The Whitney To Present Myth Astray: A Project By Arto Lindsay

Contributors include Júlio Bressane, Barbara Browning, Gustavo di Dalva, Christopher Dunn, and Pedro Meira Monteiro

Brazilian-American artist and experimental composer Arto Lindsay will present MYTH ASTRAY, a series of talks, screenings, and musical performances at the Whitney Museum of Modern Art from September 7 to 10.

On the occasion of the current Whitney exhibitions Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium and Calder: Hypermobility, MYTH ASTRAY brings together a multidisciplinary group of artists and scholars to explore the themes of Oiticica’s work and life. Lindsay kicks off the project with the debut of a site-specific installation and a ticketed solo performance on Thursday evening, September 7, in the Museum’s Susan and John Hess Theater. He returns on Saturday, September 9, to perform with the noisemakers and instrument-like objects made by Alexander Calder that were inspired by his travels to Brazil in the late 1940s.

Miguel Rio Branco, Babylonests, 1971. Digital projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy of César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Miguel Rio Branco, Babylonests, 1971. Digital projection, dimensions variable. Courtesy of César and Claudio Oiticica, Rio de Janeiro

Three seminal films by Júlio Bressane, an influential member of Brazil’s Cinema Marginal movement of the late 1960s/early 1970s, screen throughout the weekend. Matou a Família e Foi ao Cinema (1969), O Anjo Nasceu (1969), and Cuidado Madame (1970) are among the films to be shown.

Speakers include award-winning novelist, dancer, and cultural critic Barbara Browning and scholars of Brazilian studies Christopher Dunn and Pedro Meira Monteiro. Brazilian percussionist Gustavo di Dalva—who has performed and recorded with some of Brazil’s preeminent musicians, including Gilberto Gil, Milton Nascimento, and Caetano Veloso—performs throughout the weekend.

The program will explore Tropicália, Samba, and the Brazilian avant-garde, focusing on the aesthetic and political movements of Brazil that were central to Oiticica’s practice and the period he spent in New York in the 1970s, where he was stimulated by the art, music, poetry, and theater scenes.

A complete schedule of events is noted below. Programs and screenings on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday are free with Museum admission. For more information, visit whitney.org.

SCHEDULE

All events will take place in the Museum’s Susan and John Hess Family Theater, Floor 3.

Thursday, September 7

8 pm: Arto Lindsay in Concert

Tickets are required ($25 adults; $18 members, students and seniors). Capacity is limited, and all tickets are standing room only. Visitors are encouraged to purchase tickets in advance.

Friday, September 8

  • 3 pm: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 4 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s O Anjo Nasceu, 1969 (90 min)
  • 6 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 7:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 8:30 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning

Saturday, September 9

  • 12 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning
  • 2 pm: Performance of Alexander Calder’s noisemakers
  • 3 pm: Performance of Alexander Calder’s noisemakers
  • 4:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 5 pm: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 6 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 6:30 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 8:30 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s Film Cuidado Madame, 1970 (70 min)

Sunday, September 10

  • 11 am: “Beyond the Image Problem: Hélio Oiticica and Tropicália,” a talk by Christopher Dunn
  • 12 pm: “Manhatã: Brazilian in New York,” a talk by Barbara Browning
  • 1 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 1:30 pm: “Gambiarra rocks: from the concrete to the precarious; from the individual to the collective in Hélio Oiticica,” a talk by Pedro Meira Monteiro
  • 2:30 pm: Performance by Gustavo di Dalva
  • 4 pm: Screening of Júlio Bressane’s Film Matou a Família e Foi ao Cinema, 1969 (90 min)

Hélio Oiticica: To Organize Delirium is organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh; and the Art Institute of Chicago. Support for the national tour of this exhibition is provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. In New York, major support is provided by The Whitney’s National Committee.

Generous support is provided by Art&Art Collection, Tony Bechara, the Garcia Family Foundation, and the Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Foundation. Additional support is provided by the Evelyn Toll Family Foundation. Generous endowment support is provided by The Keith Haring Foundation Exhibition Fund.

Major support for Calder: Hypermobility is provided by the Dalio Foundation, the Jerome L. Greene Foundation, the Philip and Janice Levin Foundation, and the Whitney’s National Committee. Significant support is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation.

Generous support is provided by Irma and Norman Braman, Fairfax Dorn and Marc Glimcher, the Fisher Family, Further Forward Foundation in honor of Susan R. Malloy, Norman and Melissa Selby, and Michelle Smith.

Additional support is provided by the Mitzi and Warren Eisenberg Family Foundation.

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