National Gallery of Art Celebrates the 25th Anniversary of Its Photography Collection with Three Major Exhibitions

In 2015, the National Gallery of Art will commemorate the 25th anniversary of its photography collection with three major exhibitions exemplifying the vitality, breadth, and history of the Gallery’s photography holdings. The celebration commences in the spring with two exhibitions—In Light of the Past: 25 Years of Photography at the National Gallery of Art (May 3–July 26, 2015) and The Memory of Time: Contemporary Photographs at the National Gallery of Art, Acquired with the Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund (May 3–September 7, 2015). It concludes in the fall with Celebrating Photography at the National Gallery of Art: Recent Gifts (November 1, 2015–February 28, 2016), a selection of gifts and acquisitions made in honor of this anniversary. In addition, a series of lectures and other programs highlighting the importance of photography at the Gallery will be presented throughout the year.

2013.43.1.lutter

Photograph by Vera Lutter, whose  most prominent works utilizes a room-sized camera obscura to capture large black and white negative images. The subject matter of her images varies greatly between urban centers, industrial landscapes, abandoned factories, and transit sites, such as shipyards, airports, and train stations. Many of her images present locations in and around New York, as well as several international venues.

 

 

The Collection got its start when, in 1949, Georgia O’Keeffe gave the Gallery an unparalleled collection of Alfred Stieglitz photographs. In December 1948, she was deciding where to place the largest and most significant collection of photographs by her late husband, the seminal American photographer Alfred Stieglitz, she visited the National Gallery of Art. She wrote to a friend a few days later, “Stieglitz worked for the recognition of photography as a fine art—the National Gallery means something in relation to that.” The following year, O’Keeffe and the Alfred Stieglitz Estate laid the cornerstone for the photography collection at the museum by donating the “Key Set” of more than 1,600 Stieglitz photographs. It is the largest and most complete collection of his work in existence. The entire collection is documented in a two-volume publication Alfred Stieglitz: The Key Set(2002) and will soon be accessible on the Gallery’s website.

And while the museum did not actively committed itself to collecting photography until 1990, under the stellar leadership of Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department, the collection has since expanded to nearly 14,000 American and European photographs, spanning from 1839 to the present, spanning the entire history of the medium, including a choice group by British photographer William Henry Fox Talbot (1800–1877), the inventor of photography. Other 19th-century British photographers represented in the Gallery’s collection include Julia Margaret Cameron (1815–1879), David Octavius Hill (1802–1870), Robert Adamson (1821–1848), Roger Fenton (1819–1869), and Peter Henry Emerson (1856–1936).

The Gallery also has exceptional examples by 19th-century French photographers, including Gustave Le Gray (1820–1884), Charles Nègre (1820–1880), Henri Le Secq (1818–1882), Édouard-Denis Baldus (1813–1889), and Charles Marville (1813–1879)—many of whom were trained as painters and brought highly refined aesthetic sensibilities to the new art of photography.

Nineteenth-century American photography is also well-represented in the collection with works by Albert Sands Southworth (1811–1894) and Josiah Johnson Hawes (1808–1901); Timothy O’Sullivan (1840–1882); Carleton Watkins (1829–1916); Eadward Muybridge (1830–1904), and William H. Rau (1855–1920), among many others.

Among the greatest strengths of the collection are large, often unparalleled groups of photographs by several major 20th-century American practitioners, including Paul Strand (1890–1976), Ansel Adams (1902–1984), Walker Evans (1903–1975), André Kertész (1894–1985), Ilse Bing (1899–1998), Frederick Sommer (1905–1999), Robert Frank (b. 1924), Harry Callahan (1912–1999), Irving Penn (1917–2009), Lee Friedlander (b. 1934), and Robert Adams (b. 1937). Modeled after the Stieglitz collection, each of these holdings includes works from throughout the photographers’ careers and illustrates all aspects of their contributions to the art of photography. Often formed with input from the photographers themselves, each of these collections frequently contain exceptionally rare works.

The Gallery has also established an international reputation for its photography exhibitions and publications. In the last 25 years, it has organized and mounted more than 40 shows, often award-winning, of both 19th- and 20th-century photography, most with highly acclaimed scholarly catalogs and many which have traveled both nationally and internationally. Among the most notable are: Garry Winogrand (2014); Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial (2013); Charles Marville: Photographer of Paris (2013);The Pre-Raphaelite Lens: British Photography and Painting, 1848–1875 (2010); Looking In: Robert Frank’s “The Americans,” (2009); The Art of the American Snapshot, 1888–1978 (2008);Impressed by Light: British Photographs from Paper Negatives, 1840–1860 (2007); Foto: Modernity in Central Europe, 1918–1945 (2007); Irving Penn: Platinum Prints (2005); André Kertész (2005); All the Mighty World: The Photographs of Roger Fenton, 1852–1860 (2004); Modern Art and America: Alfred Stieglitz and His New York Galleries (2001); Harry Callahan (1996); Robert Frank: Moving Out (1994); Walker Evans: Subways and Streets (1991); and Paul Strand (1990).

In Light of the Past: 25 Years of Photography at the National Gallery of Art (May 3–July 26, 2015) charts the evolution of photography from the birth of the medium in 1839 to 1990. Some 100 works will be drawn from the Gallery’s photography collection that have been acquired since its founding a quarter of a century ago, including stunning 19th-century works, turn-of-the-century pictorialist prints, examples of international photographic modernism of the 1920s and 1930s, the most influential mid-20th-century American photographers, and ending with the new directions photographers explored in the 1970s and 1980s, including color and conceptual work. The curators of this exhibition are Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, and Diane Waggoner, associate curator, department of photographs, National Gallery of Art.

The Memory of Time: Contemporary Photographs at the National Gallery of Art, Acquired with the Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund (May 3–September 13, 2015)

Representing the past in the present is one of photography’s essential characteristics, but its relationship to time is by no means straightforward. Each photograph contains multiple layers of time, including the instant of exposure, the moment of viewing, and the lapse in between. This exhibition explores work by contemporary photographers—such as Sally Mann (b. 1951), Vera Lutter (b. 1960), Hiroshi Sugimoto (b. 1948), Carrie Mae Weems (b. 1953), and Sophie Calle (b. 1953)—who investigate this rich subject and explore the complexity of time, memory, and history. A fully illustrated catalog will accompany the exhibition.

All of the featured works were recently acquired through the generosity of the Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund. The curators of this exhibition are Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, and Andrea Nelson, assistant curator, department of photographs, National Gallery of Art.

Celebrating Photography at the National Gallery of Art: Recent Gifts (November 1, 2015–February 28, 2016)

This exhibition will feature a selection of photographs donated to the Gallery in honor of the 25th anniversary of the museum’s collection. Marking the culmination of a year-long celebration of photography at the museum, this exhibition brings together an exquisite group of gifts, ranging from experimental photographs made in the earliest years of the medium’s history to key works by major 20th-century figures, as well as contemporary pieces that examine the ways in which photography continues to shape our experience of the modern world.  The exhibition will be accompanied by a major publication celebrating 25 years of photography at the National Gallery of Art.

The curators of this exhibition are Sarah Greenough, senior curator and head of the department of photographs, and Sarah Kennel, associate curator, department of photographs, National Gallery of Art.

Each exhibition tells a concise and fascinating story about photography in general—and photography at the National Gallery of Art, specifically,” said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art, Washington. “We start by charting the history of the medium and probing its relationship to time, memory, and history, and end with an abundant display of gifts given in honor of our celebrated collection and programs for photography.”

Anniversaries should be a time to celebrate, and to reflect on the past and contemplate the future,” said Greenough. “Our intention is to present some of the most significant and compelling photographs we have acquired over the years, which both chart the development of the medium and reveal the beauty and dynamic versatility of photography over its course of more than 175 years.”

Due to the fragility of photographs, which are subject to deterioration if exposed to light for extended periods of time, the greatest part of the collection is kept in storage. While dedicated photography galleries, opened in the West Building in 2004, have enabled the Gallery to highlight many works in the collection during the past decade, numerous photographs in this trio of exhibitions will be on public view for the first time at the Gallery.

(Students and other visitors may take advantage of the Gallery’s photograph study room—open weekdays from 10:00 a.m. to noon and 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.—to examine works not on view. To book an appointment, please call (202) 842-6144.)

 

 

 

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Winter Films at National Gallery of Art Highlight Georgian Cinema, Contemporary Brazilian Documentary, Recent International Shorts, New Restorations, and More

Film still from Resistfilm by Pablo Marin, 2014, to be shown as part of the series Selections from Oberhausen, New International Shorts, program one, on Saturday, January 3, at 2:00 p.m. National Gallery of Art, West Building Lecture Hall. Image courtesy the artist

Film still from Resistfilm by Pablo Marin, 2014, to be shown as part of the series Selections from Oberhausen, New International Shorts, program one, on Saturday, January 3, at 2:00 p.m. National Gallery of Art, West Building Lecture Hall. Image courtesy the artist

This winter, the National Gallery of Art Film Program continues its collaboration with Washington-area institutions during the ongoing renovation of the East Building galleries, which temporarily impacts the availability of the Gallery’s auditorium. The season opens with Selections from Oberhausen (January 3–10), featuring recent work from one of the oldest and most prominent showcases for short cinema in the world. Each event is introduced by artist and programmer Sylvia Schedelbauer. Discovering Georgian Cinema (January 12–March 26), a retrospective survey of filmmaking (in 35 mm archival prints) from this distinctive cultural milieu with roots in antiquity, takes place at several Washington venues. The Georgian project was originally organized by curators from the Museum of Modern Art and the Berkeley Art Museum/Pacific Film Archive. Washington is the only American venue other than New York and Berkeley. (Seating for all events is on a first-come, first-seated basis, unless otherwise noted. Doors open thirty minutes before show time. Whenever possible, works are presented in their original formats. Please note that the West Building Lecture Hall seats only 150 visitors.)

Films will be shown at:

American Film Institute, Silver Theatre (8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring, MD)

American University, Malsi Doyle and Michael Forman Theater (McKinley Building, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW)

Embassy of France (4100 Reservoir Road NW)

Freer Gallery of Art (1050 Independence Avenue SW)

Goethe-Institut Washington (812 7th Street NW)

National Archives, McGowan Theater (7th Street and Constitution Avenue NW)

National Portrait Gallery, McEvoy Auditorium (8th and F Streets NW)

National Gallery of Art, West Building Lecture Hall (7th Street and Constitution Avenue NW)

Film still from The Machine Which Makes Everything Disappear by Tinatin Gurchiani, to be shown as part of the film series Discovering Georgian Cinema on Thursday, January 29 at 6:30 p.m. at the Goethe-Institut. Image courtesy Icarus Films

Film still from The Machine Which Makes Everything Disappear by Tinatin Gurchiani, to be shown as part of the film series Discovering Georgian Cinema on Thursday, January 29 at 6:30 p.m. at the Goethe-Institut. Image courtesy Icarus Films

Film still from Hélio Oiticica by Cesar Oiticica Filho, 2012, to be shown as part of the series Cruzamentos: Contemporary Brazilian Documentary, on Friday, February 13 at 2:30 p.m. at the National Gallery of Art, West Building Lecture Hall.  Image courtesy Wide Management

Film still from Hélio Oiticica by Cesar Oiticica Filho, 2012, to be shown as part of the series Cruzamentos: Contemporary Brazilian Documentary, on Friday, February 13 at 2:30 p.m. at the National Gallery of Art, West Building Lecture Hall. Image courtesy Wide Management

Film still from Housemaids by Gabriel Mascaro, 2013, to be screened as part of the series Cruzamentos: Contemporary Brazilian Documentary, on Sunday, January 25, at 4:30 p.m. at American University, Malsi Doyle and Michael Forman Theater, McKinley Building. Image courtesy Icarus Films

Film still from Housemaids by Gabriel Mascaro, 2013, to be screened as part of the series Cruzamentos: Contemporary Brazilian Documentary, on Sunday, January 25, at 4:30 p.m. at American University, Malsi Doyle and Michael Forman Theater, McKinley Building. Image courtesy Icarus Films

Actress Fa´angase (Fa´angase Su´a-Filo) in a color photograph by Frances Hubbard Flaherty taken in Samoa during production of the silent film classic Moana by Robert Flaherty, 1926. Moana with Sound by Monica and Robert Flaherty, 1926-2014, to be shown on Wednesday, January 17 at 7:00 p.m. at the National Archives, McGowan Theater. Image courtesy 2K Digital Restoration Moana with Sound, The Robert and Frances Flaherty Study Center

Actress Fa´angase (Fa´angase Su´a-Filo) in a color photograph by Frances Hubbard Flaherty taken in Samoa during production of the silent film classic Moana by Robert Flaherty, 1926. Moana with Sound by Monica and Robert Flaherty, 1926-2014, to be shown on Wednesday, January 17 at 7:00 p.m. at the National Archives, McGowan Theater. Image courtesy 2K Digital Restoration Moana with Sound, The Robert and Frances Flaherty Study Center

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Gustave Caillebotte Exhibition Presents French Impressionist’s Most Important and Provocative Paintings Premieres at National Gallery of Art, Washington,

Fifty of the most important and beloved paintings of Paris and its environs by impressionist Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894) will be the focus of the first major U.S. exhibition of the artist’s work in 20 years. On view in the West Building of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, from June 28 through October 4, 2015, Gustave Caillebotte: The Painter’s Eye will provide visitors with a better understanding of Caillebotte’s artistic character and the complexity of his contribution to modernist painting.

Gustave Caillebotte, The Pont de l’Europe, 1876, oil on canvas. 124.8 × 180.7 cm (49 1/8 × 71 1/8 in.). Collection: Association des Amis du Petit Palais, Geneva

Gustave Caillebotte, The Pont de l’Europe, 1876, oil on canvas. 124.8 × 180.7 cm (49 1/8 × 71 1/8 in.). Collection: Association des Amis du Petit Palais, Geneva

From spectacular images of the new public spaces designed under Napoleon III by his prefect Baron Haussmann to visual meditations on leisure-time activities in and around Paris, the works presented will be lent by private collections and a small number of institutions in Europe and the United States.

Organized thematically, the exhibition showcases Caillebotte’s fascination with the contemporary lifestyle of the Parisian bourgeoisie, from depictions of interior life, portraits, and still lifes, to urban street views and idyllic river scenes. Many of the works on view were completed between 1875 and 1885, the period in which Caillebotte was most involved with the impressionist movement.

Gustave Caillebotte, Young Man Playing the Piano, 1876, oil on canvas, 81 × 116 cm (31 7/8 × 45 11/16 in.), Bridgestone Museum of Art, Ishibashi Foundation, Tokyo

Gustave Caillebotte, Young Man Playing the Piano, 1876, oil on canvas, 81 × 116 cm (31 7/8 × 45 11/16 in.), Bridgestone Museum of Art, Ishibashi Foundation, Tokyo

Gustave Caillebotte, The Floor Scrapers, 1875, oil on canvas, 102 × 147 cm (40 3/16 × 57 7/8 in.), Musée d'Orsay, Paris, Gift of Caillebotte's heirs through the intermediary of Auguste Renoir, 1894

Gustave Caillebotte, The Floor Scrapers, 1875, oil on canvas, 102 × 147 cm (40 3/16 × 57 7/8 in.), Musée d’Orsay, Paris, Gift of Caillebotte’s heirs through the intermediary of Auguste Renoir, 1894

Caillebotte sought to depict contemporary home life in the French capital, such as interior vantage points and views from the inside looking out. The exhibition opens with scenes of work and play set in bourgeois interiors, including A Game of Bezique (1881, Louvre, Abu Dhabi), Young Man Playing the Piano (1876, Bridgestone Museum of Art), and his first important painting The Floor Scrapers (1875, Musée d’Orsay). Views from balconies of the new buildings that were part of Haussmann’s building project were of particular interest to Caillebotte, including The Rue Halévy, Seen from a Balcony (1878, Joan and Bernard Carl), a completely exterior view, and Interior, Woman at the Window (1880, Private Collection), a view from inside an apartment looking out.

Gustave Caillebotte, Man at his Bath, 1884, oil on canvas, 144.8 × 114.3 cm (57 × 45 in.) Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Museum purchase with funds by exchange from an Anonymous gift, Bequest of William A. Coolidge, Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection, and from the Charles H. Bayley Picture and Painting Fund, Edward Jackson Holmes Fund, Fanny P. Mason Fund in memory of Alice Thevin, Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, Gift of Mrs. Samuel Parkman Oliver-Eliza R. Oliver Fund, Sophie F. Friedman Fund, Robert M. Rosenberg Family Fund, and funds donated in honor of George T. M. Shackelford, Chair, Art of Europe, and Arthur K. Solomon Curator of Modern Art, 1996-2011

Gustave Caillebotte, Man at his Bath, 1884, oil on canvas, 144.8 × 114.3 cm (57 × 45 in.)
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Museum purchase with funds by exchange from an Anonymous gift, Bequest of William A. Coolidge, Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection, and from the Charles H. Bayley Picture and Painting Fund, Edward Jackson Holmes Fund, Fanny P. Mason Fund in memory of Alice Thevin, Arthur Gordon Tompkins Fund, Gift of Mrs. Samuel Parkman Oliver-Eliza R. Oliver Fund, Sophie F. Friedman Fund, Robert M. Rosenberg Family Fund, and funds donated in honor of George T. M. Shackelford, Chair, Art of Europe, and Arthur K. Solomon Curator of Modern Art, 1996-2011

Gustave Caillebotte, On the Pont de l’Europe, 1876-1877, oil on canvas, 105.7 × 130.8 cm (41 5/8 × 51 1/2 in.), Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

Gustave Caillebotte, On the Pont de l’Europe, 1876-1877, oil on canvas, 105.7 × 130.8 cm (41 5/8 × 51 1/2 in.), Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

Gustave Caillebotte, At a Café, 1880, oil on canvas, 156 × 114 cm (61 7/16 × 44 7/8 in.) Musée d'Orsay, Paris, on deposit at musée des Beaux-arts de Rouen

Gustave Caillebotte, At a Café, 1880, oil on canvas, 156 × 114 cm (61 7/16 × 44 7/8 in.)
Musée d’Orsay, Paris, on deposit at musée des Beaux-arts de Rouen

Gustave Caillebotte, Portrait of Paul Hugot, 1878, oil on canvas, 228.6 × 101.6 cm (90 × 40 in.), The Lewis Collection

Gustave Caillebotte, Portrait of Paul Hugot, 1878, oil on canvas, 228.6 × 101.6 cm (90 × 40 in.), The Lewis Collection

Gustave Caillebotte, Portrait of Richard Gallo, 1878, oil on canvas, 80 × 65 cm (31 1/2 × 25 9/16 in.), Private Collection, on loan to Fondation de l'Hermitage, Lausanne

Gustave Caillebotte, Portrait of Richard Gallo, 1878, oil on canvas, 80 × 65 cm (31 1/2 × 25 9/16 in.), Private Collection, on loan to Fondation de l’Hermitage, Lausanne

Street views of Paris as revitalized by Haussmann are Caillebotte’s most renowned works, including Paris Street, Rainy Day (1877, The Art Institute of Chicago) and The Pont de l’Europe(1876, Petit Palais, Geneva), both of which were included at the impressionist exhibition of 1877.

Two of Caillebotte’s most provocative works—Man at His Bath (1884, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston) and Nude on a Couch (1880, The Minneapolis Institute of Arts)—will be on view alongside individual portraits of the artist’s friends, such as Portrait of Eugéne Daufresne (1878, Private Collection) and Portrait of Richard Gallo (1881, Private Collection). Two rarely seen self-portraits from private collections are also included.

Caillebotte’s still-life paintings are potentially the most revelatory to visitors, from traditional images of dead birds and game (Game Birds and Lemons, 1883, Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield), to decorated foodstuffs (Calf in a Butcher’s Shop, c. 1882, Private Collection) and commercial food presentations (Fruit Displayed on a Stand, c. 1881–1882, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston). The exhibition concludes with a section on suburban pleasures. River scenes and landscape views—popular themes of the impressionists—include The Yerres, Effect of Rain (1875, Indiana University Art Museum) and Sunflowers, Garden at Petit Gennevilliers (c. 1885, Private Collection).

Gustave Caillebotte, Nude on a Couch, 1880, oil on canvas, 129.54 × 195.58 cm (51 × 77 in.)Lent by The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, The John R. Van Derlip Fund

Gustave Caillebotte, Nude on a Couch, 1880, oil on canvas, 129.54 × 195.58 cm (51 × 77 in.)Lent by The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, The John R. Van Derlip Fund

Gustave Caillebotte, Fruit Displayed on a Stand, c. 1881-1882, oil on canvas, 76.52 × 100.65 cm (30 1/8 × 39 5/8 in.), Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Fanny P. Mason Fund in memory of Alice Thevin

Gustave Caillebotte, Game Birds and Lemons, 1883, oil on canvas, 50.8 × 81.3 cm (20 × 32 in.), Michele and Donald D'Amour Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, Massachusetts, The James Philip Gray Collection

Gustave Caillebotte, Game Birds and Lemons, 1883, oil on canvas, 50.8 × 81.3 cm (20 × 32 in.), Michele and Donald D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts, Springfield, Massachusetts, The James Philip Gray Collection

Gustave Caillebotte, Yellow Roses in a Vase, 1882, oil on canvas, 53.34 × 45.72 cm (21 × 18 in.), Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., in honor of Janet Kendall Forsythe

Gustave Caillebotte, Yellow Roses in a Vase, 1882, oil on canvas, 53.34 × 45.72 cm (21 × 18 in.), Dallas Museum of Art, The Eugene and Margaret McDermott Art Fund, Inc., in honor of Janet Kendall Forsythe

Gustave Caillebotte, Still Life with Crayfish, 1880-1882, oil on canvas, 58 × 72 cm (22 13/16 × 28 3/8 in.. Private Collection, Europe

Gustave Caillebotte, Still Life with Crayfish, 1880-1882, oil on canvas, 58 × 72 cm (22 13/16 × 28 3/8 in.. Private Collection, Europe

He was a unique player in the impressionist movement and his work was out of public view for almost a century, remaining in private collections. Born into a wealthy Parisian upper middle-class family, Caillebotte obtained a law degree and was a veteran of the Franco-Prussian War. He joined Léon Bonnat’s studio and passed the entrance exam for the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1873, but his participation was minimal.

He was attracted by the innovative spirit of the artists who were to become known as the impressionists. Originally invited by Edgar Degas to participate in the first impressionist exhibition in 1874, Caillebotte did not join the group until 1876, at Auguste Renoir’s invitation. Caillebotte was one of the regular participants in the group’s exhibitions (1877, 1879, 1880, and 1882), and he organized the 1877 presentation. Having inherited a large fortune from his parents, Caillebotte had no need to sell his own paintings and could focus on collecting the work of his artist-friends instead.

Gustave Caillebotte, The Fields, a Plain in Gennevilliers, Study in Yellow and Green, 1884 oil on canvas, 54 × 65 cm (21 1/4 × 25 9/16 in.), Collection of Frederic C. Hamilton, Bequest to the Denver Art Museum

Gustave Caillebotte, The Fields, a Plain in Gennevilliers, Study in Yellow and Green, 1884
oil on canvas, 54 × 65 cm (21 1/4 × 25 9/16 in.), Collection of Frederic C. Hamilton, Bequest to the Denver Art Museum

Gustave Caillebotte, The Rue Halévy, Seen from a Balcony, 1878. oil on canvas, 60 × 73.2 cm (23 5/8 × 28 13/16 in.). Joan and Bernard Carl, Washington DC

Gustave Caillebotte, The Rue Halévy, Seen from a Balcony, 1878. oil on canvas, 60 × 73.2 cm (23 5/8 × 28 13/16 in.). Joan and Bernard Carl, Washington DC

Gustave Caillebotte, Portrait of Henri Cordier, 1883, oil on canvas, 65 × 81.5 cm (25 9/16 × 32 1/16 in.). Musée d'Orsay, Paris, Gift of Mrs. Henri Cordier, 1926

Gustave Caillebotte, Portrait of Henri Cordier, 1883, oil on canvas, 65 × 81.5 cm (25 9/16 × 32 1/16 in.). Musée d’Orsay, Paris, Gift of Mrs. Henri Cordier, 1926

Gustave Caillebotte, Richard Gallo and his Dog, 1884, oil on canvas 89 x 116 cm (35 1/16 x 45 11/16 in.). Private Collection

Gustave Caillebotte, Richard Gallo and his Dog, 1884, oil on canvas 89 x 116 cm (35 1/16 x 45 11/16 in.). Private Collection

Gustave Caillebotte, Skiffs, 1877, oil on canvas, 88.9 x 116.2 cm (35 x 45 3/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

Gustave Caillebotte, Skiffs, 1877, oil on canvas, 88.9 x 116.2 cm (35 x 45 3/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

Although Gustave Caillebotte is widely recognized as the painter of a small number of iconic works—particularly The Pont de l’Europe and Paris Street, Rainy Day—and sometimes given more credit as a collector and supporter of the arts, his breadth or depth as a critical impressionist artist is not generally known by the American public. Continue reading

LG To Unveil First Mega-Capacity Refrigerator With Double Door-in-Door(TM) At CES 2015

LG Electronics (LG) today announced plans to introduce its first double Door-in-Door Mega-Capacity Refrigerator (Model LPXS34886C) in 2015. The award-winning “door-in-door” concept pioneered by LG is among the highlights of cutting-edge refrigerator innovations to be unveiled at the 2015 International CES® in Las Vegas next week. (Visitors to LG’s booth at CES 2015 (Las Vegas Convention Center, Central Hall #8204) can personally experience LG’s newest home appliances for themselves.)

LG Mega-Capacity Refrigerator with Double Door-in-Door(TM) (model LPXS34886C) (PRNewsFoto/LG Electronics, Inc.)

LG Mega-Capacity Refrigerator with Double Door-in-Door(TM) (model LPXS34886C) (PRNewsFoto/LG Electronics, Inc.)

LG Mega-Capacity Refrigerator with Double Door-in-Door(TM) (model LPXS34886C) (PRNewsFoto/LG Electronics, Inc.)

LG Mega-Capacity Refrigerator with Double Door-in-Door(TM) (model LPXS34886C) (PRNewsFoto/LG Electronics, Inc.)

This new model, which is expected to be ENERGY STAR® certified, has two independent Door-in-Door(TM) compartments, giving you the ultimate in convenience — better organization and easy access — while maximizing conservation of cold air. The right Door-in-Door(TM) is accessible from both the outside with a simple push of a button as well as from the inside, making it easy to load with often-used items like snacks, drinks, lunches and more. The left Door-in-Door(TM) provides additional easy access storage space via a trigger on the bottom of the door. By utilizing LG’s innovative Door-in-Door(TM) feature without opening the entire refrigerator, cold air loss is reduced by up to 47 percent to help keep food fresh longer.(1)

Expertly crafted, the refrigerator also features contour processed, tempered glass that has been applied over curved glass. Black patterned finishing provides a stylish design that is both aesthetically pleasing and leaves the outside fingerprint and smudge resistant so it always looks its best. The refrigerator is also equipped with EasyLift Bins, which allows users to adjust the height of the internal compartments to accommodate large or oddly-shaped bottles.

The LG Mega-Capacity Door-in-Door((TM)) refrigerator also offers Smart Diagnosis(TM), which allows call center representatives to quickly diagnose problems over the phone. LG’s Smart Diagnosis(TM) smartphone app (2) even allows homeowners to record and analyze signals from the refrigerator for immediate advice on repair options.

LG Electronics, Inc.is a global leader and technology innovator in consumer electronics, mobile communications and home appliances, employing 82,000 people working in 119 locations around the world. Its subsidiary, LG Electronics Home Appliance & Air Solution Company is a global leader in home appliances, air conditioning and air quality systems and works to create total solutions for the home with its industry leading core technologies (encompassing innovative and thoughtfully designed products, including refrigerators, washing machines, dishwashers, cooking appliances, vacuum cleaners, built-in appliances, air conditioners, air purifiers and dehumidifiers).

1)  Percent reduction in exchange rate of air between opening the door-in-door compared to one French Door for 10 seconds. Results based on testing of comparable model with same LG(®) Door-in-Door(TM) design. Results may vary by models and the duration of time the door remains open.
(2)  Available only on Android smartphones.

 

Chrissy Teigen And Jack Guinness Star In UGG Australia’s Winter 2015 Campaign, Unveiling New Weatherproof, Waterproof and Water-Resistant Collection that Pairs Style with Function

The UGG® brand announced the debut of its Winter 2015 “This Is UGG.” brand marketing campaign starring supermodel Chrissy Teigen and DJ Jack Guinness. For the latest iteration of “This Is UGG.” – a campaign designed to develop an emotional connection with consumers that transcends any specific product – UGG took to the pristine snowcapped mountain peaks of Iceland for a breathtaking experiential journey to develop an emotional connection with the consumers to present our extensive winter product – a fashionable line that infuses the most innovative weatherproof, waterproof and water-resistant technologies. The multi-media, cross-channel campaign, which will run through February 1, 2015, will leverage this storytelling platform to illustrate how UGG products “Feels Like Nothing Else“.

In the spirit of “This is UGG.” Teigen and Guinness, who have catapulted themselves to notoriety by being “plugged in,” were asked to do just the opposite – unplug in order to reconnect to their experiences, environment and themselves. The campaign follows a story of meaningful moments that capture a feeling. From discovering local treasures to reflecting on a snow-topped glacier, Chrissy and Jack embrace their experiences and radiate emotion that mirrors what the UGG brand is all about — a comfort and ease that “Feels Like Nothing Else.”

Chrissy Teigen in UGG Australia's Winter Campaign. (PRNewsFoto/UGG Australia)

Chrissy Teigen in UGG Australia’s Winter Campaign. (PRNewsFoto/UGG Australia)

Teigen radiates an unexpected outgoing personality with a passion for adventure. For “This Is UGG.”, Chrissy unveils her most natural side, indulging in her interest for unique foods and beauty. In an exclusive video, “Soul Food,” she reflects on slowing down to appreciate life’s small moments: “Life goes by so quickly so it is really important to create time and space for yourself. Sometimes you have to think of your surroundings and how blessed you are: Close your eyes, take it all in and be in the moment. In Iceland we were surrounded by so much beauty and so much simplicity– it’s just food for the soul.” (See Chrissy Teigen, “Soul Food” video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWVLbX7LjJo)

The “This Is UGG” winter journey shows an intimate side of Jack Guinness – one that reflects his personal interests and creative pursuits, out of the limelight. Jack barely has a moment for himself; those rare moments are like gold. As an accomplished DJ, one of Jack’s favorite things to do is spending time getting lost for hours in hidden record stores and finding little gems of sound that will make his sessions better. As a musician, avid reader, writer and art collector, before departing for Iceland Guinness spoke about his excitement for the “This Is UGG” campaign via an exclusive video featuring the UGG brand:

Iceland is a sublime place. There’s something so romantic and unique about Iceland; it’s rugged and magic. I want to meet the people, listen to the music that’s popular there, and learn about their culture. Does living in Iceland create a different outlook on life? An original aesthetic and way of looking at things? I want to drink and dance with the locals, and try and see the world through their eyes. It sounds cheesy but it’s true! I’m really, really excited… I’ll keep a diary while I’m out there, sometimes writing helps me share thoughts that would otherwise go unexpressed and be forgotten. I don’t just want to remember what I did, I want to remember how it made me feel.” – Jack Guinness. (See Jack Guinness, “On the Rocks” video here: http://youtu.be/H8XjyGWqOvg)

The new collection highlights fashion-forward weatherproof, water-resistant and waterproof styles fit for blizzards, thunderstorms and everything in between. Updated classics with touches fit for the elements, including weatherproof, water-resistant and waterproof technology, are joined for the men’s winter campaign.

Winter 2015 – Women’s collection highlights includes:
—  A contemporary take on a classic silhouette, the Emalie boot fuses waterproof leather with a water-repellent wool blend forming a protective cover for feet, while the Simmens boot incorporates a textured, water-resistant shaft and a soft, cozy lining to keep feet warm and comfortable.
—  Chartering bold new territory, sumptuous sheepskin is fixed to cuff the Patten’s water-resistant Silkee suede in rugged-riche style, while a luxurious, natural wool lining keeps feet warm and dry.
—  Renowned for its bar-raising blend of fashion and performance, the Adirondack Boot II features waterproof full-grain leather, cozy lining and cuffable suede shaft. And an UGG®-exclusive Vibram® outsole on the Adirondack Boot II stands up to snowy weather in style.

Winter 2015 – Men’s collection highlights:
—  Oiled suede complements the waterproof leather in the Munroe, creating a durable style with a contemporary feel. Fully lined in luxurious, natural wool, this rugged boot is cold weather rated to -4 degrees Fahrenheit and equipped with an exclusive Vibram® outsole.
—  The shorter iteration of the iconic classic, the Classic Mini Deco serves as a perfect alternative for warmer climates, elevated stylistically with sophisticated stitching at the heel counter. Showcasing all the characteristics of the Classic Collection, this boot keeps feet dry and comfortable with a moisture-wicking interior.
—  Crafted to handle the harshest winter elements, the men’s Butte pairs understated style with stay-dry technology. Cuffable, waterproof leather and nylon are finished with an exclusive Vibram® outsole and moisture-wicking lining to offer the warmth and dry comfort characteristic of classic UGG boots.

The UGG brand has demonstrated steady success in expanding its offering and developing strong product throughout the year including recent transitional footwear, as well as high fashion styles that incorporate high-tech weather features,” said Connie Rishwain, President of UGG. “We’ve called upon Chrissy Teigen and Jack Guinness to serve as our brand ambassadors for our Winter 2015 ‘This Is UGG.’ campaign to bring attention to our compelling weather designs that transcend what traditional weather products look like. These are beautiful, yet highly functional products that also deliver the luxury and comfort that the UGG brand is known for.”

9 FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILMS ADVANCE IN OSCAR® RACE

Nine features will advance to the next round of voting in the Foreign Language Film category for the 87th Academy Awards®.  Eighty-three films had originally been considered in the category. Foreign Language Film nominations for 2014 are being determined in two phases. The Phase I committee, consisting of several hundred Los Angeles-based Academy members, screened the original submissions in the category between mid-October and December 15.  The group’s top six choices, augmented by three additional selections voted by the Academy’s Foreign Language Film Award Executive Committee, constitute the shortlist.

The shortlist will be winnowed down to the category’s five nominees by specially invited committees in New York, Los Angeles and, for the first time, London.  They will spend Friday, January 9, through Sunday, January 11, viewing three films each day and then casting their ballots.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

Argentina, “Wild Tales,” Damián Szifrón, director;
Estonia, “Tangerines,” Zaza Urushadze, director;
Georgia, “Corn Island,” George Ovashvili, director;
Mauritania, “Timbuktu,” Abderrahmane Sissako, director;
Netherlands, “Accused,” Paula van der Oest, director;
Poland, “Ida,” Paweł Pawlikowski, director;
Russia, “Leviathan,” Andrey Zvyagintsev, director;
Sweden, “Force Majeure,” Ruben Östlund, director;
Venezuela, “The Liberator,” Alberto Arvelo, director.

The 87th Academy Awards nominations will be announced live on Thursday, January 15, 2015, at 5:30 a.m. PT in the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater. The Oscars® will be held on Sunday, February 22, 2015, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live by the ABC Television Network.  The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

THE ACADEMY OF MOTION PICTURE ART AND SCIENCES CELEBRATES COSTUME DESIGN WITH OSCAR® CLASSICS “TAXI DRIVER,” “ANNIE HALL,” “THE GODFATHER,” AND “MARY POPPINS”

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences begins 2015 with two new screening series, Street Clothes: Contemporary Costuming in New Hollywood and Two Sides of a Costume Designer, in conjunction with the landmark Hollywood Costume exhibition now on view.

Street Clothes: Contemporary Costuming in New Hollywood
Showcasing the groundbreaking urban American films of the late 1960s and 1970s, the Academy’s new Friday evening series will demonstrate how a designer’s work can be a key element in creating contemporary characters. The first five programs feature costumes designers Theoni V. Aldredge (“Network”), Ruth Morley (“Annie Hall”),Rosanna Norton (“Cisco Pike”), Ann Roth (“Klute”) and Albert Wolsky (“All That Jazz”).

January 9
Midnight Cowboy – 7:30 p.m.
Cisco Pike – 9:40 p.m.

January 16
Klute – 7:30 p.m.
Network – 9:40 p.m.

January 23
All That Jazz – 7:30 p.m.
Phantom of the Paradise – 9:50 p.m.

January 30
Taxi Driver – 7:30 p.m.
Uptight – 9:40 p.m.

February 6
Annie Hall – 7:30 p.m.
Fingers – 9:20 p.m.

Two Sides of a Costume Designer
The Academy’s new Saturday evening series demonstrates the remarkable creative range of many of cinema’s top designers over the decades. The series kicks off in January with four double features pairing impressive and varied achievements by designers working in multiple genres. The costume designers highlighted include Milena Canonero (“Barry Lyndon,” “The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou”), Anna Hill Johnstone (“East of Eden,” “The Godfather”), Theadora Van Runkle (“Bonnie and Clyde,” “The Godfather Part II”) and Tony Walton (“Fahrenheit 451,” “Mary Poppins”).

January 10
Fahrenheit 451 – 5 p.m.
Mary Poppins – 7:30 p.m.

January 17
East of Eden – 5 p.m.
The Godfather – 7:30 p.m.

January 24
Bonnie and Clyde – 5 p.m.
The Godfather Part II – 7:30 p.m.

January 31
The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou – 5 p.m.
Barry Lyndon – 7:30 p.m.