Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row at New York Spring/Summer 2016 Fashion Week

Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row to Air Nationwide on E! Wednesday, Sept. 23 at 8 p.m. ET

On Thursday, Sept. 17 at7:30 p.m., live from New York City, Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row will hit the stage at The Theater at Madison Square Garden in a dazzling spectacle celebrating the intersection of music and fashion. Featuring the fall season’s hottest looks, hitting the runway will be special presentations of designs from Heidi by Heidi Klum Intimates, Hello Kitty®, I.N.C. International Concepts, Jessica Simpson, Levi’s®, Ryan Seacrest Distinction, Thalía Sodi, Tommy Hilfiger; and more. Lancôme is the event’s signature make-up partner. Samsung is the signature technology partner and will provide attendees with a unique look at its products on the runway.

Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row continues the company’s legacy of charitable giving and is set to support Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS and the Council of Fashion Designers of America Foundation (CFDA), with 100 percent of the proceeds from ticket sales from the Sept. 17 live show at The Theater at Madison Square Garden.

We are thrilled to celebrate New York Fashion Week with a spectacular event that will bring the high-fashion runway closer to fans everywhere,” said Martine Reardon, Macy’s chief marketing officer. “Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row will ignite the catwalk in a celebration of fashion and music, featuring the hottest styles for fall, as well as fantastic music and dance performances that make that elusive front row seat during Fashion Week a possibility for all.

Amid the runway spectacle, Nate Ruess, Grammy Award-winning front man of the band fun., will perform songs from his debut solo album, “Grand Romantic.” He will take the stage along with additional performers, to be announced at a later date.

Fans from coast-to-coast will have the ultimate VIP experience when they tune-in to E! for the broadcast debut of Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row on Wednesday, Sept. 23 at 8 p.m. ET (check local listings). The broadcast will include highlights of the live show and performances, celebrity appearances, interviews, behind-the-scenes elements including a look at the arrivals carpet, as well as special moments from New York Fashion Week. Additionally, fans will have the opportunity to shop their favorite looks from the show instantly as they come down the runway by visiting macys.com/FrontRow.

Beginning on Friday, August 14, select credit card holders will have the exclusive first chance to purchase tickets to Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row priced at $55 and $80. The general public on-sale begins on Friday, August 21. Tickets may be purchased through TICKETMASTER (at ticketmaster.com or 866-858-0008) or in person at the Madison Square Garden Box Office. Ticketmaster orders are subject to service fees. All tickets include a $5 facility fee. Tickets for people with disabilities may be purchased through Ticketmaster, at the MSG Box Office or by calling MSG’s Disabled Services Department at (212) 465-6034.

Additionally, Macy’s has partnered with several extraordinary charity organizations for its first-ever Fashion Pass, to benefit and strengthen the communities the company serves nationwide. Now through August 15, when customers give$5 at the register, they will receive 15 percent to 20 percent off on select storewide purchases, plus $10 off a $30 purchase. Fashion Pass kicked off on July 22 and through its conclusion, 100 percent of the $5 donation will benefit: Children’s Cancer Research Fund; Council of Fashion Designers of America Foundation, Inc.; The Elizabeth Taylor AIDS Foundation; Ronald McDonald House Charities of Chicagoland & Northwest Indiana; Ronald McDonald House New York; and The Fashion Incubators at Macy’s.

Between September 24 and 26, Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row will also extend to in-store events nationwide. Macy’s flagship locations in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York City and San Francisco will host in-store celebrations featuring celebrity and designer appearances, special performances and fashion presentations, bringing the fashion week experience closer to fashionistas everywhere. In addition, at 20 select locations, Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row-themed shopping parties will spread the glamor to more cities nationwide.

Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row is created and produced by Macy’s. The national broadcast that will air on E! is produced in partnership with IMG. For more information about Macy’s Presents Fashion’s Front Row including a listing of local events, please visit macys.com/FrontRow.

Lane Bryant Introduces Hothouse Beauties, First Scent created by artists Isabel and Ruben Toledo

Isabel and Ruben Toledo has partnered with Lane Bryant on on Hot House Beauties (2.5 fl. oz. eau de parfum spray: $52.50 each; .33 oz rollerball: $16.50 each), both their first foray into the world of designer fragrance. It follows the debut of the Isabel Toledo for Lane Bryant fashion collection, the first ever designer collaboration for Lane Bryant. Imagined by the Toledos, and developed with world renowned Swiss fragrance house, Givaudan, the scents are categorized as a floral, fruity gourmand (Kuba Rose) and a floral, fruity musk (Crystal Honey). Both teams worked closely to create a scent for the woman who understands the power of inner beauty and the attraction of love in all its expressions. She welcomes the opportunity to indulge.

Kuba Rose by Isabel and Ruben Toledo at Lane Bryant (PRNewsFoto/Lane Bryant)

Kuba Rose by Isabel and Ruben Toledo at Lane Bryant (PRNewsFoto/Lane Bryant)

Crystal Honey by Isabel and Ruben Toledo at Lane Bryant (PRNewsFoto/Lane Bryant)

Crystal Honey by Isabel and Ruben Toledo at Lane Bryant (PRNewsFoto/Lane Bryant)

 Lane Bryant’s CEO Linda Heasley says, “We are thrilled to work with Isabel and Ruben Toledo on the first ever fragrance collaboration for Lane Bryant. We already know our existing customer is drawn to the Toledos’ approach to artistry and design and hope this venture opens the door to more women experiencing the brand for the first time.”
 Kuba Rose is all about mystique, she captures the heart, intimate and passionate with a rare depth of character, reminiscent of a walk through the magical gardens and courtyards of Cuba.
Top Notes: Italian bergamot, red grapefruit, red currant, and boysenberry.
Heart: Sheer rose, jasmine, peony, tuberose and gardenia.
Base: Vanilla bean, warm musk, exotic sandalwood and patchouli.

Crystal Honey represents the joy of life. She inspires play, is carefree and flirtatious. She’s an independent spirit that lives fully in the moment.
Top Notes: Pink grapefruit, green Italian mandarin, pear nectar, green apple, and white starfruit.
Heart: Dewberry, juicy raspberry, pink jasmine, apple blossom, and mountain magnolia.
Base: Warm musk, cedarwood, liquid amber and sandalwood.

Capturing Isabel’s couturier talents and Ruben’s artisanal flare, each fragrance box was designed using the “inside out” approach to craftsmanship, a hallmark of the Toledo’s work.  From the bottle, produced by glassmaker Pochet, formed from the highest quality Parisian glass, to its shape, inspired by the 100-year-old skylight in the couple’s studio, to Ruben’s hand drawn illustrations on the packaging, an exquisite attention to detail brings the Hothouse Beauties to life.
Isabel Toledo says, “Creating fragrance felt like a natural progression. It’s an extension of your wardrobe; the starting point for dressing a mood, and a lingering reminder of your presence. Ruben and I felt strongly that we wait until we were truly ready to follow our noses with a concept we loved. Partnering with Lane Bryant allowed us to create an experience that is deeply personal and quite different from everything else in the market, as well as access to the uniquely loyal and diverse customer that so inspires my work. I believe the joy of living is most felt when it is shared.”
Hot House Beauties by Isabel and Ruben Toledo will be available at Lane Bryant stores in September 2015.

The Whitney Museum OF American Art To Debut Frank Stella: A Retrospective, Opening October 30

The most comprehensive career retrospective in the U.S. to date of the work of Frank Stella, co-organized by The Whitney Museum of American Art and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, will debut at the Whitney this fall. Frank Stella: A Retrospective brings together the artist’s best-known works installed alongside lesser known examples to reveal the extraordinary scope and diversity of his nearly sixty-year career. Approximately 100 works, including icons of major museum and private collections, will be shown. Along with paintings, reliefs, sculptures, and prints, a selection of drawings and maquettes have been included to shed light on Stella’s conceptual and material process. Frank Stella: A Retrospective is organized by Michael Auping, Chief Curator, Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, in association with Adam D. Weinberg, Alice Pratt Brown Director, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, with the involvement of Carrie Springer, Assistant Curator, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

The exhibition will be on view at the Whitney from October 30, 2015 through February 7, 2016, and at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth from April 17 through September 4, 2016; it will subsequently travel to the DeYoung Museum, San Francisco. This will be the inaugural special exhibition and the first career retrospective devoted to a living artist in the Whitney’s new downtown home on Gansevoort Street. It will fill the entire 18,000-square-foot fifth floor—the Museum’s largest gallery for temporary exhibitions. Annabelle Selldorf, Selldorf Architects, is doing the exhibition design for the Whitney installation.

A Stella retrospective presents many challenges,” remarks Auping, “given Frank’s need from the beginning of his career to immediately and continually make new work in response to previous series. And he has never been timid about making large, even monumental, works. The result has been an enormous body of work represented by many different series. Our goal has been to summarize without losing the raw texture of his many innovations.”

It’s not merely the length of his career, it is the intensity of his work and his ability to reinvent himself as an artist over and over again over six decades that make his contribution so important,” said Weinberg. “Frank is a radical innovator who has, from the beginning, absorbed the lessons of art history and then remade the world on his own artistic terms. He is a singular American master and we are thrilled to be celebrating his astonishing accomplishment.

Frank Stella.   Die Fahne hoch!,   1959.  Enamel on canvas, 121 5/8 x 72 13/16 in.  Whitney  Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene M. Schwartz and purchase, With funds from the John I.H. Baur Purchase Fund; the Charles and Anita Blatt Fund; Peter M. Brant; B.H. Friedman ; the Gilman Foundation, Inc.; Susan Morse Hilles; The Lauder Foundation;  Frances and Sydney Lewis; the Albert A. List Fund; Philip Morris Incorporated; Sandra Payson;  Mr. and Mrs. Albrecht Saalfied; Mrs. Percy Uris; Warner Communications, Inc. and the National Endowment for the Arts  75.22  © 2014 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Frank Stella. Die Fahne hoch!, 1959. Enamel on canvas, 121 5/8 x 72 13/16 in.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene M. Schwartz and purchase,
With funds from the John I.H. Baur Purchase Fund; the Charles and Anita Blatt Fund; Peter M. Brant;
B.H. Friedman ; the Gilman Foundation, Inc.; Susan Morse Hilles; The Lauder Foundation;
Frances and Sydney Lewis; the Albert A. List Fund; Philip Morris Incorporated; Sandra Payson;
Mr. and Mrs. Albrecht Saalfied; Mrs. Percy Uris; Warner Communications, Inc. and the National
Endowment for the Arts 75.22 © 2014 Frank Stella / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Born in Malden, Massachusetts, in 1936, Frank Stella attended Phillips Academy, Andover, and then Princeton University, where he studied art history and painting. In college, he produced a number of sophisticated paintings that demonstrated his understanding of the various vocabularies that had brought abstract painting into international prominence. After graduating in 1958, Stella moved to New York and achieved almost immediate fame with his Black Paintings (1958–60), which were included in The Museum of Modern Art’s seminal exhibition Sixteen Americans in 1959–60.

The Leo Castelli Gallery in New York held Stella’s first one-person show in 1962. The Museum of Modern Art, under William Rubin’s stewardship, presented his first retrospective only a few years later, in 1970, when Stella was only thirty-four years old. A second retrospective was held at MoMA in 1987. Since then, Stella has been the subject of countless exhibitions throughout the world, including a major retrospective in Wolfsburg in 2012. Frank Stella: A Retrospective is the first survey of the artist’s career in the U.S. since 1987. He was appointed the Charles Eliot Norton Professor of Poetry at Harvard University in 1983. “Working Space,” his provocative lecture series (later published as a book), addresses the issue of pictorial space in postmodern art. Stella has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including the 2009 National Medal of Arts and the 2011 Lifetime Achievement in Contemporary Sculpture Award from the International Sculpture Center, as well as the Isabella and Theodor Dalenson Lifetime Achievement Award from Americans for the Arts (2011) and the National Artist Award at the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Aspen (2015).

Frank Stella, Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985. Oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum. 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Frank Stella, Gobba, zoppa e collotorto, 1985. Oil, urethane enamel, fluorescent alkyd, acrylic, and printing ink on etched magnesium and aluminum. 137 x 120 1/8 x 34 3/8 in. (348 x 305 x 87.5 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize Fund; Ada Turnbull Hertle Endowment 1986.93. © 2015 Frank Stella/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Throughout his career, Stella has challenged the boundaries of painting and accepted notions of style. Though his early work allied him with the emerging minimalist approach, Stella’s style has evolved to become more complex and dynamic over the years as he has continued his investigation into the nature of abstract painting.

Adam Weinberg and Marla Price, Director of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, note in the directors’ foreword to the catalogue, “Abstract art constitutes the major, and in many ways, defining artistic statement of the twentieth century and it remains a strong presence in this century. Many artists have played a role in its development, but there are a few who stand out in terms of both their innovations and perseverance. Frank Stella is one of those. As institutions devoted to the history and continued development of contemporary art, we are honored to present this tribute to one of the greatest abstract painters of our time.

The exhibition begins with rarely seen early works, such as East Broadway(1958), from the collection of Addison Gallery of American Art, which show Stella’s absorption of Abstract Expressionism and predilections for colors and composition that would appear throughout the artist’s career.

Stella’s highly acclaimed Black Paintings follow. Their black stripes executed with enamel house paint were a critical step in the transition from Abstract Expressionism to Minimalism. The exhibition includes such major works as Die Fahne hoch! (1959), a masterpiece from the Whitney’s own collection, and The Marriage of Reason and Squalor II (1959) from The Museum of Modern Art’s collection. A selection of the artist’s Aluminum and Copper Paintings of 1960–61, featuring metallic paint and shaped canvases, further establish Stella’s key role in the development of American Minimalism.

Even with his early success, Stella continued to experiment in order to advance the language of abstraction. The chronological presentation of Stella’s work tracks the artist’s exploration of the relationship between color, structure, and abstract illusionism, beginning with his Benjamin Moore series and Concentric Square Paintings of the early 1960s and 70s—including the masterpiece Jasper’s Dilemma (1962). In his Dartmouth, Notched V, and Running V paintings, Stella combines often shocking color with complex shaped canvases that mirror the increasingly dynamic movement of his painted bands. These were followed by the even more radically shaped Irregular Polygon Paintings, such as Chocorua IV (1966) from the Hood Museum, with internally contrasting geometric forms painted in vibrant fluorescent hues; and the monumental Protractor Paintings, such as Harran II (1967) from the Guggenheim‘s collection, composed of curvilinear forms with complex chromatic variations. Continue reading