this consequential legislation,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president, and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “As New York was the center of the nation’s feather trade, the exhibition also investigates how the act impacted the city’s feather importers, hat manufacturers, retailers, and fashion consumers—as well as how New York women played an important role in pushing for the legislation.”

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John James Audubon (1785–1851) with Maria Martin (1796–1863), Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus), Study for Havell pl. 379, 1836–37. Watercolor, graphite, black ink, and gouache with touches of pastel and selective glazing on paper laid on card. Purchased for the New-York Historical Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.379. Audubon painted three species of North American hummingbirds. He never saw the western Rufous Hummingbird alive, but painted it from specimens sent to him by the naturalist Thomas Nuttall. While naturalists always admired the hummingbirds they studied, the larger public’s appreciation of these sensationally beautiful creatures resulted from exposure in public arenas. Many pieces of hummingbird jewelry, like the Red-legged Honeycreeper earrings seen in the exhibition, were produced in England by Harry Emanuel, who in 1865 patented a process for insetting the heads in silver and gold mounts.

N-YHS Oppenheimer Editions AWC Plate 321 Roseate Spoonbill

John James Audubon (1785–1851), Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja), Study for Havell pl. 321, ca. 1831–32; 1836. Watercolor, graphite, gouache, and black ink with touches of glazing on paper laid on Japanese paper. Purchased for the New-York Historical Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, 1863.17.321. Audubon admired these prehistoric-looking, wading birds, the largest North American member of the ibis family. The beauty of their feathers brought the species to the brink of extinction by 1920. Plume hunters invaded colonies to slaughter the birds for fans sold in the tourist trade. They survived after the Audubon Society dispatched wardens to protect them and urged the passage of strict conservation laws. Today, the Roseate Spoonbill is one of the great success stories of the conservation movement.

The first gallery of the exhibition, “A Fancy for Feathers,” presents examples of the late 19th- and early 20th-century fashion including feathered hats, boas, fans, aigrettes, jewelry, and clothing. Highlights include a gold and diamond aigrette hair ornament (1894) featuring the wispy feathers of a Snowy or Great Egret, which were scornfully called the “white badge of cruelty” by activists; a muff and tippet accessory set (1880–99) composed of four adult Herring Gulls created during a craze for gulls that nearly drove the sea birds to extinction; a folding brisé fan of swirling white feathers (1910–29); and a pair of earrings inset with hummingbird heads (ca. 1865). Painted miniatures on view from the late 19th and early 20th centuries portray women adorned with bird plumes, such as one professed bird lover, wearing a hat decorated with dyed ostrich feathers while holding an American robin and surrounded by caged birds. Feathers also adorned men’s regalia and hats.

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Unidentified maker. Red-Legged Honeycreeper hummingbird earrings, ca. 1865 Probably London, England Preserved bird, gold, metal. Metropolitan Museum of Art, Alfred Z. Solomon and Janet A. Sloane Endowment Fund, 2013, 2013.143a, b. Animal parts and insects decorated late 19thcentury jewelry. In 1865, London jeweler Harry Emanuel patented a method to inset hummingbird heads, skins, and feathers into gold and silver mounts. As objects of beauty as well as scientific fascination, the dazzling birds’ heads and feathers were prized as earrings, necklaces, brooches, and fans.

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George Bird Grinnell (1849–1938) From Nathaniel Pitt Langford, Diary of the Washburn Expedition to the Yellowstone and Firehole Rivers in the year 1870, n.p. St. Paul, MN: Yellowstone National Park, 1905 New-York Historical Society Library. Born in Brooklyn, Grinnell played a seminal role in American conservation. He lived as a youth in Audubon Park in upper Manhattan, previously the estate of the legendary naturalist-artist John James Audubon. There Grinnell was tutored by Lucy Bakewell Audubon, who encouraged his lifelong passion for wildlife and the natural world. After a later expedition to Yellowstone, his report included what may be the first official statement in opposition to the excessive killing of big game. In 1886, Grinnell founded the Audubon Society of New York, the forerunner of the National Audubon Society (1905). He launched it from its publication Audubon Magazine as “an association for the protection of wild birds and their eggs.”

Continue reading

New-York Historical Society To Showcase Norman Rockwell’s “Four Freedoms” On First Stop Of International Touring Exhibition

Rockwell, Roosevelt & the Four Freedoms” On View May 25 – September 2, 2018

A new major exhibition exploring the evolution of Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms from a series of illustrations into a national movement debuts at the New-York Historical Society this spring as part of an international seven-city tour.

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Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) Four Freedoms, 1943. Assemblage Story illustrations for four February-March, 1943 issues of the Saturday Evening Post Collection of Norman Rockwell Museum. ©SEPS: Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved. http://www.curtislicensing.com

Rockwell, Roosevelt & the Four Freedoms, on view at New-York Historical May 25 – September 2, 2018, showcases Rockwell’s depictions of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Fear, and Freedom from Want. Organized by the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA—where the tour culminates in 2020 after traveling to five additional U.S. venues as well as Normandy, France—the exhibition illuminates the historical context for these now-iconic images and examines how Rockwell’s 1943 paintings united the public behind Roosevelt’s call for the defense of universal rights.

6. Photo of Rockwell Freedom Speech War Bond Show

Photographer unknown. Photograph of Norman Rockwell with Freedom of Speech painting at Four Freedoms War Bond Show, 1943. Collection of Norman Rockwell Museum © Norman Rockwell Family Agency. All rights reserved

The Norman Rockwell Museum is dedicated to education and art appreciation inspired by the legacy of Norman Rockwell. The Museum holds the world’s largest and most significant collection of art and archival materials relating to Rockwell’s life and work, while also preserving, interpreting, and exhibiting a growing collection of art by other American illustrators throughout history. The Museum engages diverse audiences through onsite and traveling exhibitions, as well as publications, arts and humanities programs, and comprehensive online resources.

2. Rockwell - Freedom of Speech

Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) Freedom of Speech, 1943 Oil on canvas, 45 ¾” x 35 ½”. Story illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, February 20, 1943. Collection of Norman Rockwell Museum ©SEPS: Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved. http://www.curtislicensing.com

Norman Rockwell’s iconic images remind us of the significant role his work played in inspiring Americans to embrace Roosevelt’s call to protect freedom around the world,” said Dr. Louise Mirrer, president and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “At the same time, Rockwell’s art underscores the enduring importance of Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech. What Rockwell and Roosevelt identified as central to human dignity in the era of World War II is equally valid today. We are honored to convey this message to our visitors, and to be the first venue on the Norman Rockwell Museum’s illustrious tour.

3. Rockwell - Freedom of Worship

Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) Freedom of Worship, 1943 Oil on canvas, 46” x 35 ½”. Story illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, February 27, 1943. Collection of Norman Rockwell Museum ©SEPS: Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved. http://www.curtislicensing.com 

The Norman Rockwell Museum conceived of Rockwell, Roosevelt & the Four Freedoms both to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Freedoms and to tell the story of how Norman Rockwell’s paintings came to be among the most enduring images in the history of American art,” said Norman Rockwell Museum Director Laurie Norton Moffatt. “The exhibition provides a rare opportunity to view the Four Freedoms together, outside their permanent home in Stockbridge. As the steward of Rockwell’s legacy, we are thrilled to launch the exhibition at the New-York Historical Society, whose remarkable work explores the relevance of historic events to our lives today.”

4. Rockwell - Freedom from Want

Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) Freedom from Want, 1943 Oil on canvas, 45 ¾” x 35 ½”. Story illustration for The Saturday Evening Post, March 6, 1943.  Collection of Norman Rockwell Museum ©SEPS: Curtis Licensing, Indianapolis, IN. All rights reserved. http://www.curtislicensing.com

Rockwell, Roosevelt & the Four Freedoms, which is organized into five thematic sections, features paintings, drawings, and other original artworks by Rockwell and his contemporaries, as well as historical documents, photographs, videos, artifacts, interactive digital displays, and immersive settings, some with virtual reality elements. Continue reading

House and Home: KitchenAid® Debuts New Products At 2018 Housewares Show

KitchenAid, the global pioneer of kitchen appliances, is unveiled a new consumer-inspired product lineup at the 2018 International Home and Housewares Show, adding even more versatility and function to its full suite of kitchen solutions. From a mini mixer with an elegant glass bowl to new stand mixer attachments to breakfast essentials, and innovative food processors, the new 2018 KitchenAid products will equip passionate makers with the tools they need to reach their culinary potential.

KitchenAid Celebrates Coffee And Breakfast Culture With New Countertop Essentials

KitchenAid introduced new countertop appliances designed to kick-start the consumer’s day at this year’s International Home and Housewares Show, March 10-13 in Chicago. Kettles, a toaster, and a larger size cold brew coffee maker join an extensive line of appliances designed with a purpose to inspire culinary passion from dawn to dusk.

We see the kitchen as the heart of the home and a place to be inspired through a variety of passions,” said Nikki Lockett, U.S. Marketing Leader for KitchenAid® Small Appliances. “We want to help coffee and breakfast enthusiasts start their day right with exciting new premium appliances.

New KitchenAid coffee and breakfast appliances include the following:

Precision Gooseneck Kettles (available in June 2018) – Simply pour with precision. The gooseneck spout and three unique flow rate settings deliver precise pour control for a pour over, tea or beverage of your choice. A brew range thermometer is displayed in the lid to keep track of the water temperature while pouring. It’s also easy to use and easy to clean, made of polished stainless steel in a sleek, compact design. The International Housewares Association recently selected the Digital Precision Gooseneck Kettle as a finalist in the Kitchen Electronics category for this year’s Global Innovation Awards.

KNK1012SS; MSRP: Stovetop – $99.99, KEK1025SS; Electric – $119.99, KEK1032SS; Digital – $149.99

KitchenAid Electric Kettle

KitchenAid Electric Kettle

Electric Kettle (available in September 2018) – Offering convenience and flexibility, this electric kettle features dual-wall design keeping the inside hot, even while it’s boiling, making it ideal for any space. The kettle boils quietly and fast, making it the perfect companion to the early-morning routine. The kettle has an all-metal interior and lime scale filter.

KEK1565; MSRP: $79.99

Cold Brew (larger size)

KitchenAid (new) Cold Brew Coffee Maker (larger size)

Cold Brew Coffee Maker (larger size) (available in September 2018) – Treat yourself to a smooth and balanced cold brew at home. Only KitchenAid offers home cold brew on tap, for a smooth flavor profile. It’s easy to use, pour and clean. Simply fill with coffee concentrate and cold water, step back and enjoy straight from inside the refrigerator where it will stay fresh for up to two weeks. It is currently available in a smaller, 28-ounce size.

KCM5912SX; MSRP: $169.99

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KitchenAid Long Slot 4-Slice Toaster with High Lift Lever

Long Slot Toaster with High Lift Lever (available in September 2018) – Whatever the toast preference, the new KitchenAid Toaster provides the flexibility to toast a variety of breads without adjusting bread size. The toaster comes in 2-slice and 4-slice options. Continue reading

Coach Announces Coach x Selena Gomez Lifestyle Collection To Launch In Fall

Following the global success of the Selena Grace handbag and accessories in Fall 2017, Coach announces that a new offering from Coach x Selena Gomez will launch this fall. The new collection includes Ms. Gomez’ first ready-to-wear collaboration with the brand and is designed by Ms. Gomez in collaboration with Coach Creative Director Stuart Vevers.

Coach Logo

Coach Logo

The new collection will feature a range of outerwear, ready-to-wear, handbags, small leather goods, and other accessories.

“I always look forward to designing with Selena because she has a strong point of view,” said Mr. Vevers. “We wanted to bring cool new ideas to the table and I loved getting her take on clothes as much as accessories this time around.”

Coach with Selena Gomez

Coach Creative Director Stuart Vevers with Selena Gomez

“I am so excited to be working with Coach again,” said Ms. Gomez. “Getting to create my own collection with Stuart has been such a fun process, and I can’t wait for everyone to see what we have been working on over the past several months.”

EDITORIAL CREDIT: Coach

IMAGE CREDIT: Courtesy of Coach

SOCIAL MEDIA: @Coach; #CoachxSelena

The Museum of Science and Industry Chicago Presents “The Science Behind Pixar”

New Exhibit Unveils The Technology Behind Some Of The Most Beloved Animated Films

Discover the science and technology behind “Toy Story,” “A Bug’s Life,” “Finding Nemo,” and more timeless Pixar films with The Science Behind Pixar, opening at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago (MSI) on May 24, 2018. This interactive exhibition showcases the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) concepts used by the artists and computer scientists who help bring Pixar’s award-winning films to the big screen. This exhibition was developed by the Museum of Science, Boston in collaboration with Pixar Animation Studios. (© Disney/Pixar. All Rights Reserved. Used Under Authorization.)

Museum of Science and Industry Chicago Logo

Museum of Science and Industry Chicago Logo

Guests of all ages can experience the filmmaking process through hands-on activities inspired by some of Pixar’s most treasured films, from the first-ever computer-animated feature film “Toy Story,” which opened over two decades ago, to Pixar’s 2015 release, “Inside Out.”

Pixar’s pioneering technology sits at the intersection of art, engineering and science and shows that there are multiple paths to a STEM career,” said David Mosena, president and CEO of MSI. “As an institution dedicated to inspiring the inventive genius in everyone, we are excited to show guests the unexpected ways that the fundamental skills taught in science learning – problem-solving, trial and error and iteration – are utilized to bring these beloved characters to life.

Created by the Museum of Science, Boston and Pixar Animation Studios, The Science Behind Pixar features more than 40 interactive elements demonstrating the technology that supports the creativity and artistry of Pixar’s storytellers. The exhibit is divided into eight sections, each focusing on a step of filmmaking: Modeling, Rigging, Surfaces, Sets and Cameras, Animation, Simulation, Lighting, and Rendering. Each section provides guests with a behind-the-scenes look at the production process and the concepts used at Pixar every day:

  • Sets and Cameras: Guests will discover how a bugs-eye view was achieved for “A Bug’s Life,” through camera angles and large-set design within the computer.
  • Modeling: Envision how digital sculptures are created based on sketches from artists.
  • Lighting: Solve challenges similar to what Pixar artists faced in creating animated water in “Finding Nemo.”
  • Rigging: See how models are given a virtual skeleton to enable the animators to add movement.
  • Surfaces: Discover the techniques behind adding color and texture to every surface.

Guests will also have the opportunity to take their photo with human-size recreations of many of their favorite Pixar film characters, including Buzz Lightyear, Dory, Mike and Sulley, Edna Mode, and WALL•E.

To better understand the science and math that goes into creating the worlds and characters of Pixar’s films, guests will hear first-hand from members of the studios’ production teams. They will also be invited to experience different roles within the production pipeline, through screen-based activities and physical interactive elements.

The Science Behind Pixar is a behind-the-scenes look at how our movies are made,” said Ed Catmull, president of Pixar and Disney Animation Studios. “The interactive exhibition gives people the opportunity to learn about the jobs our filmmakers do every day and tackle similar problems. It’s a great demonstration of how much creativity and imagination is involved in the science, technology, engineering, art, and math thinking essential to our filmmaking process.”

The Science Behind Pixar is sponsored locally by BMO Harris Bank and will be at MSI through January 6, 2019. It is not included in Museum Entry and requires an additional timed-entry ticket, $14 for adults and seniors and $11 for children.

The Science Behind Pixar is funded through support by Google, members of the Science Museum Exhibit Collaborative (SMEC), Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

BMO Harris Bank proudly supports the Museum of Science and Industry in their mission to inspire and foster creativity among people of all ages,” said Christopher Begy, U.S. Country Head & CEO, BMO Financial Corp. and MSI trustee. “This interactive exhibition is a great example of what a career in STEM can look like and we’re thrilled to be sponsoring it.”

The Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago (MSI), one of the largest science museums in the world, offers world-class and uniquely interactive experiences that inspire inventive genius and foster curiosity. From groundbreaking and award-winning exhibits that can’t be found anywhere else, to hands-on opportunities that make you the scientist—a visit to MSI is where fun and learning mix. Through its Welcome to Science Initiative, the Museum offers a variety of student, teacher and family programs that make a difference in communities and contribute to MSI’s larger vision: to inspire and motivate children to achieve their full potential in science, technology, medicine, and engineering.

MSI is open 9:30–4 p.m. every day except Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. Extended hours, until 5:30 p.m., are offered during peak periods. The Museum is grateful for the support of its donors and guests, who make its work possible. MSI is also supported in part by the people of Chicago through the Chicago Park District. For more information, visit msichicago.org or call (773) 684-1414.

Pixar Animation Studios, a wholly owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is an Academy Award®-winning film studio with world-renowned technical, creative and production capabilities in the art of computer animation. The Northern California studio has created some of the most successful and beloved animated films of all time, including “Toy Story,” “Monsters, Inc.,” “Cars,” “The Incredibles,” “Ratatouille,” “WALL•E,” “Up,” “Toy Story 3,” “Brave,” “Inside Out,” and “Coco.” Its movies have won 32 Academy Awards® and have grossed more than $11 billion at the worldwide box office to date. “Incredibles 2,” Pixar’s 20th feature, opens in theaters on June 15, 2018.

Andy Gibb’s Top Hits Collected For ‘The Very Best Of Andy Gibb’

Album To Be Released April 13 By Capitol/Ume

(Preorder The Very Best Of Andy Gibb: https://UMe.lnk.to/AndyGibbVeryBest)

cover-art-Andy-Gibb-The-Very-Best-Of-Andy-Gibb

Andy Gibb’s top hits have been collected for a new CD and digital collection, ‘The Very Best Of Andy Gibb,’ to be released by CapitolUMe on April 13.

The Very Best Of Andy Gibb honors the monumental worldwide success, achieved within just a few years, of one of the most celebrated recording artists and stage performers of his time. The collection’s 15 tracks include Gibb’s three Number One chart-toppers, “I Just Want To Be Your Everything,” “Shadow Dancing,” and “(Love Is) Thicker Than Water.” Four more Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 hits are showcased: “An Everlasting Love,” “(Our Love) Don’t Throw It All Away,” “I Can’t Help It” featuring Olivia Newton-John, and “Desire,” Gibb’s collaboration with his brothers Barry, Maurice, and Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees. The digital album preorder includes instant download and streaming access for “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” featuring P.P. Arnold.

All of the collection’s tracks are drawn from Andy Gibb’s three hit studio albums, 1977’s platinum-certified Flowing Rivers, 1978’s platinum-certified Shadow Dancing, and 1980’s gold-certified After Dark.

ANDY GIBB: The Very Best Of Andy Gibb

Shadow Dancing

I Just Want To Be Your Everything

An Everlasting Love

Flowing Rivers

(Our Love) Don’t Throw It All Away

(Love Is) Thicker Than Water

After Dark

Man On Fire

I Can’t Help It (featuring Olivia Newton-John)

Desire (featuring the Bee Gees)

Time Is Time

Me (Without You)

Wherever You Are

One More Look At The Night

Will You Love Me Tomorrow (Album Version) (featuring P.P. Arnold)

Philadelphia Museum of Art to Renovate and Update Chinese Galleries

Six Galleries to Close on April 11, 2018, Reopening in Early 2019

The Philadelphia Museum of Art will soon begin the first comprehensive renovation and reinstallation of its galleries of Chinese art in many decades. This initiative will enable its staff to reimagine the presentation of this important part of the Museum’s collection and interpret it in new ways for the benefit of visitors. This represents the next step in an ongoing series of reinstallations of the Museum’s collection that began with the Rodin Museum in 2012 and continued with the renovation of its galleries of South Asian art in 2016. Beginning April 11, 2018, six galleries in the wing of the Museum devoted to Asian art will close for approximately ten months and then re-open to the public in early 2019.

Philadelphia Museum of Art logo

Philadelphia Museum of Art logo

The Philadelphia Museum of Art houses one of the country’s earliest Chinese art collections, initially established through purchases made at the Centennial International Exhibition held in Philadelphia in 1876. Today it includes more than 7000 works in a wide range of media spanning more than 4000 years. Strengths include Tang dynasty (618–907) tomb figures, Song dynasty (960–1127) ceramics as well as Ming (1368–1644) and Qing dynasty (1644–1911) imperial art and Buddhist sculpture. The collection includes more than 500 paintings, dating from the 12th to the 20th centuries, as well as costumes and textiles, furniture, jades, lacquer wares, and cloisonné. It also features three remarkable architectural interiors: an early 15th-century coffered ceiling from an imperial Buddhist temple, a 17th century painted wood reception hall, and an 18th-century scholar’s study that provides context for the collection and an exceptional immersive experience.

Timothy Rub, The George D. Widener Director, and Chief Executive Officer, said: “This once-in-a-generation project follows the success of our new galleries of South Asian art, and is proceeding in tandem with the implementation of the next phase of our Facilities Master Plan. It will transform the experience of one of the most important, but still underappreciated parts of our collection. In addition to renovating these galleries, a step that is long overdue, this project will enable us to re-present and reinterpret our extensive holdings of Chinese art for the benefit of our visitors and will also serve as the basis for a new, purpose-built curriculum taught by our educators. These efforts will create relevance, deepen understanding, and renew our visitors’ appreciation for different cultures and artistic traditions around the world.”

A $2 million initiative, this project on the second floor of the main building will promote improved visitor engagement with Chinese art through the implementation of significant physical improvements, including new gallery furniture and the creation of better sight lines. Select windows will be enclosed, improving conditions for the display of light-sensitive textiles and paintings not previously exhibitable in these galleries, while new lighting will enhance the viewing experience. The Museum’s exhibition team is designing purpose-built casework, some equipped with internal lighting that will dramatically improve viewing clarity. These changes will allow for greater flexibility in the rotations of works of art, giving curators the opportunity to regularly refresh the installations and offering returning visitors new works to experience. The project will also benefit from a multi-year study of interpretation strategies, including the development of new learning resources and training, for teacher workshops and new school visits.

Reinstallation

The reinstallation is led by project director Dr. Hiromi Kinoshita, The Hannah L. and J. Welles Henderson Associate Curator of Chinese Art, supported by staff specialized in Exhibition Design, Education, and Publishing. Dr. Kinoshita’s interpretive plan is arranged around key themes through which four thousand years of art can be understood. It will present a new comprehensive display of Chinese art in all media, including paintings, sculpture, porcelains, ceramics, carvings, metalwork, costume and textiles, furniture, and contemporary works. Continue reading

Cocktail Artist® Launches Seven New Mixologist-Crafted Cocktail Mixes and Bar Ingredients

After a year of driving growth in the cocktail mix category, Cocktail Artist expands its footprint to fifteen premium mixes and ingredients that inspire home bartenders everywhere to make the glass their canvas

Cocktail Artist®, an innovative brand of premium cocktail mixes and bar ingredients, celebrates its one-year anniversary this month with the release of seven new products, crafted by award-winning mixologists from across America and the Bahamas. Starting in March 2018, all fifteen Cocktail Artist mixes and bar ingredients, including seven new ones, will be available nationwide in Walmart stores, and shortly thereafter, in supermarket chains across the country.Cocktail_Artist_Logo

Cocktail Artist® is shaking up the cocktail mix category with fifteen essential mixes and bar ingredients that are designed in collaboration with award-winning mixologists, whose premium products help demystify the art of mixology, so anyone can mix perfectly balanced craft cocktails at home. After a year of driving growth in the cocktail mix category at one of the nation’s largest retailers, the Cocktail Artist family now touts 15 products, including category mainstays Margarita Mix and Bloody Mary Mix, available nationwide.

Cocktail Artist has invigorated the cocktail mix category with its high-quality standards: eliminating high fructose corn syrup and unnecessary artificial ingredients; using natural cane sugar and fruit juices; and developing perfectly balanced flavor profiles in collaboration with renowned mixologists and cocktail tastemakers. The mixes and ingredients are packaged in artfully designed bottles that elevate the aesthetic of any home bar, and are available at an accessible price point.

7-New-SKUs

Cocktail Artist® Launches Seven New Mixologist-Crafted Cocktail Mixes and Bar Ingredients

The seven new Cocktail Artists and their curated mixes and bar ingredients include:

  • Skyy John (Los Angeles, CA; Host and Creator of Tipsy Bartender, top cocktail social media influencer with 27 million followers): Margarita Mix

I want to help people make delicious cocktails easily—and have fun with it,” said Skyy John. “My Cocktail Artist Margarita Mix is made with the very best ingredients, meaning there’s no high fructose corn syrup, just pure cane sugar and natural fruit juices. It’s so smooth that you can enjoy it on its own or with spirits, from tequila to rum or vodka. It is so versatile and perfectly balanced, you can’t beat it!

  • Carla Rivera (Miami, FL; Secretary of Miami’s Chapter of the United States Bartenders’ Guild; Top 15 Finalist at the Diageo World Class Cocktail Competition, 2014): Piña Colada Mix

Piña Colada was invented in Puerto Rico, and I like to tell people that while my ethnicity is Puerto Rican, my blood type is Piña Colada,” explained mixologist Carla Rivera. “My Cocktail Artist Piña Colada Mix is a great substitute for the classic recipe used at the Caribe Hilton Hotel in San Juan.” Continue reading

Newseum to Host Program on March 23 Featuring Student Journalists From Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School

The Eagle Eye Journalists Will Be in Washington, D.C., to Attend the “March for Our Lives” Rally the Following Day

Today, the Newseum announced that student journalists from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., will participate in a program at the Newseum on March 23 called “Witnessing and Reporting Tragedy: The Student Journalists of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.” Margaret Brennan, moderator of CBS News’ “Face the Nation” and CBS News’ senior foreign affairs correspondent, will lead the discussion.

Newseum March for Our Lives

Students participating in a national school walkout to protest gun violence marched from the White House to the U.S. Capitol on March 14.

At the program, students will recount their experiences witnessing and reporting on the Feb. 14 shooting that killed 17 of their fellow students and teachers. During the shooting, reporters for the school’s newspaper The Eagle Eye recognized not only that they were involved in the major story but they also had a responsibility to report on it. The event thrust them into the role of being both crime victims and reporters.

On Saturday, March 24, the students will report from Washington, D.C., on that day’s “March for Our Lives,” an event organized by the survivors of the shooting that calls for increased gun control and school safety measures. Continue reading

The 2018 James Beard Foundation Award Finalists is Announced

The James Beard Foundation has announced the finalists for its annual chef, restaurant, and media awards. Here is the full list. Winners will be announced at the annual gala on May 7 in Chicago.

Best New Restaurant
The Charter Oak, St. Helena, CA
Empellón Midtown, NYC
Felix Trattoria, Venice, CA
JuneBaby, Seattle
Kismet, Los Angeles

Outstanding Baker
Dianna Daoheung, Black Seed Bagels, NYC
Zachary Golper, Bien Cuit, Brooklyn, NY
Maura Kilpatrick, Sofra Bakery and Café, Cambridge, MA
Belinda Leong and Michel Suas, B. Patisserie, San Francisco
Alison Pray, Standard Baking Co., Portland, ME
Greg Wade, Publican Quality Bread, Chicago

Outstanding Bar Program
Anvil Bar & Refuge, Houston
Bar Agricole, San Francisco
Clyde Common, Portland, OR
Cure, New Orleans
Kimball House, Decatur, GA
Trick Dog, San Francisco

Outstanding Chef
Ashley Christensen, Poole’s Diner, Raleigh, NC
Gabrielle Hamilton, Prune, NYC
David Kinch, Manresa, Los Gatos, CA
Christopher Kostow, The Restaurant at Meadowood, St. Helena, CA
Donald Link, Herbsaint, New OrleansJBF_LOGO_PMS_SILVER

Outstanding Pastry Chef
Kelly Fields, Willa Jean, New Orleans
Meg Galus, Boka, Chicago
Margarita Manzke, République, Los Angeles
Dolester Miles, Highlands Bar & Grill, Birmingham, AL
Diane Yang, Spoon and Stable, Minneapolis

Outstanding Restaurant
Balthazar, NYC
Canlis, Seattle
Frasca Food and Wine, Boulder, CO
Highlands Bar & Grill, Birmingham, AL
Quince, San Francisco

Outstanding Restaurateur
Kevin Boehm and Rob Katz, Boka Restaurant Group, Chicago (BokaGT Fish & OysterGirl & the Goat, and others)
JoAnn Clevenger, Upperline, New Orleans
Continue reading