New Copper Barware Collection By Absolut Elyx® Now Available Online

Also Premiering At The Original Farmers Market For The Holidays

The Luxury Vodka Brand Introduces The Elyx Boutique Featuring A Collection Of Expertly Crafted Copper Bar Tools And Drinking Vessels Designed For Gifting

Luxury vodka brand, Absolut Elyx is expanding their range of signature copper drinking vessels and unique lifestyle pieces to include their professional grade bar tools and festive drinkware. The copper collection features high-end designs, attuned functionality and an unparalleled attention to detail that truly defines luxury. For the2017 festive Holiday season, the Elyx Boutique Pop-up Shop at The Original Farmers Market will be open every day from Monday November 27th through Sunday December 24th.

Over the last few years, our copper collection has become increasingly popular and we are thrilled to have the opportunity to expand the brand beyond the spirits industry,” says CEO Jonas Tåhlin.

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Absolut Elyx Deluxe Martini Kit.

Absolut Elyx has a one-of-a-kind, handcrafted distillation process in which copper plays an integral role. The unique use of copper in the distillation process removes unwanted impurities and gives Elyx a distinct character and unparalleled silky smoothness. It is to be enjoyed in many forms and arguably best served in Elyx’s original copper drinking vessels.

For every copper item and every bottle of Absolut Elyx sold in the USA, the brand will be donating a week’s (140 liters) worth of safe water to those in need of it. Absolut Elyx has been helping to provide sustainable water solutions where they are needed most through their partnership with the non-profit organization Water for People. Elyx is made from over 50% water so they have partnered with one of the most respected water organizations to drive awareness to the cause with hopes of transforming the spirits industry. To date, over 30,000 people have been given access to safe drinking water through this partnership.

In addition to the upcoming pop-up, Holiday shoppers can purchase select copper pieces at www.ElyxBoutique.com and Fred Segal (8500 Sunset Blvd). Exclusive copper gift sets and Absolut Elyx will also be available at Los Angeles locations including Mel & Rose (8344 Melrose Ave), Liquor Locker (8161 Sunset Blvd.) and John & Pete’s Fine Wine and Spirits (621 N. La Cienega Blvd.).

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Presents West Coast Exclusive of Robert Rauschenberg: Erasing the Rules

Major Retrospective Includes Vast Array of Work from the Boundary-Breaking Artist’s Six-Decade Career

Robert Rauschenberg: Erasing the Rules, November 18, 2017–March 25, 2018

A fuse was lit in the 1953 art world when Robert Rauschenberg convinced artist Willem de Kooning to allow him to erase one of his drawings; fellow artist Jasper Johns executed the inscription within the frame: “ERASED DE KOONING DRAWING ROBERT RAUSCHENBERG 1953.” Now seen as a bombshell that shook the foundations of Abstract Expressionism, Erased de Kooning Drawing (1953) is an outstanding example of Rauschenberg’s irreverent yet incisive style, and it famously pushes the limits of what art can be.SFMOMA logo 2

This special work was acquired by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) from Rauschenberg through a gift of Phyllis C. Wattis, an instrumental member of the board of trustees who befriended Rauschenberg late in her life. It now anchors the museum’s exceptional holdings of the artist’s early work and is a highlight in the West Coast exclusive of Robert Rauschenberg: Erasing the Rules, on view at SFMOMA from November 18, 2017, through March 25, 2018.

Formerly presented at Tate Modern, London, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the exhibition’s iteration in San Francisco pays special tribute to SFMOMA’s close and longstanding relationship with Rauschenberg. From hosting his first retrospective — organized by Walter Hopps in 1976 — to spearheading the recent Rauschenberg Research Project — an ambitious digital resource published on www.sfmoma.org that makes art historical and conservation research about Rauschenberg works widely accessible — SFMOMA has long been devoted to this extraordinary and trail-blazing figure. This presentation is also dedicated to Phyllis C. Wattis, in honor of her generosity and cherished relationship with the artist and SFMOMA.

Robert Rauschenberg, Retroactive I, 1963

Robert Rauschenberg, Retroactive I, 1963; oil and silkscreen ink on canvas; Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, Connecticut, gift of Susan Morse Hilles; © Robert Rauschenberg Foundation

Robert Rauschenberg and Phyllis Wattis were kindred spirits,” said Gary Garrels, Elise S. Haas Senior Curator of Painting and Sculpture at SFMOMA. “Both were eager to discover new ideas that broke old boundaries. They relished life and art with expansiveness of spirit and always with a twinkle in their eyes.

A defining figure of contemporary art, Rauschenberg produced a prolific body of work across a wide range of media — including painting, sculpture, drawing, prints, photography, and performance — frequently and fearlessly defying the traditional art practice of his time. Robert Rauschenberg: Erasing the Rules marks the first retrospective of the artist’s work in nearly 20 years, celebrating the depth and scope of his six-decade career. SFMOMA’s presentation emphasizes his iconoclastic approach, his multidisciplinary working processes and frequent collaborations with other artists.

Largely organized chronologically, the exhibition begins with the artist’s wide-ranging early work, from bold blueprint photograms and intimate photographs to his delicate Scatole personali (boxes filled with found objects). These galleries introduce Rauschenberg’s eagerness to experiment with and break from artistic conventions, his innovative approach to materials and his multi-disciplinary and collaborative nature, all of which were driving forces throughout his career. This early period plays out across three locales: Black Mountain College, a fertile ground for experimentation where Rauschenberg studied with Josef Albers and Hazel Larsen Archer, and undertook his first important collaborations with Susan Weil, Cy Twombly, John Cage and Merce Cunningham; North Africa and Italy, where Rauschenberg traveled with Twombly; and lower Manhattan, where he set up his early studios and worked in close dialogue with Jasper Johns.

Among the many highlights of the exhibition is Automobile Tire Print (1953) in SFMOMA’s collection, made when the artist instructed composer John Cage to drive his Model A Ford through a pool of paint and then across 20 sheets of paper. The layered paper and fabrics in his Black paintings and Red paintings led to the artist’s landmark Combines (1954–64), a body of work that breaks down the boundaries between painting and sculpture. Collection (1954/1955) and Charlene (1954) are presented together for the first time in almost four decades, providing a rare opportunity to see and compare the range of strategies Rauschenberg explored in the Combines’ formative stages. Monogram (1955–59), his landmark work assembled from a taxidermied goat with a painted tire around its body, anchors this presentation.

The exhibition continues by presenting key periods of the artist’s career in depth, including a gallery devoted to transfer drawings and silkscreen paintings. For the Thirty-Four Illustrations for Dante’s Inferno (1958–60), Rauschenberg clipped pictures from magazines and newspapers, illustrating Dante’s epic poem with images from contemporary American life. Rauschenberg’s merging of classical themes, art history references, contemporary politics and pop culture culminate in the silkscreen paintings, such as the vibrant Scanning (1963) and Persimmon (1964). Rauschenberg also actively explored technological innovations for his performances and artworks in the early 1960s. Collaborations with Billy Klüver and a team of engineers lead to the inclusion of embedded radios in Oracle (1962–65). For the sound-activated work Mud Muse (1968–71) the artist constructed an enormous vat of vigorously spurting and bubbling mud. Originally conceived for an exhibition in Los Angeles and inspired by a hydrothermal basin in Yellowstone National Park, this presentation marks Mud Muse’s first return to California since 1971.

In 1970, Rauschenberg relocated his primary residence and studio to Captiva Island, Florida, where he lived and worked for the rest of his life. These new surroundings prompted the creation of the series Cardboards (1971–72). SFMOMA’s Rosalie/Red Cheek/Temporary Letter/Stock (Cardboard) (1971), one of the earliest of the series, encapsulates this move with a mailing label from Rauschenberg’s New York studio to his Captiva address affixed to its front. Far from isolated in Florida, Rauschenberg constantly welcomed visitors, many of them artists, and continued to travel frequently. A trip to India inspired his striking, lively series Jammers (1975–76); a 1982 visit to China ultimately lead to the launch of ROCI (the Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange), an intense seven-year project encompassing travel, art-making and exhibitions in over 10 countries. Rauschenberg’s own photos from this period of travel appear in many later works including SFMOMA’s Port of Entry [Anagram (A Pun)] (1998). Continue reading

2017 Hoilday Gift Guide: Nespresso Reveals Colorful, Candy-Inspired Limited Edition Collection For The Festive Season

Artists Craig & Karl add a pop of color to the latest Nespresso Limited Editions

Coffee lovers are set to be full of joy this holiday season as Nespresso reveals its Limited Edition Festive Collection, in collaboration with renowned artists Craig & Karl. To bring to life the color and fun of the season, this exclusive collection has been inspired by traditional candies that evoke nostalgic childhood memories.Nespresso_logo

Nespresso coffees are packaged in aluminum, a material that preserves the quality and freshness of the coffee, and can be recycled over and over again. Nespresso is committed to making recycling as easy as possible and offers consumers several ways to recycle. Nespresso offers pre-paid UPS recycling bags for consumers in 48 states to mail back used capsules or drop them off at more than 88,000 drop-off locations. Consumers can also recycle used capsules at over 500 collection points at Nespresso Boutiques across the country and at select retail partners.

To create the ultimate gift collection, Nespresso has teamed up with design duo Craig & Karl. Craig Redman and Karl Maier are transatlantic-based university friends turned creative collaborators who have a love for simple shapes paired with wildly colorful patterns and a wry sense of humor. The duo has injected their signature colors and patterns into both the Nespresso Limited Edition Variations coffees and espressos and into a selection of unique accessories that make the perfect gifts for design and coffee aficionados.

Craig and Karl explained: “We were inspired by the Nespresso Variations flavors and the notion they were all based on old-style confectionery. We were also mindful that the design had to feel modern and relevant to now, so in our initial development we honed in on candy cane style stripes, which were prevalent in the past. In it, we saw a classic motif that can evoke nostalgia for the customer, but one that equally feels current owing to its bold and graphic form. We also loved that the stripes once applied to dome-shaped capsules gave them the appearance of candy themselves.

NESPRESSO LIMITED EDITION VARIATIONS CONFETTO

The holidays are a time for unique experiences, and the range of Nespresso Limited Edition Variations Confetto coffees and espressos do not disappoint in that regard. Their candy-flavored aromas are combined with the highest quality Pure Arabica to invoke feelings of surprise and wonder. There are three OriginaLine and three Vertuo™ Variations to try, each with a Craig & Karl designed capsule. The OriginalLine Variations consist of Pure Arabica from Southern and Central America, while the Vertuo™ Variations consist of a smooth Arabica from Ethiopia in addition to the Arabica blend from Southern and Central America.

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Nespresso Variations Confetto Snowball

  • OriginalLine Variations Confetto Snowball – a delicious espresso pairing sweet coconut notes with a touch of vanilla. Intensity: 6
  • OriginalLine Variations Confetto Orangette – the bittersweet flavor of an orange peel and a hint of chocolate are vibrant in this flavored espresso. Intensity: 6
  • OriginalLine Variations Confetto Licorice – a tasty combination of spices and licorice candy notes are prominent in this espresso. Intensity: 6
  • Vertuo™ Variations Confetto Banana – a sweet banana flavor, reminiscent of banana candy, is present in this coffee. With milk, the roasted coffee notes fade, further enhancing the sweet indulgence. Intensity: 5

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    Nespresso Variations Confetto Peppermint Cane

  • Vertuo™ Variations Confetto Peppermint Cane – the peppermint flavor comes to life with a distinctive candy-sweet note characteristic of a peppermint candy cane within this coffee. With a touch of milk, the lingering notes of peppermint soften to reveal a well-balanced finish. Intensity: 5
  • Vertuo™ Variations Confetto Cherry – the cherry flavor opens up, harmonizing with almond notes for a cherry candy inspired treat within this coffee. With the addition of milk, the coffee flavor is reminiscent of a sweet dessert. Intensity: 5

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