Denim: Past, Present and Future on Display at The Museum at FIT

Denim: Fashion’s Frontier

Fashion & Textile History Gallery, The Museum at The Fashion Institute of Technology

December 1, 2015 – May 7, 2016

All photography © Copyright 2015 The Museum at FIT

Men’s work pants, denim and brushed cotton, circa 1840, USA, museum purchase. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Men’s work pants, denim and brushed cotton, circa 1840, USA, museum purchase. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Denim has long been one of the world’s most beloved fabrics. Your jeans do more than cover your body. They hold you. They support and comfort, they remind you that you are girded for the struggle. They take your measure and keep your faith. Jeans mold to you and become yours alone. If you eat too much, they tell you. Denim is a sturdy cotton warp-faced twill textile in which the weft passes under two or more warp threads. This twill weaving produces the familiar diagonal ribbing of the denim that distinguishes it from cotton duck (a linen canvas). After being made into an article of clothing, most denim articles are washed to make them softer and to reduce or eliminate shrinkage (which could cause the article to not fit properly after its owner washes it). In addition to being washed, “washed denim” is sometimes artificially distressed to produce a “worn” look. Much of the appeal of artificially distressed denim is that it resembles dry denim which has faded. In jeans made from dry denim, such fading is affected by the body of the person who wears them and by the activities of his or her daily life. This process creates what many enthusiasts feel to be a more “natural” look than the look of artificially distressed denim.

Embellished men's jeans; blue denim 5-pocket jeans with multicolor overall applique, beadwork, hand and machine embroidery, incorporating leather, vinyl, contrast fabric, rhinestones and cord. Levi Strauss & Co., jeans, embroidered denim, circa 1969, USA, gift of Jay Good. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Levi Strauss & Co., jeans, embroidered denim (blue denim 5-pocket jeans with multicolor overall applique, beadwork, hand and machine embroidery, incorporating leather, vinyl, contrast fabric, rhinestones and cord), circa 1969, USA, gift of Jay Good. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

According to anthropologist Daniel Miller, “On any given day, nearly half the world’s population is in jeans.” The cultural significance of this has yet to be fully determined.

Denim: Fashion’s Frontier will explore the dynamic history of denim and its relationship with high fashion from the 19th century to the present. The exhibition, presented by The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology, (Seventh Avenue at 27 Street, New York City 10001-5992) will trace denim from its origins in work wear of the 19th century, through its role as a symbol of counterculture rebellion in America, to its acceptance into mainstream culture. It will culminate with the arrival of blue jeans as luxury items during the late 20th century, and denim’s subsequent deconstruction by contemporary designers through postmodern pastiche and experimentation.

Comme des Garçons (Junya Watanabe), dress, repurposed denim, spring 2002, Japan, museum purchase. Photograph by William Palmer.

Comme des Garçons (Junya Watanabe), dress, repurposed denim, spring 2002, Japan, museum purchase. Photograph by William Palmer.

In 1853, a Bavarian immigrant named Levi Strauss, an astute merchant in San Francisco, responded to the gold-rush need for tough miner’s clothes. He had his stock of brown cotton tent canvas run up as plain trousers, no belt loops and no back pockets. A cinch belt in the back kept them up. Scrabbling among too many rocks and too little gold, crawling along shafts, wrestling timber supports and balky dray mules, Strauss’s “overalls” lasted. They were cheap and they felt good.

Strauss switched to denim (from Serge de Nimes, a twill made in southern France) and had it dyed in reliable, uniform indigo. By the 1860s, Levi Strauss‘s blue pants were daily wear for miners and farmers and cattlemen throughout the West. In 1873 he bought, for $69—the price of the patent application — an idea from a Russian immigrant tailor in Reno for making miner’s pants stronger by riveting the critical seams. They were nicknamed jeans after the city of Genoa, where sailors wore blue cotton canvas.

White and black organic tunisian denim one shoulder gown with black denim trim and shoulder strap, pieced black panel at waist, front zippered slit at front L, and pleated white denim deatchable train attached at back . Edun, dress, white and black denim, 2007, USA, gift of Edun. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Edun, dress, white and black organic tunisian denim one shoulder gown with black denim trim and shoulder strap, pieced black panel at waist, front zippered slit at front L, and pleated white denim deatchable train attached at back . Edun, 2007, USA, gift of Edun. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Walking suit, striped denim, circa 1915, USA, museum purchase. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Walking suit, striped denim, circa 1915, USA, museum purchase. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

By 1880 the Levi was full-blown, with orange stitching (including the trademark “arcuate” design across the back pockets, once the functional anchor for pocket lining), bar tacking, rivets, watch pocket and the “Two Horse” leather patch. Lot numbers are assigned to products and, for the 01-weight denim used, the “waist-high overalls” are called 501s. It’s true; more so than most of the thin ghosts we call up for our heritage, Levi’s are rooted in the real stuff.

Henry David Lee was another kind of merchant. He started out in Ohio selling kerosene and moved west to Salina, Kansas, with a small bundle of venture capital. The H. D. Lee Mercantile Company sold fancy canned goods and offered a line of Eastern work clothes. When shortages and shipping didn’t suit Henry David, he set up his own garment works, producing overalls, jackets and dungarees. Dungarees refer specifically to cotton drill pants without bib fronts, and generally to the rough blue cotton cloth named for the dyer’s section of Bombay—Dungri—where it originated. Lee’s chauffeur probably came up with the Lee Union-All, a denim coverall that became the uniform of mechanics and other workers in grimy environments. Later, it evolved into the flight suit.

In the 1920s, about the time Lee was introducing the first zipper fly, Levi Strauss was deleting the crotch rivet. Chafed horsemen had pressed the company for years to remove it, but it took a fly-fishing trip by the chairman of the board to do so. As he crouched near a campfire listening to a story, that central copper rivet heated up nicely. The chairman bolted upright—and the rivet went. Later, with the universal acceptance of jeans, the back-pocket rivets that scratched school desks, dining room chairs, saddles and car fenders became extinct.

Alongside this chronology, Denim: Fashion’s Frontier will highlight important points of engagement between high fashion and denim that are often left out of typical denim histories. Themes addressed will include the role of advertising in creating popular mythologies, as well as issues of distressing, connoisseurship, and environmental concerns. The goal will be to shed new light on one of the world’s most popular types of clothing, and to explore how a particular style of woven cotton has come to dominate the clothing industry.

The exhibition opens with an example of Levi Strauss & Co.’s most famous style of jeans—the 501XX—positioning its importance as the original template for the five-pocket, riveted jean that continues to dominate the market today.

The exhibition’s historic chronology begins with rare pieces of denim work wear from the 19th century, including a pair of work pants from the 1830s-40s that predate Levi Strauss & Co.’s jeans production and a woman’s work jacket from the late 19th century, which demonstrates that denim was not only a menswear fabric.

By the start of the 20th century, denim was regularly used for a variety of clothing, from prison garb to naval uniforms, both of which are on view in the exhibition. Also on view in this section is a fashionable women’s walking suit from the 1910s rendered entirely in a striped, white denim. Cut in accordance with the fashionable silhouette of the time, the ensemble illustrates the widening applications for denim.

During the interwar years, two distinct genres of lifestyle clothing emerged that shifted denim’s cultural associations: “Western wear” (which emerged alongside the popularity of dude ranch vacations) and “play clothes” (which were designed to outfit fashionable men and women while engaging in an array of new leisure activities, such as tennis and days at the beach). Examples from both of these categories are on view, including a pair of “Lee Riders” from the 1940s and a woman’s denim play ensemble from the 1930s. Also on view from this period is an haute couture blouse by Elsa Schiaparelli that imitates the look of denim. The blouse is accentuated with pearl essence buttons to play on the tradition of western wear rodeo shirts.

Jumpsuit, denim, 1942-45, USA, gift of David Toser. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Jumpsuit, denim, 1942-45, USA, gift of David Toser. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

With the onset of World War II, women went to work as part of the war effort when men left for the front. The all-in-one denim jumpsuit—an example of which is on view—became the unofficial uniform of these female factory workers, personified in the figure of “Rosie the Riveter.”

Simultaneously, a new market emerged for practical-yet-fashionable clothing that affluent women could wear while tending to their own households, a need that arose in the wake of housekeepers defecting to work for the war effort. Claire McCardell was the first to capitalize on this new demand in 1942 with her denim “Pop Over” dress.

As World War II came to a close, a new influence shaped the cultural view of denim in 1950s America: the biker gang. Jeans became the center of controversy, and there was a general public outcry against denim as a symbol (and even the cause) of teenage unrest. Examples of denim garments from this time include a Levi Strauss & Co. 507 denim jacket.

18th century/1960s-inspired ensemble with light blue denim redingote and micro mini skirt embroidered with large floral border design, silk crepe de chine camisole and boned corset in contrasting pale and deep pink floral prints. Roberto Cavalli, ensemble, embroidered denim, spring 2003, Italy, gift of Roberto Cavalli. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Roberto Cavalli, Ensemble, embroidered denim(18th century/1960s-inspired ensemble with light blue denim redingote and micro mini skirt embroidered with large floral border design, silk crepe de chine camisole and boned corset in contrasting pale and deep pink floral prints), spring 2003, Italy, gift of Roberto Cavalli. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

To combat fears of juvenile delinquency, a group of denim mills and manufacturers banded together to found The Denim Council in 1955. The Special Collections of FIT’s Gladys Marcus Library contains the papers of The Denim Council, which include press clippings, reports, and cartoons. Examples of these on display in the exhibition shed new light on denim’s rapid rise in popularity during this period.

In the 1960s, denim became closely associated with the hippie counterculture movement. Within the movement, denim was important for its working class connotations and as a comment on the growing materialism of postwar American culture. The hippies’ particular use of denim established certain trends, such as bellbottom jeans, embroidered denim, and patched denim. Examples of these different styles are on view.

By the early 1970s, the counterculture movement had crossed into the mainstream, taking denim with it. A prime example of this transition is a pair of denim shorts printed with a photograph of the crowd at the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair. The print transforms the hippies themselves into a decorative motif, in essence making them a commodity of the consumerist industry they were protesting against. At the same time, denim began appearing in the work of major fashion designers, such as Yves Saint Laurent. A denim safari jacket by Saint Laurent from this period is shown alongside a denim leisure suit by American designer John Weitz.

European companies, such as Fiorucci, started a cultural craze for Italian and French jeans in the late 1970s. These jeans were defined by their sexy fit and were often so tight that wearers were forced to lie down in order to zip them up. Examples of Fiorucci’s signature “Safety Jeans” represent this trend. Also on view in this section is a pair of the original Calvin Klein Jeans—often heralded as the first “designer” jeans—which were immortalized by Brooke Shields in the company’s controversial 1980 commercials.

Raphael, leisure suit, denim, circa 1973, Italy, gift of Chip Tolbert. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

Raphael, leisure suit, denim, circa 1973, Italy, gift of Chip Tolbert. Photograph courtesy of The Museum at FIT.

During the 1980s, the practice of “finishing” denim with different techniques, such as stonewashing and acid-washing, became standard across the industry. The innovation of stonewashing is often linked to French duo Marithé & François Girbaud. An example of their work is juxtaposed with jeans from another important 1980s brand: Guess. This section of the exhibition also includes a selection of designer experiments with denim from the 1980s, including a look from Ralph Lauren’s “Prairie” collection of 1981. Continue reading

Marriott International Creates Two Epic Super Bowl 50 Fan Experiences

In anticipation of SUPER BOWL 50 in February 2016, one of the biggest events in the history of the NFL, Marriott International is changing the game for lucky fans with an epic season long SUPER BOWL 50 CAMPAIGN. Courtyard by Marriott, the Official Hotel of the NFL for the past four years, is adding to its tradition of unique NFL experiences by hosting the world’s first SUPER BOWL “SUITE STADIUM CONTEST” SLEEPOVER in Levi’s Stadium.

Marriott Rewards, the company’s award-winning loyalty program, launches its “50 TO 50” CAMPAIGN that includes a sweepstakes which gives members in three countries a once-in-a-lifetime chance to take a group of 50 of their friends and family to attend the game and enjoy an exclusive VIP Super Bowl 50 weekend in the San Francisco Bay area.

Marriott Rewards is making it possible for the winner to take a group of 50 friends and family to SUPER BOWL 50 in the San Francisco Bay area with its 50 TO 50 SWEEPSTAKES on Facebook (www.Marriott50to50.com).  The trip includes flights, hotel, tickets to the game and an unforgettable VIP weekend experience at the biggest game of the year. Members can enter today for a chance to win through November 30, and non-members will be able to sign up instantly for Marriott Rewards which is free to join.  Visit the Marriott Rewards Facebook page for info and follow the conversation with #50to50. The sweeps is available to residents of the United States, Canada (excluding Quebec) and the United Kingdom

As a part of Marriott International’s worldwide sponsorship with the NFL, Marriott Rewards will participate in the League’s International Series “NFL On Regent Street” Fan Fest Event on October 24 in London, providing an interactive Football Challenge, surprise visits from special VIP guests and chances to enter the 50 to 50 sweepstakes. To extend the exclusive experience, a few lucky Marriott Rewards members will also be invited to watch the Jacksonville Jaguars and Buffalo Bills square off at Wembley Stadium from a private suite on October 25.

The NFL is the powerhouse of professional sports, and our long-standing sponsorship gives us an opportunity to tap into a passionate group of travelers, bringing the breadth and depth of our brand offerings to fans,” said Karin Timpone, Global Marketing Officer, Marriott International.Similar to our relationships with global leaders in the music and entertainment industry, our NFL sponsorship represents the company’s ongoing effort to bring exclusive and memorable experiences for our guests and the 52 million members of our Marriott Rewards program.

Marriott provides unique and interactive experiences that have resonated with football fans across the country,” said Renie Anderson, Senior Vice President Of Sponsorship, NFL. “We are pleased to work with Marriott to reach our fans in authentic and innovative ways, especially leading up to Super Bowl 50.

Courtyard by Marriott offers the SUPER BOWL “SUITE STADIUM CONTEST” an unforgettable overnight stay at Levi’s Stadium the night before Super Bowl 50 in a suite transformed into a Courtyard guest room. Following the slumber party of the century, the winner and three guests will continue to party as they cheer during the epic Super Bowl 50 game. The contest is now open and the winner will be determined through a series of social media challenges before closing in November. The prize also includes flights and tickets to the game. Visit Courtyard.com or follow the conversation with #SuiteSB50Contest.

Courtyard will also build momentum with a season-longJOURNEY TO SUPER BOWL 50” ROAD TRIP that travels through NFL markets across the country before reaching its big, final stop in San Francisco. Each stop brings a fun-filled fan fest complete with NFL-themed games, NFL legend appearances, samples from the brand’s Bistro and special connections to brand contests and Marriott Rewards gifts. Fans can track the journey with #CourtyardNFL or Courtyard.com/NFL.

Courtyard has also launched its newest NFL television campaign starring NFL anchor Rich Eisen. In the spots, the brand invites Eisen to test their latest NFL-themed hotel innovations that go to humorous, overzealous extremes to please their guests. The spots will air throughout the season and can be viewed at the Courtyard YouTube page. Continue reading

Givenchy Came. Givenchy Saw. Riccardo Tisci Conquered. Riccardo Tisci Takes Manhattan

The Givenchy by Riccardo Tisci Spring/Summer 2016 Collection in New York City Enchanted New York City

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Image provided by Givenchy PR

Runway Images by InDigital/Other Images Provided by Givenchy PR

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Riccardo Tisci surround by models at the Givenchy Spring/Summer Collection fashion show, featuring designs from the women’s Prêt-à-Porter (ready-to-wear), Haute Couture, and menswear collections. (Image provided by Givenchy PR)

This season, the House of Givenchy, under the initiative of Artistic Director Riccardo Tisci, brought an exceptional collection to New York, as the city represents the capital of the American dream for the designer and for the founder Hubert de Givenchy, who were both supported from the very beginning by the American market.

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The runway at the Givenchy Spring/Summer 2016 Collection fashion show, designs from the women’s Prêt-à-Porter (ready-to-wear), Haute Couture, and menswear collections. (Image provided by Givenchy PR)

On September 11th 2015, New York hosted a performance show dedicated to love and sharing. With a décor of recycled materials installed on the banks of the Hudson in Tribeca, there was an unprecedented audience in attendance: professionals from the fashion world rubbed shoulders with celebrities, fashion-school students, winners of a competition organized in partnership with the city, and local residents from the neighbourhood.

The website givenchy.com and giant screens installed across the city, from Soho to Times Square, also broadcast the show live, while advertising buses made their way across the Bronx, Harlem, and Queens inviting a wide a number as possible to follow the event.

With Marina Abramovic, a friend of the House and co-author of numerous artistic projects, Riccardo Tisci created a performance which reached beyond the scope of fashion. Designed to be an emotional experience focusing on universal themes (love, peace, freedom, humility, spirituality), it notably put the spotlight on four artists who performed spiritual and cultural chants from across the world. True to form, Marina Abramovic also invited seven artists to host live performances on the show’s location.

While the event coincides with the opening of the new boutique on Madison Avenue, designed by Tisci, and the designer’s ten-year anniversary as artistic director at the house, it is above all to celebrate the success of the Givenchy style which finds equal expression both in the world of haute couture as in street fashion. Shapes from women’s prêt-à-porter, haute couture, and male fashion, all came to exemplify this two-edged style.

As Tim Blanks, Chief Fashion Critic of The Business of Fashion (and one of my favorite fashion critics and features writer) wrote in his review, “Tisci-takes-Manhattan could logically have been the rationale for a super-urban extravaganza, in keeping with the sportswear that has propelled Givenchy onto the torsos of kids the world over. Instead, he offered up a beautifully measured meditation on the thing that really makes the world go round, love….Mixing couture and ready-to-wear, womenswear and menswear, Tisci rolled his universe into a ball that felt simultaneously restrained and rich. Maybe too rich in the sense that some judicious editing might have honed his point, but at the same time the stately, ritualistic nature of the presentation, with its liturgical soundtrack, underscored the designer’s frequent emphasis on the tribalism of his aesthetic. And, right here, right now, at the 10th anniversary of Tisci’s time with Givenchy, there has never been a moment in his career where he seemed more shamanic.

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The different fashion looks are exceptional reinterpretations of the most iconic pieces that Tisci has designed during the last decade. Black and white, male and female, strength and fragility, the tailor’s discipline and the delicateness of lingerie all come together in a natural way in a collection which has the feel of a marriage of opposites. It was indeed a collection for the ages and one everyone will remember for a very long time.

Ready! Set! Go! Toys”R”Us® Unveils The 2015 #TRUHotToyList

The World’s Greatest Toy Store Names a Clever Little Parakeet, the Biggest Tiny Toy Boutique, a Rockin’ Return and an Intergalactic Favorite–Among Others–to Its Annual Gift List

The 2015 Toys"R"Us Holiday Hot Toy List is here! (PRNewsFoto/Toys"R"Us, Inc.)

The 2015 Toys”R”Us Holiday Hot Toy List is here! (PRNewsFoto/Toys”R”Us, Inc.)

Jingle bells are ringing in the distance, which can only mean one thing – the holiday shopping season is fast approaching. With parents and gift-givers eager to buy the best toys this season has to offer, Toys”R”Us® today revealed its highly anticipated 2015 Holiday Hot Toy List, comprised of 36 new playthings categorized by age from Baby’s First Christmas to Big Kids. Following months of carefully identifying, researching and experimenting with hundreds of toys, Toys”R”Us experts have selected items sure to be at the top of kids’ wish lists. Featuring a wide assortment of toys, games, dolls and collectibles, shoppers can see the full list at Toysrus.com/HotToys and follow the conversation on social media using #TRUHotToyList.

Toys"R"Us Logo (PRNewsFoto/Toys"R"Us, Inc.)

Toys”R”Us Logo (PRNewsFoto/Toys”R”Us, Inc.)

Toys”R”Us experts have traveled thousands of miles around the world on a mission to narrow down the ultimate list of toys kids hope to unwrap this holiday season. In addition to alleviating the guesswork of the types of gifts kids will be requesting in their letters to Santa, Toys”R”Us is making it even simpler to spot the hottest playthings. Customers can find the Hot Toy List featured prominently in stores, including the “Fabulous 15,” which will be showcased in the “Here’s What’s Hot” shop in October. Whether planning to shop in store or buy online, customers can get started at Toysrus.com/HotToys, or by browsing a vast array of playthings grouped by age, toy category, current promotions and more using the company’s online Gift Finder.


Determining our annual Hot Toy List is a year-long selection process we take very seriously. It is our mission to identify the very best playthings, giving parents and gift-givers the inside scoop straight from the toy experts on coveted items sure to leave kids smiling on Christmas morning,” said Richard Barry, Executive Vice President, Global Chief Merchandising Officer, Toys”R”Us, Inc. We are proud that customers rely on the Toys”R”Us Holiday Hot Toy List as a trusted and valuable resource to help navigate the holiday shopping season even before kids start writing their wish lists.”

THE TOYS“R”US “FABULOUS 15”: The Cream of the Crop
Among the 36 items named to the Toys“R”Us Holiday Hot Toy List are the “Fabulous 15,” expected to be the most sought-after and anticipated items of the holiday season:

  • Bright Beats Dance & Move BeatBo from Fisher-Price®

  • Doc McStuffins Take Care of Me Lambie from Just Play™

  • Imaginext® Ultra T-Rex from Fisher-Price®

  • PAW Patrol PAW Patroller™ from Spin Master™

  • Barbie® Saddle ‘N Ride Horse from Mattel®

  • Little Live Pets Clever Keet from Moose Toys™

  • Journey Girls® 2015 Italy Holiday Doll from Toys“R”Us®

  • LEGO® Dimensions Starter Pack from Warner Brothers®

  • Shopkins™ Fashion Boutique Playset from Moose Toys™

  • Smart Toy Bear from Fisher-Price®

  • Star Wars™ BladeBuilders Jedi Master Lightsaber from Hasbro®

  • NERF® N-Strike Modulus ECS-10 Blaster from Hasbro®

  • Star Wars™ R2-D2™ Interactive Robotic Droid from Thinkway Toys

  • Guitar Hero® Live from Activision®

  • Meccanoid G15 from Spin Master

THE 2015 #TRUHotToyList: From Baby’s First Christmas to Big Kids, the 2015 Toys”R”Us Holiday Hot Toy List represents the top new toys of the year in each age group:

BABY’S FIRST CHRISTMAS

Bright Beats Smart Touch Play Space

Bright Beats Smart Touch Play Space


Bright Beats Smart Touch Play Space from Fisher-Price®
This interactive, touch-sensitive light-up and musical play space is perfect for babies’ natural stages of progression: sitting, crawling and cruising. It comes equipped with innovative Smart Touch Technology that responds to baby’s touch. With three different modes, including piano, dance and learning, little ones will be encouraged to keep the fun lasting all day long. 4 “C” batteries required (not included). Ages 6 to 36 months.

Lil' Ocean Explores 3-in-1 Adventure Course Box

Lil’ Ocean Explores 3-in-1 Adventure Course Box


Lil’ Ocean Explorers 3-in-1 Adventure Course from Little Tikes®

This adventure course stimulates and entertains tiny tots throughout three key developmental milestones. When sitting, babies can work on building tactile skills with features like the submarine peek-a-boo door, the marine wall and ball drop periscope. When crawling, little ones can explore the course, discovering new ways to play. Finally, when standing, they will hear sounds and phrases from their new octopus friend and will be encouraged to play ball. 2 “AA” batteries required (not included). Ages 6 months to 3 years.

13 MONTHS TO 2 YEARS

Bright Beats Dance & Move BeatBo

Bright Beats Dance & Move BeatBo

Bright Beats Dance & Move BeatBo from Fisher-Price® (TOYS“R”US “FABULOUS 15”)
BeatBo is the perfect interactive pal to get baby moving, dancing and singing with its amazing multicolor LED tummy and touch-points that elicit various ways to play. With three modes, this engaging character will keep little ones growing and developing, as they wiggle and sing, as well as learn about colors and their ABCs. 4 “AA” batteries required (included). Ages 9 months and up.

Go! Go! Smart Wheels Ultimate RC Speedway Box

Go! Go! Smart Wheels Ultimate RC Speedway Box

Go! Go! Smart Wheels(®) Ultimate RC Speedway(TM) from VTech®
Ready, Set…Go! Go! Watch the littlest speed racer zip through a colorful course, packed with four action zones and nine SmartPoint(®) locations. Kids can take the wheel during playtime by building the ultimate speedway using the 13.5 feet of interchangeable tracks, a stunt ramp, elevator, movable gears, starting flags and track switches that are all triggered by the RC race car. Then, they can use the steering wheel-shaped remote control and watch as the RC car zooms around, entertaining them with a light-up driver button that activates playful music and fun sounds. 4 “AAA” batteries required (not included). Ages 1 year and up.pan_xlg

2 TO 4 YEARS

Calico Critters Seaside Cruiser

Calico Critters Seaside Cruiser

Calico Critters Seaside Cruiser

Calico Critters Seaside Cruiser

Calico Critters Seaside Cruiser Houseboat from International Playthings, LLC
Calico Critters fans can set sail for an exciting seaside adventure with this Seaside Cruiser Houseboat. Featuring more than 50 pieces, including a boat, critters, waterslides, private island, food, drinks and more, the boat expands to 20 inches for even more space to play and bring the ocean adventures to life. No batteries required. Ages 3 years and up.

DINOTRUX Mega Chompin’Ty Rux from Mattel®

DINOTRUX Mega Chompin'Ty Rux from Mattel® Photographer:Jeff O'Brien)

DINOTRUX Mega Chompin’Ty Rux from Mattel® Photographer:Jeff O’Brien)

Have a ferociously fun time with the half-dinosaur, half-construction vehicle character from Dinotrux, DreamWorks‘ brand-new animated children’s series on Netflix. This Toys”R”Us exclusive features lights, sounds and movements unique to his roar-tastic personality. 3 “AA” batteries required (included). Ages 3 to 5 years.

Doc McStuffins Take Care of Me Lambie

Doc McStuffins Take Care of Me Lambie

Doc McStuffins Take Care of Me Lambie from Just Play
Ah choooo! Looks like Doc McStuffin‘s best pal Lambie is sick and needs help to feel “so much better.” This snuggly sweet, interactive plush talks and sings, sharing with little aspiring doctors how she’s feeling with more than 50 phrases activated through her wrist, belly and heart. Like any little one under the weather, Lambie’s face, eyes and mouth feature realistic movements that are telltale signs she’s not feeling well.  Kids can help “take the ouches away” by making sure to give Lambie a thorough check-up using the included stethoscope, thermometer, otoscope and sticker bandages. 4 “C” batteries required (included). Ages 3 years and up.

StarLily, My Magical Unicorn

FurReal Friends StarLily, My Magical Unicorn from Hasbro®

FurReal Friends StarLily, My Magical Unicorn from Hasbro®
Ordinary friendship turns extraordinary with StarLily, My Magical Unicorn pet, the first interactive toy unicorn in the FurReal Friends line. Featuring 100-plus sound and motion combinations, the more little ones play with StarLily, the more she responds, even moving her head and opening and closing her eyes. The sensors around her face and on her horn allow this unique unicorn to respond to children’s loving touches, and her long silky hair can be styled, braided and combed in many ways for fun-filled grooming play. When kids feed StarLily her special sugarberry treat, this adorable pet opens and closes her mouth and makes happy eating sounds. To communicate how she’s feeling, StarLily will flutter her wings and her light-up horn will change colors. Additionally, little animal lovers can pose her to stand or lie down. Children can become even closer friends with StarLily, win collectibles and make her forest world even more magical with the free StarLily, My Magical Unicorn app (download required). 4 “C” batteries required (not included). Ages 4 years and up.

Tumble Train from Little Tikes®

Tumble Train from Little Tikes®

Tumble Train from Little Tikes®

Tumble Train from Little Tikes®

Tumble Train from Little Tikes®
Get ready to roll in a crazy train adventure. Kids can press the button on the smoke stack to start the Tumble Train and watch as the track will tumble around, inspiring kids to chase after it. The train will randomly reverse at times, causing the track to roll in unpredictable directions that will capture every kid’s attention and imagination. 4 “AA” batteries required (not included). Ages 3 years and up.
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2015 Toronto International Film Festival Official Selection: Women He’s Undressed, A Film By Gillian Armstrong

The Extraordinary Hollywood Story Of Australia’s Orry-Kelly…The Designer Whose Costumes Created Some Of The Most Magical Moments In Cinema History.

Orry-Kelly was a Hollywood legend, his costume designs adored by cinema’s greatest leading ladies – but in his home country of Australia his achievements remained unknown. Now acclaimed director Gillian Armstrong is bringing the legend home and celebrating the life of this extraordinary Aussie in her new film, WOMEN HE’S UNDRESSED. (Australia, 1110 minutes, International Premiere)

The creative ORRY-KELLY adjusts his costume for his muse Kay Francis in a scene from WOMEN HE'S UNDRESSED - A FILM BY GILLIAN ARMSTRONG

The creative ORRY-KELLY adjusts his costume for his muse Kay Francis in a scene from WOMEN HE’S UNDRESSED – A FILM BY GILLIAN ARMSTRONG

Women He's Dressed

Women He’s Dressed Poster

During the boom years of Hollywood, he was costume designer on an astonishing 282 motion pictures. He designed for the stars like Marilyn Munroe, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Rosalind Russell, Errol Flynn and many more of the immortals. His films included Some Like It Hot, Casablanca, An American in Paris and Now, Voyager.

Orry was as big a legend behind the scenes as the on-screen legends he adoringly dressed. He was talented, daring, brash, bold, the toast of Hollywood yet the thorn in the side of many a studio head and the first Australian to win three Academy Awards. But who was Orry-Kelly and how could he be so unknown in his homeland?

He was outrageous, witty, outspoken and uncompromising and he survived partially protected by his friendship with Jack and Ann Warner and gossip columnist Hedda Hopper, and ultimately by his extraordinary talent.

Natalie Wood starred in the classic GYPSY in a costume designed by ORRY-KELLY in a scene from the film WOMEN HE'S UNDRESSED - A FILM BY GILLIAN ARMSTRONG

Natalie Wood starred in the classic GYPSY in a costume designed by ORRY-KELLY in a scene from the film WOMEN HE’S UNDRESSED – A FILM BY GILLIAN ARMSTRONG

Oscar® winner ORRY-KELLY designed these amazing costumes for the film LES GIRLS - as featured in the new documentary WOMEN HE'S UNDRESSED - A FILM BY GILLIAN ARMSTRONG

Oscar® winner ORRY-KELLY designed these amazing costumes for the film LES GIRLS – as featured in the new documentary WOMEN HE’S UNDRESSED – A FILM BY GILLIAN ARMSTRONG

Women He Undressed

Women He Undressed

In Women He’s Undressed, filmmaker Gillian Armstrong delves into Kelly’s untold stories with an approach that’s as bold and playful as he was. She casts the Australian stage actor Darren Gilshenan to portray Kelly, who speaks directly to the camera.

Armstrong reunites with her Unfolding Florence co-conspirator, writer Katherine Thompson in crafting a revealing behind the scenes look at the extraordinary life of Orry-Kelly. Featuring interviews with screen and fashion icons Jane Fonda, Angela Lansbury, June Dally-Watkins, costume designers Catherine Martin (the only Australian to exceed Kelly in Academy Award wins), Ann Roth, Kym Barrett, Michael Wilkinson, Deborah Nadoolman Landis, Hollywood identities and historians including director/producer Eric Sherman, Hollywood fixer Scotty Bowers, Leonard Maltin, David Chierichetti, Marc Eliot, William J Mann, Jean Mathison, Larry McQueen and Barbara Warner Howard (daughter of Ann & Jack Warner). Topping it off, we’re treated to a vast array of film clips showcasing Kelly’s costumes in Gold Diggers of 1933, Casablanca, Irma la Douce, and other classics.

CHECK OUT THE TRAILER: http://www.tiff.net/festivals/festival15/tiffdocs/women-hes-undressed

Travel and Hospitality: The Citizen Hotel in Sacramento, California Joins Marriott International’s Autograph Collection Hotels™ Global Portfolio

The Hotel Joins The Growing List Of More Than 85 Passionately Independent Hotels Worldwide.

The Citizen Hotel in Sacramento, California, which was recently acquired by Platinum Equity, is the latest addition to the Autograph Collection Hotels, Marriott International’s exclusive portfolio of properties recognized for celebrating individuality. The Citizen is truly a unique establishment, located within walking distance to the most powerful building in California and offering modern amenities with historic old-world charm.

Located less than half a mile from the California State Capitol Building, The Citizen occupies the historic California Life Insurance Building, California’s first sky-scraper, built in 1925. Guests of the hotel will be treated to a truly one-of-a-kind experience, as no two rooms are exactly alike and each offers a different view of downtown Sacramento. On the historic thirteenth floor, for example, gorgeous tile mosaics adorn each bathroom.

The Citizen seamlessly marries the historic with the modern, offering amenities such as iPod sound systems and LCD high-definition televisions in each room. Boasting 9,000 square

The Citizen Hotel logo

The Citizen Hotel logo

feet of meeting space, including a beautiful 3,000 square foot tented roof deck with city views, the hotel is the perfect destination for any meeting, wedding or special event.

The Grange Restaurant and Bar, located on the grounds, incorporates farm fresh ingredients from the local farms of Central California into delicious seasonal menus. The Grange is also terrific choice for intimate gatherings, offering a private dining room for up to twenty guests. To learn more about the hotel or to book your next stay in Sacramento online, please visit TheCitizenHotel.com.

Our goal is to give guests of the Citizen an upscale luxury experience with a location convenient to all that downtown Sacramento has to offer,” said Michael George, President and CEO of Crescent Hotels & Resorts.The partnership with Autograph Collection has positioned us to present this superb and unique property to business and leisure travelers alike.”

The Autograph Collection Hotels celebrates a collection of independent leaders in film, art, design and literature by curating one-of-a-kind travel experiences at 89 luxury lifestyle hotels found in the world’s most desirable destinations. Exactly like nothing else, each hotel has been hand selected for its distinction as an iconic landmark, for its remarkable design or for its best-in-class resort amenities.

Crescent Hotels & Resorts is a nationally recognized, top-5 operator of hotels and resorts. Crescent currently operates over 100 hotels and resorts in 36 states in the US and 4 provinces in Canada. Crescent is one of the few elite management companies approved to operate upper-upscale and luxury hotels under the brand families of Marriott, Hilton, Starwood, Hyatt and IHG. Crescent also operates a collection of legendary independent hotels and resorts. Crescent’s clients are made up of hotel REITs, private equity firms and major developers.

Marriott International, Inc. is a global leading lodging company based in Bethesda, Maryland, USA, with more than 4,300 properties in 81 countries and territories. The company operates and franchises hotels and licenses vacation ownership resorts under 19 brands. Marriott Rewards is Marriott International’s award-winning loyalty program spanning 16 brands and 4,000 properties worldwide. Marriott Rewards is free to join and has no blackout dates, and members can earn and redeem points at Marriott properties around the world and at Marriott Rewards exclusive luxury partner The Ritz-Carlton®. Members can also redeem points for frequent flyer miles, cruises, car rentals, merchandise and more. To enroll and for more information about Marriott Rewards, guests can visit MarriottRewards.com.


Founded in 1995 by
Tom Gores, Platinum Equity is a global investment firm with more than $6 billion of assets under management and approximately 30 operating companies that serve customers around the world. Platinum Equity specializes in mergers, acquisitions and operations – a trademarked strategy it calls M&A&O® – acquiring and operating companies in a broad range of business markets, including manufacturing, distribution, transportation and logistics, equipment rental, metals services, media and entertainment, technology, telecommunications and other industries. Over the past 20 years Platinum Equity has completed more than 150 acquisitions.

Lancôme Launches Limited Edition Anthony Vaccarello For Lancôme Color Collection

For Fall, A Chic Look with Rock-Style Aspirations

This year, Lancôme invites the Italian-Belgian fashion designer Anthony Vaccarello, the creative director of Versus Versace, to bring his raw, contemporary perspective on beauty to a daring new collaboration. Introducing the Anthony Vaccarello Color Collection for Lancôme, a capsule line that transposes his signature style to the eyes and lets women make a bold, sartorial statement with every strong gaze.

Lancôme - Anthony Vaccarello / Fall 2015

Lancôme – Anthony Vaccarello / Fall 2015

Known for his ultra-modern and energetic designs, Vaccarello’s work projects a liberated, confident attitude. His fresh and assertive creations usher in a new era in contemporary design, combining subtle femininity with graphic splendor. Considered a virtuoso with blacks, whites, and neutrals, he now brings his love of contrast to eye color with dazzling, nuanced shades that shimmer perfectly over nude flesh.

 Anthony Vaccarello Color Collection for Lancôme - Blue Mania

Anthony Vaccarello Color Collection for Lancôme – Blue Mania

 Anthony Vaccarello Color Collection for Lancôme -- Green Fever

Anthony Vaccarello Color Collection for Lancôme — Green Fever

 Anthony Vaccarello Color Collection for Lancôme -- Golden Black

Anthony Vaccarello Color Collection for Lancôme — Golden Black

The result is three sensual eye shadow palettes for an endless array of statement-making eye looks. The limited-edition collection Hypnôse Palette in 3 fashion-forward color combinations ($50 each. Available September 2015 exclusively at Net-A-Porter.com, while supplies last) offer dynamic, perfectly-tailored light and dark effects. Each one comes in a chic leather-effect case embossed with golden, glam-rock style typography and slashed with Vaccarello’s hallmark diagonal cut. The palettes enclose four luminous shades made with mother of pearl and vivid pigments, an eye-liner created with an innovative wet/dry formula, and a pair of magnetic, professional applicators. The limited-edition shades include Golden Black, for resplendent looks crowned by a golden aura; Green Fever, with a mysterious and scintillating air; and Blue Mania, for a touch of sincerity pierced by raw intensity.