Rooftop Films Announces 2014 Opening Weekend Tickets and Full Program Details

To launch the 18th Annual Rooftop Films Summer Series, presented by Industry City, Rooftop Films has set out to prove once again that the short film is the medium best suited to showcase the power of a freewheeling imagination. Rooftop Films is proud to announce the selection of short films to be screening on opening night, Friday, May 16th. THIS IS WHAT WE MEAN BY SHORT FILMS will highlight some of the most exciting and original short films from around the world, and will screen at Industry City, premier venue and presenting sponsor of the 18th annual Summer Series.

The Rooftop Films Summer Series is nothing if not wild, and this selection of dynamic short films encapsulates the adventurous spirit of the organization. This is a short film program that will inspire you to pump iron, smack your friends’ butts, launch yourself into space, question the concepts of time and life, and then go home to share an egg sandwich and recharge.

THIS IS WHAT WE MEAN BY SHORT FILMS

Date: Friday, May 16

Venue: Industry City, 39th Street and First Avenue, Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Directions: Take the D, N, or R trains to 36th Street

Bunda Pandeiro (Carlo Sampietro | 3’)

In Brazilian slang, the phrase “Bunda Pandeiro” is used to describe attractive buttocks by referring to them as a tambourine. This film blurs lines between gender and race, reducing each participant to the utilitarian role of a musical instrument. Filmmaker in Attendance.

Rhino Full Throttle (Nashom im Galopp) (Erik Schmitt | 15’)

A young man uses art to reshape the city around him in search of its soul, but a beautiful tourist overtakes his mission in this imaginative love story.

Symphony No. 42 (Réka Busci | 10’)

47 observations in the irrational connections between human and nature.

An Extraordinary Person (Quelqu’un d’Extraordinaire) (Monia Chokri | 28’)

A 30-year-old scholar, intelligent and beautiful yet socially crippled, is forced to attend a bachelorette party where her quest for authenticity leads to an unavoidable confrontation with old acquaintances. Winner of SXSW Jury Prize.

Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared II: Time (Becky Sloan, Joe Pelling | 4’) Rooftop Alumnus

Eventually everyone runs out of time – but before that happens to you, make some time to go on a journey, a journey through directorial duo Becky & Joe’s existentialist universe of temporal confusion, TV guides and bathtime.

Afronauts (Frances Bodomo | 13’) Rooftop Alumnus

It’s July 16, 1969: America is preparing to launch Apollo 11. Thousands of miles away, the Zambia Space Academy hopes to beat America to the moon in this film inspired by true events. Filmmaker in Attendance.

Master Muscles (Efren Hernandez | 13’)

Veronika and Efren take a trip. Filmmaker in Attendance.

Person To Person (Dustin Guy Dega | 18’) Rooftop Alumnus

Waking up the morning after hosting a party, a man discovers a stranger passed out on his floor. He spends the rest of the day trying to convince her to leave.

Tickets: $13

8:00PM: Doors Open

8:30PM: Live Music

9:00PM: Films Begin

11:30PM: After party celebration with DJs and dancing

The following night, Rooftop Films will present a special sneak preview screening of the international festival favorite and upcoming A24 Films release OBVIOUS CHILD (Brooklyn comedian Donna Stern gets dumped, fired, and pregnant just in time for the best/worst Valentine’s Day of her life in this film festival favorite. Courtesy of A24 Films. Winner of the Rooftop Films Eastern Effects Equipment Grant), a subversive, modern-day romantic comedy from writer/director Gillian Robespierre.

Date: Saturday, May 17

Venue: Industry City, 39th Street and First Avenue, Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Directions: Take the D, N, or R trains to 36th Street

Tickets: $13

8:00PM: Doors Open

8:30PM: Live Music

9:00PM: Films Begin

10:30PM: Q&A with filmmaker Gillian Robespierre

11:30PM: After party celebration

Both evenings will feature live music before each screening and a post-screening after party, presented by our exclusive Gin and Vodka sponsor, New Amsterdam Spirits.

Rooftop Films will be returning to Industry City throughout the summer for numerous screenings at their main rooftop location. For one weekend only, they are moving the celebration to a spectacular and undiscovered space — affectionately dubbed “Secret Party Cove” — tucked away amongst Industry City’s massive complex along the Sunset Park Waterfront.

On View Now: The Glamour of Italian Fashion 1945 – 2014 at The Victoria and Albert Museum

5 April – 27 July 2014  

The Glamour of Italian Fashion 1945 – 2014, April 5 – July 2014, is a glamorous, comprehensive look at Italian Fashion from the end of the Second World War to the present day. The story is explored through the key individuals and organisations that have contributed to its reputation for quality and style and  includes both womens and menswear to highlight the exceptional quality of techniques, materials and expertise for which Italy has become renowned. 

British-born US actress Elizabeth Taylor attends a reception in Venice on September 20, 1967.   AFP PHOTO  - dida: Elizabeth Taylor at the masked ball in Hotel Ca’ Rezzonico, Venice 1967, wears her necklace and earrings in platinum with emeralds and diamonds

British-born US actress Elizabeth Taylor attends a reception in Venice on September 20, 1967. AFP PHOTO
– dida: Elizabeth Taylor at the masked ball in Hotel Ca’ Rezzonico, Venice 1967, wears her necklace and earrings in platinum with emeralds and diamonds

he Italian stylist Valentino posing among his models nearby Trevi Fountain. Rome, July 1967 | Photo Credit: [ The Art Archive / Mondadori Portfolio / Marisa Rastellini  ]

he Italian stylist Valentino posing among his models nearby Trevi Fountain. Rome, July 1967 | Photo Credit: [ The Art Archive / Mondadori Portfolio / Marisa Rastellini ]

The exhibition examines Italy’s dramatic transition from post-war ruins to the luxury paraded in the landmark ‘Sala Bianca’ catwalk shows held in Florence in the 1950s, which propelled Italian fashion onto the world stage. During the 1950s and ’60s the many Hollywood films that were shot on location in Italy had an enormous impact on fashion as stars like Audrey Hepburn and Elizabeth Taylor became style ambassadors for Italian fashion, fueling a keen international appetite for luxurious clothing made in Italy. On display are around 100 ensembles and accessories by leading Italian fashion houses including Simonetta, Pucci, Sorelle Fontana, Valentino, Gucci, Missoni, Giorgio Armani, Dolce & Gabbana, Marni, Fendi, Prada and Versace, through to the next generation of fashion talent. 

Evening dress of silk, Roberto Capucci, 1987-1988, Courtesy Roberto Capucci Foundation, Photo © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Evening dress of silk, Roberto Capucci, 1987-1988, Courtesy Roberto Capucci Foundation, Photo © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Return to Luxury

In 1945, Italy’s post-war government aimed to reinvigorate a country weakened in spirit and in physical and financial ruin. With American aid provided through the Marshall Plan, the swift retooling of Italian factories alongside efforts by the country’s many entrepreneurs helped fashion become a cornerstone of Italy’s post-war recovery.

Evening dress of embroidered net and matelasse coat (detail), Mila Schön, 1966, Courtesy Maison Mila Schön, Photo © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Evening dress of embroidered net and matelasse coat (detail), Mila Schon, 1966, Courtesy Maison Mila Schön, Photo © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

In 1951, Giovanni Battista Giorgini launched Italy’s first internationally recognized fashion shows. The following year, he secured the use of the Sala Bianca or ‘White Hall’, an opulent, chandelier-lit gallery in Florence’s Pitti Palace. As clothing designers and textile manufacturers gradually resumed trading, their stylish designs responded to a hunger for glamour after years of wartime deprivation. Italian high fashion and fine tailoring became popular exports. Continue reading