San Francisco’s Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) Announces Winners of the Inaugural Emerging Artists Program (EAP)

In Conjunction With MoAD’s 10th Year Anniversary, Local Artists Tim Roseborough and Cheryl Derricotte Awarded Exhibition Space as First EAP Winners Beginning Nov. 11

The Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) announced Tim Roseborough and Cheryl Derricotte as the winners of the museum’s inaugural Emerging Artists Program. The two San Francisco Bay Area artists were selected among 45 applicants for the opportunity to exhibit at MoAD.

MoAD Logo (Provided by  MoAD,/www.moadsf.org)

MoAD Logo (Provided by MoAD,/www.moadsf.org)

The Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD, 685 Mission Street at 3rd, San Francisco, California 94105, (415) 358-7200) is an arts and cultural institution dedicated to preserving the stories of our common African heritage and sharing those stories with audiences from around the world. Situated in the heart of the Yerba Buena Arts District in San Francisco, MoAD is actively engaged in building a community that inspires, educates and connects people of all ages and backgrounds.

Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) (Photo Credit: www.freelon.com)

Museum of the African Diaspora (MoAD) (Photo Credit: http://www.freelon.com)

MoAD‘s mission is to build a deeper understanding of the African Diaspora through art, programs and events that cultivate wonder and excitement about the ways in which our personal histories are connected. As a nonprofit organization, the museum’s operations and programs are supported by grants and contributions from public and private sources. As a Smithsonian Institution affiliate, MoAD has access to the Smithsonian Institution’s 136 million artifact collection for research, exhibits and programming. MoAD joins a network of more than 190 organizations in 45 states, Puerto Rico and Panamá with a shared goal of creating lasting experiences that educate, inspire and broaden perspectives on science, history, world culture and the arts.

Applicants submitted works that address the cultural and artistic richness of the African Diaspora which elaborated on MoAD’s four themes: Origins, Movement, Adaptation and Transformation. Roseborough is the first artist to exhibit in the museum’s multipurpose artwork space in the Salon gallery. His Four Themes exhibition is on view Nov. 11, 2015–Jan. 18, 2016. Derricotte’s exhibit, Ghost/Ships, is on view Jan. 27–April 3, 2016.

MoAD responded to local artists’ requests to creatively address issues around the Diaspora with new and fresh perspectives,” said MoAD’s director of exhibitions, Emily Kuhlmann. “One of our key goals is to provide opportunities for the arts community to share their Diaspora story through MoAD’s mission and vision. We’re excited by the interest in this year’s program and look forward to seeing both of these exhibitions come to life.”

Panelists Kuhlmann, along with Michael Warr (MoAD’s deputy director), Dr. Sarah Ladipo Manyika (professor of literature at San Francisco State University and board member) and Melorra Green and Melonie J. Green (both local arts professionals) selected the winners of the program.

Four Themes: San Francisco-based Tim Roseborough literally leveraged MOAD’s mission and four themes by translating them into his unique Englyph writing system. 

Four Themes: San Francisco-based Tim Roseborough literally leveraged MOAD’s mission and four themes by translating them into his unique Englyph writing system.

Four Themes

San Francisco-based Tim Roseborough literally leveraged MOAD’s mission and four themes by translating them into his unique Englyph writing system. Four Themes is one of the two collections of works that consists of seven digital prints and an animated video that joins all of the artwork thematically. His practice includes a series of artworks rendered in Englyph – a conflation of “English” and “hieroglyphics”.

Englyph was inspired by hieroglyphics – the hermetic language system of Egypt – whereby he weds the ancient tradition to contemporary digital culture. Englyph is a part of his ongoing effort to balance the worlds of form and idea in artworks that are both visually appealing and conceptually rigorous.

Roseborough is a digital artist whose work has been featured in numerous publications such as the San Francisco Chronicle, Artforum and SF Examiner. He has performed and showcased at the 2012 and 2010 ZERO1 New Media Biennials, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and SOMArts Cultural Center, among others. He has also been awarded residencies at the Kala Art Institute in Berkeley and the School of Visual Arts in New York.

My generation is notable for being exposed to an ever-expanding array of screens: motion pictures, televisions, computer monitors, cell-phones and hand held devices,” said Roseborough. “My work is informed by this “screen culture:” film, television, virtual reality and video games. I incorporate contemporary aesthetics into my art, but my work injects these “screens” with ambiguity, questions and challenges.

He continued: “From paint tubes in the 19th century, to acrylic paint, silkscreen technique and portable film and video cameras in the 20th, artists have seized upon new technologies in their practices, thereby reinvigorating art for each age. Following in this tradition, I utilize a range of what is broadly termed “Digital Media,” including 2-and-3-dimensional modeling and animation, video, digital photography, Web sites and digital printing. My practice involves traditional artist’s skills including drafting, sketching and coloring, while incorporating 21st Century aptitudes such as programming and digital design and modeling. My work is informed by Minimalism, Conceptual and Video art and infuses these influences with a provocative vision and singular visual aesthetic.

In my Englyph series, I have devised a new way of writing English and other Latin alphabet based languages. This process, implemented in a variety of media including Web sites, animations and digital prints, has a distinctive style and, literally, its own visual vocabulary. My animations, installations and videos focus on events, media and cultural phenomena and artifacts that have been lost, ignored or forgotten, mining the past and the subconscious of our culture to highlight profound, yet under-recognized, notions and ideas.”

Cheryl Derricotte pays homage to Fred Wilson's Mining the Museum by "mining the library” (the British Library) for images related to the global slave trade. This show includes approximately 20 works that reveal images of people from African descent who come from diverse locales and were involved in the trade.

Cheryl Derricotte pays homage to Fred Wilson’s Mining the Museum by “mining the library” (the British Library) for images related to the global slave trade. This show includes approximately 20 works that reveal images of people from African descent who come from diverse locales and were involved in the trade.

Ghosts/Ships

Cheryl Derricotte pays homage to Fred Wilson’s Mining the Museum by “mining the library” (the British Library) for images related to the global slave trade. This show includes approximately 20 works that reveal images of people from African descent who come from diverse locales and were involved in the trade.

Images of ships and oceans reveal how the art and culture of the African people have been dispersed all over the world. The exhibit will include portraits of enslaved people from the Diaspora, ships, oceans and botanical illustrations of cotton, which was a central crop to the institution of slavery and the basis of much of the early craft art.

Originally from Washington D.C., Derricotte is a visual storyteller who currently resides in Oakland, Calif. She holds a master of fine arts from the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) and has been awarded Art Alliance for Contemporary GlassInaugural Visionary Scholarship and a D.C. Commission on the Arts & Humanities /National Endowment for the Arts Artist Fellowship Grant. She’s exhibited at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Florida State University Museum of Fine Arts and the San Francisco Airport Museum.

Four Themes and Ghosts/Ships are concurrent with MoAD’s 2015 fall/2016 winter exhibitions, Alison Saar: Bearing and Who Among Us…: The Art of Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle. Both open on Nov. 11, 2015 and end on April 3, 2016. To learn more and to support MoAD, visit www.moadsf.org.