Stuart Davis: In Full Swing Opens at The Whitney Museum of American Art, June 10–Sept 25, 2016

Stuart Davis: In Full Swing features 100 artworks by an artist whose formal brilliance and complexity captured the energy of mass culture and modern life. The exhibition is unusual in its focus on Davis’s mature work, from his paintings of consumer products of the early 1920s to the work left on his easel at his death in 1964, and in exploring Davis’s habit of using preexisting motifs as springboards for new compositions.

Davis_ColonialCubism

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), Colonial Cubism, 1954. Oil on canvas, 45 1/8 x 60 1/4 in. (114.6 x 153 cm). Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; gift of the T. B. Walker Foundation, 1955. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

The exhibition departs in significant ways from earlier presentations of the artist’s work, in that it omits Davis’s decade of apprenticeship to European modernism (following his introduction to it at the 1913 Armory Show) in favor of the series of breakthroughs he made beginning in 1921 with his paintings of tobacco packages and household products, and continuing into his last two decades in which he employed abstract shapes, brilliant color, and words to evoke the ebullience of popular culture.

31.170

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), Place Pasdeloup, 1928. Oil on canvas, 36 3/8 × 29 in. (92.4 × 73.7 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney 31.170. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Davis_ReportfromRockport

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), Report from Rockport, 1940. Oil on canvas, 24 x 30 in. (61 x 76.2 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Edith and Milton Lowenthal Collection, bequest of Edith Abrahamson Lowenthal, 1991. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

One of America’s leaders of abstract art, Stuart Davis was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His mother was a sculptor and his father was an art editor of the Philadelphia Press, working with Luks, Glackens, Robert Henri, and other members of the Eight. Inspired by the artistic environment at home, Davis left high school in 1909 to attend the Robert Henri School of Art in New York until 1912. Robert Henri was a liberal teacher, encouraging students to be spontaneous in their art. Davis responded to this progressive approach, which permitted him to absorb the new styles that were emerging at the time. Spontaneity in art extended to life, and Davis and his fellow students became fans of jazz, resulting in Davis’s lifelong sensitivity to both musical and visual rhythms.

Davis_SwingLandscape

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), Swing Landscape, 1938. Oil on canvas, 86 3/4 x 173 1/8 in. (220.3 x 400 cm). Indiana University Art Museum, Bloomington; museum purchase with funds from the Henry Radford Hope Fund. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

59.38a-b

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), The Paris Bit, 1959. Oil on canvas, 46 1/8 × 60 1/16 in. (117.2 × 152.6 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art 59.38. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Between 1912 and 1916, while supporting himself as an illustrator for several magazines, he began experimenting with cubist abstraction. Davis introduced a new style of cubism in the United States, basing his compositions on combinations of flattened forms, often abstracted from the urban scene. Drawing on familiar structures and objects, he he would reduce them to flat, sharp-edged shapes arranged in broad, colorful patterns and active lines that punctuate the composition.

Egg Beater No. 2_1928_Amon Carter

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), Egg Beater No. 2, 1928. Oil on canvas, 29 1/4 x 36 1/4 in. (74.3 x 92.1 cm). Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Davis exhibited five watercolors at the 1913 Armory Show, unusual recognition for a young artist, and in 1917 he had his first one-person exhibition in New York. His first solo museum exhibition was held in 1925 at the Newark Museum. The following year he was included in the “International Exhibition of Modern Art Arranged by the Société Anonyme for The Brooklyn Museum.”

In 1927 Davis’s abstract style reached its culmination in his Egg Beater series. Davis wrote to Duncan Phillips, who had purchased Egg Beater No. 4 (1928): “The ‘Egg Beater’ represents the best example of this series which enabled me to realize certain structural principals [sic] that I have continued to use ever since.” At the same time, Edith Halpert, a proponent of modern art and owner of the Downtown Gallery, became his dealer. ”

Tropes de Teens_1956

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), Tropes de Teens, 1956. Oil on canvas, 45 1/4 x 60 1/4 in. (114.8 x 153 cm). Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph by Cathy Carver

From 1928 to 1929 Davis lived in Paris, where he created many paintings and lithographs of cafés and street scenes. Upon his return to America in 1929, he moved to Greenwich Village and spent most of his summers in Gloucester, Massachusetts. From 1931 to 1932, Davis taught at New York’s Art Students League. He was a muralist for the Public Works Art Project from 1933 to 1939. Though Davis had an active and successful career as an artist, he continued his teaching, notably at New York’s New School for Social Research (1940-50) and at Yale University (1951).**

Davis_TownSquare1929

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), Town Square, c. 1929. Watercolor, gouache, ink, and pencil on paper, 15 1/2 x 22 7/8 in. (39.4 x 58.1 cm). The Newark Museum; purchase 1930, The General Fund. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Stuart Davis has been called one of the greatest painters of the twentieth century and the best American artist of his generation, his art hailed as a precursor of the rival styles of pop and geometric color abstraction,” remarks Barbara Haskell. “Faced with the choice early in his career between realism and pure abstraction, he invented a vocabulary that harnessed the grammar of abstraction to the speed and simultaneity of modern America. By merging the bold, hard-edged style of advertising with the conventions of avant-garde painting, he created an art endowed with the vitality and dynamic rhythms that he saw as uniquely modern and American. In the process, Davis achieved a rare synthesis: an art that is resolutely abstract yet at the same time exudes the spirit of popular culture.

Art Work at PA Home

Stuart Davis (1892–1964), Fin, 1962–64. Casein and masking tape on canvas, 53 7/8 x 39 3/4 in. (136.8 x 101 cm). Private collection. © Estate of Stuart Davis / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Co-organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the exhibition will be on view at the Whitney from June 10 through September 25, 2016, and at the National Gallery of Art from November 20, 2016 through March 5, 2017. It will subsequently travel to the De Young Museum in San Francisco from April 8 through August 6, 2017, and to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, from September 16, 2017 through January 8, 2018.

**(Sourced from http://www.phillipscollection.org/research/american_art/bios/davis_s-bio.htm)

Experience Authentic Japanese Culture Through A Program Of Activities At The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto

Located in the heart of a city famed for its Zen temples, historic palaces and beautiful gardens, The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto, the city’s first international luxury branded resort, invites guests to uncover its best kept secrets and hidden gems. Providing more than meets the eye, guests will witness the property’s dedication to the destination and unparalleled attention to detail through all-encompassing guest activities and innovative keepsakes.

THE RITZ-CARLTON HOTEL COMPANY, L.L.C. LOGO

Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, LLC logo. (PRNewsFoto/The Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, LLC.)

HARMONIOUSLY ZEN: First developed during the 8th century to mimic the gardens of China’s Song Dynasty, Japanese Zen gardens combine the basic elements of moss, rocks, and white stones, representing the pure beauty of Japan and a place of quiet contemplation. Surrounded by many of these gardens, the property features a special white gravel garden neighboring the oldest lantern on site – a nod to the past blended with a contemporary minimalist aesthetic. To ensure the gravel garden is kept in its pristine appearance, Master Gardner, Suzuki-san meticulously rakes the white gravel each week, taking one hour every time to complete the task with expert precision. Learning from the master himself, guests are also invited to discover the art of garden-making by participating in his class, ‘Your Own Zen Garden,’ and create a miniature Zen garden – allowing their creativity to draw the lines of their own personal landscape.068

A FAN OF SCENTS: From the moment guests step foot inside The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto, they are embraced with a sense of calm and tranquility, due in large part to the resort’s signature scent – a custom-blended green tea aroma. Exclusively designed for the property, the original fragrance features soft, refreshing notes of lemon, bergamod and cardamom, with hints of rose, thyme, and jasmine. A culinary master and surprisingly skilled artist, Chef de Cuisine Masahiko Miura of the property’s Japanese restaurant, Mizuki, has invented a unique way to allow guests to enjoy this scent long after they leave the property. Extending his creativity outside the kitchen, Chef Miura has become known for his colorfully decorated traditional Japanese fans which he presents to guests infused with the resort’s signature scent. Another option for guests to take home this unique aroma is by purchasing it in the form of aroma oil and room spray.

AN ODE TO SOAP: Unbeknownst to many, Kyoto is where the first Japanese soap was produced. Situated on the land where the soap was first made, The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto honors the inaugural craftsmen by featuring special gold-flecked Kyoto Shanbon-ya handmade soap in every guest room.

Inviting guests to embrace the storied history, the property offers a ‘Handmade Soap Workshop’ where guests can try their hand at soap-making at Shabon-ya, Kyoto’s famous purveyor of natural, organic soap. In the process, guests can enjoy a relaxing foot bath in the shop or sample sweets and green tea in the in-store café while waiting for their soap to set.

A CULINARY MATCH MADE IN…KYOTO: Once a two-story villa originally built in 1907 for Denzaburo Fujita, founder of the Fujita industrial group, a historic local structure was re-assembled within The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto as a private dining room in La Locanda and preserved as a spiritual space for diners. It contains wood that is over 700 years old, nearly impossible to find anywhere else in Japan today. Dining in Ebisugawa-tei while wearing traditional kimonos is an incredibly unique experience, which connects to the rich traditions and history of Japan juxtaposed with delicious modern flavors from another world entirely.

TIME FOR TEA: As the birthplace of the tea ceremony and with the city’s rich Zen connections, Kyoto has long been admired as the ideal place to experience all things tea. Commemorating the time-honored tradition, The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto seamlessly incorporates the celebrated drink into the guest experience. Upon arrival, guests are escorted to their room for a personalized check-in conducted over a cup of local Japanese tea to refresh the senses. At The Ritz-Carlton Spa, the sensory experience begins was matcha green tea is served. The spa’s signature treatment, Ryokucha Serenity Ritual, infuses rich anti-oxidant properties of green tea leaves from the nearby Uji region of Kyoto. Additionally, guests can learn about the world of tea with special tea brewing classes – offered seasonally – from a local tea master. Guests can also go the traditional route of indulging in Afternoon Tea in The Lobby Lounge, where seasonal teas, finger sandwiches, and sweets by French patisserie PERME HERMÉ PARIS delight the most discerning palette.

PARISIAN TREATS IN KYOTO: Known for revolutionizing modern pastry making, Pierre Hermé has invented his own original world of tastes and sensations, using pastry as a canvas to create stunning works of art. Home to the city’s only team of pâtissiers from PIERRE HERMÉ PARIS, The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto showcases these tasty creations throughout the property. Most notably, guests have the opportunity to be in full view of the masters at work at the property’s Vetrina Della Boutique in its Italian restaurant, La Locanda. A testament to Pierre Hermé’s deep connection to the destination, a must-have for guests is the ‘Incontournable Kyoto’ souvenir macaroon box made exclusively for The Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto. Featuring illustrations of renowned landmarks in Kyoto by famed French artist Soledad Bravi that Hermé himself believes guests should see including the Golden Temple and the philosophy’s path, guests can choose from a selection of macaroons that rotate seasonally. Guests also have the unparalleled opportunity to work alongside the pâtissiers through the ‘Sticky Fingers’ activity as part of the property’s Ritz Kids program.

For more information and to book a reservation, visit www.ritzcarlton.com/en/hotels/japan/kyoto.