Youth is Served: The Whitney Announces Curators For 2017 Biennial

This Will Be The First Presentation Of The Biennial In The Whitney’s New Downtown Building.

With a history of exhibiting the most promising and influential artists and provoking debate, the Whitney Biennial—the Museum’s signature exhibition—is the most important survey of the state of contemporary art in the United States. The Biennial, an invitational show of work produced in the preceding two years, was introduced by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney in 1932, and it is the longest continuous series of exhibitions in the country to survey recent developments in American art.

The Whitney Museum of American Art announced today that the 2017 Whitney Biennial will be co-curated by Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks. This will be the seventy-eighth in the Museum’s series of Annual and Biennial exhibitions inaugurated in 1932 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. The Museum’s signature survey of contemporary art in the United States, the Biennial goes on view in spring 2017. It will be the first Biennial presented in the Whitney’s new building in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District. The 2017 Whitney Biennial is presented by Tiffany & Co, lead sponsor of the Biennial through 2021.

The Whitney Museum of American Art announced today that the 2017 Whitney Biennial will be co-curated by Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks.

The Whitney Museum of American Art announced today that the 2017 Whitney Biennial will be co-curated by Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks.

Christopher Y. Lew is Associate Curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art, where he has organized the first US solo exhibitions for Rachel Rose and Jared Madere. He has also organized, with Curator and Curator of Performance Jay Sanders, the first US theatrical presentation by New Theater.

His upcoming exhibitions at the Whitney include a solo show by Sophia Al-Maria (summer 2016). Prior to joining the Whitney in 2014, he held positions at MoMA PS1 since 2006 and organized numerous exhibitions including the group shows New Pictures of Common Objects (2012) and Taster’s Choice (2014). His notable solo shows include Clifford Owens: Anthology (2011), GCC: Achievements in Retrospective (2014), James Ferraro: 100% (2014), and Jack Smith: Normal Love (2013), which received an award from the International Association of Art Critics. Lew has contributed to several publications including Art AsiaPacific, Art Journal, Bomb, Huffington Post, and Mousse.

From 2013 until recently, Mia Locks was Assistant Curator at MoMA PS1, where she organized exhibitions including Math Bass: Off the Clock (2015); IM Heung-soon: Reincarnation (2015); Samara Golden: The Flat Side of the Knife (2014); and The Little Things Could Be Dearer (2014). Prior to MoMA PS1, Locks organized Cruising the Archive: Queer Art and Culture in Los Angeles, 1945–1980 (2012), with David Frantz, at ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives as part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time initiative. From 2010 to 2013, she worked at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA), where she helped to organize Blues for Smoke (2012), which traveled to the Whitney, and Bob Mizer and Tom of Finland (2013), both with Bennett Simpson. Locks was part of the curatorial team for the Greater New York exhibition now on view at MoMA PS1. She is currently publishing a book on the work of Samara Golden, forthcoming in December 2015.

Scott Rothkopf, the Whitney’s Deputy Director for Programs and Nancy and Steve Crown Family Chief Curator, said, “With the opening of the new building, we’re rededicating ourselves to the Whitney’s longstanding commitment to emerging artists. Chris’s keen eye has been critical to this renewed focus in our program, which just launched with his presentations of Jared Madere, Rachel Rose, and New Theater. Mia’s interest in both historical figures and new tendencies, as well her years on the West Coast will add important perspective to the Biennial. The two of them have great intellectual chemistry, and it’s exciting to see the first Biennial in our new home in the hands of such talented young curators.

Whitney Museum of American Art, May 2015. Photograph by Timothy Schenck

Whitney Museum of American Art, May 2015. Photograph by Timothy Schenck

The Whitney’s Alice Pratt Brown Director Adam D. Weinberg noted: “Every Whitney Biennial is a galvanizing process for the Museum, a tradition that goes back to the institution’s roots while retaining its freshness and immediacy. Endeavoring to gauge the state of art in America today, the Biennial demands curators who are attuned to the art of the current moment and there is no question that Chris Lew and Mia Locks have their fingers on the pulse. The expanded spaces and possibilities offered by our new downtown building will make this Biennial particularly lively and groundbreaking.” Continue reading

New-York Historical Society Announces Ten Fellows For The 2015-16 Academic Year

Now Accepting 2016–17 Applicants at this link

The New-York Historical Society is pleased to announce ten fellows who will be in residence during the 201516 academic year. Leveraging its incomparable collections of documents, artifacts, and works of art detailing American history from the perspective of New York City, New-York Historicals fellowships—open to scholars at various times during their academic careers—provide scholars with material resources and an intellectual community to develop new research and publications that illuminate complex issues of the past.

The ambitious and diverse range of research topics that our incoming fellows will tackle—from the role European and African women in expanding slavery, to how turn of the 20th-century New York elite clubs redefined the city’s architectural and social history—are a testament to the reach and importance of  New-York Historical’s  collections and their relevance to  today’s world,” said Valerie Paley, Vice President, Chief Historian, and Dean of Scholarly Programs at New-York Historical.

New-York Historical offers fellowships to scholars dedicated to understanding and promoting American history. Fellowship positions are made possible by the generous support of Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Sid Lapidus, The Lehrman Institute, and Patricia and John Klingenstein. All fellows receive research stipends while in residency, and Bernard & Irene Schwartz Fellows each teach two courses at Eugene Lang College The New School for Liberal Arts during their year as resident scholars. This year’s fellows are:

NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES FELLOW 
T. Cole Jones is currently Assistant Professor of History at Purdue University. He received a BA in History from Duke University in 2006, an MA in History from Johns Hopkins University in 2009, and completed his PhD from that same institution in 2014. Jones’s proposed research project, “Captives of Liberty: Prisoners of War and the Radicalization of the American Revolution” is a comprehensive analysis of revolutionary American treatment of enemy prisoners and will illuminate the role of wartime violence in the social and political transformations of the era. With the support of the N-YHS, Jones will spend the 2015–2016 academic year mining the Library’s vast assemblage of regimental orderly books, as well as the papers of several Continental Army figures. Jones will also consult the diary of Thomas Gilpin to contextualize the plight of Philadelphia’s Quaker exiles within the larger history of American prisoner-of-war treatment during the revolution. Jones’s work will challenge common understandings of violence during the revolution. He will uncover the central role brutality played in the war.  Initially the revolutionary leadership  adhered to European rules of war, but their vision of restraint did not endure. Jones will examine how American military practices evolved during the war, analyzing the factors that precipitated the escalation of violence and redefined treatment the revolution’s prisoners of war.

ANDREW W. MELLON FOUNDATION FELLOWS
Matthew Karp is currently Assistant Professor of History at Princeton University. He received a BA in History from Amherst College in 2003 and a PhD in History from the University of Pennsylvania in 2011. During his residency at N-YHS, Karp will undertake a full revision of his book manuscript The Foreign Policy of Slavery. This work will consider pro-slavery internationalism and revise the way we see southern slaveholders in the broader context of modern world history. As presidents, cabinet officers, diplomats, and military leaders, southern elites controlled international policy within the powerful American federal governments. Karp will examine how their unwavering dedication  to slavery shaped the course and destiny of U.S. foreign relations.

Stephen Petrus received a BA in History and Philosophy from Gettysburg College in 1995, an MA in History from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa in 1997, and a PhD in History from the City University of New York in 2010. While at N-YHS, Dr. Petrus will conduct archival research within the Library’s collections, including the Shirley Hayes Papers, the Margot Gayle Papers, and the N-YHS Washington Square Park Redevelopment Collection, to complete a project entitled “The Politics and Culture of Greenwich Village and the Rise of the Tumultuous Sixties.” What made the Village a distinct political and cultural entity in the 1950s and 1960s, and why did many political and artistic movements emerge and flourish there? Petrus’ narrative attributes the political and artistic ferment to community organizations; they were engines of political and cultural change. The concentration of its neighborhood institutions attracted an influx of talent from all over the nation. More than simply a bohemian sanctuary during an age of conformity, Greenwich Village was a hub of resistance to the dominant political and cultural order of the mid-century United States.

BERNARD AND IRENE SCHWARTZ FELLOWS 
Christine Walker is currently Assistant Professor of History at Texas Tech University. She received a BA in American Studies from Yale University in 2000, an MA in History from the University of Connecticut in 2007, and completed her PhD at the University of Michigan in 2014. Walker’s project at N-YHS, entitled “The Jamaica Ladies: Gender, Authority, and Atlantic Slavery,” will adapt her PhD dissertation into a manuscript for publication. Her scholarship argues that free women of European and African descent were crucial investors in the expansion of slavery, and situates the lives of free and enslaved people in a broader colonial context. To complete her research, Dr. Walker will review the John Brown Papers, focusing on the letters of Brown family women, and will mine New-York Historical’s extensive print collection to support research on how local and imperial events influenced women’s lives.

Brendan P. O’Malley he earned a BA in History at Vassar College in 1992 and a PhD in History from the City University of New York in 2015. Dr. O’Malley’s project, “Protecting the Stranger: The Origins of U.S. Immigration Regulation in Nineteenth-Century New York,” will be the first book-length examination of the New York State Board of the Commissioners of Emigration— the first government agency in the United States devoted entirely to immigration. The creation of the Emigration Board in 1847 marked a watershed moment in the relationship between government and immigration, expanding it from a local to a statewide and national concern. The commissioners protected vulnerable immigrants from those who sought to defraud them, facilitated their migration Westand gave immigrants access to numerous amenities to ease their transition into a new life in the United States. The N-YHS’s papers of Gulian C. Verplank, the president of the Emigration Board from 1848 until his death in 1870, are critical to this study.

PATRICIA AND JOHN KLINGENSTEIN SHORT-TERM FELLOWS
H. Horatio Joyce is currently a doctoral candidate in History at Oxford University. He received a BA in the History of Art and Architecture from the University of Chicago in 2010 and an MA in the same subject from Boston University in May 2012. Joyce’s project, “Building and Belonging: McKim, Mead & White and the Making of New York City’s Clubland,” is a social and architectural study of private clubs in New York City in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. His focus on both elite identity and urban transformation connects the threads of social and architectural history. The project is organized around the architects and clubmen McKim, Mead, and White, and will utilize the records of the Harmonie Club and the Seventh Regiment. Continue reading

Holiday Express: Trains and Toys from the Jerni Collection Returns to the New-York Historical Society

On View October 30, 2015 – February 28, 2016

Enchanting Display of 300 Toys and Related Programming Will Enthrall Visitors of All Ages This Holiday Season

The New-York Historical Society will again be transformed this holiday season with a vibrant and sweeping display of spectacular antique toy trains, toys, and scenic elements. On view October 30, 2015 through February 28, 2016, Holiday Express: Trains and Toys from the Jerni Collection celebrates the beauty and allure of toys from a bygone era. Holiday Express: Trains and Toys from the Jerni Collection is sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies.

Lutz Toy Company  Floor toy train set, 1884. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Lutz Toy Company  Floor toy train set, 1884. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Märklin 5-gauge locomotive, 1905. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Märklin 5-gauge locomotive, 1905. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Since its acquisition by New-York Historical Society last year, the Jerni Collection has become a highlight of the Museum’s holdings. Assembled over the course of five decades by U.S. collectors Jerry and Nina Greene, the Jerni Collection is considered one of the world’s leading collections of antique trains and toys and includes unique, hand-crafted and hand-painted pieces dating from approximately 1850 to 1940, featuring prime examples by the leading manufacturers that set the standard for the Golden Age of Toy Trains, including the German firms of Märklin and Bing, as well as the American firms Lionel and Ives.

Gebruder Bing Leviathan ocean liner, 1920. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Gebruder Bing Leviathan ocean liner, 1920. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Toy Airship, 1920-1930. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Toy Airship, 1920-1930. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

This exhibition will engage visitors in the thrill and joy of trains while conveying the important history of American industry—for example, how train tracks replaced waterways as the most popular mode of transport for people and goods,” stated Dr. Louise Mirrer, President and CEO of the New-York Historical Society. “With the pounding of the golden spike in 1869, the First Transcontinental Railroad was complete, spurring migration across the continent and forever transforming the American landscape. Locomotives rapidly traversed the terrain, connecting the U.S. heartland to East Coast factories, shipyards, and piers. In urban centers such as New York, local railways, both elevated and underground, allowed for the first rapid, public intercity transport. ”

 Märklin 5-gauge locomotive, 1905. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Märklin 5-gauge locomotive, 1905. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Detail of Gebrüder Bing Carousel, 1880-1890. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

Detail of Gebrüder Bing Carousel, 1880-1890. New-York Historical Society, The Jerni Collection.

The Holiday Express exhibition will unfold over a broad swath of New-York Historical’s first floor, featuring pieces from the Jerni Collection that will transform the space into a magical wonderland. With the aid of theatrical lighting, an ambient audio “soundscape,” and other visual effects, visitors will be engaged in an immersive experience. The exhibition begins at the West 77th Street entrance, where movement and sound from four large-scale multimedia screens will make it seem as though trains are roaring through the space. A 360-degree mountainous landscape will be on view in the Judith and Howard Berkowitz Sculpture Court, featuring artifacts grouped into ten scenes. Continue reading

Astolat Dollhouse Castle To Go On Public Display for the First Time

Structure to be Unveiled During ‘Holiday Under The Stars’: A New York Tradition at The Shops at Columbus CircleMain photo with girl-bd0c4f0649

Free Indoor Exhibit Ideal for Cold, Shorter Days of Winter and NYC Thanksgiving Holiday Visits

The Astolat Dollhouse Castle will go on public display for the very first time – to be unveiled during ‘Holiday Under The Stars’: A New York Tradition at The Shops at Columbus Circle on November 12 through to December 8main-logo2

Renowned miniature artist Elaine Diehl designed and built the Castle over a 13-year period. Her inspiration was Elaine of Astolat, the heroine of the Victorian ballad, The Lady of Shalott by Alfred Lord Tennyson. Diehl commissioned fine craftsmen, carpenters, goldsmiths, glass blowers, and silversmiths from around the world to furnish the incredible structure. Thousands of additional hand-crafted pieces have been added over the last 20 years and include seven periods and styles including Spanish, Oriental, Tudor, 18th-century English, and Victorian. Original works of art include Eric Pearson, George Becker, Warren Dick, Laurel Coulon, Mary McGrath, and others. Photos and video at www.dollhousecastle.com.

Appraised at $8.5 million, The Astolat Dollhouse Castle will be on public display this holiday season at The Shops of Columbus Circle at Time Warner Center in Manhattan for the first time ever since being built in the 1980s. On November 12, the unveiling of the "dollhouse" will coincide with Time Warner Center's lighting of its "Holiday Under the Stars" at 5 p.m. Admission to both the Astolat Dollhouse Castle and star viewing is free, courtesy of The Shops at Columbus Circle. Voluntary donations to benefit children's charities can be made at www.dollhousecastle.com. (PRNewsFoto/Astolat Dollhouse Castle Proj.)

Appraised at $8.5 million, The Astolat Dollhouse Castle will be on public display this holiday season at The Shops of Columbus Circle at Time Warner Center in Manhattan for the first time ever since being built in the 1980s. (PRNewsFoto/Astolat Dollhouse Castle Proj.)

Notable reviewers have said: “Astolat Dollhouse Castle represents an important example of American art, both historically and aesthetically.” “Astolat is one of the finest miniature structures in the world…exhibiting a rare combination of sculpture, art, engineering and detail that set it apart from anything in existence today. It must be seen to be believed.”

Appraised at $8.5 million, The Astolat Dollhouse Castle will be on public display this holiday season at The Shops of Columbus Circle at Time Warner Center in Manhattan for the first time ever since being built in the 1980s. On November 12, the unveiling of the “dollhouse” will coincide with Time Warner Center‘s lighting of its “Holiday Under the Stars” at 5 p.m., the largest specialty crafted exhibit of illuminated color mixing in the world featuring twelve 14-foot stars that hang from the ceiling of the 150-foot Great Room overlooking iconic Central Park.

Under the massive stars and through tiny doors is the world-famous Astolat Dollhouse Castle. It is nine feet tall, weighs 800 pounds and features 29 rooms filled with 10,000 miniature pieces, including elaborate furniture, oil paintings, mirrors, fireplaces, gold miniature jewelry, rare-mini books more than 100 years old, fine rugs, fabrics, and pieces made of and silver and gold. It has seven levels, stairways, hallways, a basement, a wine cellar, a kitchen and an armory. There are formal rooms, a library, a music room, a grand ballroom and a bar, and that’s before you get to the Wizard’s tower on the top level. Continue reading

NET-A-PORTER and MR PORTER Launch ‘All For You,’ The First Ever Combined Campaign From The Luxury Retailers

This holiday season, NET-A-PORTER and MR PORTER join creative forces to reveal their first ever combined campaign. Entitled ‘All For You‘, the short film underscores the world-class service proposition for which both brands are globally renowned, and gives an enchanting behind-the-scenes glimpse into the world of the online luxury retail leaders.

NET-A-PORTER and MR PORTER launch 'All For You,' the first ever combined campaign from the luxury retailers (PRNewsFoto/NET-A-PORTER,MR PORTER)

NET-A-PORTER and MR PORTER launch ‘All For You,’ the first ever combined campaign from the luxury retailers (PRNewsFoto/NET-A-PORTER,MR PORTER)

The campaign spans print and digital, with the lead medium of film taking the viewer on a insiders’ journey of a package, re-imagined through a magical lens: models in chiffon gowns pluck garments from gliding rails, multicolored butterflies become pocket squares and products are meticulously, individually hand-wrapped before embarking on the final stretch of their journey to our customer and the gift recipient. The film showcases the ultimate luxury services provided by both brands, and it’s #AllForYou.

The campaign was directed by creative duo Us, comprised of renowned British creative directors Christopher Barrett and Luke Taylor. The film will premier across all mediums including a first-ever broadcast on television and select cinemas, as well as existing media partners and online social networks. The film will also live on both NET-A-PORTER YouTube and MR PORTER YouTube channels throughout the holidays.

Alison Loehnis, President of The Net-a-Porter Group said: “Our first joint campaign, ‘All For You,’ highlights the year-round mission of our businesses: to deliver exceptional service and style to our customers around the globe, making NET-A-PORTER and MR PORTER the ultimate online destinations for luxury gifting this holiday season.”