Holiday 2015 Travel: Full Moon, Flotilla, Fireworks, and “Enchanted Airlie” Kick Off the Holidays in North Carolina

32nd Annual North Carolina Flotilla and 11th Annual Enchanted Airlie Gardens Starts the Thanksgiving Weekend and the Holiday Season in Wrightsville Beach, NC

Yes, this is real. Full Moon Rising at Wrightsville Beach, N.C., Courtesy Lee Capps Photography, Burlington

Yes, this is real. Full Moon Rising at Wrightsville Beach, N.C., Courtesy Lee Capps Photography, Burlington

The 32nd Annual North Carolina Holiday Flotilla, Zambelli Fireworks, and The 11th Annual Enchanted Airlie officially launch the holiday season Thanksgiving weekend in Wrightsville Beach. As if by design, a full moon rising will prelude festivities Thanksgiving Eve, Wed., Nov. 25, 2015, at 5:45 p.m.

Voted a Top 20 Event in 2015 by the Southeast Tourism Society, Airlie Gardens’ 67-acre nighttime forest awakens as Enchanted Airlie, with an estimated one million twinkling lights illuminating the half-mile, self-guided, walking trail of holiday displays and seasonal sounds.

Enchanted Airlie, Courtesy of Airlie Gardens

Enchanted Airlie, Courtesy of Airlie Gardens

Conceived and created by Airlie Gardens Foundation eleven years ago, Enchanted Airlie has rapidly gained national and international prominence as a must-see attraction. “We had visitors from all 50 states and 47 different countries,” said Janine Powell, Airlie Gardens’ Development Director. “In 2015, attendance was a record-breaking 40,000 people.”

As well as a maritime parade of festive boats and stunning fireworks, the flotilla itinerary is packed with Friday’s tree lighting ceremony, a visit from Santa, and the Atlantic Marine Flotilla Launch Party featuring The Embers. On Saturday, Festival in the Park will bustle with bouncy houses, slides, climbing walls, the Arab Choo Choo, live music, an antique auto show, and an estimated 100 booths featuring local merchants and arts and crafts vendors.

NC Holiday Flotilla Host Hotel, Blockade Runner Beach Resort, Photo courtesy Lemonstripe

NC Holiday Flotilla Host Hotel, Blockade Runner Beach Resort, Photo courtesy Lemonstripe

Located directly on the flotilla parade route, host hotel Blockade Runner Beach Resort kicks off the holiday celebration with a traditional and coastal Thanksgiving Day feast for early arrivals. Cape Fear Naturalist Captain Joe Abbate will navigate local waters with scenic nature tours and Sunset Cruises at the Blockade Runner dock.

2012 North Carolina Holiday Flotilla Entry

2012 North Carolina Holiday Flotilla Entry

The North Carolina Holiday Flotilla features a procession of creatively decorated yachts and watercraft, glittering with thousands of lights, slowly motoring past an estimated crowd of 50,000 cheering revelers. Text voting continues this year, with the Crowd Favorite and People’s Choice Awards determined by spectators.

North Carolina Holiday Flotilla, Zambelli Fireworks, Photography by Josh McClure

North Carolina Holiday Flotilla, Zambelli Fireworks, Photography by Josh McClure

Immediately following the flotilla, a 21-minute, 4,000-round fireworks display illuminates the night sky, showering the waterway with sound and color. “We have a long show by Zambelli Fireworks, one of the most reputable fireworks companies in the world,” said Pres Davenport, Flotilla Chairman. “We’re able to put on a really impressive display that rivals or surpasses most July 4th shows.”

Courtesy Wilmington and Beaches Convention and Visitors Bureau

Courtesy Wilmington and Beaches Convention and Visitors Bureau

Enchanted Airlie will open to the public Nov. 27-28, Dec. 4-6, 10-13, and 16-22. There are two reservation times each evening, 5-7 and 7-9 p.m. Enchanted Airlie tickets are available on the Airlie Gardens website, or Blockade Runner guests can call the hotel to make arrangements. Tickets sell out frequently and are not available at the gate.

Courtesy North Carolina  Holiday Flotilla

Antique auto Show at the Festival in The Park. Courtesy North Carolina Holiday Flotilla

An Epic Thanksgiving Holiday – Schedule of events – Wrightsville Beach:

Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015

Full moon rising at 5:44 p.m. – Sunset at 5:03 p.m.

Full moon rising celebration at Blockade Runner Beach Resort, on the oceanfront garden lawn at East Oceanfront Dining.

Thursday, Nov. 26

Thanksgiving Day Buffet at Blockade Runner Beach Resort – Children’s games on the garden lawn, chairs and umbrellas on the beach, and The Loop. The 2.5-mile John Nesbitt Loop offers fresh air, exercise, and the scenic beauty of Wrightsville Beach. The Loop is used for walking, biking, jogging, and skating.

Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Nov. 26-30, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Scenic waterway nature tours with Captain Joe Abbate, the Cape Fear Naturalist. Island shelling, Masonboro Island Cruises, Harbor Island Cruises, and Sunset Cruises. Learn, discover, explore, and enjoy the natural wonders of the Carolina Coast. Continue reading

Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation Announces Short List for the Hugo Boss Prize 2016

Finalists for Milestone Twentieth Anniversary Are Tania Bruguera, Mark Leckey, Ralph Lemon, Laura Owens, Wael Shawky, and Anicka Yi

Six finalists have been selected for the Hugo Boss Prize 2016, the biennial award established in 1996 to recognize artists whose work is among the most innovative and influential of our time. Nancy Spector, Deputy Director and Jennifer and David Stockman Chief Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, and chair of the jury, announced the finalists chosen by a panel of international critics and curators. Over the past two decades juries have identified and selected as finalists paradigm-shifting artists from around the world, recognizing the achievements of both emerging and established figures, and setting no parameters in terms of age, gender, or medium.

Since its inception in 1996, the Hugo Boss Prize has been awarded to ten innovative and influential contemporary artists: American artist Matthew Barney (1996); Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (1998); Slovenian artist Marjetica Potrč (2000); French artist Pierre Huyghe (2002); Thai artist Rirkrit Tiravanija (2004); British artist Tacita Dean (2006); Palestinian artist Emily Jacir (2008); German artist Hans-Peter Feldmann (2010); Danish artist Danh Vo (2012); and American artist Paul Chan (2014). The related exhibitions have constituted some of the most compelling presentations in the museum’s history.

The following artists are finalists for the Hugo Boss Prize 2016:

Tania Bruguera (b. 1968, Havana)
Mark Leckey (b. 1964, Birkenhead, UK)
Ralph Lemon (b. 1952, Cincinnati)
Laura Owens (b. 1970, Euclid, Ohio)
Wael Shawky (b. 1971, Alexandria, Egypt)
Anicka Yi (b. 1971, Seoul)

Promoting the most innovative cultural production continues to be at the core of the Guggenheim’s institutional mission, and for the past twenty years, the Hugo Boss Prize has given us the opportunity to identify and honor artists who make a lasting impact on the landscape of contemporary art,” said Spector. “We are grateful for the sustained enthusiasm of Hugo Boss for a project that acknowledges today’s most prescient creative voices.

The prize, administered by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, has become an integral part of the Guggenheim’s contemporary art programming. The winner is awarded a $100,000 cash prize and featured in a solo exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. The Hugo Boss Prize catalogues, which have evolved over the years into ambitious collaborations between curators, artists, and designers, form a key component of the program’s legacy. The Hugo Boss Prize 2016 winner will be announced in the fall of 2016, and the exhibition will be held in 2017.

The Hugo Boss Prize has developed into a renowned accolade over the past two decades, and we are proud to celebrate its 20th anniversary next year. Together with the Guggenheim Foundation, we have since honored many excellent and successful artists,” said Claus-Dietrich Lahrs, Chairman and CEO, HUGO BOSS AG. “Our sincerest congratulations go out to our nominees for 2016.”

The Hugo Boss Prize 2016 Short List

Tania Bruguera Tatlin’s Whisper #5, 2008 Mounted police, crowd control techniques, audience, overall dimensions variable Installation view: UBS Openings: Live the Living Currency, Tate Modern, London, 2008 Photo: Sheila Burnet Courtesy the artist

Tania Bruguera, Tatlin’s Whisper #5, 2008
Mounted police, crowd control techniques, audience, overall dimensions variable
Installation view: UBS Openings: Live the Living Currency, Tate Modern, London, 2008
Photo: Sheila Burnet. Courtesy the artist

Tania Bruguera (b. 1968, Havana) lives and works in various cities depending on the location of her long-term projects. In her politically driven, performance-based social practice, Bruguera activates communities through participatory projects that she categorizes as arte útil (useful art). Bruguera’s activism calls attention to injustice and advocates social change, as in Immigrant Movement International, which operates as a community center representing the interests of immigrant populations in Queens, New York.

Solo exhibitions of Bruguera’s work have been presented at the Malmö Konsthall, Sweden (2015); Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands (2013); Queens Museum of Art, New York (2013); Tate Modern, London (2012); Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris (2010); Beirut Art Center (2007); Kunsthalle Wien, Vienna (2006); Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes, Havana (2004); San Francisco Art Institute (2002); and Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wifredo Lam, Havana (1996), among other venues.

Bruguera’s art has been included in group exhibitions such as the Venice Biennale (2015); Under the Same Sun: Art from Latin America Today, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2014); Revolution Not Televised, Bronx Museum of the Arts, New York (2012); Riwaq Biennial, Ramallah, Palestine (2009); Gwangju Biennial, South Korea (2008); Moscow Biennial of Contemporary Art (2007); Istanbul Biennial (2003); Documenta, Kassel, Germany (2002); SITE Santa Fe Biennial (1999); Johannesburg Biennial (1997); São Paulo Biennial (1996); New Art from Cuba, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London (1995); and Havana Biennial (1994).

Mark Leckey GreenScreenRefrigeratorAction, 2010 Installation view: Gavin Brown’s enterprise, 2010 Samsung refrigerator, rear screen projection rig, digital video, green screen set, PA, can of coolant Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise

Mark Leckey, GreenScreenRefrigeratorAction, 2010. Installation view: Gavin Brown’s enterprise, 2010
Samsung refrigerator, rear screen projection rig, digital video, green screen set, PA, can of coolant. Courtesy the artist and Gavin Brown’s enterprise

Mark Leckey (b. 1964, Birkenhead, UK) lives and works in London. Leckey’s fluid practice ranges across video, sculpture, music, performance, installations, and the exhibition format. His work unravels the entwined forces of desire, imagination, and cultural allegiance that shape our everyday experience, absorbing both rarified and lowbrow references into a unique artistic vocabulary.

Leckey’s work has been presented in solo exhibitions at Secession, Vienna (2015); Haus der Kunst, Munich (2015); Kunsthalle Basel (2015); WIELS Contemporary Art Centre, Brussels (2014); Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2013); Serpentine Gallery, London (2011); Institute of Contemporary Art, London (2009); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2008); Tate Britain, London (2003); and Migros Museum für Gegenwartskunst, Zurich (2003).

Leckey’s work has also been included in group exhibitions such as Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh (2013); Venice Biennale (2013); Ghosts in the Machine, New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (2012); Push and Pull, Tate Modern, London (2011); Gwangju Biennial, South Korea (2010); Pictures in Motion: Artists & Video/Film, Museum Ludwig, Cologne (2010); Turner Prize, Tate Britain, London (2008); Yokohama Triennial (2008); Tate Triennial, Tate Britain, London (2006); Istanbul Biennial (2005); Manifesta, San Sebastián, Spain (2004); and Protest & Survive, Whitechapel Gallery, London (2000).

Ralph Lemon Untitled, 2010 Archival pigment print, 40 x 40 inches Courtesy the artist

Ralph Lemon, Untitled, 2010. Archival pigment print, 40 x 40 inches. Courtesy the artist

Ralph Lemon (b. 1952, Cincinnati) lives and works in New York. Lemon is a choreographer, writer, director, and visual artist whose interdisciplinary performance projects draw on political histories and personal relationships to illuminate the complexity and raw beauty of the human experience. Lemon combines dance, film, text, music, and sculptural installation in evocative programs that explore themes of identity, loss, and the body.

Lemon is Artistic Director of Cross Performance. His most recent projects include Scaffold Room (2015); Four Walls (2012); and How Can You Stay in The House All Day and Not Go Anywhere? (2008–10), a work that features live performance, film, and visual art and toured the United States. Lemon has curated the performance series Some sweet day at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (2012) and I Get Lost at Danspace Project, New York (2010).

His solo visual art exhibitions include 1856 Cessna Road, Studio Museum in Harlem, New York (2012); How Can You Stay in the House All Day and Not Go Anywhere?, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco (2010); (the efflorescence of) Walter, Contemporary Art Center, New Orleans (2008), The Kitchen, New York (2007), and Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2006); and The Geography Trilogy, Ezra and Cecile Zilkha Gallery, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut (2001). Group exhibitions featuring Lemon’s work include Move: Choreographing You, Hayward Gallery, London (2010) and The Record: Contemporary Art and Vinyl, Nasher Museum of Art, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (2010).

Laura Owens Untitled, 2014 Oil, Flashe, and silkscreen ink on linen, 137.5 x 120 inches Courtesy the artist / Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York / Sadie Coles HQ, London / Capitain Petzel, Berlin / Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

Laura Owens, Untitled, 2014. Oil, Flashe, and silkscreen ink on linen, 137.5 x 120 inches. Courtesy the artist / Gavin Brown’s enterprise, New York / Sadie Coles HQ, London / Capitain Petzel, Berlin / Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne

Laura Owens (b. 1970, Euclid, Ohio) lives and works in Los Angeles. For the past two decades, Owens’s influential work has questioned the parameters and possibilities for making and viewing a painting today. She has continually shifted the terms of her practice, incorporating figuration, abstraction, digital techniques, and gestural mark making into multivalent compositions that confound expectations of pictorial space.

Owens’s work has been presented in solo exhibitions at Secession, Vienna (2015); Kunstmuseum Bonn (2011); Kunsthalle Zürich (2006); Camden Arts Centre, London (2006); Milwaukee Art Museum (2003); Aspen Art Museum, Colorado (2003); Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2003); and Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston (2001), among other venues.

Owens’s art has also been featured in group exhibitions such as The Forever Now, Museum of Modern Art, New York (2014); Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2014); The Spectacular of Vernacular, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (2011); Undiscovered Country, Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2004); Whitney Biennial (2004); Public Offerings, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2001); Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh (1999); and Vertical Painting Show, P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center (1997). She is the founder of 356 S. Mission Rd., a contemporary art exhibition space in downtown Los Angeles. Continue reading

Fun Facts About The Annual American Holiday – Thanksgiving Day: Nov. 26, 2015

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

U.S. Census Bureau Logo.  (PRNewsFoto/U.S. Census Bureau)

U.S. Census Bureau Logo. (PRNewsFoto/U.S. Census Bureau)

In the fall of 1621, the Pilgrims — early settlers of Plymouth Colony — held a three-day feast to celebrate a bountiful harvest. This event is regarded by many as the nation’s first Thanksgiving. The Wampanoag Indians in attendance played a key role. Historians have recorded ceremonies of thanks among other groups of European settlers in North America. These include the British colonists in Virginia as early as 1619.

The legacy of thanks and the feast have survived the centuries, as the event became a national holiday 152 years ago (Oct. 3, 1863) when President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday of November as a national day of thanksgiving. Later, President Franklin Roosevelt clarified that Thanksgiving should always be celebrated on the fourth Thursday of the month to encourage earlier holiday shopping, never on the occasional fifth Thursday.

Where to Feast
117 million
Number of occupied housing units across the nation in the second quarter of 2015 — all potential stops for Thanksgiving dinner.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Housing Vacancies and Homeownership, Table 8 http://www.census.gov/housing/hvs/data/histtabs.html

4.5 million
Number of multi-generational households in the U.S. in 2014. It is possible these households, consisting of three or more generations, will have to purchase large quantities of food to accommodate all the family members sitting around the table for the holiday feast — even if there are no guests!
Source: 2014 American Community Survey, Table B11017
http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_14_1YR_B11017&prodType=table

4
Number of places in the United States named after the holiday’s traditional main course. Turkey Creek Village, La., was the most populous in 2014, with 443 residents, followed by Turkey Creek, Ariz. (412), Turkey City, Texas (396) and Turkey Town, N.C. (296). There are also 11 townships in the U.S. with “Turkey” in the name. (Please note that the Turkey Creek, Ariz., population total pertains to the 2009-2013 American Community Survey and is not statistically different from the population estimates of the other three places.)

Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, 2014 Population Estimates
http://www.census.gov/popest/data/cities/totals/2014/index.html
http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/gazetteer.html
U.S. Census Bureau, 2009-2013 American Community Survey
http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/13_5YR/B01003/1600000US0477415

7
Number of places and townships in the United States that are named Cranberry, a popular side dish at Thanksgiving. Cranberry township (Butler County), Pennsylvania, was the most populous of these places in 2014, with 30,170 residents. Cranberry township (Venango County), Pennsylvania., was next (6,546).

Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, 2013 Population Estimates and 2010 Census Summary File 1 http://www.census.gov/popest/data/cities/totals/2014/index.html
http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/gazetteer.html

32
Number of counties, places and townships in the United States named Plymouth, as in Plymouth Rock, the landing site of the first Pilgrims. The two counties, both named Plymouth, are in Massachusetts (507,022) and Iowa (24,874).
Plymouth, Minn., is the most populous place, with 75,057 residents in 2014. There are two places in the United States named Pilgrim: one, a township in Dade County, Mo., had a population of 129; the other, a census designated place in Michigan, had a population of 36. And then there is Mayflower, Ark., whose population was 2,345, and Mayflower Village, Calif., whose population was 5,662.

Note: Townships have been included in these counts from 12 states (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and Wisconsin) where the primary governmental or administrative divisions of a county serve as general-purpose local governments that can perform the same governmental functions as incorporated places. These county subdivisions are known as minor civil divisions, and the Census Bureau presents data for these in all products for which place data are provided.
(Please note that population totals for the two places on the list that are census designated places — Pilgrim, Mich., and Mayflower Village, Calif. — pertain to the 2009-2013 American Community Survey.)
Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, Vintage 2014 Population Estimates
http://www.census.gov/popest/data/counties/asrh/2014/index.html
http://www.census.gov/popest/data/cities/totals/2014/index.html
http://www.census.gov/geo/maps-data/data/gazetteer.html
U.S. Census Bureau, 2009-2013 American Community Survey
http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/13_5YR/B01003/1600000US0646436
http://factfinder.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/13_5YR/B01003/1600000US2664100 Continue reading