2014 Holiday Gift Guide: Give the Gift of Beauty and Good Health

With the last dish being placed in the dishwasher and your getting ready for Black Friday shopping, the holidays are officially here. Bring on the season of hot chocolate, decorations, too much family time, parties and potentially extreme cold weather.  You can give the best gifts, all while looking your best, with these beauty holiday essentials.

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With the Marvis 7 Flavour Gift Set (Amarelli Licorice, Aquatic Mint, Cinnamon Mint, Classic Strong Mint, Ginger Mint, Jasmine Mint and Whitening Mint,$36), discover the 7 unique experiences of the Marvis product line. Marvis is a luxury line of oral care products that turn your daily teeth cleaning ritual into a wonderful sensory experience. Their gentle xylitol- and sorbitan-based formulas cleanse and condition your teeth and gums without causing irritation. This flavorful gift set is available on www.BigelowChemists.com

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In chic hotels around the world, you’ll find Marvis 7 Flavour Gift Set . It make makes any space feel more like home. It was developed using a proprietary blend of waxes with lead-free wicks to ensure even melting, specially infused with the highest quality fragrance oil to burn approximately 60 hours. Other scents in the line include Fig, Freesia, Eucalyptus, Smoke, Amber, Lemon, Musk, and Neroli. C.O. Bigelow Candle in Lavender & Peppermint ($42), is available on BigelowChemists.com

OPI Gwen Stefani Holiday Glam’s in the Bag ($23, available at www.ulta.comincludes two Nail Lacquers 15 mL – 12 Fl. Oz.(Bogotá Blackberry and Funny Bunny) and two Free zippered cosmetic cases.

Rimmel Lasting Finish by Kate Moss in 01

Rimmel Lasting Finish by Kate Moss in 01

Don’t leave the house this holiday season without Rimmel Lasting Finish by Kate Moss in 01 ($5.49, available at drugstores nationwide), this (and every holiday’s) signature fierce red lip! The 1st Lipstick collection created by Kate Moss is a high intensity color that lasts for up to 8 hours and infused with Black Diamonds that reflects light like never before.

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This holiday season give the gift that keeps on giving and giving… a GoodMouth Subscription Service. Many types of subscription services exist nowadays. From health subscription services to food subscription services, there is one for everyone to enjoy. Replacing your toothbrush every month, as doctors suggest, can be such a daunting task – so much that people often forget. Not to mention when going to convenience stores you tend to spend more by purchasing items you don’t even need. GoodMouth ( www.goodmouth.com. ) helps you stay healthy and keeps your budgeting on track all for less than $5 a month ($4.95)!

Style your hair just right this season with KMS California FREESHAPE 2-in-1 Styling + Finishing Spray ($19.99).  Whether you want to curl, straighten, or put your hair in an up-do, this product is the ultimate do over on dry hair. It keeps your hair dry – Drying instantly to not dampen your existing style, keeps it protected – Thermal protection so you can refresh your style with hot tools and keeps it light – Finish with a light, flexible hold for no product build-up. Available at salons nationwide

The Salvation Army Kicks Off 124th Red Kettle Campaign During Cowboys Thanksgiving Day Game

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The Dallas Cowboys will kick off the 124th annual Salvation Army Red Kettle Campaign when the Jones family makes this season’s first official kettle donation at halftime of the nationally televised Cowboys Thanksgiving Day game on FOX against the Philadelphia Eagles. For the past 18 years, the Dallas Cowboys have helped The Salvation Army kick off the campaign, which has raised more than $1.8 billion in that time. From its humble beginnings as a San Francisco donation collection by Salvation Army Captain Joseph McFee in 1891, the Red Kettle Campaign has grown into one of the most recognizable and important charitable campaigns in the United States. It provides toys for kids, coats for the homeless, food for the hungry and countless social service programs year-round.
Jerry Jones, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Comm. David Jeffrey share their #RedKettleReason. What’s yours?

Jerry Jones, Charlotte Jones Anderson and Comm. David Jeffrey share their #RedKettleReason. What’s yours?

The focus of this year’s national Red Kettle Campaign is to encourage Americans to share their reasons for giving by using #RedKettleReason in social media posts. The Dallas Cowboys will share their #RedKettleReason before halftime on FOX to signify the official kickoff of the Red Kettle Campaign. Fans who share their #RedKettleReason may also be featured during halftime of the Cowboys Thanksgiving Day game. Those who share their #RedKettleReason online through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube can see their posts on www.RedKettleReason.org. The site serves as a hub for #RedKettleReason conversations around the country and features an interactive mosaic of pictures, videos and information.
For the official campaign kickoff, Jerry Jones, owner and general manager of the Dallas Cowboys, and wife Gene will make their annual “kettle drop” – which is the inaugural donation to the Red Kettle Campaign – at the start of halftime. The Jones Family has made the kettle drop each year since 1997, when the Cowboys and The Salvation Army began their partnership.

The Gene and Jerry Jones Family Charities’ mission (also known as the Gene and Jerry Jones Family Foundation) is built on a philosophy of helping those who don’t have the strength, the resources or the means to help themselves. As a sports entity that has enjoyed unprecedented success and recognition for more than four decades, the Dallas Cowboys has long felt a strong obligation to transfer that championship tradition and the magic that it creates to the bigger purpose of making a difference in the community.

Dallas Cowboys running back DeMarco Murray shares his #RedKettleReason and invites his fans to do the same

Dallas Cowboys running back DeMarco Murray shares his #RedKettleReason and invites his fans to do the same

Papa John’s founder John Schnatter shares his #RedKettleReason. From now until December 28, Papa John’s is offering a Red Kettle Cookie, a unique holiday twist to their popular treat, the Chocolate Chip Cookie. A portion of the proceeds from the cookie will be used to support The Salvation Army’s funding.

Papa John’s founder John Schnatter shares his #RedKettleReason. From now until December 28, Papa John’s is offering a Red Kettle Cookie, a unique holiday twist to their popular treat, the Chocolate Chip Cookie. A portion of the proceeds from the cookie will be used to support The Salvation Army’s funding.

Charlotte Jones Anderson, executive vice president and chief brand officer for the Dallas Cowboys, shared her #RedKettleReason. “I choose to support The Salvation Army because the Army is a great team of people who are fighting to make a difference in the lives of those who need it most,” she said. “The Salvation Army is close to my heart, and my family has worked with the organization for decades. #RedKettleReason is a great way for people to recognize and talk about all the good the Army does to serve America’s most vulnerable all year long.” Anderson recently concluded a three-year term as chairman of The Salvation Army’s National Advisory Board alongside fellow board members Gene and Jerry Jones.

It’s been truly inspiring to see every #RedKettleReason shared from around the country. It proves that giving is a universal language,” said Lieutenant Colonel Ron Busroe, national community relations and development secretary for The Salvation Army. “We know that for many, the choice to donate is a sacrifice, and we’re very happy to see why people choose to support the Army and those it serves. So far, we’ve seen posts from celebrities, Salvation Army officers and even the entire Cowboys team, and we hope to see many more posts using #RedKettleReason from everyone who supports The Salvation Army in any way this holiday season.”

Red Kettle Kickoff is just the beginning of an exciting holiday season for The Salvation Army. In addition to #RedKettleReason, more than 25,000 Red Kettles are stationed at storefronts and street corners nationwide, and there are many other ways to get involved:

  • Rock the Red Kettle Concert: On Saturday, Dec. 6, some of music’s rising young stars will take the stage at L.A. LIVE in Los Angeles for the fifth annual free concert hosted by The Salvation Army and produced by Ned Specktor of Specktor Media. Headliners Becky G and Shawn Mendes will be joined by R5, Josh Levi, Bea Miller and Exist Elsewhere. A live stream of the concert will be available on RedKettleReason.org.
  • Walmart Fill the Truck Toy Drive: On select weekends, from Nov. 28 through Dec. 14, participating Walmart stores across the country will collect toys and coats for children.
  • Papa John’s Red Kettle Cookie: From now until Dec. 28, Papa John’s is offering a Red Kettle Cookie, a unique holiday twist to their popular treat, the Chocolate Chip Cookie. A portion of the proceeds from the cookie will be used to support The Salvation Army’s funding. In addition, Papa John’s will offer 25 percent off regular menu priced orders for everyone who donates to The Salvation Army through RedKettleReason.org and shares a reason of their own with their following. John Schnatter, founder of Papa John’s will share his #RedKettleReason today, “Because The Salvation army works to make people’s lives better.”
  • Russell Stover Candy Tin: Now in stores at freestanding Russell Stover locations, $2 from the purchase of these commemorative candy tins featuring The Salvation Army logo will be donated to The Salvation Army.
  • Online Red Kettle: Throughout the season, Americans can become virtual bell ringers by starting their own Online Red Kettle atonlineredkettle.org.
  • Text-to-Give: For the mobile donor, it’s easy to give $10 by texting the word “KETTLE” to 80888 and replying “YES.”*
  • Angel Tree: To support an Angel in your town, contact your local Salvation Army by entering your zip code at salvationarmyusa.org
  • Volunteer: For more ways to volunteer and give back, visitsalvationarmyusa.org to find a local corps.

The Salvation Army, an evangelical part of the universal Christian church established in London in 1865, has been supporting those in need for more than 130 years in the United States. Nearly 30 million Americans receive assistance from The Salvation Army each year through a range of social services: providing food for the hungry, relief for disaster victims, assistance for the disabled, outreach to the elderly and ill, clothing and shelter to the homeless, and opportunities for underprivileged children. 82 cents of every dollar The Salvation Army spends is used to support those services in 5,000 communities nationwide.

For more information about The Salvation Army and Red Kettle Kickoff, please visit blog.salvationarmyusa.org, facebook.com/SalvationArmyUSA or twitter.com/salvationarmyus.

*A one-time donation of $10 will be added to your mobile phone bill or deducted from your prepaid balance. Message and data rates may apply. All charges are billed by and payable to your mobile service provider. Service is available on Verizon Wireless, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile. All purchases must be authorized by account holder. By participating, you certify that you are 18 years or older and/or have parental permission. Donations are collected for The Salvation Army and subject to the terms found at igfn.org/t. Privacy policy: igfn.org/p. Text STOP to 80888 to stop; Text HELP to 80888 for help.

HIV & AIDS in the United States Update

In anticipation of World AIDS Day 2014, December 1st, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released its 2014 HIV Vital Signs report, which includes:

The topic of this year’s Vital Signs is the HIV Care Continuum in the United States, which reports on the percentages of people living with HIV in various stages of diagnosis, care, and antiretroviral treatment. Ensuring that all those living with HIV are successfully treated is critical to improve their overall health and reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to their partners. The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) and the White House’s Continuum of Care Initiative seek to identify people who are living with HIV, link them to care, and ultimately increase the proportion of people with a suppressed viral load.

Vital Signs: HIV Diagnosis, Care, and Treatment Among Persons Living with HIV — United States, 2011

On November 25, 2014, this report was posted as an MMWR Early Release on the MMWR website (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr).

Heather Bradley, PhD1, H. Irene Hall, PhD1, Richard J. Wolitski, PhD1, Michelle M. Van Handel, MPH1, Amy E. Stone, MCo1, Michael LaFlam1, Jacek Skarbinski, MD1,Darrel H. Higa, PhD1, Joseph Prejean, PhD1, Emma L. Frazier, PhD1, Roshni Patel, MPH1, Ping Huang, MS1, Qian An, MS1, Ruiguang Song, PhD1, Tian Tang, MS1,Linda A. Valleroy, PhD1 (Author affiliations at end of text)

Abstract

Background: Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), if untreated, leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and premature death. However, a continuum of services including HIV testing, HIV medical care, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) can lead to viral suppression, improved health and survival of persons infected with HIV, and prevention of HIV transmission.

Methods: CDC used data from the National HIV Surveillance System and the Medical Monitoring Project to estimate the percentages of persons living with HIV infection, diagnosed with HIV infection, linked to HIV medical care, engaged in HIV medical care, prescribed ART, and virally suppressed in the United States during 2011.

Results: In 2011, an estimated 1.2 million persons were living with HIV infection in the United States; an estimated 86% were diagnosed with HIV, 40% were engaged in HIV medical care, 37% were prescribed ART, and 30% achieved viral suppression. The prevalence of viral suppression was significantly lower among persons aged 18–24 years (13%), 25–34 years (23%), and 35–44 years (27%) compared with those aged ≥65 years (37%).

Conclusions: A comprehensive continuum of services is needed to ensure that all persons living with HIV infection receive the HIV care and treatment needed to achieve viral suppression. Improvements are needed across the HIV care continuum to protect the health of persons living with HIV, reduce HIV transmission, and reach prevention and care goals.

Implications for public health practice: State and local health departments, community-based organizations, and health care providers play essential roles in improving outcomes on the HIV care continuum that increase survival among persons living with HIV and prevent new HIV infections. The greatest opportunities for increasing the percentage of persons with a suppressed viral load are reducing undiagnosed HIV infections and increasing the percentage of persons living with HIV who are engaged in care.

Introduction

In the United States, an estimated 1.2 million persons are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a serious infection that, if untreated, leads to illness and premature death. Persons living with HIV who use antiretroviral therapy (ART) and achieve very low levels of the virus (suppressed viral load) can have a nearly normal life expectancy (1) and have very low risk for transmitting HIV to others (2). However, each year in the United States, nearly 50,000 persons become infected with HIV (3). Each step along the HIV care continuum (HIV diagnosis, prompt and sustained HIV medical care, and ART) is essential for achieving a suppressed viral load.

To accelerate progress toward reaching the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS), which include reducing new HIV infections, improving health outcomes among persons living with HIV, and reducing HIV-related disparities, the President issued an executive order in July 2013 directing federal agencies to improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum, with the goal of increasing viral suppression among persons living with HIV. This report estimates the number of persons living with HIV who received selected services along the HIV care continuum in the United States and the overall percentage of persons with suppressed viral load.

Methods

Data reported through December 2013 to the National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS) from 50 states and the District of Columbia were used to estimate the number of persons living with HIV infection and the number living with diagnosed HIV by year-end 2011. The number of persons living with HIV infection (prevalence) was estimated as previously described (4). NHSS data from 19 jurisdictions (18 states and the District of Columbia)* with complete laboratory reporting were used to estimate linkage to HIV medical care. Linkage to HIV medical care was defined as one or more documented viral load or CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4+) count test within 3 months after HIV diagnosis and was estimated among persons aged ≥13 years newly diagnosed with HIV in 2011.

Data from the Medical Monitoring Project were used to estimate the number of persons aged ≥18 years with HIV engaged in care, prescribed ART, and with a suppressed viral load (5). Numbers are weighted, nationally representative population estimates from a complex sample survey of persons in HIV medical care in the United States. Being engaged in care was defined as having had an HIV medical care visit during the survey’s sampling period of January–April 2011. ART was defined as documentation in the medical record of an ART prescription during the 12 months preceding interview. Viral suppression was defined as documentation in the medical record of viral load <200 copies/mL at last viral load test in the 12 months preceding interview. Statistical testing of differences between groups was conducted using the delta method (6).

Findings

In 2011, an estimated 1.2 million persons were living with HIV infection in the United States; an estimated 86% were diagnosed with HIV, 40% were engaged in HIV medical care, 37% were prescribed ART, and 30% achieved viral suppression (Figure 1).

The prevalence of viral suppression was significantly lower among persons aged 18–24 years (13%), 25–34 years (23%), and 35–44 years (27%) compared with those aged ≥65 years (37%). (Table 1). An estimated 28% of blacks achieved viral suppression, compared with 32% of whites, a difference that was not statistically significant.

Of 15,449 persons newly diagnosed with HIV in the 19 surveillance areas in 2011, 80% were linked to HIV medical care within 3 months. Linkage to care was lowest among persons aged 13–24 years (73%) and blacks (76%) (Table 2).

Of the estimated 1.2 million persons living with HIV, an estimated 839,336 (70%) had not achieved viral suppression. Of these 839,336, an estimated 20% had never been diagnosed with HIV, 66% had been diagnosed but were not engaged in HIV medical care, 4% were in HIV medical care but had not been prescribed ART, and 10% had been prescribed ART but had not achieved viral suppression (Figure 2).

Discussion

Of persons living with HIV in the United States in 2011, 30% achieved viral suppression. This percentage was relatively stable from 2009 (26%) to 2011 (4). Improvements are needed across the HIV care continuum to protect the health of persons living with HIV, reduce HIV transmission, and reach national prevention and care goals. The greatest opportunities for increasing the percentage of persons with a suppressed viral load are reducing undiagnosed HIV infections and increasing the percentage of persons living with HIV who are engaged in care.

HIV diagnosis is the entry point of the HIV care continuum. All adolescents and adults should be tested for HIV infection at least once. Pregnant women should be tested, including those presenting at labor with an unknown HIV status. Persons at increased risk for HIV infection should be tested at least annually, including men who have sex with men (MSM), persons who inject drugs, and persons presenting for sexually transmitted disease testing (7,8).

Persons living with HIV must receive HIV medical care to benefit from being prescribed ART, becoming virally suppressed, and receiving prevention counseling to reduce risk behaviors. Approximately 66% of persons who did not have a suppressed viral load were diagnosed with HIV but not engaged in HIV medical care. Thus, interventions that increase the likelihood that such persons will seek and receive ongoing medical care are essential. Strategies include strengths-based case management (i.e., encouraging patients to identify and use internal strengths and assets to overcome obstacles), provider notification systems, co-located medical and support services, clinic materials promoting engagement in care, clinic staff who have expertise serving affected subpopulations (e.g., youths and gay men), and appointment scheduling (9). Patient navigation and outreach services might also be helpful (10).

To prevent deterioration of immune function, prolong life, and decrease transmission risk, all persons diagnosed with HIV should receive medical care and be offered ART as soon as possible after diagnosis with HIV infection, regardless of CD4+ count or HIV viral load (11). HIV medical care and treatment have multiple benefits. Most persons in HIV medical care are prescribed ART (92%) and achieve viral suppression (76%). Persons who are diagnosed with HIV at age 20 years and initiate ART immediately and consistently throughout their lives can expect to live an additional 51 years, which approaches the life expectancy of a person aged 20 years in the general population (1). Early ART has been shown to reduce the likelihood of sexual transmission of HIV by 96% (2). However, one in five newly diagnosed persons was not linked to care within 3 months, missing an important opportunity to receive early HIV treatment and care.

Outcomes along the HIV care continuum were associated with age. The lower percentages of younger people diagnosed, engaged in care, and on ART might reflect shorter duration of infection and less time for diagnosis. Further, the low percentage (13%) of persons aged 18–24 years achieving viral suppression is largely driven by the lower percentage diagnosed compared with other age groups. Although there were no significant differences in viral suppression by race/ethnicity, blacks had lower percentages than whites of being diagnosed and achieving viral suppression. Disparities along the HIV care continuum might reflect differences in access to and use of health care and treatment (12,13). Both targeted interventions and efforts to address underlying social determinants of health, such as increased access to health care and supportive services, could increase HIV diagnosis, engagement in care, ART, and viral suppression.

These findings are subject to limitations. First, linkage to care is based on persons newly diagnosed in 2011 using data from only 19 areas with complete laboratory reporting so might not be representative of the United States as a whole. Second, engagement in care might be underestimated, because only persons receiving HIV medical care during January–April, 2011 were considered engaged in care. Weighted population estimates of persons on ART and virally suppressed were only calculated among persons engaged in care, so an underestimate of engagement in care might also lead to underestimates of ART and viral suppression. Third, percentages of persons on ART might also reflect guidelines in effect in 2011 recommending ART initiation for persons with CD4+ count <500 cells/µL, which were revised in 2012 and now recommend treatment for all persons with HIV regardless of immune status. Fourth, viral suppression was defined based on laboratory results at last test and might not indicate durable viral suppression. Fifth, the number of persons living with HIV infection was estimated using NHSS data and was calculated for persons aged ≥13 years. Medical Monitoring Project data include persons aged ≥18 years, so persons aged 13–17 years are included in the denominator, but not the numerator, for estimates of percentages engaged in care, on ART, and virally suppressed. However, there were fewer than 5,000 persons aged 13–17 years living with diagnosed HIV in 2011, so this limitation is unlikely to substantially influence estimates.

State and local health departments, community-based organizations, and health care providers should work to reduce undiagnosed HIV infections and ensure that comprehensive services promoting linkage to, and engagement in, HIV medical care are available to all persons diagnosed with HIV. To support these efforts, CDC provides funding and technical assistance to reduce undiagnosed HIV infection, improve initial linkage and continued engagement in HIV medical care, increase viral suppression, and address disparities along the HIV care continuum. CDC is also working with state and local health departments to expand the use of HIV surveillance data in aggregate and on the individual level to improve engagement in HIV medical care and reduce viral load. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is supporting a range of projects to improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum, including research, Special Projects of National Significance, the Care and Prevention in the United States Demonstration Project, Partnerships for Care, Steps to Care, and other innovative programs.

The findings in this report indicate that continued and intensified efforts are needed along the HIV care continuum. Only with success at each step in the continuum (i.e., diagnosing those with HIV, linking them to and engaging them in care, and ensuring they receive optimal treatment and prevention services) can the ultimate goals of improving health, reducing disparities, extending lives, and preventing further HIV transmission be achieved.

1Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, CDC (Corresponding author: Heather Bradley,hmbradley@cdc.gov, 404-639-8373)

References

  1. Samji H, Cescon A, Hogg RS, et al. Closing the gap: increases in life expectancy among treated HIV-positive individuals in the United States and Canada. PLoS One 2013;8:e81355.
  2. Cohen MS, Chen YQ, McCauley M, et al. Prevention of HIV-1 infection with early antiretroviral therapy. N Engl J Med 2011;365:493–505.
  3. CDC. Estimated HIV incidence in the United States, 2007–2010. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2012. Available athttp://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/surveillance/resources/reports/#supplemental.
  4. CDC. Monitoring selected national HIV prevention and care objectives by using HIV surveillance data—United States and 6 dependent areas—2012. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2014. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/reports/surveillance.
  5. Blair JM, Fagan JL, Frazier EL, et al. Behavioral and clinical characteristics of persons receiving medical care for HIV infection—Medical Monitoring Project, United States, 2009. MMWR 2014;63(Suppl 5).
  6. Oehlert GW. A note on the delta method. American Statistician 1992;46:27–9.
  7. Branson BM, Handsfield HH, Lampe MA, et al. Revised recommendations for HIV testing of adults, adolescents, and pregnant women in health-care settings. MMWR 2006;55(No. RR-14).
  8. Moyer VA, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for HIV: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med 2013;159:51–60.
  9. CDC. Compendium of evidence based interventions and best practices for HIV prevention. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC; 2014. Available at http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/prevention/research/compendium/ma/index.html.
  10. Thompson MA, Mugavero MJ, Amico KR, et al. Guidelines for improving entry into and retention in care and antiretroviral adherence for persons with HIV: evidence-based recommendations from an International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care panel. Ann Intern Med 2012;156:817–33.
  11. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-infected adults and adolescents. Washington, DC: US Department of Health and Human Services; 2014. Available at http://aidsinfo.nih.gov/contentfiles/adultandadolescentgl.pdf Adobe PDF fileExternal Web Site Icon.
  12. DeNavas-Walt C, Proctor BD, Smith JC. Income, poverty, and health insurance coverage in the United States: 2012. Washington, DC: US Department of Commerce, US Census Bureau; 2013. Available at https://www.census.gov/prod/2013pubs/p60-245.pdf Adobe PDF fileExternal Web Site Icon.
  13. Wohl AR, Galvan FH, Myers HF, et al. Do social support, stress, disclosure and stigma influence retention in HIV care for Latino and African American men who have sex with men and women? AIDS Behav 2011;15:1098–110.

* The 19 jurisdictions were California (Los Angeles County and San Francisco only), Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, South Carolina, West Virginia, Wyoming, and the District of Columbia. Data from these areas represent 37% of data on diagnoses of HIV infection among persons aged ≥13 years during 2011 in the United States.

Additional information on these programs available online: Special Projects of National Significance (http://hab.hrsa.gov/abouthab/partfspns.htmlExternal Web Site Icon), the Care and Prevention in the United States Demonstration Project (http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/prevention/demonstration/capus), Partnerships for Care (http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/prevention/demonstration/p4c/index.html), and STEPS to Care (http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf/policies_dhap_annualreport_2013.pdf Adobe PDF file).

 

Key Points

  • An estimated 1.2 million persons are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the United States. Early HIV diagnosis, timely treatment, and HIV medical care can lead to viral suppression, which improves the health of persons living with HIV, increases survival, and prevents transmission to others.
  • An estimated 30% of persons living with HIV in the United States were virally suppressed in 2011, compared with 26% in 2009.
  • Persons aged 18–24 years, 25–34 years, and 35–44 years were less likely to have suppressed viral load compared with those aged ≥65 years.
  • Among persons whose viral load was not suppressed, 20% had never been diagnosed with HIV, 66% were diagnosed but not engaged in HIV medical care, 4% were engaged in HIV medical care but not prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 10% were prescribed ART but had not achieved viral suppression.
  • Increasing viral suppression will require increasing the percentages of persons with HIV who are aware of their infection (86% in 2011), engaged in HIV medical care (40% in 2011), and prescribed ART (37% in 2011).
  • Additional information is available at http://www.cdc.gov/vitalsigns.

All of these data and much more can be found in Monitoring Selected National HIV Prevention and Care Objectives by Using HIV Surveillance Data—United States and 6 Dependent Areas—2012, also released at the same time.

The percentage of people living with HIV who achieve viral suppression could be increased by expanding HIV testing efforts so that all people living with undiagnosed HIV know their status and are linked to and engaged in ongoing HIV medical care. Early and regular treatment with ART can protect health and extend life. People with HIV who are diagnosed early, begin ART immediately, and continue receiving ongoing care can have a life expectancy near to that of people who do not have HIV. Further, being on ART and virally suppressed can greatly reduce the risk of sexual transmission of HIV to partners. These benefits are powerful.

Health care providers can help keep patients in care by using appointment reminders, or by referring them to support services, such as nutrition, housing, or mental health services. They can also work with health departments in a Data to Care program to use HIV surveillance data to identify people with HIV who are not in care and link them to care. To encourage people living with HIV to get in care and stay in care, CDC recently released HIV Treatment Works, a new campaign under the Act Against AIDS initiative. This campaign focuses on helping people living with HIV get into care, start taking ART, remain in care, and adhere to treatment. Our clinical partners – doctors, nurses, and other health care providers, as well as health departments and professional organizations–play a pivotal role in helping get the word out about the health-preserving and HIV- prevention potential of getting on, and staying on, ART in order to achieve viral suppression.

Burj Al Arab Jumeirah Unveils “The Dream”, Video Marking its 15th Anniversary

Burj Al Arab - Exterior

Burj Al Arab – Exterior

As part of its 15th anniversary celebrations, Burj Al Arab Jumeirah, the world’s most luxurious hotel, has launched The Dream
[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMtS1M0MsLc&feature=youtu.be ] – a powerful motion graphics video that takes the viewer on a journey starting from the vision, to the arrival, to the unveiling, to the heart and finally to the promise of more to come. The Dream [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMtS1M0MsLc&feature=youtu.be ] showcases a number of the hotel’s most recognisable locations, including its famed sail, helipad and 180m high atrium – the world’s tallest.

Burj Al Arab Jumeirah always strives to find new ways of expressing its uniqueness to its many admirers across the world,” said Ross McAuley, Group Vice President of Brand, Digital and Loyalty at Jumeirah Group. “The hotel has always sought to be bold and innovative. This time the innovation is more artful, using carefully devised double-exposure filming techniques to bring elements of this remarkable icon to life with a dream-like narrative and a mesmerizing sequence of images. Another great example of Jumeirah’s STAY DIFFERENT(TM) promise“.

Burj Al Arab Jumeirah is owned and managed by Jumeirah Group, the global luxury hotel company and a member of Dubai Holding. It is designed to resemble a billowing sail and stands at a height of 321 meters. It is one of the most photographed structures in the world and has been consistently voted the world’s most luxurious hotel, with features including in suite check-in and check-out, reception desks on every floor, round-the-clock private butlers and use of the hotel’s Rolls-Royce fleet and private beach. The hotel’s 202 luxury suites range from 170 to 780 square meters with a rain shower and a Jacuzzi in each suite, as well as six restaurants and conference and banqueting venues.

Burj Al Arab - Remarkable Exterior View

Burj Al Arab – Remarkable Exterior View

Already one of the most awarded hotels in the world, Burj Al Arab Jumeirah were the recipient of the following awards in 2014:

  • Virgin Holidays Awards 2014 – Best Platinum Hotel (Al Qasr – Gold Award)
  • Virgin Holidays Awards 2014 – Best Hotel in the Middle East (Jumeirah Zabeel Saray – Silver Award)
  • Travel Weekly’s Hot Hotel Awards 2014 – Favourite Hotel for Spa and Luxury (Jumeirah Zabeel Saray)
  • Travel Weekly’s Hot Hotel Awards 2014 –  Favourite Hotel for Food and Drink (Madinat Jumeirah)
  • That’s Shanghai Awards – Best Foreign Culture Spa (Talise Spa, Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel)
  • City Traveler Awards 2014  – Highest Indoor Ceiling in Shanghai (Grand Ballroom at Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel)
  • Condé Nast Traveller Middle East – Best Hotel for Business Travel in the Middle East (Jumeirah Emirates Towers)
  • Condé Nast Traveler Reader’s Choice Awards 2014 – Best Hotels in the Middle East & North Africa (Burj Al Arab – ranked no.1; Jumeirah Emirates Towers – ranked no.7 and Jumeirah Beach Hotel – ranked no.8)
  • Condé Nast Traveler Reader’s Choice Awards 2014 – Top 100 Hotels & Resorts in the World (Burj Al Arab – ranked no. 28)
  • Villégiature Awards 2014 – Best Hotel in the Middle East (Jumeirah at Etihad Towers)
  • Hotels 2014 Social Hotel Award – Best Digital Video Campaign (Burj Al Arab – Red Bull Racing F1 Stunt on Burj Al Arab Helipad)
  • Orbitz 2014 – Best in Stay Elite Award – Dubai (Dar Al Masyaf)
  • Orbitz 2014 – Best in Stay Elite Award – Rome (Jumeirah Grand Hotel via Veneto)
  • Business Traveller UK Awards – Best Business Hotel Chain in Middle East (Jumeirah Group)
  • Business Traveller UK Awards – Best Business Hotel in Middle East (Jumeirah Emirates Towers)
  • Green Globe Organisation – Sustainability Leader Award (Jumeirah Group)
  • Business Traveller Awards Asia Pacific 2014 – Best Business Hotel Brand (Jumeirah Group)
  • Spanish Institute for the Tourism Sustainability (ISTUR) & Spanish Ministry of Industry and Tourism – Golden Sustainability Certificate (Jumeirah Port Soller)
  • Green Globe Certification 2014 – Jumeirah Zabeel Saray; Jumeirah at Etihad Towers; Burj Al Arab Jumeirah; Jumeirah Beach Hotel; Jumeirah Emirates Towers; Jumeirah World Trade Centre Residences
  • Skift 2014 – Best Social Media Presence by an Individual Hotel, Property or Resort (Burj Al Arab)
  • TripAdvisor – Certificate of Excellence Award 2014 (Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel)
  • TripAdvisor – Best Waterparks in the World (Wild Wadi – 6th place)
  • Expedia Insiders’ Select 2014 List – Most Reviewed Hotels (Dar Al Masyaf-3rd; Jumeirah Beach Hotel; Jumeirah Zabeel Saray; Jumeirah at Etihad Towers)
  • Travel + Leisure World’s Best Hotels 2014 – Burj Al Arab (No. 4 Top City Hotel in Africa and Middle East)
  • Uğur National Award 2014 – Best Spa Resort (Jumeirah Bilgah Beach Hotel)
  • Middle East Hotel Awards 2014 – Best Hotel in the Middle East (Burj Al Arab)
  • Middle East Hotel Awards 2014 – Best Hotel Lobby (Jumeirah Creekside Hotel)
  • Dubai Quality Awards 2013 Tourism Sector – Jumeirah Beach Hotel
  • Dubai Quality Appreciation Award 2013 Tourism Sector – Jumeirah Zabeel Saray
  • Daily Telegraph’s Ultratravel Readers 2014 – Best Hotel in the World (Burj Al Arab)
  • Daily Telegraph’s Ultratravel Readers 2014 – Best Hotel in the Middle East (Burj Al Arab)
  • Spa Traveller Awards 2014 – Best Wellness SPA Middle East (Talise Ottoman Spa)
  • Expedia Insiders’ Select™ 2014  – Winner, one of the top-ranked properties on Expedia (Jumeirah Zabeel Saray)
  • World Luxury Hotel Awards 2014 – Best Luxury Hotel Spa – Global Winner (Talise Spa, Burj Al Arab)
  • World Luxury Hotel Awards 2014 – Best Luxury Hotel Spa – Europe Continent Winner (Talise Spa, Jumeirah Port Soller Hotel & Spa)
  • World Luxury Hotel Awards 2014 – Best Luxury Hotel Spa – Middle East Continent Winner (Talise Ottoman Spa, Jumeirah Zabeel Saray)
  • World Luxury Hotel Awards 2014 – Best Luxury Wellness Spa – Middle East Continent Winner (Talise Spa, Jumeirah Emirates Towers)
  • Arabian Travel Market 2014 – Expedia’s ‘Middle East & Indian Ocean Campaign of the Year 2013 (Jumeirah Hotels & Resorts)
  • Business Traveller Middle East Awards 2014 – Best Hotel Brand in the Middle East (Jumeirah Group)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Kuwait’s Leading Business Hotel (Jumeirah Messilah Beach Hotel & Spa)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Middle East’s Leading Spa (Talise Ottoman Spa, Jumeirah Zabeel Saray)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Middle East’s Leading Resort Residences (Jumeirah Zabeel Saray)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Abu Dhabi’s Leading Hotel (Jumeirah at Etihad Towers)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Abu Dhabi’s Leading Conference Hotel (Jumeirah at Etihad Towers)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Middle East’s Leading Hotel (Jumeirah at Etihad Towers)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Middle East’s Leading All-Suite Hotel (Burj Al Arab)
  • World Travel Awards 204 – Dubai’s Leading Hotel (Burj Al Arab)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Dubai’s Leading Conference Hotel (Al Qasr)
  • World Travel Awards 2014 – Middle East’s Leading Conference Hotel (Al Qasr)
  • Travellers Choice Awards 2014 – Top 10 Hotels for Families, United Arab Emirates (Jumeirah Beach Hotel – ranked at no.1)
  • HolidayCheck Award 2014 – TopHotel in the region – Dubai (Jumeirah Beach Hotel)
  • HolidayCheck Award 2014 – TopHotel in the region – Abu Dhabi (Jumeirah at Etihad Towers)
  • HolidayCheck Award 2014 – “Popular among couples” (Jumeirah Zabeel Saray)
  • HolidayCheck Award 2014 – “City Trip” (Jumeirah Emirates Towers)
  • Conde Nast Traveler 2014 Gold List Africa – Middle East – Top Hotels (Burj Al Arab)
  • Conde Nast Traveler 2014 The Platinum Circle – Readers’ Favorites Year In and Year Out – (Burj Al Arab)

The Jumeirah Group operates a world-class portfolio of hotels and resorts including the flagship Burj Al Arab Jumeirah. Jumeirah Hotels & Resorts manages properties in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, UAE, and Kuwait in the Middle East; Baku, Frankfurt, Istanbul, London, Mallorca (Spain) and Rome in Europe; the Maldives and Shanghai in Asia. Jumeirah Group also runs the luxury serviced residences brand Jumeirah Living with properties in London and Dubai; the new contemporary lifestyle hotel brand VENU; the wellness brand Talise; Jumeirah Restaurants; Wild Wadi Waterpark; The Emirates Academy of Hospitality Management; and Sirius, its global loyalty programme. Future openings include luxury and lifestyle hotels in China, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Morocco, Oman, Russia and the UAE.