America Is Hard to See: Film & Video Screenings at The Whitney Museum of American Art

As part of the landmark exhibition America Is Hard to See, the Whitney Museum of American Art presents a screening series showcasing films and videos from the Museum’s collection by approximately fifty artists. Programs screen on select Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays in the Susan and John Hess Family Theater on the Museum’s third floor. Special Saturday evening events feature expanded cinema performances and rare screenings of works on film.

SCREENING SCHEDULE

Nayland Blake (b. 1960), still from Negative Bunny, 1994. Video, color, sound, 30 min. looped. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Lin Lougheed  2014.268 © Nayland Blake 1994; image courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York

Nayland Blake (b. 1960), still from Negative Bunny, 1994. Video, color, sound, 30 min. looped. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Lin Lougheed 2014.268 © Nayland Blake 1994; image courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery, New York

Normal Love
July 3, 11 am
August 22, 7 pm
September 6, 4 pm

In Jack Smith’s Flaming Creatures (1962–63), David Wojnarowicz’s A Fire in My Belly (1986–87), Nayland Blake’s Negative Bunny (1994), and Kenneth Anger’s Mouse Heaven (2005), intense desire is often expressed through indirect means, including role-playing and emulation or appropriation of popular culture.

Jack Smith  (b. 1932, Colombus, OH; d. 1989; New York, NY), Flaming Creatures, 1962–63. 16mm film, black‑and‑white, sound, 43 min. Gift of Gladstone Gallery, New York 2010.209

David Wojnarowicz (b. 1954, Red Bank, NJ; d. 1992, New York, NY), A Fire In My Belly (Film In Progress) and A Fire In My Belly (Excerpt), 1986–87. Super 8mm film transferred to video, black‑and‑white and color, silent, 13:06 min. and 7 min. Purchase with funds from the Director’s Discretionary Fund 2012.4

Nayland Blake (b. 1960, New York, NY), Negative Bunny, 1994. Video, color, sound; 30 min. Gift of Lin Lougheed 2014.268

Kenneth Anger (b. 1927, Santa Monica, CA), Mouse Heaven, 2005. Video, color, sound; 10 min. Gift of the artist 2006.226

Mike Kelley (1954-2012), still from Day Is Done, 2005-2006. Video, color, sound; 169 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Randy Slifka  2009.128 © Estate of Mike Kelley; Courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York

Mike Kelley (1954-2012), still from Day Is Done, 2005-2006. Video, color, sound; 169 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Randy Slifka 2009.128 © Estate of Mike Kelley; Courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York

Day Is Done
July 3, 2 pm
August 16, 11 am
September 19, 1 pm

Mike Kelley based his 2005–6 Day is Done on a series of high school yearbook photographs of “extracurricular activities,” which Kelley transformed into a fractured, quasi-narrative musical that cycles through themes such as personal trauma, the structure of the institution, repressed memory, mass cultural ritual, and adolescence.

Mike Kelley (b. 1954, Detroit, MI; d. 2012, South Pasadena, CA) Day Is Done, 2005–6. Video, color, sound; 169 min. Purchase with funds from Randy Slifka 2009.128

Matt Saunders (b. 1975), still from Century Rolls, 2012. Video, color; 10:45 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2013.81 © 2015 Matt Saunders

Matt Saunders (b. 1975), still from Century Rolls, 2012. Video, color; 10:45 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2013.81 © 2015 Matt Saunders

The Art of Vision
July 3, 8 pm
August 21, 11 am
September 19, 5 pm

The program includes Julie Murray’s Untitled (light) (2002), Sandra Gibson’s NYC Flower Film (2003), Stan Brakhage’s Chinese Series (2003), Bryan Frye’s Oona’s Veil (2000), Luis Recoder’s Linea (2002), and Matt Saunders’s Century Rolls (2012). Examining the material and formal conditions of film, video, and animation, these artists build on the tradition of American avant-garde filmmaking. On September 19, Sandra Gibson’s NYC Flower Film will be screened on film, and Gibson will be present.

Brian Frye (b. 1974, San Francisco, CA), Oona’s Veil, 2000. 16mm film, black and white, sound; 11 min. Purchase with funds from the Film and Video Committee 2002.160

Julie Murray (b. 1961, Dublin, Ireland), Untitled (light), 2002. 16mm film, color, sound; 5 min. Purchase with funds from the Film and Video Committee 2004.46

Luis Recoder (b. 1971, San Francisco, CA), Linea, 2002. Two channel 16mm film, black and white, silent; 18 min. Purchase with funds from the Film and Video Committee 2005.23

Sandra Gibson (b. 1968, Portland, OR), NYC Flower Film, 2003. Super 8 film transferred to video, color, silent; 5 min. Purchase with funds from George Kaufman 2004.642

Stan Brakhage (b. 1933, Kansas City, MO; d. 2003; Victoria, Canada), Chinese Series, 2003. 16mm film, color, silent; 2 min. Purchase, with funds from the Orentreich Family Foundation  2005.119

Matt Saunders (b. 1975; Tacoma, WA) Century Rolls, 2012. Video, color, silent; 10:45 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2013.81

Maya Deren (1917-1961), still from At Land, 1944. 16mm film, black-and-white, silent, 15 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2015.45 © Estate of Maya Deren; image courtesy Anthology Film Archives

Maya Deren (1917-1961), still from At Land, 1944. 16mm film, black-and-white, silent, 15 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2015.45 © Estate of Maya Deren; image courtesy Anthology Film Archives

Dream States
July 4, 11 am
August 16, 3 pm
September 6, 2 pm

Made in the 1940s, Maya Deren’s At Land (1944) and Hans Richter’s Dreams that Money Can Buy (1947) draw on dream imagery and surrealism to produce non-narrative experimental cinema.

Maya Deren (b. 1917, Kiev, Ukraine; d. 1961, New York, NY) At Land, 1944. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, silent; 15 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2015.45

Hans Richter (b. 1888, Berlin, Germany; d. 1976, Minusio, Switzerland) Dreams That Money Can Buy, 1943. 16mm film transferred to video, color, sound; 85 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  T.2014.151

Yvonne Rainer (b. 1934), still from Five Easy Pieces, 1966-69. 8mm and 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, silent; 48 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo in honor of Ron Clark and The Independent Study Program  2011.91 © Yvonne Rainer; courtesy Video Data Bank, www.vdb.org

Yvonne Rainer (b. 1934), still from Five Easy Pieces, 1966-69. 8mm and 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, silent; 48 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo in honor of Ron Clark and The Independent Study Program 2011.91 © Yvonne Rainer; courtesy Video Data Bank, http://www.vdb.org

Inner and Outer Territories
July 4, 3 pm
August 21, 2 pm
September 6, 11 am

The social and psychological space presented in Yvonne Rainer’s Five Easy Pieces (1966–69) and David Lamelas’s The Desert People (1974) is set against the landscape of the deserts of the American West represented in Nancy Holt’s Sun Tunnels (1978) and Walter De Maria’s Hardcore (1969).

Yvonne Rainer (b. 1934, San Francisco, CA), Five Easy Pieces, 1966–69. 8mm and 16mm film transferred to video, black‑and‑white, silent, 48 min. Purchase with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo in honor of Ron Clark and The Independent Study Program  2011.91

Walter De Maria (b. 1935, Albany, CA; d. 2013, Los Angeles, CA), Hardcore, 1969. Two‑channel 16mm film transferred to video, color, sound; 28 min. Gift of Virginia Dwan  94.79

David Lamelas (b. 1946, Buenos Aires, Argentina), The Desert People, 1974. 16mm film, color, sound; 52 min. Gift of the artist  2001.238

Nancy Holt (b. 1938, Worcester, MA; d. 2014, New York, NY), Sun Tunnels, 1978. 16mm film transferred to video, color, sound, 28:31 min. Purchase with funds from Cristina Enriquez‑Bocobo in honor of Cody Smith  2010.142

Howardena Pindell (b. 1943), still from Free, White and 21, 1980. Video, color, sound; 12:15 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2015.35 © Howardena Pindell

Howardena Pindell (b. 1943), still from Free, White and 21, 1980. Video, color, sound; 12:15 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2015.35 © Howardena Pindell

Radical Takes
July 4, 6 pm
August 23, 11 am
August 30, 4 pm

Made at the height of the feminist movement, Howardena Pindell’s Free, White and 21 (1980), Cynthia Maughan’s sixteen selected videos (1973–78), and Suzanne Lacy’s Learn Where the Meat Comes From (1976) present frank, derisive, and at times humorous commentary on identity, including female subjectivity, and—in Pindell’s case—race.

Howardena Pindell (b. 1943, Philadelphia, PA), Free, White and 21, 1980. Video, color, sound; 12:15 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2015.35

Cynthia Maughan (b. 1949, Bell, CA), Scar/Scarf, 1973–74; Arteries and Veins, 1974; Frozen & Buried Alive, 1974–75; Coffin from Toothpicks, 1975; Statue, 1975; Razor Necklace, 1975; The Way Underpants Really Are, 1975; Chart of the Solar Systems Showing Gods Home on Venus, 1975; Monster Voice, 1975; Candy Mexican Hats, 1977; The Four Horsemen, 1977; Tsetse Fly, 1977–78; On Being in Love, 1977–78; I Tell Three Cats About Jail, 1977–78; Tamale Pie, 1978; Calcium Pills, 1978. All: Video, sound; running times variable. Purchased with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2015.1.1–16

Suzanne Lacy (b. 1945, Wasco, CA) Learn Where the Meat Comes From, 1976, from the series Anatomy Lessons. Video, color, sound; 14:20 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2014.142

Kevin Jerome Everson (b. 1965), still from Act One: Betty and the Candle, 2010. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, silent, 11:25 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2012.17 © Kevin Jerome Everson; courtesy the artist, Tribolite-Arts DAC, and Picture Palace Pictures

Kevin Jerome Everson (b. 1965), still from Act One: Betty and the Candle, 2010. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, silent, 11:25 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2012.17 © Kevin Jerome Everson; courtesy the artist, Tribolite-Arts DAC, and Picture Palace Pictures

Lyrical Observations
July 5, 11 am
August 14, 7 pm
August 29, 11 am

Robert Beavers’s Sotiros (1975–96), Kevin Jerome Everson’s Act One: Betty and the Candle (2010), Anna Gaskell’s SOSW Ballet (2011), and David Hartt’s Stray Light (2011) are intimate observations that become poetic—sometimes lyrical, sometimes pensive—in their sustained duration.

Robert Beavers (b. 1949, Brookline, MA), Sotiros, 1975–96. 35mm film, color, sound; 25 min. Purchase with funds from the Film and Video Committee and preserved with funds from the National Film Preservation Foundation  2003.90

Kevin Jerome Everson (b. 1965, Mansfield, OH), Act One: Betty and the Candle, 2010. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, silent, 11:25 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2012.17

Anna Gaskell (b. 1969, Des Moines, IA), SOSW Ballet, 2011. 35mm film, color, sound; 27:04 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2012.20

David Hartt (b. 1967, Montreal, Canada), Stray Light, 2011. Video, color, sound; 12:12 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2013.80

Liz Magic Laser (b. 1981), still from I Feel Your Pain, 2011. Video, color, sound; 180 min., with poster. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo and The Dorothea L. Leonhardt Foundation, Inc. in honor of Ron Clark, Director, Independent Study Program  2013.14 © Liz Magic Laser 2011. Performa Commission. Featuring Annie Fox and Rafael Jordan. Photograph by Yola Monakhov

Liz Magic Laser (b. 1981), still from I Feel Your Pain, 2011. Video, color, sound; 180 min., with poster. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo and The Dorothea L. Leonhardt Foundation, Inc. in honor of Ron Clark, Director, Independent Study Program 2013.14 © Liz Magic Laser 2011. Performa Commission. Featuring Annie Fox and Rafael Jordan. Photograph by Yola Monakhov

I Feel Your Pain (A Performa Commission)
July 5, 1 pm
August 22, 2 pm
September 18, 6 pm

Liz Magic Laser’s 2011 video I Feel Your Pain dramatizes recent political events and speeches, recasting them as a romance narrative. The performance was originally staged, performed, filmed, and edited in real time at a movie theater in front of a live audience.

Liz Magic Laser (b. 1981, New York, NY), I Feel Your Pain, 2011. Video, color, sound; 180 min. Purchase with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo and The Dorothea L. Leonhardt Foundation Inc. in honor of Ron Clark, Director, Independent Study Program  2013.14

Morgan Fisher (b. 1942), still from ( ), 2003. 16mm film, color, silent; 21 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2010.8 © Morgan Fisher and Galerie Daniel Bucholz, Cologne/Berlin

Morgan Fisher (b. 1942), still from ( ), 2003. 16mm film, color, silent; 21 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2010.8 © Morgan Fisher and Galerie Daniel Bucholz, Cologne/Berlin

Lifted Frames
July 5, 5 pm
August 22, 6 pm
August 28, 11 am

Raphael Montañez Ortiz’s Cowboy and “Indian” Film (1957–58) and Morgan Fisher’s ( ) (2003) each make use of mainstream movie footage, remixing it in order to turn it against its narrative origins. Ortiz re-edits a classic Hollywood Western in a symbolic act of repatriation to the Native Americans. Fisher’s composition is a seemingly chance collection of interstitial moving pictures. The program on August 22 will include a special screening of Christian Marclay’s Telephones (1995).

Raphael Montañez Ortiz (b. 1934, Brooklyn, NY), Cowboy and “Indian” Film, 1957–58. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, sound; 2:19 min.

Morgan Fisher (b. 1942, Washington, DC), ( ), 2003. 16mm film, color, silent; 21 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2010.8

Christian Marclay (b. 1955, San Rafael, CA), Telephones, 1995. Video, color, sound; 7:30 min. Gift of Anne and Arthur Goldstein  2014.20

This screening is free with Museum admission. Please note: Christian Marclay’s Telephones will screen on August 22 only.

Carolee Schneemann (b. 1939), still from Meat Joy, 1964. 16mm film transferred to video, color, sound; 10:35 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Randy Slifka  2009.126 © 2009 Carolee Schneemann / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York

Carolee Schneemann (b. 1939), still from Meat Joy, 1964. 16mm film transferred to video, color, sound; 10:35 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Randy Slifka 2009.126 © 2009 Carolee Schneemann / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York

Mind Eye Body
July 10, 11 am
August 23, 5 pm
August 29, 3 pm

Carolee Schneemann’s Meat Joy (1964) and Michael Joo’s Salt Transfer Cycle (1994) each explore the ritual-like transformation of human energy through the body, movement, and the organic world. These works are shown with Stan Brakhage’s expressionistic abstract film Persian Series 13–18 (2001).

Carolee Schneemann (b. 1939, Philadelphia, PA) Meat Joy, 1964. 16mm film transferred to video, color, sound, 10:35 min. Purchase with funds from Randy Slifka  2009.126

Michael Joo (b. 1966, Ithaca, NY), Salt Transfer Cycle, 1994. Video, color, sound; 8 min. Gift of the artist in honor of Eileen and Michael Cohen  2015.117

Stan Brakhage (b. 1933, Kansas City, MO; d. 2003, Victoria, Canada), Persian Series13–18, 2001. 16mm film, color, silent; 9 min. Purchase with funds from the Orentreich Family Foundation  2005.118

David Haxton (b. 1943), still from Cube and Room Drawings, 1976-77. 16mm film, color, silent; 15 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of the artist  2013.47 © David Haxton 1976-1977

David Haxton (b. 1943), still from Cube and Room Drawings, 1976-77. 16mm film, color, silent; 15 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of the artist 2013.47 © David Haxton 1976-1977

Structures and Gestures
July 10, 1 pm
August 30, 11 am
September 20, 11 am

Hollis Frampton’s nostalgia (HAPAXLEGOMENA I) (1973), Gordon Matta-Clark’s Splitting (1974), Peter Campus’s third tape (1976), and David Haxton’s Cube and Room Drawings (1976–77) each play with the structural properties of film. Following this formalist filmmaking lineage, Alex Hubbard uses the video frame to create a play in abstraction in Dos Nacionales (2008).

Hollis Frampton (b. 1936, Wooster, OH; d. 1984, Buffalo, NY),nostalgia (HAPAX LEGOMENA I), 1973. 16mm film, black‑and‑white, sound; 36 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee and the Director’s Discretionary Fund  2013.96

Gordon Matta‑Clark (b. 1943, New York, NY; d. 1978, Nyack, NY),Splitting, 1974. Super 8mm film transferred to video, black‑and‑white and color, silent; 10:50 min. Purchase with funds from the Film and Video Committee 2000.161

Peter Campus (b. 1937, New York, NY), third tape, 1976. Two-inch open reel film transferred to video, color, sound; 5:06 min. Gift of the artist  2014.17

David Haxton (b. 1943, Indianapolis, IN), Cube and Room Drawings, 1976–77. 16mm film transferred to video, color, silent; 15 min. Gift of the artist  2013.47

Alex Hubbard (b. 1975, Toledo, OR), Dos Nacionales, 2008. Video, color, sound; 3:38 min. Purchase with funds from Melva Bucksbaum in honor of Mary and Patrick Scanlan and April and Glenn Bucksbaum  2011.6

Ericka Beckman (b. 1951), still from You The Better, 1983. 16mm film, color, sound; 30 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee © Ericka Beckman

Ericka Beckman (b. 1951), still from You The Better, 1983. 16mm film, color, sound; 30 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee © Ericka Beckman

Popular Mechanics
July 12, 11 am
August 21, 6 pm
September 5, 2 pm

Influenced by the rise of mass media, the works in this program—Dara Birnbaum’s PM Magazine/Acid Rock (1982), Dan Graham’s Rock My Religion (1982–84), Ericka Beckman’s You the Better (1983), and Charles Atlas’s Hail the New Puritan (1986)—examine popular culture, sub-culture, and imagined culture during the 1980s.

Dara Birnbaum (b. 1946, New York, NY), PM Magazine/Acid Rock, 1982. Video, color, sound; 4:09 min. Purchase with funds from Beth Rudin DeWoody  2012.14

Dan Graham (b. 1942, Urbana, IL), Rock My Religion, 1982–84. Video, black‑and‑white and color, sound; 55:27 min. Purchase with funds from the Film and Video Committee  2000.170

Charles Atlas (b. 1949, St. Louis, MO), Hail the New Puritan, 1985–86. Video, color, sound; 84 min. 47 sec. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee and Catherine Orentreich in honor of Norman Orentreich  2014.284

Ericka Beckman (b. 1951, Hempstead, NY), You the better, 1983. 16mm film transferred to video, color, sound; 30 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2014.4

Andy Warhol (1928-1987), Henry Geldzahler, 1964. 16mm film, black-and-white, silent; 99 min. at 16 frames per second. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo and the Dorothea L. Leonhardt Fund at the Communities Foundation of Texas and The Horace W. Goldsmith Fund. ©2015 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Image courtesy the Andy Warhol Film Project at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Andy Warhol (1928-1987), Henry Geldzahler, 1964. 16mm film, black-and-white, silent; 99 min. at 16 frames per second. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo and the Dorothea L. Leonhardt Fund at the Communities Foundation of Texas and The Horace W. Goldsmith Fund. ©2015 The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, PA, a museum of Carnegie Institute. All rights reserved. Image courtesy the Andy Warhol Film Project at the Whitney Museum of American Art

Henry Geldzahler
August 14, 11 am
August 28, 7 pm
September 5, 11 am

Andy Warhol shot the film Henry Geldzahler (1964) at twenty-four frames per second but projected it at the lower speed used for silent films, causing the projection to seem slowed. The result presents the notable critic and curator in a durational, and at times monumental, portrait of identity, personality, and discomfort.

Andy Warhol (b. 1928, Pittsburgh, PA; d. 1987, New York, NY), Henry Geldzahler, 1964, from the The Geldzahler Portfolio. 16mm film, black‑and‑white, silent; 99 min. Purchase with funds from Joanne Leonhardt Cassullo and the Dorothea L. Leonhardt Fund at the Communities Foundation of Texas and The Horace W. Goldsmith Fund  99.62.11

Mary Ellen Bute (1906-1983), still from Synchromy No. 4: Escape, 1937-38. 16mm film, color, sound; 4 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2014.101 © Estate of Mary Ellen Bute; courtesy Arsenal – Institut für Film und Videokunst, Berlin

Mary Ellen Bute (1906-1983), still from Synchromy No. 4: Escape, 1937-38. 16mm film, color, sound; 4 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2014.101 © Estate of Mary Ellen Bute; courtesy Arsenal – Institut für Film und Videokunst, Berlin

Colorwork
August 14, 3 pm
August 29, 7 pm
September 20, 2 pm

Mary Ellen Bute’s abstract films Synchromy No. 4: Escape (1937–38),Spook Sport (1939), and Tarantella (1940) start this program of works that investigate the intersection of color and form. Richard Serra’s Color Aid(1970–71) and John Baldessari’s Six Colorful Inside Jobs (1977) explore perception and process, while Amy Sillman’s Draft of a Voice-Over for Split-Screen Video Loop (2012) illustrates poetry with vibrant images. On August 29, works by Mary Ellen Bute will be screened on film.

Mary Ellen Bute (b. 1906, Houston, TX; d. 1983, New York, NY),Synchromy No. 4: Escape, 1937–38; Spook Sport, 1939; Tarantella, 1940. All:16mm film transferred to video, color, sound; running times variable. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2014.101, 2014.226, 2014.102

Richard Serra (b. 1939, San Francisco, CA), Color Aid, 1970–71. 16mm film, color, sound; 36 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2011.100

John Baldessari (b. 1931, National City, CA), Six Colorful Inside Jobs, 1977. 16mm film transferred to video, color, silent; 32:53 min. Purchase with funds from Allison and Warren B. Kanders  2012.12

Amy Sillman (b. 1955, Detroit, MI), Draft of a Voice‑Over for Split‑Screen Video Loop, 2012. Video, color, sound; 6:06 min. Purchase with funds from Anne and Joel Ehrenkranz in honor of Chrissie Iles  2013.84

Beat Life, Street Life
August 15, 2 pm
August 30, 2 pm
September 18, 11 am

Helen Levitt’s In the Street (1952), Robert Frank and Alfred Leslie’s Pull My Daisy (1959),

David Bienstock, (1943-1973), film strip from Nothing Happened This Morning, 1965. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white and color, sound; 21 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  T.2014.377 © 1965, David Bienstock; image courtesy the New American Cinema Group, Inc/The Film-Makers’ Cooperative

David Bienstock, (1943-1973), film strip from Nothing Happened This Morning, 1965. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white and color, sound; 21 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee T.2014.377 © 1965, David Bienstock; image courtesy the New American Cinema Group, Inc/The Film-Makers’ Cooperative

David Bienstock’s Nothing Happened This Morning( 1965), and Lucas Samaras’s Self (1969) present a varied set of personal, subjective reflections on urban life in the mid-twentieth century.

Helen Levitt (b. 1913, Brooklyn, NY; d. 2009, New York, NY), In the Street, 1952. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, sound; 15 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2014.30

Robert Frank (b. 1924, Zurich, Switzerland), and Alfred Leslie (b. 1927, New York, NY), Pull My Daisy, 1959. 16mm film, black‑and‑white, sound; 28 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2014.132

David Bienstock (b. 1943, New York, NY; d. 1973, New York, NY), Nothing Happened This Morning, 1965. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white and color, sound, 21 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2015.116

Lucas Samaras (b. 1936, Kastoría, Greece), Self, 1969. 16mm film, color, sound; 23 min. Gift of the artist  2004.10

 

Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk
August 15, 4 pm
August 23, 1 pm
September 18, 3 pm

Andrea Fraser’s 1989 video Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk is a fictional docent tour performed by the artist at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The performance simultaneously parodies and critiques the structures of cultural institutions.

Andrea Fraser (b. 1965), still from Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk, 1989. Video, color, sound; 29:28 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Wilfred P. and Rose J. Cohen Purchase Fund © 1989 Andrea Fraser

Andrea Fraser (b. 1965), still from Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk, 1989. Video, color, sound; 29:28 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Wilfred P. and Rose J. Cohen Purchase Fund © 1989 Andrea Fraser

Andrea Fraser (b. 1965; Billings, MT), Museum Highlights: A Gallery Talk, 1989. Video, color, sound; 29:28 min. Purchase with funds from the Wilfred P. and Rose J. Cohen Purchase Fund 2015.53

Jonas Mekas (b. 1922), film strip from Lost Lost Lost, 1976. 16mm film, color and black-and-white, sound; 178 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2014.248 © Jonas Mekas

Jonas Mekas (b. 1922), film strip from Lost Lost Lost, 1976. 16mm film, color and black-and-white, sound; 178 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee 2014.248 © Jonas Mekas

Chronicles and Diaries
August 15, 6 pm
August 28, 2 pm
September 4, 11 am

Raphael Montañez Ortiz’s Newsreel (1958) appropriates archival news footage to create a

fragmented and inverted view of history. Jonas Mekas’s Lost Lost Lost (1976) recounts the artist’s coming of age in the immigrant community and artistic scene of New York. Each of these films, though disparate, works to navigate personal and political American histories. On August 15, Jonas Mekas‘s Lost Lost Lost will be screened on film.

Raphael Montañez Ortiz (b. 1934, Brooklyn, NY), Newsreel, 1958. 16mm film transferred to video, black-and-white, sound; 1:40 min. Gift of the artist  2015.42

Jonas Mekas (b. 1922, Semeniškiai, Lithuania), Lost Lost Lost, 1976. 16mm film transferred to video, color and black‑and‑white, sound; 178 min. Purchase with funds from the Film, Video, and New Media Committee  2014.248

This screening is free with Museum admission.

Walter De Maria (1935-2013), still from Hardcore, 1969. Two-screen 16mm film installation, 28 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Virginia Dwan  94.79 © Walter De Maria 1969

Walter De Maria (1935-2013), still from Hardcore, 1969. Two-screen 16mm film installation, 28 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Virginia Dwan 94.79 © Walter De Maria 1969

Hardcore and Shutter Interface
September 5, 7–8 pm

This special one-night screening event brings together Walter De Maria’s rarely seen avant-garde western Hardcore (1969) with Paul Sharits’s two-projection cinematic performance of Shutter Interface (1972).

Walter De Maria (b. 1935, Albany, CA; d. 2013, Los Angeles, CA),Hardcore, 1969. Two-screen 16mm film, color, sound; 28 min. Gift of Virginia Dwan  94.79

Paul Sharits (b. 1943, Denver, CO; d. 1993; Buffalo, NY), Shutter Interface, 1972. Two‑channel 16mm film, color, sound; 32 min. Purchase with funds from the Film and Video Committee 2000.263

Luis Recoder (b. 1971), Linea, 2002. 16mm film double projection, black-and-white, silent, 18 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film and Video Committee  2005.23. Installation view: Devin Borden Hiram Butler Gallery, Houston, 2003 © Luis Recoder; courtesy Devin Borden Hiram Butler Gallery, Houston

Luis Recoder (b. 1971), Linea, 2002. 16mm film double projection, black-and-white, silent, 18 min. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase, with funds from the Film and Video Committee 2005.23. Installation view: Devin Borden Hiram Butler Gallery, Houston, 2003 © Luis Recoder; courtesy Devin Borden Hiram Butler Gallery, Houston

Linea
September 19, 7–10 pm

Luis Recoder’s Linea (2002)—which is also included in the program The Art of Vision—is presented for one night only in its installation version. The looped, two-projector film installation creates an immersive experience of light and abstraction that builds upon the traditions of expanded cinema. The artist will be present.

Luis Recoder (b. 1971, San Francisco, CA), Linea, 2002. Two-channel 16mm film, black‑and‑white, silent; 18 min., looped. Purchase with funds from the Film and Video Committee  2005.23

This screening is free with Museum admission.